Protecting Our Houses of Worship: Guest Column by Security Expert / Retired NYPD Detective Sergeant         

By ALAN SCHISSEL

Founder & Chief Executive Officer

  • Integrated Security Services

  • According to the Washington Post, “it’s been a bad 2017 for Jews.” During the month of January, 48 bomb threats were called in to Jewish community centers across the country. Also last month, a neo-Nazi made national news by promising to hold a march in Whitefish, Montana to intimidate the town’s small Jewish population.

    This, of course, was followed by another unprecedented press conference by our President during which two reporters were moved to ask Mr. Trump about the rise in anti-Semitism. Many of us were aghast at the President’s rude and dismissive response, and his unwillingness to address the question seriously. The fact is, the country is experiencing an alarming increase of anti-Semitic incidents, and this has been trending upward since 2015. A security report issued by the Department of Homeland Security on protecting houses of worship stated that the United States has approximately 345,000 religious congregations representing 230 denominational groups and roughly 150 million members. Despite being sanctuaries from the troubles of the world, houses of worship have also been targets as violence has spiked across the country in recent years. The killing of nine people at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, South Carolina was the largest mass shooting in a house of worship since 1991, when nine people were shot at the Wat Promkunaram Buddhist temple in Waddell, Arizona, northwest of Phoenix.

    [Under relentless pressure, the President subsequently denounced anti-Semitism.]

  • Empathy and action: Muslims unite to help fix vandalized Jewish cemeteries


  • The intent of this column is to generate awareness and provide a short guide which contains security practices for religious institutions, parishioners and our non religious communities to help deter threats, mitigate hazards and risks, and minimize the damage caused by an incident in or around a house of worship, including mass casualty events.

    I preface with the word “short” because there is a wide range of methods from programmatic and procedural considerations to technological enhancements that religious facilities and their leadership may consider implementing based upon the most likely threats to their facilities and their available resources. Basic security principals would suggest taking a blended approach to security and safety with the goal of hardening the facility to deter, detect and/or delay a criminal occurrence before it happens. The next steps are equally important and this is where lives are saved and mass casualties are reduced. Selecting the appropriate response to a threat or armed intrusion will help facilitate a safe transition into an effective recovery and restoration of services mode.

    Identifying Your Threats & Vulnerabilities

    Identifying and evaluating a known or potential threat to a given facility is the first step of a security assessment. The results of which will guide the process of developing a security plan. A proper readiness plan will aim to deter a threat or mitigate a threat by reducing the religious facility’s vulnerability to those threats.

    Natural Hazards vs. Targeted Violence

    As stated before, all life safety solutions should be designed using a blended approach to managing risk. Protecting a religious facility means your emergency management plan(s) must address an all-hazard approach to both natural hazards, e.g., infectious diseases and illnesses, fire, and seismic and weather-related events (hurricanes, tornadoes, flash floods) as well as targeted attacks. Spontaneous and pre-planned attacks are likely to occur by individual(s) who use firearms; improvised explosive devices (IEDs); vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices (VBIEDs); chemical, biological, or radiological attacks; or arson in order to inflict a number of casualties and damage to religious facilities.

    Protective Measures

    As previously mentioned earlier, a house of worship environment is managed by creating layers of protective measures in collaboration with state and local partners that allow religious institutions to deter, detect and delay threats. These layers also allow an institution to consider a threat as soon as possible and to more effectively respond to, further deter, eliminate or mitigate that threat.

    • Technological sensors such as CCTV surveillance cameras or alarms (fire, smoke, wind, and intrusion detection) will trigger informed decision-making.

    • Barriers, such as locked doors or fixed barriers or uniform security personnel should be in place to deter or delay a threat and afford more time for effective decision making.

    • Having the correct inbound and outbound communication network in place will influence a number key decisions. Time, or the lack of time, is a principle disrupter of effective decision-making. Sound communication strategies such as emergency email blasts, voice activated alert systems, and silent alert systems help to improve response to and during a crisis. An effective communication protocol should expand the window of time available to leaders to make sound decisions.

    Additional Measures to Consider:

    • Reporting Procedures

    • Establishing Collaborative Planning Teams

    • Starting an Emergency Operations Plan

    • Define Roles and Responsibilities

    • Notification Procedures

    • Evacuation Lockdown and Shelter‐In‐Place Policies and Procedures

    • Plans for Diverse Needs of Children and Staff

    • Necessary Equipment and Supplies

    • Common Vocabulary

    • Emergency Drills

    Call us at (212) 808-4153, or write us to tell what you think or how we can be of more assistance and remember, always dial 911 first in an emergency!







  • Integrated Security Services


  • About Alan Schissel










  • Cool Justice Editor’s Note: By way of disclosure, Cool Justice is an occasional denizen of Integrated’s Hartford office and once in a while even does a little work …

  • more COOL JUSTICE

  • Hartford PI Stars in Network Real-Life Manhunt Show

  •           Air Force details available mechanical engineering position        

    A position as a mechanical engineer is currently available for the Department of the Air Force in the Air Force Personnel Center at the Robins Air Force Base (AFB) in Georgia.

    For this position, the recipient will work as a professional mechanical engineer for the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) protection system, including tasks like designing, developing and documenting hardware systems, and organizing and testing engineering products. Applicants must also have one year of previous experience in such tasks. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree in engineering technology or related degree and have spent one year underneath a professional engineer, pass a written test and have completed specific courses in the physical, engineering and mathematical sciences. There is occasional travel required: a maximum possibility of five nights per month.

    Applicants may be susceptible to a preemployment physical examination, although the position is generally low-movement. Applicants must also be able to acquire the appropriate security clearance. Upon application, applicants will be evaluated as either qualified, highly qualified or best qualified. The applicant will then be notified if he or she is to receive an interview. If applicant is selected and given a job offer, the candidate must pass a security check. The position should be filled within 40 days after the deadline.

    Salary runs between $71,102 and $92,316 per year. It is a full-time, permanent position. To apply, an applicant must be a U.S. citizen, pass a background test, provide college transcript or course listing and -- if a male born after Dec. 31, 1959 -- be registered for, or have exemption from, the Selective Service. The position is open from Wednesday, March 9, to Tuesday, March 15. 

    An application package must be completed by Tuesday, March 15. The application can be found at the USAJOBS home page, or can be accessed through a previous USAJOBS login. Include a resume, the online occupational questionnaire, college transcripts and a copy of licenses, certificates and veterans' preference documentation, if applicable.

    To contact the agency, please contact Robins Deo by phone at 478-926-6846, fax at 478-757-3144 or email at 78MSG.DPC.DEU@ROBINS.AF.MIL.


              Center for Domestic Preparedness welcomes LSCC students to incident response course        

    The Center for Domestic Preparedness (CDP) in Anniston, Alabama, hosted students from Lawson State Community College (LSCC) for the first time on March 23. 

    Located in Birmingham, Alabama, LSCC has been predominantly made up of black students since its founding.

    CDP hosted an Incident Complexities Responder Actions (ICR) for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Incidents course, allowing 42 seniors from LSCC's nursing program to partake in discussions, case studies and training concerning hazardous materials. The students were taught how to handle dangerous chemical and biological agents, radiological substances and explosives that they may come into contact within the nursing field. 

    The training begins with CDP team members traveling to the students' campus to teach them the Standardized Awareness Training (SAT), which will also be available in the latter half of 2016 as the Emergency Medical Response Awareness (EMRA) course -- after some alterations are made.

    CDP has been training potential nurses for over eight years, hosting students from Jacksonville State University, Jefferson State Community College, Gadsden State Community College, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Augusta University and Samford University. LSCC is the newest program that has had access to CDP's nurse training program, after hearing about the opportunity through Gadsden State Community College's president, Martha Lavendar. 

    LSCC President Perry Ward was immediately interested, according to LSCC's associate dean of health professions, Shelia Marable. After touring CDP's facility and discussing the courses, LSCC quickly scheduled their nursing program to train in CDP's ICR course. LSCC now plans to train their nurses at CDP every year.

    With over 33 years experience at LSCC, Marable was impressed by the training. 

    “The mobile training went extremely well,” she said. “The training helped the students be prepared for any disasters that may occur.” 

    Alyssa Mullinex and Julia Norfleet, both students who participated in the ICR course at CDP, reported that the training was a valuable experience, as it made them consider their surroundings and trained them for a scenario concerning mass causalities.

    Marable said she would definitely recommend the program to other nursing schools.


              Benefits of Islet Transplantation as an Alternative to Pancreas Transplantation: Retrospective Study of More Than 10 Ten Years of Experience in a Single Center.        
    Related Articles

    Benefits of Islet Transplantation as an Alternative to Pancreas Transplantation: Retrospective Study of More Than 10 Ten Years of Experience in a Single Center.

    Rev Diabet Stud. 2017;14(1):10-21

    Authors: Voglová B, Zahradnická M, Girman P, Kríž J, Berková Z, Koblas T, Vávrová E, Németová L, Kosinová L, Habart D, Fábryová E, Dovolilová E, Leontovyc I, Neškudla T, Peregrin J, Kovác J, Lipár K, Kocík M, Marada T, Svoboda J, Saudek F

    Abstract
    BACKGROUND: Pancreas transplantation (PTx) represents the method of choice in type 1 diabetic patients with conservatively intractable hypoglycemia unawareness syndrome. In 2005, the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine (IKEM) launched a program to investigate the safety potential of islet transplantation (ITx) in comparison to PTx.
    AIM: This study aims to compare the results of PTx and ITx regarding severe hypoglycemia elimination, metabolic control, and complication rate.
    METHODS: We analyzed the results of 30 patients undergoing ITx and 49 patients treated with PTx. All patients were C-peptide-negative and suffered from hypoglycemia unawareness syndrome. Patients in the ITx group received a mean number of 12,349 (6,387-15,331) IEQ/kg/person administered percutaneously into the portal vein under local anesthesia and radiological control. The islet number was reached by 1-3 applications, as needed. In both groups, we evaluated glycated hemoglobin, insulin dose, fasting and stimulated C-peptide, frequency of severe hypoglycemia, and complications. We used the Mann Whitney test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and paired t-test for analysis. We also individually assessed the ITx outcomes for each patient according to recently suggested criteria established at the EPITA meeting in Igls.
    RESULTS: Most of the recipients showed a significant improvement in metabolic control one and two years after ITx, with a significant decrease in HbA1c, significant elevation of fasting and stimulated C-peptide, and a markedly significant reduction in insulin dose and the frequency of severe hypoglycemia. Seventeen percent of ITx recipients were temporarily insulin-independent. The results in the PTx group were comparable to those in the ITx group, with 73% graft survival and insulin independence in year 1, 68% 2 years and 55% 5 years after transplantation. There was a higher rate of complications related to the procedure in the PTx group. Severe hypoglycemia was eliminated in the majority of both ITx and PTx recipients.
    CONCLUSION: This report proves the successful initiation of pancreatic islet transplantation in a center with a well-established PTx program. ITx has been shown to be the method of choice for hypoglycemia unawareness syndrome, and may be considered for application in clinical practice if conservative options are exhausted.

    PMID: 28632818 [PubMed - in process]


              (USA-CA-Merced) Radiology Technologist        
    *Position Summary* Operates diagnostic imaging equipment to produce clinical diagnostic x-ray images. Performs diagnostic radiologic procedures on neonatal, pediatric, adolescent, adult and geriatric patients. Ensures images are delivered to PACS in proper sequence, position, along with all required documents. Performs daily room checks at end of shift and signs check list, prepares room, equipment, supplies and contrast media as needed. Directly assists the physician in the performance of procedures. Positions and communicates instructions to patients before and during procedures. Ensures the clinical history is appropriate for the exam that is ordered. Ensures patient safety through appropriate monitoring during the procedures. *Minimum Qualifications* 1. Must possess and maintain a current California radiography certificate (CRT) and national registry certificate (ARRT). 2. Must possess and maintain a current Fluoroscopy certification within six months of hire. 3. Must possess and maintain current Basic Life Support certificate (BLS). 4. Will be required to take call. Will be required to work weekends on a rotational basis. Mercy Medical Centerhas been building a rich history of care in our community for more than 100 years. We have grown from a small one-story wooden structure into a major healthcare provider with a brand new 186-bed main campus, offering the latest in facility design and technology. Mercy also operates Outpatient Centers, a Cancer Center and several rural clinics. Wherever you work throughout our system, you will find faces of experience with dedication to high quality, personalized care. Joining our 1,300 employees, 230 physicians and many volunteers, you can help carry out our commitment to providing our community with the excellence they have come to associate with Mercy Medical Center. **Job:** **Imaging / Radiology (PCS)* **Organization:** **Mercy Medical Center Merced* **Title:** *Radiology Technologist* **Location:** *California-Central California Service Area-Merced-Mercy Merced Community* **Requisition ID:** *1700014581* **Equal Opportunity** Dignity Health is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, protected Veteran status or any other characteristic protected by law.
              Margaret Wooldridge Receives Department of Energy’s E.O Lawrence Award        

    The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that Margaret Wooldridge, a University of Michigan Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Mechanical Engineering, is one of six 2013 recipients of the prestigious E.O. Lawrence Award, the agency’s highest award for mid-career scientists. Created in 1959, the award celebrates contributions in research and development that support the Energy Department’s science, energy and national security missions.

    Wooldridge’s award acknowledges “her work advancing energy science and innovation.” Her research group focuses on combustion, that powerful release of energy from fossil fuels that powers much of modern life− at great environmental cost. Her work explores combustion’s possibilities in both traditional and new energy supplies, in the context of the growing need to mitigate climate change and plan for an ecologically sustainable and secure energy future.

    “It’s hard to change our behavior when it comes to energy, not only because we use so much fuel, but because we don’t want the cure to be worse than the disease. When we switch to sustainable fuels, fuels built on a short carbon life cycles, as opposed to the long carbon life cycle associated with fossil fuels, we have to be careful about the impact on performance and environmental effects, as well as the larger social implications,” Wooldridge explained.

    “If we tinker with these fuels, we want to know, what are the specific properties that are attractive to us, and how can we leverage them? We look at traditional fossil fuel chemistry, but also explore new feedstocks. We want to understand how to leverage the best − and avoid the worst − properties of these fuels in engines, combustors, stationary power plants, and other combustion systems.”

    Five of this year’s six Lawrence awardees hold positions at national laboratories; Wooldridge is the only recipient who’s also juggling a teaching load.

    “Sometimes I can keep all the plates spinning, and sometimes a couple come crashing down,” she joked Tuesday, reacting to her award while preparing a lecture for the coming day and answering the questions of a student at her door.

    After the student leaves, she explained, “Each time you teach, you have to answer one of the hardest questions researchers are asked: ‘What does this mean to me?’ It constantly requires that you be able to translate very fundamental research in a way that communicates its practicality and its essential nature. It’s hard, but it’s good to do, and it’s fun- most of the time.”

    Just six percent of the Lawrence Award’s 218 past winners have been women. “I’ve always been interested in the energy sector, and that research is justifiably dominated by combustion. Once you get into the fundamental research in combustion, it’s pretty male-dominated, but I can’t say I thought about it too much as I was choosing my field,” Wooldridge said.

    Past Lawrence awardees have included Nobel Prize-winners Richard Feynman, Saul Permutter, Richard Smalley, Burton Ricter, Sam Ting, Murray Gell-Mann, Bob Laughlin and George Smoot, as well as HIV research pioneer Bette Kerber.

    Another Lawrence award winner from U-M is former University of Michigan President and prominent nuclear physicist James Duderstadt, who received the award in 1986. Of this year’s awardee, he said, “Dr. Wooldridge has become one of the world's leaders in combustion science. Her research on fuel reaction chemistry and combustion diagnostics has provided important tools for many areas of both basic and applied energy research. As a Thurnau Professor, she is also one of our most outstanding teachers.”

    Edward Larsen, a U-M professor of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, won a Lawrence Award in 1994 "for his profound impact on the analytic and numerical methods used to model the transport of particles and radiation in complex systems, with applications in diverse areas of nuclear technology ranging from nuclear weapons design to nuclear reactor safety."

    Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz weighed in on the award winners, saying, “The Lawrence Award recipients announced today have made significant contributions to the national, economic and energy security of the United States – strengthening U.S. leadership in discovery and innovation. I congratulate the winners and thank them for their work on behalf of the Department of Energy and the Nation."

    Wooldridge has been a member of the U-M faculty since 1998. She received an M.S. and a Ph.D from Stanford University. Her research has been funded by the Department of Energy, Ford Motor Company, the National Science Foundation, Hyundai, and Honda.

    The E.O. Lawrence Award was established to honor the memory of Dr. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, who invented the cyclotron – an accelerator of subatomic particles – and received a 1939 Nobel Laureate in physics for that achievement. Dr. Lawrence later played a leading role in establishing the U.S. system of national laboratories, and today, the Energy Department’s national laboratories in Berkeley and Livermore, Calif., bear his name. The six Lawrence Award recipients announced today will receive a medal and a $20,000 honorarium at a ceremony in Washington, D.C., later this year.

    A full list of past E.O. Lawrence Award winners can be found here. 

    Referenced Faculty: 
    Margaret Wooldridge
    Image: 
    Date: 
    Wednesday, April 16, 2014
    Author: 
    Amy Mast

              Motorola Talkabout T5100 Specs        
    Motorola released the Talkabout T5100 in 2007. The device is a 2 way radio that allows two or more people to communicate with one another via the 14 channels in the Family Radio Service, or FRS, frequency band. The device was designed for family and group recreational use. Although the product was no longer manufactured, it could still be purchased for about $43 as of December 2010.
    Range and Weight
    The Motorola Talkabout T5100 works at distances of about two miles, though the range fluctuates depending on weather conditions, altitude and noise in the frequency band. The range also decreases when buildings, trees or other obstacles get in the way of the radio signal. Motorola doesn’t recommend using the device at distances closer than 5 feet. The device weighs 0.39 lb.
    Power
    The Motorola Talkabout T5100 is powered by three AA alkaline batteries. According to the manual, the batteries provide up to three hours of talk time and 27 hours of standby time. The battery meter, located on the front display, is divided into three bars, the bars disappearing as the power is used. If the battery is low, the device beeps every 10 minutes.
    Operation
    The Motorola Talkabout T5100 produces up to 0.5 watt of power output. To send a message, the person needs to hold the radio 2 or 3 inches from the mouth.
    Standards
    The Motorola Talkabout T5100 operates in the frequency band of between of 450 and 470 MHz. The device complies with numerous national and international standards including those issued and upheld by the United States Federal Communications Commission, American National Standards Institute (ANSI), Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, National Radiological Protection Board of the United Kingdom and the Ministry of Health (Canada).
              1st integrated national CBRN centre now operational in Kuwait        
    Defence and security company Saab has together with their Kuwaiti partner Bader Sultan & Bros, delivered the world´s first integrated national CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear) centre, which is now operational in Kuwait. The CBRN centre is yet another innovative solution from Saab. It is the first centre to cover a whole country with fixed and mobile CBRN sensors and units, whilst also providing a unique capability for simulated training. During 2015, Saab deli...
              Saab to Deliver CBRN Equipment to INTERPOL        
    Defence and security company Saab has received an order for delivery of specially customised CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear) sampling equipment and a certified transport packaging container to INTERPOL’s BioTerrorism Prevention Unit. Under the agreement with INTERPOL’s BioTerrorism Prevention Unit, Saab will supply a total of six sampling units, to be used in the field to combat bioterrorism. The delivery also includes a certified packaging container design...
              Radiologic Technologist (or Limited RT) - Twin Rivers Urgent Care - Seward, NE        
    For more information, call Beth at 402-834-1412. Clinical Staff Member needed for our Urgent Care Clinic....
    From Indeed - Fri, 04 Aug 2017 21:02:15 GMT - View all Seward, NE jobs
              Eksperci PLTR: zasady audytów klinicznych pracowni mammograficznych nie wymagają większych zmian        
    Kryteria według, których przeprowadzany był kliniczny audyt pracowni mammograficznych wymagają niewielkich korekt. Tak wynika ze stanowiska, jakie Polskie Lekarskie Towarzystwo Radiologiczne przygotowało w odpowiedzi na zapytania Ministerstwa Zdrowia.
              'CFTR-opathies': disease phenotypes associated with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations        
    *Note from Nicole: My post with my take on all of this to come but for a bit I am going to be posting articles related to 'atypical' or 'mild' CF.




    CFTR-opathies': disease phenotypes associated with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene mutations


    Peadar G Noone 1 and Michael R Knowles1


    Abstract
    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease that is associated with abnormal sweat electrolytes, sino-pulmonary disease, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and male infertility. Insights into genotype/phenotype relations have recently been gained in this disorder. The strongest relationship exists between 'severe' mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) and pancreatic insufficiency. The relationship between 'mild' mutations, associated with residual CFTR function, and expression of disease is less precise. Atypical 'mild' mutations in the CFTR gene have been linked to late-onset pulmonary disease, congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens, and idiopathic pancreatitis. Less commonly, sinusitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and possibly even asthma may also be associated with mutations in the CFTR gene, but those syndromes predominantly reflect non-CFTR gene modifiers and environmental influences.

    Introduction
    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive genetic disease that is caused by mutations on both CFTR alleles, resulting in abnormal sweat electrolytes, sino-pulmonary disease, male infertility, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in 95% of patients [
    1,2]. In its classic form, the disease is easily diagnosed early in life, through a combination of clinical evaluation and laboratory testing (including sweat testing, and CFTR mutation analysis) [3]. Depending on the ethnic background of the populations tested, common genetic mutations are identified in the majority of cases of CF. In the USA, two-thirds of patients carry at least one copy of the ΔF508 mutation, with approximately 50% of CF patients being homozygous for this mutation [4].


    A wide spectrum of molecular abnormalities may occur in the CFTR gene, and uncommon mutations that result in partial (residual) CFTR function may be associated with nonclassic presentations of disease. Overall, 7% of CF patients are not diagnosed until age 10 years, with a proportion not diagnosed until after age 15 years; some of these patients present a considerable challenge in establishing a diagnosis of CF. Moreover, the phenotype in these patients may vary widely [
    5,6]. The focus of the present review is on nonclassic phenotypes associated with mutations in the CFTR gene, which may manifest as male infertility (congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens [CBAVD]), mild pulmonary disease and idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP). These phenotypes are included within the definition of 'atypical CF'.

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator: the relationship between gene mutations and function


    CFTR is a transmembrane spanning protein with multiple activities that are related to normal epithelial cell function [
    2]. Mutations in CFTR result in abnormalities in epithelial ion and water transport, which are associated with derangements in airway mucociliary clearance and other cellular functions related to normal cell biology [7]. Depending on the molecular abnormality, the defect in CFTR may be the equivalent of that associated with a 'null' mutation, or may be 'mild', with partial/residual function [4]. At one end of the spectrum of severity, 'null' or 'severe' mutations reflect nonsense, frame-shift or splice mutations; these result in absence of production of functional CFTR, which correlates strongly with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but less strongly with severity of lung disease. At the other end of the spectrum, 'mild' mutations may result in some production of functional CFTR protein at the apical membrane, with partial CFTR channel function, and are generally associated with pancreatic sufficiency and milder pulmonary disease.


    The molecular basis for the severity of mutations may derive from the extent to which normal mRNA transcription or protein synthesis takes place; for example, splice mutations may influence the efficiency of normal/abnormal CFTR mRNA transcription to varying degrees. In turn, the severity of the abnormality in CFTR may relate directly to the phenotypic expression of disease, with absent function causing more severe disease, whereas some residual function may modulate the severity of disease in different organ systems. Clinically, this may be reflected in normal or borderline sweat chloride values in patients with atypical CF.
    Other factors, including non-CFTR gene modifiers and environmental influences, are probably also associated with the severity of disease.
    Given this background, it is not surprising that disease expression is complex and that nonclassic CF phenotypes exist.


    Phenotypes associated with atypical cystic fibrosis


    Table 1 provides a schema of how mutations on one or both alleles of the CFTR gene might relate to nonclassic phenotypic expression of disease. 'Atypical CF' includes those clinical phenotypes that have the strongest associations with mutations in the CFTR gene: CBAVD in males, mild pulmonary disease and ICP.

    Table 1
    Hierarchy of associations with mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene


    Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens

    Although not all males with CBAVD have mutations in the CFTR gene, approximately 50% have abnormal CFTR alleles [8]. Generally, one 'severe' allele is combined with one 'mild' allele, such that the 'mild' allele appears to dominate and cause the milder phenotype (e.g. ΔF508 in combination with R117H). Routine screening for common mutations that does not take into account milder or rarer mutations may miss many of the mild mutations associated with this particular clinical expression of disease [8]. This combination of mutations may occur in other forms of atypical CF (see below).


    One particular abnormality deserves a special mention – the various alleles of the polythymidine tract in the intron 8 (IVS8) of the CFTR gene [9]. Of the three alleles that have been identified in IVS8 (5T, 7T and 9T), the 9T allele is associated with the most efficient usage of the intron 8 splice acceptor site. This efficiency decreases with shorter polythymidine tracts (5T and 7T), which results in a lower than normal level of full-length CFTR mRNA and presumably in a decrease in mature, functional CFTR protein. For example, the mild CFTR mutation R117H is influenced by the polythymidine tract sequence, such that an R117H-bearing allele in cis with a 7T allele may result in CBAVD, whereas when R117H is associated with the 5T allele the phenotypic expression may be associated with atypical CF. R117H with a 9T allele may exhibit a normal phenotype. The 5T allele under the influence of other sequence variants in the CFTR gene may also be associated with atypical CF [10].


    Although males with CBAVD may present to urology clinics, with no discernable lung or other organ presentation of disease, a careful work-up should be carried out to determine whether subtle lung disease is present. Evidence of CFTR dysfunction may be found on laboratory testing, with abnormal or borderline sweat chloride levels and/or abnormal CFTR-mediated chloride conductance in nasal epithelia [11,12]. Whether lung disease may develop later in life in these generally young males remains to be determined, but they should at least be counseled regarding lung health and cigarette smoking.


    Mild pulmonary disease
    Older patients with mild pulmonary disease, including bronchiectasis, may not present with symptoms until later in life, but are found to have atypical CF when appropriate investigations are carried out, including normal or borderline sweat chlorides and pancreatic sufficiency [
    10]. Thus, as with CBAVD, a careful work-up is mandatory. This should include not only a standard diagnostic work-up, including a sweat chloride and radiologic screening for subtle lung disease, but also nasal potential difference measures in order to evaluate CFTR at a physiologic level, and screening for mild and rare CFTR mutations [10]. A 'severe' mutation may be found on one allele, with a 'mild' mutation, such as the 5T abnormality (with or without other abnormalities in the CFTR gene), on the other allele. The level of expression of full-length mature CFTR may be less than that in CBAVD, with adverse consequences for the lung, albeit with a later presentation [10]. Although the pulmonary disease is milder than that with classic CF, these patients generally exhibit phenotypic similarities to CF; for example, the distribution of radiographic changes often involve the upper lobe, and mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be present in the lower airway.


    Idiopathic bronchiectasis (IB) could loosely be defined as bronchiectasis in which no clear cause has been found, and in which the clinical pattern differs from CF and other known causes of bronchiectasis. Two studies [13,14] suggested that IB may be linked to mutated CFTR. In one study [13], five out of 16 patients with IB harbored the 5T allele in the CFTR gene. Of those, two were 5T/5T homozygotes. Insufficient data were supplied regarding the clinical phenotype in the five patients harboring the 5T allele to draw any firm conclusions as to whether they would otherwise fulfill rigorous diagnostic criteria for CF [3]. In the second study [14], from France, 13 mutations were found in 16 CFTR alleles in 32 patients with idiopathic bronchiectasis. Only six of the 13 mutations were confirmed to be CF-causing mutations, with the remainder hypothesized as being 'potentially' CF causing. Four patients were compound heterozygotes, and all 11 of the patients who harbored mutations had abnormal sweat chloride levels (>60 mmol/l), with apparently no clear-cut evidence of CF otherwise ('isolated bronchiectasis'). Girodon et al. [14] speculated that IB might be related, at least in part, to mutated CFTR, with possible other factors at play. In any such population, atypical or variant CF is likely to be present in a proportion of patients studied in detail.


    Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis
    Recent reports [
    5,6,15,16] suggest that patients with an ICP phenotype have an increased incidence of mutations in CFTR. Such patients generally present with symptoms of pancreatitis at an older age than those patients with classic CF. Because CF carriers represent 3–4% of the general population, it is important to know whether one or two mutations predispose to ICP. Although the data initially appeared to suggest that patients with one mutation in CFTR were at risk, subsequent studies have borne out the observation of a link between mutated CFTR on both alleles and ICP.


    A rigorous search was conducted for other mutations in patients with one CFTR mutation, and CFTR function in nasal epithelia was assessed in vivo in patients with ICP [17]. Sequencing of the CFTR gene indicated that nine out of 41 patients with ICP had two abnormal CFTR alleles; again the combination of 'severe' and 'mild', and having two mutations increased the risk for ICP 40-fold. ICP patients with two abnormal CFTR alleles had reduced CFTR-mediated chloride conductance in nasal epithelia as compared with ICP control individuals. The number of CFTR heterozygotes with ICP was no higher than is expected in the general population. These data strongly suggest that abnormalities on both alleles are required for expression of 'CF-related ICP', perhaps with some added influence from mutations in pancreatic inhibitor genes (PRSS1, PSTI) [18].

    Other phenotypes associated with mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator gene
    Other sino-pulmonary syndromes have been studied to test for a link to mutated CFTR; sinusitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and asthma. However, the likelihood is that they predominantly reflect non-CFTR gene modifiers and environmental influences.


    Sinusitis
    In a recent study [
    19], DNA from 147 patients with chronic rhino-sinusitis was screened for 16 CFTR mutations, including the 5T sequence, and patients with a mutation had their DNA screened over the entire coding region. Eleven patients had a mutation in CFTR (all severe mutations, and one patient eventually developed CF), as compared with two out of 123 control individuals, whereas there was no difference in the incidence of the 5T allele between controls and study subjects. There was also a higher frequency of the M470V polymorphism on the opposite allele to that containing a severe mutation as compared with control individuals. Physiologic testing in the sinusitis patients showed normal indices of nasal epithelial sodium transport, with a slight reduction in CFTR-mediated chloride conductance. The authors of that report concluded that the combination of a severe mutation on one allele with a sequence variant that is not normally associated with CF on the opposite allele may be responsible. An analogy is again drawn with the other non-classic phenotypes, with enough residual CFTR function to protect against early, classic sino-pulmonary disease and a pancreatic phenotype, but clearly other non-CFTR factors may also be at play (Table 1).


    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis
    Although Aspergillus fumigatus is ubiquitous in nature, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) occurs in only a small number of patients with asthma and CF; thus, genetic factors may play a role in the pathogenesis of ABPA in some patients. A study from several years ago [
    20] showed that, in a small number of patients who met criteria for ABPA, there was a higher frequency of abnormal CFTR alleles than expected. The authors of that report speculated that mutations in CFTR may play a role in the pathogenesis of ABPA, either as a result of heterozygosity alone (and 50% CFTR function), or heterozygosity plus other genetic factors that were not detected by the methods used in the study. The situation is probably similar to that in asthma, with genetic factors outside of CFTR, together with environmental influences, playing major roles.


    Asthma
    There are conflicting data as to whether mutations in the CFTR gene are over-represented in patients with asthma [
    21,22,23]. In Denmark, a questionnaire study was carried out in a cohort of carriers of the ΔF508 mutation in CFTR [24]. Of 250 adults studied, it appeared that 9% reported symptoms of asthma, as compared with 6% of control non-carriers, with airways obstruction being present in those carriers with symptoms of asthma. However, there are clear limitations in a study of this kind, relying solely on a questionnaire for diagnosis. A second study investigated 144 patients with documented asthma [22], and identified 15 missense mutations in the CFTR gene of 15 patients, compared with none in a small control group. When tests were carried out in a larger control group, however, the differences lost significance. In contrast, several other studies failed to show a link between mutations in CFTR and asthma, and if anything show a protective effect [23]. Thus, there is little evidence to support a link between asthma and abnormalities in CFTR, such that, if there is a link, then it plays a small role in the overall pathogenesis of disease, with a much larger role played both by genetic factors outside of CFTR and by environmental influences (Table 1).


    Conclusion
    Mutated CFTR may be associated with an atypical CF phenotype in the sino-pulmonary tract, pancreas, and male genital tract, with reduced CFTR epithelial function. Although abnormalities in the CFTR gene may play a minor role in the pathogenesis of asthma, sinusitis, and ABPA in subsets of patients, these diseases predominantly result from genetic (non-CFTR) and nongenetic environmental influences.


    Abbreviations
    ABPA = allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis; CBAVD = congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens; CF = cystic fibrosis; CFTR = cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator; IB = idiopathic bronchiectasis; ICP = idiopathic chronic pancreatitis.

    Keywords: asthma, cystic fibrosis (CF), cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), mutations, pancreatitis, phenotype


              Diagnosis and treatment of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma        

    Adenocarcinoma is a type of malignant tumours arising from glandular tissue organs, i.e. from glandular epithelium. There are several different types of tumours, depending on their degree of differentiation (similarity to the original normal tissue). One such species is the high-grade adenocarcinoma. These tumours minimally differ from the tissue of normal cells in the shape and structure. Therefore, they are less aggressive.

    Furthermore, adenocarcinoma can be classified depend on the place of its formation. Thus, it can distinguish well-differentiated carcinoma of the uterus body, cervix, colon, stomach, lung, and any other body which has a glandular epithelium.

    What are the possible causes of adenocarcinoma?

    The medical science for many years carefully study all types of cancer. Every year, new facts are discovered about subtle molecular mechanisms of cancer formation, but a definite answer-fits-all is not yet open. To date, regarding all oncological disease doctors determine the so-called risk factors, which can only define the propensity to develop a disease.

    For well-differentiated adenocarcinoma and other adenocarcinomas risk factors include:

    • Hereditary predisposition (adenocarcinoma or another type of cancer in close relatives).
    • Malnutrition, when a diet includes an insufficient amount of fibre and too much flour and fatty foods. Coupled with physical inactivity, it contributes to slow the passage of stool and stagnation in an intestine, which is also a risk factor for a variety of intestinal tumours.
    • Elderly age. In old patients, anti-tumor immunity is weaker.
    • Infection with HPV, which can cause adenocarcinoma of the rectum, uterine body and cervix.
    • Prolonged contact with carcinogens and radiation.
    • Hormonal disorders, e.g., excessive oestrogen may cause uterine adenocarcinoma.
    • Frequent and severe nervous stress.
    • Metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes.
    • Premorbid conditions often include inflammation in various organs, chronic bowel inflammation, chronic inflammatory diseases of female reproductive system, etc.

    Of course, this list is not complete, there are much more risks factors for adenocarcinoma of each organ and system. However, their absence does not rule out the possibility to have cancer, as well as their presence in your is not obligatory predicts the onset of disease.

    When to worry? 

    Unfortunately, in the early stages of the disease, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma give no symptoms. They reveal themselves only after a significant proliferation, and in such cases, their treatment can be difficult. Therefore, regular preventive examinations are so necessary for the timely diagnosis.

    Rectal adenocarcinoma is characterised by:

    • Long-term pain in the lower abdominal area, without apparent reason.
    • Flatulence and bloating.
    • Frequent diarrhoea or constipation.
    • Unreasoned loss of appetite and weight in a short time.
    • Blood and mucus in faeces.

    Adenocarcinoma of the uterus is characterised by:

    • Uterine bleeding not associated with the period (in 90% of cases).
    • Endometrial polyps.
    • Hypermenorrhoea - extended menstruation more than 7 days.
    • Too copious menstruation.

    What is the possible prognosis in a case of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma?

    The oncologists use for predicting the results of cancer treatment the so-called criterion "5-year survival". It represents the percentage of patients which have survived 5 years after cancer was detected. This rate depends on such factors:

    • Age of the patient. For example, in the case of well-differentiated uterine adenocarcinoma in patients up to 50 years, the 5-year survival rate can exceed 91%, and in the same patients after 70 years - about 60%;
    • A depth of germination and tumour size. The larger a tumour, and the more deeply it has penetrated into the surrounding tissues, it is more difficult completely to remove it by surgery and therefore it decreases a prognosis;
    • The presence of metastases;
    • The degree of tumour differentiation.

    It is important to note that the diagnosis of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma is a factor affecting the 5-year survival. As the higher the degree of differentiation of tumours (similarity to the original tissue), the tumour is less aggressive, in other words, it grows slower, not as fast spreads or proliferates into the surrounding tissue. Therefore, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma is treated more efficiently and have the highest 5-year survival in the group.

    How is adenocarcinoma diagnosed?

    The diagnostic process in the well-differentiated adenocarcinoma includes conventional methods useful for the diagnosis of cancer. These include radiological techniques such as CT or magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic methods and the identification of cancer markers in the blood. However, the only method to confirm cancer is a biopsy. Only followed by histological study, cancer can be verified. Of course, there are differences in the diagnosis of various adenocarcinomas, depending on the affected organ.

    Methods to treat well-differentiated adenocarcinoma

    Depending on the organ in which the tumour was formed, it is provided certain techniques and components in the treatment. Although in all cases of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma, the most critical stage is radical surgery, which aims to remove the entire tumour from the body as possible. Due to modern technology, the surgical operation is performed quickly and efficiently. For example, colon surgery may even be made without opening the abdominal cavity, which greatly speeds up the patient's rehabilitation after surgery.

    Achieving a complete removal of cancer cells prevents a possibility of recurrence following surgery. For this aim, oncologists also use modern radiotherapy and radiopharmaceuticals. It is necessary to note that despite significant progress in the treatment of cancer, the maximum efficiency and 5-year survival rate is only achieved in cases of timely diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Therefore, regular examination by a specialist and oncological screening are so necessary. 


              Radiology Masterclass - free online tutorial        


    A very nice and simple online tutorial freely offered by Radiology Masterclass.

    These tutorials, and the galleries, will give you a good foundational knowledge in the art of radiological interpretation. Before you start, please read the page on 'using the tutorials'.

    The tutorials marked *** are associated with certificated online course assessments, accredited by the Royal College of Radiologists - London - UK.

              FDA Clears First Respirators for Use in Public Health Medical Emergencies        
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today cleared for marketing the first respirators that can help reduce the user's exposure to airborne germs during a public health medical emergency, such as an influenza pandemic.

    These two filtering facepiece respirators, manufactured by St. Paul, Minn.-based 3M Company (and called the 3M Respirator 8612F and 8670F), will be available to the general public without a prescription.

    The devices are also certified as N95 filtering facepiece respirators by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). NIOSH certifies respirators for use in occupational settings in accordance with an appropriate respiratory protection program.

    An N95 filtering facepiece respirator is a type of face mask that fits tightly over the nose and mouth. It is made of fibrous material that is designed to filter out at least 95 percent of very small airborne particles. The filter and a proper fit determine the effectiveness of the product.

    "While the exact nature and concentration of the biological agent or germ may not be known in a public health medical emergency, we believe that minimizing exposure will help reduce risk," said Daniel Schultz, M.D., director, FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "These respirators are only one part of a combination of approaches that can be used to help reduce the spread of infection between individuals during such events."

    Many companies make N95 respirators for workplaces, including health care settings. However, the 3M respirators are the first devices to receive FDA clearance for use by the public during public health medical emergencies to reduce exposure to airborne germs.

    Under Occupational Safety and Health Administration and other occupational health regulations, respirators used in the workplace must be individually selected for each worker and tested to ensure a proper fit. This kind of fit testing is not generally employed outside the workplace now and would probably not be feasible during a public health medical emergency.

    FDA is requiring those who want to market respirators for use during public health medical emergencies to assure that they are certified by NIOSH to provide adequate filtration without hampering people's ability to breathe. In addition, companies must conduct fit assessment testing, conduct biocompatibility testing to reduce the chance for allergic skin reaction, and provide instructions that will enable wearers to achieve a protective fit and use the devices properly.

    3M evaluated fit characteristics in healthy adults to determine that a user could achieve a protective fit following the instructions on the label. They measured how many airborne test particles were able to get inside the respirator through small leaks between the edges of the respirator and the wearer's face. While individual results varied, all participants tested achieved some reduction in exposure to airborne test particles.

    The 3M respirators are sized for adults and may not form a proper fit on children. Anything that comes between the respirator and the face, such as facial hair, may interfere with its fit. Persons with pre-existing heart or lung disease or other health conditions may have difficulty breathing through a respirator. The devices are for single use. Wearers should not wash, disinfect, reuse or share their respirator with others. The respirators should be discarded after use.

    FDA will soon issue a guidance document outlining its regulatory approach to this new type of device.

    Inhaling particles is just one route of exposure to disease-causing organisms. Others include touching contaminated surfaces and coming into close contact with those who have infectious diseases. A total approach to personal protection includes hand hygiene, cough etiquette and other protection practices such as avoiding crowded settings.
              Commenti su Mondo You Tube “collection” di dal web        
    TERREMOTO E SEGRETI | Articoli | News TERREMOTO E SEGRETI ...Terremoti segreti Di Solange ManfrediDopo il terremoto che ha colpito l'Abruzzo vari paesi esteri ci hanno offerto aiuto. Erano pronti ad inviare uomini e mezzi. Il Governo ha rifiutato affermando che non ne avevamo bisogno. Berlusconi ha rilasciato la seguente dichiarazione: "Ringraziamo i paesi stranieri per la loro solidarietà, ma invitiamo a non inviare qui i loro aiuti. Siamo in grado di rispondere da soli alle esigenze, siamo un popolo fiero e di benessere, li ringrazio ma bastiamo da soli”.Siamo in grado di rispondere da soli alle esigenze? Siamo un popolo fiero e di benessere? Bastiamo da soli? Ma se i terremotati dell'Irpinia è trent'anni che vivono in prefabbricati e cenano con pantegane che sono più grandi del mio cane (che pesa 45 kg).Lì per lì ho pensato che il rifiuto fosse stato motivato dal fatto che è più difficile rubare se hai accanto volontari di paesi esteri dove per una evasione fiscale vai in galera per trent'anni. Potrebbero non capire che, da noi, in Italia fa curriculum avere una, o due, condanne passate in giudicato per entrare in parlamento, e che rubare gli aiuti a chi è stato colpito da una calamità è una prassi consolidata. Poi ho letto che il Governo ha rifiutato gli aiuti di uomini e mezzi, ma accetterà volentieri quelli economici........sempre, ovviamente, perché siamo un popolo fiero e benestante.....soprattutto stanno molto bene quelli che riescono a rubare di più, ad aggiudicarsi la ricostruzione e non ricostruire o, nella migliore delle ipotesi, costruire con cemento “disarmato”.Poi, però, una domanda mi è sorta spontanea: perché l'Italia non vuole personale straniero nelle zone colpite dal terremoto?Così ho provato a cercare di capire cosa potesse esserci di “particolare” in quelle zone, in aiuto mi è arrivata la segnalazione di un nostro lettore.Due i risultati:1. Sotto il Gran Sasso, a 1.400 metri sotto terra ci sono i Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), i più grandi laboratori scientifici sotterranei del mondo. Detti laboratori sono di proprietà dell'Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). In cosa consistano questi esperimenti è facile immaginarlo trattandosi di FISICA NUCLEARE, comunque qualcosa, solo qualcosa, è consultabile visitando il sito: http://www.lngs.infn.it/home_it.htm .Quanto materiale chimico, radioattivo, nucleare era presente nei laboratori al momento del sisma? Quali esperimenti erano in corso? Ma sopratutto quali e quanti danni ha subito la struttura? Perché i media non fanno un solo cenno a tutto ciò? Interi paesi sono distrutti, l'Aquila è una città fantasma e del più grande laboratorio di fisica nucleare del mondo, situato a 1400 metri di profondità sotto il Gran Sasso, zona colpita dal sisma, non si dice nulla? Se le strutture hanno retto perché non dirlo? Cosa successo a 1400 metri di profondità?2. Vicino a Sulmona, poi, sotto le colline di S. Cosimo vi è un notevole deposito militare, chilometri di tunnel sotterranei con tanto di ferrovia privata. Meno di un anno fa, il deposito di San Cosimo è stato al centro di un'aspra polemica che aveva costretto il generale di Corpo d'Armata Giorgio Ruggeri ad affermare: “Nel deposito militare di San Cosimo non c'è nulla che possa rappresentare un rischio ambientale o una contaminazione radiologica pericolosa per la salute della popolazione residente. Posso affermare con estrema certezza che gli ipotetici casi di malattia non sarebbero assolutamente collegati alla presenza del deposito e che non sarà smantellato perché rappresenta per l'Esercito una presenza strategica sul territorio”.Personalmente non mi fido molto delle rassicurazioni date dall'esercito, sopratutto dopo quanto fatto con i nostri soldati e l'Uranio impoverito ( articolo su questo blog http://paolofranceschetti.blogspot.com/2007/12/vergognamoci-per-loro-3-migliaia-di.html )in cui ricordiamo 2000 nostri soldati che hanno partecipato alle missioni all'estero sono tornati ammalati di tumore.Dal 1977 vi erano circolari e relazioni scientifiche che avvertivano del pericolo dell'esposizione dei militari alle particelle di uranio impoverito, scarto nucleare usato per rafforzare gli armamenti. Dal 1984, erano state emanate, dalla Nato, precise norme di protezione per chi operava nelle zone a rischio. Ma l'Italia, che pure fa parte della Nato, sino al 1999 non recepisce.Ma la vergogna più grande avviene dopo. Infatti, i nostri soldati, una volta ammalati, hanno chiesto un indennizzo al Ministero. Sapete cosa dovevano firmare per poter ottenere l'indennizzo? Dovevano firmare un foglio in cui affermavano di essersi ammalati per paura! Si esattamente così. Non per l'uranio impoverito, la cui pericolosità è provata da innumerevoli relazioni scientifiche, ma per “strizza da sentinella”.Ora, se l'esercito tiene questo comportamento con i suoi soldati, con buona pace dello “spirito di corpo”, mi riesce difficile pensare che possa comportarsi con maggiore correttezza con la c.d. “popolazione civile”.Ma, a parte questa mia considerazione personale, la domanda è un'altra: ha subito danni quel deposito? Se si, quali e quanti? Anche in questo caso, da parte dei media, assoluto silenzio. Segreto di Stato!Dunque, nella zona colpita dal terremoto ci sono: - il più grande laboratorio sotterraneo di fisica NUCLEARE del mondo;- un deposito di armi (non si sa quali) ed esplosivi con tanto di ferrovia privata.Perché nessuno ne parla? Cosa è successo a quelle strutture? Sono state danneggiate? Ci possono essere state fuoriuscite di materiale radioattivo? Nulla, il più assoluto silenzio, meglio fare un servizio giornalistico sulle uova di pasqua nelle tendopoli. http://paolofranceschetti.blogspot.com/2009/04/terremoto-e-segreti.html I miei sinceri complimenti. Grazie a internet ma, sopratutto, a Lei perchè sino a questo momento non sapevo e non conoscevo che sotto al Gran Sasso avessimo questo importante laboratorio. Mi chiedo quante altre persone(immagino molte) non ne sono a conoscenza. Mille grazie. Con sincerastima. Stefano Cristian |15/04/2009 -- 14:09:05 Grazie per l'informazione ...girovagando ho trovatoquesto: http://www.lngs.infn.it/lngs_infn/scripts/ news/earthquake.html <a href='JOSC_reply(312)' rel="nofollow">Rispondi</a> <a href='JOSC_voting(312,"yes")' rel="nofollow">1</a> <a href='JOSC_voting(312,"no")' rel="nofollow">0</a> <!-- style='padding-left:20px;'> --> <a></a> MARCO   |29/04/2009 -- 20:59:04 questo sito non esiste...o forse..non piu`! chissa` cosa c`era di bello! iside |15/04/2009 -- 15:51:46 ...è chissà quante altre cose non ci dicono....grazie per l'informazione... lisa simpson |17/04/2009 -- 02:19:49 E se invece fosse stata una esplosione nucleare sotterranea o un altroesperimento mal riuscito?? Kane |17/04/2009 -- 14:04:37 Ma quante stronzate scrivi? complimenti ne hai di fantasia!!! Ma vai a lavorarecazzaro decerebrato!!!! Anonimo |20/04/2009 -- 17:55:13 Sei un povero idiota degno dell'estinzione! Vai tu a lavorare pezzetto di merdamarcia. IO NON POSSO LAVORARE, SONO VITTIMA DI MAFIA! E IMPARATE A LAVORATEONESTAMENTE NON COME FATE VOI CHE VI ARRICCHITE A DANNO DELLE PERSONE. EVAPORA CHE MI VIENE DA VOMITARE! maudibi |24/04/2009 -- 22:27:57 ma chi sei tu per rispondere con questo tono da ignorante?!sai essere soloaggressivo e dai risposte che nemmeno tu sai da quale lobo cerebrale provenganoo forse lo sai visto che hai solo un neurone Anonimo |13/05/2009 -- 19:43:57 Mi pare che ad aver usato un tono un po troppo arrogante sia stato tu. Agliignoranti rispondo con la stessa arroganza. Tanto è inutile parlare con ideficienti. Senti chi parla di lobo cerebrale!... Ma vai a cagare decerebratoche per trovare i tuoi neuroni devi prendere la lente di ingrandimento! Evaporaimbecille! |17/04/2009 -- 14:52:31 Cosa non si farebbe per 5 minudi di notorietà... o per due contatti inpiù... Già... c'è il laboratorio del Gran Sasso... come CHIUNQUE SA, nonè MICA UN SEGRETO !! Lo si studia anche a SCUOLA... Anonimo |22/04/2009 -- 00:31:51 biagio belli |23/04/2009 -- 09:13:43 Ma insomma! Ancora con queste stropidate: Americani che si fanno l'11settembre, P2 che organizza terremoti, etc. Allora vorrei chiedere a P2 e adAmericani di mettere bombe sotto Palazzi di Comune di Napoli e Regione Campania,così ci liberano da i due "monnezzari" fetenti. Uagliu'! Iate afaticà e nun scrivite cchiù strunz... |24/04/2009 -- 19:25:35 madonna mia che idiota quello che scrive queste stronzate. la sua ignoranza favenire i brividi. Invece di inventare queste favole vieni qui a l'aquila ad aiutare.....magari ti ci accompagno io sotto i laboratori del gran sasso e tifaccio capire che magari devi dire grazie a chi lavora li quando vai in ospedale a farti la tac.... Anonimo oddio mio |25/04/2009 -- 16:09:27 OoOooDDIO gianfranco ALLARME??? |27/04/2009 -- 23:20:48 Questa sera il sito del giornale il centro ha diffuso questa telefonata registrata oggi con Giuliani-ASCOLTATE http://ilcentro.gelocal.it/multimedia/home/5700416 charlie queste grosse cazzate |30/04/2009 -- 00:39:24 http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisica_nucleare la fisica NUCLEARE non è necessariamente collegata all'ENERGIA nucleare, siete un branco di ignoranti! dipanare e rendere pubbliche le teorie complottistiche, illuminati, rettiliani,wto, 2012 o quant'altro è sacrosanto ma attenti a non sparare QUESTE GROSSE CAZZATE per piacere angela |02/05/2009 -- 17:02:23 scusate...ma nn m sento di escludere nulla....si è parlato di ogni singolodanno...e di ogni singolo pezzo ke al contrario ha retto...xkè nn parlare diuna"struttura" così importante????invece di coprirvi gli occhi cn iprosciutti...fatevele qste domande...nessuno mette in discussione l operatofatto dal laboratorio..ma errare è umano,lo sappiamo tutti roberto |08/05/2009 -- 01:03:31 lavoro ai lngs da 19 anni vi assicuro che nn c e' nulla di segreto o pericolosox prenotarsi e fare una visita basta una semplice telefonata ..una sola cosa..portate il piumino uscirete umidicci ma nn radioattivi...ormai x quest anno e'andato ma ogni anno aala terza domenica di maggio c e' l open day ..labaperti..ciao Anonimo |11/05/2009 -- 23:40:18 Fesso chi ci crede, più fesso chi non ci crede. Commenta Nome: Email:  do not notifynotify Website: Titolo: Questo sito non rappresenta una testata giornalistica e viene aggiornato senza alcuna periodicità, esclusivamente sulla base della disponibilità di materiale sugli argomenti trattati. Pertanto, non può considerarsi prodotto editoriale sottoposto alla disciplina di cui all'art. 1, comma III della Legge n. 62 del 7.03.2001 e leggi successive. <strong>Le immagini qui inserite sono nella maggior parte tratte da internet; se qualche immagine violasse i diritti d'autore, comunicatelo e sarà immediatamente rimossa.</strong>
              Submental nodular fasciitis: Report of an unusual case        
    Abstract A 30-year-old woman presented for evaluation of a hard, enlarging, submental mass that was fixed to the underlying mandible. Fine-needle aspiration cytology initially led to a diagnosis of pleomorphic adenoma, which was unusual given the superficial location of the lesion on computed tomography. The lesion was a well-defined rim-enhancing mass, and it had displaced adjacent structures medially. Intraoperatively, the mass was found to abut against and erode the mandibular cortex. A diagnosis of nodular fasciitis was established by histologic analysis. Such a location for this tumor is unusual. The prognosis for patients with this benign condition is excellent following complete surgical excision. We discuss the clinical presentation and the cytologic, histologic, and radiologic features of this uncommon entity.
              Hepatocellular carcinoma metastatic to the mandible        
    Abstract We describe the case of a 55-year-old man with known multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who presented with a painful mandibular mass. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the mass revealed the presence of bile canaliculi and bile formation, an extremely rare finding. Findings on immunoperoxidase staining of the aspirate were consistent with an HCC. Since the patient was known to have multiorgan metastatic disease, he was administered palliative radiation therapy to the mandibular metastasis for pain control, which was achieved. One year after presentation, the patient died as a result of disease progression. HCC rarely metastasizes to the mandible, as only about 70 such cases have been reported in the literature. We discuss the histopathologic appearance of HCC metastatic to the mandible, the radiologic findings, and the established treatment modalities.
              Management of Mesh and Graft Complications in Gynecologic Surgery        
    imageAbstract: This document focuses on the management of complications related to mesh used to correct stress urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse. Persistent vaginal bleeding, vaginal discharge, or recurrent urinary tract infections after mesh placement should prompt an examination and possible further evaluation for exposure or erosion. A careful history and physical examination is essential in the diagnosis of mesh and graft complications. A clear understanding of the location and extent of mesh placement, as well as the patient’s symptoms and therapy goals, are necessary to plan treatment approaches. It is important that a treating obstetrician–gynecologist or other gynecologic care provider who seeks to revise or remove implanted mesh be aware of the details of the index procedure. Diagnostic testing for a suspected mesh complication can include cystoscopy, proctoscopy, colonoscopy, or radiologic imaging. These tests should be pursued to answer specific questions related to management. Given the diverse nature of complications related to mesh-augmented pelvic floor surgery, there are no universal recommendations regarding minimum testing. Approaches to management of mesh-related complications in pelvic floor surgery include observation, physical therapy, medications, and surgery. Obstetrician–gynecologists should counsel women who are considering surgical revision or removal of mesh about the complex exchanges that can occur between positive and adverse pelvic floor functions across each additional procedure starting with the device implant. Detailed counseling regarding the risks and benefits of mesh revision or removal surgery is essential and can be conducted most thoroughly by a clinician who has experience performing these procedures. For women who are not symptomatic, there is no role for intervention.
              Tema 6.3- Aplicaciones al proceso asistencial: teleconsulta o telediagnostico. Telemonitorizacion        
    Dentro de la atencion al proceso asistencial podemos distinguir varios modelo de la telemedicina.
    • La teleasistencia supone la interaccion entre un medico y un paciente a distancia
    • La teleconsulta, cuando se realiza entre medicos para el diagnostico, remitidas por el medico que atiende al paciente a otro medico especialista en el centro asistencial
    • La televigilancia o telemonitorizacion es la posibilidad de realizar un seguimiento a distancia o vigilancia, puede realizarse desde el domicilio del paciente para el seguimiento de enfermos cronicos y procesos postoperatorios
    • La telegestion es la gestion de pacientes y administracion para citas medicas, peticiones de pruebas analiticas y radiologicas, etc...
    • Teleformacion, incluye la informacion y formaciona traves de internet o intranet

              Argon Delivers PlumeSIM instrumented CBRN training system to Austrian CBRN Defence School        
    The Austrian CBRN Defence Command based in Korneuburg have enhanced their CBRN training capability as a result of an investment in PlumeSIM, Argon's Live instrumented CBRN field and virtual Tabletop CBRN / HazMat training system. Supported by a number of RDS200 radiological simulators and LCD3.3 Chemical Warfare simulators, this new capability will enable the Command to implement a wide variety of Tabletop and Live Field Chemical Warfare, HazMat and Radiological CBRN exercises without the nee...
              DocbookMD Launches Integrated Radiology Service with Austin Radiological Association        

    Physicians can receive immediate alerts for STAT X-rays and scans directly on their mobile device with a unique ring tone, saving precious time when caring for urgent patient needs.

    (PRWeb December 17, 2013)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/12/prweb11431056.htm


              Colorectal Cancer Awareness        
    March is colorectal cancer awareness month highlighting the number three cause of death from cancer in the United States. Vigilance for signs of bowel cancer should begin at age 50 with a colonoscopy. If there is a family history of colorectal cancer these examinations should begin sooner. All adults should have annual stool guiac testing (a test for blood in stool) as part of a general physical exam.

    A recent Healthy Rounds interview with Dr. David Coletti, a general surgeon at the William W. Backus Hospital in Norwich, CT, revealed the importance adequately preparing the colon for any procedure including endoscopic colonoscopy, radiologic imaging of the colon or colorectal surgery. Careful cleansing of the colon before the procedure, as outlined in the written instructions, will directly increase the ability to find a cancerous growth and remove it without complication.

    If you have any helpful hints regarding preparation for colonoscopy please share them.
              Fed gov preparing: large-scale 10-day terrorism-drills this month Denver, Portsmouth, N.H., Wash, D.C. area. ABCNews        
    Weapons of mass destruction drills... lets hope they get it right... "looking for realism" .. preparing for world war?

    Beginning sometime between May 7 and May 29, local, state and top level federal authorities will respond to simulated weapons of mass destruction attacks in three cities — Denver, Portsmouth, N.H., and the Washington, D.C.-area.

    Denver or Portsmouth will face either a simulated biological or a chemical weapons attack. 

    The D.C. metropolitan area will respond to a radiological attack drill — which could range from simply an exposed container of radioactive material to a small nuclear detonation.

    Preparing for Major Terrorism Exercises Three Cities - ABC News

    “The goal of the exercise is to assess the nation’s crisis consequence management capacity under extraordinarily stressful conditions,” the Department of Justice said in a statement released Thursday.

    Volunteers and professional actors will play the roles of victims, who will be rescued, diagnosed, decontaminated and treated over the 10-day period. 

    A “virtual news network” will be created that will broadcast on the exercises every hour on the hour.

    But the exercises will not be too realistic, authorities say. 
    No weapons or agents will be released and, to minimize the risk of public panic or real-life accidents, emergency responders will not be speeding with lights and sirens blaring to the scenes of attack.



              Radiological protection from cosmic radiation in aviation        
    none
              Stem cell biology with respect to carcinogenesis aspects of radiological protection        
    none
              Radiologic Technologist        
    Job Description: Prep patient for diagnostic imaging exam. Read doctor's notes as to why exam is being performed. Take medical histories. Produce x-ray films of parts of the human body for use in diagnosing medical problems such as cancer or fractures. Have patient undress and remove jewelry. Explain procedure to the patient. Surround the exposed area with radiation protection devices. Position radiographic equipment at the correct angle and height over the appropriate area of a patient's body. Measure the thickness of the section to be radiographed. Adjust controls on the x-ray machine to produce radiographs of the appropriate density, detail, and contrast of the body part. Keep patient records. Minimum Qualifications: Candidate must possess a Professional License in BS Radiologic Technology. Fresh graduates/Entry level applicants are encouraged to apply. With pleasing personality. Willing to undergo training. Willing to start ASAP.
              Gdańsk: szpital ma nowy tomograf        
    Zakład Diagnostyki Radiologicznej w Szpitalu Specjalistycznym św. Wojciecha w Gdańsku-Zaspie wzbogacił się o nowy tomograf komputerowy za ponad 3 mln zł.
              Primary pulmonary artery sarcoma masquerading as pulmonary thromboembolism: a rare diagnosis unveiled        
    Primary pulmonary artery sarcomas are rare malignant vascular tumors and carry a very poor prognosis. Due to overlapping clinical and radiological features, the differentiation between pulmonary artery thrombo...
              Diagnostic Imaging in Canada        
    In Ontario, between 1993 and 2003, the annual number of MRI scans performed increased by more than 600 per cent (Iron et al. 2003), and the number of CT scans increased threefold (Tu et al. 2005). Despite these massive increases, the Fraser Institute reported a median wait of five weeks for CT and thirteen weeks for MRI scanning in 2004 (Esmail and Walker 2004), and Canadians are increasingly concerned about the length of time they wait for diagnostic imaging. Because of this, politicians have made decreasing wait times for diagnostic imaging one of their top priorities (Health Canada 2004). This raises several interesting questions. Have the indications for CT and MRI really expanded that rapidly, or was there just a huge pent-up demand because Canada had fallen so far behind in acquiring modern imaging machines? Are physicians relying more on diagnostic imaging technologies and less on clinical skills? Are an increasing number of patients undergoing scans when there is a small likelihood that the results will change their management or improve their outcomes? Supporters of the view that Canada needs to expand its diagnostic imaging capacity point to the fact that we rank well behind many developed countries in terms of the number of diagnostic imaging machines per population (Canadian Institute for Health Information 2003: 33), and that improvements in imaging quality have expanded the indication for imaging. Supporters of the view that there is an increased and inappropriate reliance on technology over clinical skill point to the findings of a recent American study showing that the regions that spent the most on healthcare did not have better outcomes than the regions that spent less - indeed, the trend was toward poorer outcomes in the highest-spending regions (Fisher et al. 2003a, 2003b). One of the greatest differences between the highest- and lowest-spending regions was their expenditure on a variety of diagnostic tests, suggesting that more testing did not lead to better outcomes on a population basis. It may in fact have led to iatrogenic illnesses because of the workup of false positive results, and diverted attention away from simple interventions that have been shown to be effective (Fisher et al. 2003a). The truth is likely a combination of many factors. Some patients with clear indications for diagnostic imaging undoubtedly wait too long for their tests in Canada. At the same time, a number of patients undergo tests whose results have a very small likelihood of changing their management, which itself contributes to the access problem. Unfortunately there are no evidence-based benchmarks for the appropriate rate of diagnostic testing that can be used to determine the optimal supply of diagnostic machines and radiological personnel. In this article we discuss the reasons it has been so difficult to determine the optimal imaging capacity needed for a population, describe some factors that are &quot;inappropriately&quot; increasing the rate of imaging and suggest some solutions. Although many of our examples deal with CT and MRI scanning, our remarks apply more broadly to many other diagnostic tests.
              FDA Supports use of Optune Medical Device to Treat a Unique Brain Cancer        
    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), lately, supported the expended indication to use the Optune medical device to treat patients suffering from a different kind of brain cancer. The Optune medical device will be used to cure a newly diagnosed brain cancer, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) that is an aggressive kind of brain cancer. The Optune medical device will be used with chemotherapy drug temozolomide (TMZ) by following standard treatments such as surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.  As per the National Cancer Institute, around 23,000 residents of America were identified with brain cancer or any other nervous system cancers in 2015. GBM roughly accounts for 15% of all different brain tumors. Generally GBM occurs in people aging between 45 and 70 years. As the tumor is highly resistant to many of the standard treatments, patients survive for an average of less than 15 months, following diagnosis. According to William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H., the acting director of the Office of Device Evaluation in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, the patients diagnosed with GBM will be able to survive longer with the help of the new treatment. Though the new treatment is not a sure cure, it will definitely increase the survival by few months, William said.  Optune medical device was first tested and approved in 2011 to treat people with GBM that progressed or recurred after chemotherapy. According to the clinical study, people treated with TMZ and the Optune medical device lived three months longer than those who were treated with other traditional treatments and drugs. With the expanded indication, now Optune medical device can be used along with traditional treatments, to treat GBM. For newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme cancer, it is not recommended to use only Optune, rather is can be used as an adjunct therapy.  

    Original Post FDA Supports use of Optune Medical Device to Treat a Unique Brain Cancer source Twease
              Inflatable Device to Help Obese Patients Lose Weight gets FDA Approval        
    The United States Food and Drug Administration has given its approval for an inflatable device that can help patients suffering from obesity shed their weight without any surgeries. The balloon, made by Reshape Medical, will be inserted inside the body and fill a portion of the stomach.  A minimally invasive endoscopic procedure will be performed by doctors, where in they will go in through the mouth to reach the stomach and implant the device. Typically, the procedure will take less than 30 minutes and will be performed while the patient is mildly sedated.  The balloon will trigger a feeling of fullness as it begins to fill up the space in the stomach. This device has proven to be effective for weight loss for the short term. However, it remains to be seen if these devices will have any long term advantages for obese patients. The balloon will be used for an estimated six months. In addition to the device, the patient will follow a medically supervised diet and exercises. The FDA stated that the inflatable device does not alter the natural anatomy of the stomach. Dr William Maisel, acting director of the Office of Device Evaluation at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health at the FDA, said in a press release that for those patients battling with obesity, remarkable weight loss and maintaining that loss of weight most often needs a combination of solutions such as exercise habits and improved diet. The device is at present limited to patients who are suffering from one or more obesity related disorders such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and/or diabetes. Over 325 people between the ages 22 and 60 participated in clinical studies evaluating the product. These people had at least one chronic obesity related health condition. 

    Original Post Inflatable Device to Help Obese Patients Lose Weight gets FDA Approval source Twease
              Scientists Advertize Breakthrough in Chemical Weapons Clash        
    This week, the chemical weapons are in the news as the U.S. military wiped out caches of the armaments. The new study is also holding the weapons in the limelight. Scientists state that they have discovered a new, fast way to annihilate chemical weapons and probably to protect the U.S. forces and first responders. The researchers at Northwestern University have created a new material that annihilates nerve agents at high speeds. As a matter of fact, it is so efficient that it can make one of the most poisonous nerve agents across the globe, Soman, powerless within mere minutes. Soman, or Military designation GD, is a clear, monochrome nerve agent similar to the more commonly known Sarin. The nerve agents are highly poisonous of famous chemical warfare agents. The Soman is not without; it can stink like camphor or a rotting fruit. Just a little bit of it on the skin can be lethal within minutes. The research of the team advises that the new material will also be efficient against other agents like the odorless and the tasteless VX. The VX is easy to make and considered the most potent of all known nerve agents.  Any liquid contact on skin could be lethal. This new material could be used for protective equipment of war fighters like gas masks. Protective equipment is essential to keep military personnel safe when they are working in environments where there is a potential use of chemical weapons. When first responders enter an environment where there may be nerve agents such as Soman or VX, the CDC recommends using a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health certified Chemical, Radiological, Biological, and Nuclear Self Contained Breathing Apparatus with the ‘A’ Level protective suit.

    Original Post Scientists Advertize Breakthrough in Chemical Weapons Clash source Twease
              ARA Develops CBRN Defense Awareness Blended Learning Course for Air Force        

    To ensure preparedness of Air Force personnel to “continue the fight” in a WMD environment, the Air Force turned to ARA’s team of CBRN and Instructional Systems Design experts to develop a comprehensive training course. ARA’s Training Solutions Super Group recently completed the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Defense Awareness Course for the U. S. Air Force Emergency Management Program managed by the Air Force Civil Engineer Center.

    (PRWeb September 27, 2013)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/9/prweb11169078.htm


              Una storia come tante.        
    Questa è una storia vera, una delle tante che conosco occupandomi dello strano mondo dei ciarlatani e delle medicine miracolose. Una storia che mi segnalarono molti mesi fa e che iniziai a seguire per poterla raccontare. Dopo qualche mese rinunciai.
    Prima di tutto la persona in questione iniziò a vendere dei prodotti e parlarne avrebbe semplicemente fatto il suo gioco, pubblicità che non volevo fare e poi Claudio (nome inventato) era felice, convinto, contento.
    Era sicuro di avercela fatta.

    Invece, guardando i referti che lui con precisione maniacale pubblicava nel suo sito, non ce l'aveva fatta per niente.
    Questo suo entusiasmo mi fece rinunciare, non avevo nessun diritto per deluderlo, per mostrargli la durissima realtà, non ero un suo amico né il suo medico e pensai semplicemente di lasciarlo proseguire per la sua strada continuando a seguirlo in silenzio.
    Quando nei giorni scorsi vi furono delle novità, in molti mi scrissero per raccontarmele. Ho deciso, anche in questo caso, di parlarne in maniera generica, cambiando parti della storia, nomi e particolari.
    Qualcuno potrà riconoscere "Claudio", è molto noto soprattutto sui social network ma non importa, in fondo non parlo di lui ma della sua storia che è comune a tante persone.

    Claudio fa un controllo medico dopo anni. Il suo stato di salute non è ottimale ma ormai sembra quasi averci fatto l'abitudine, in fondo non ha mai badato al suo stile di vita e nonostante gli avvertimenti di medici e famigliari non si può dire che abbia vissuto con moderazione. I dolori e qualche sintomo sfumato inducono il suo medico a prescrivergli degli esami che non danno l'esito sperato: alcuni valori, soprattutto quelli relativi alle funzioni del fegato, sono alterati.
    Si decide di approfondire, si fanno degli esami radiologici che non danno belle notizie, Claudio ha un tumore, abbastanza evidente, al fegato.
    A quel punto la sua vita sembra cambiata, inizia una lunga trafila fatta di medici, ospedali, controlli, esami. Si giunge ad un punto di svolta: è consigliato l'intervento chirurgico.
    Così verrà fatto, Claudio si opera anche se una parte del tumore non può essere rimossa vista la sua posizione. Per questo motivo e per aumentare le possibilità di sopravvivenza, il medico consiglia a Claudio di assumere un farmaco, non è un chemioterapico, non ha gravi effetti collaterali e diciamo, se proprio dobbiamo essere sinceri, che non aumenterà di tanto le sue possibilità di vittoria, allungherà di poco tempo la sopravvivenza. Altro non si può fare. Claudio è combattuto, inizialmente rifiuta, non vuole prendere medicine. Il suo medico però insiste: solo quel farmaco può fare qualcosa. Claudio fa una domanda che mai avrebbe voluto fare: se non prendo il farmaco quanti mesi ho davanti a me?
    Il medico abbassa gli occhi: non lo sappiamo, probabilmente due anni, poco più...non si sa.

    Claudio non ci sta, non crede sia possibile una cosa del genere, rifiuta la terapia proposta, in fondo dopo l'intervento sta bene e sembra non aver mai avuto nulla. Inizia a studiare, soprattutto su internet, che è facile e veloce e lì scopre tante cose. Farà da solo, non c'è bisogno di essere medici per curare le malattie, oggi con internet è tutto facile, possiamo pensare alla nostra salute senza problemi.

    Scopre ad esempio che ci sono persone che dicono di essere guarite dal cancro con il bicarbonato di sodio, già, proprio quello che usiamo in cucina, sono guarite, ci sono i video e le testimonianze, c'è pure un medico che dice di essere guarito allo stesso modo. Si è rivolto ad un altro medico, che però ora è stato radiato perché propone cure false per i tumori, si è fatto mettere dei cateteri, ha speso un po' di soldi ma è guarito e se lo dice un medico qualcosa vorrà pur dire. La stessa cosa una signora americana, si è rivolta ad un medico svizzero, anche lui usa il bicarbonato e lo usa sulla signora, guarendola. Qualcuno le ha chiesto i referti, le prove di quella guarigione incredibile: "ha perso tutto in un trasloco", dicono in un sito, "appena ritroverà i documenti li mostrerà", 4 anni fa, documenti mai più mostrati.

    Allora Claudio è deciso: si curerà con le cure nascoste dai medici, userà solo rimedi naturali e non ufficiali. Ma non sarà stupido come tutti gli altri che credono alle bufale ed alle sciocchezze, studierà, approfondirà, prenderà solo ciò che serve. Sa che ce la farà.
    Per esempio, per quell'ex medico, boicottato dalla medicina perché ha fatto grandi scoperte, il cancro è causato dalla candida (che è un fungo) e solo il bicarbonato può curarlo, lo spiega anche nel suo sito, mentre uno scienziato, anni fa, ha vinto il Nobel perché aveva capito che la causa principale del cancro è l'acidificazione del corpo. Ovviamente scienziati e professoroni dicono che è tutto falso ma cosa dovrebbero dire?

    Claudio inizia così a curarsi, compra il bicarbonato direttamente dal produttore, lo usa tutto il giorno, sembra sia importante alcalinizzare il corpo. Inizia così a bere anche acqua alcalina, la si ottiene mediante particolari filtri, molto costosi, che la rendono così efficace e salutare. Anzi, c'è anche un'occasione, se riuscisse a vendere apparecchi per l'acqua alcalina ad altre persone, riuscirà a ripagare la sua e magari guadagnare qualche soldo, che non fa mai male.
    C'è da pagare anche l'enorme mole di libri e manuali che Claudio compra: tutti spiegano come curare il cancro con le cure naturali.
    Le cure contro il cancro naturali, sono quelle cure che guariscono il cancro nella quasi totalità dei casi e che non sono usate dai medici perché altrimenti essi perderebbero tanti guadagni e tanti pazienti.

    Ad esempio c'è un metodo americano, si chiama "Gerson", che con l'uso di frullati di frutta e verdura e clisteri di caffè, guarisce qualsiasi malattia, tumori compresi. Come si può pensare che i medici consiglino una cura del genere? Non venderebbero più una pillola. Poi ci sono dei geni boicottati anche in Italia, basti pensare a Di Bella, è risaputo che ha guarito decine di persone, almeno, così dice lui, c'è persino un bambino con un tumore all'occhio che sta guarendo completamente.

    Claudio inizia così a comprare ogni giorno frutta fresca e verdura, poi l'estrattore, serve per fare i succhi. Non si possono escludere rimedi notoriamente efficaci contro i tumori come l'aglio, lo zenzero, l'argilla ventilata e la cannabis.
    Bisogna unire, inoltre, secondo quanto dicono alcuni siti, anche l'integrazione con magnesio, ascorbato di potassio e vitamina C.
    Così anche scatole di vitamine e flaconi di integratori, antiossidanti e sali minerali, entrano a far parte della vita di Claudio e poi minerali chelanti, disintossicanti, depuranti, ricostituenti, sfiammanti, spurganti, aminoacidi ed antiacidi.



    Il tavolo è pieno, contando i flaconi (ora si sono aggiunti anche la curcumina, la graviola, la cartilagine di squalo ed il melograno) siamo arrivati a 32 pillole al giorno più la dieta vegetariana ed un numero impressionante di gocce, tisane, oli, decotti, erbe e succhi, più i clisteri di caffè, il bicarbonato mattina e pomeriggio, la tisana Essiac, l'artemisia e l'acqua alcalina. Su un mobile fanno bella mostra alcuni macchinari, sono quelli che frullano, estraggono, macinano, purificano, almeno 4 macchine.

    Poi legge, compra libri, va su internet, studia le malattie, il corpo umano, la medicina, Wikipedia e Google. Ha raccolto centinaia di testi di cure alternative: nessun testo di medicina però, quella non dice tutta la verità.



    Sembra un malato ma in realtà sta bene. Però così c'è gente che ce l'ha fatta, alla faccia di chi li voleva già sotto terra!
    Come quella donna, di soli 25 anni che, con i frullati ed i clisteri di caffè, è guarita da un tumore gravissimo alle ossa che non le avrebbe dato scampo.
    Passati 6 mesi gli esami lo dimostrano: non c'è più niente. Il tumore non è tornato, resta quello che c'era già dopo l'operazione, anzi, alcuni linfonodi, che sembravano ingrossati, ora sono praticamente invisibili.
    Bisogna urlarlo in giro, dirlo a tutti.
    Claudio così apre una pagina Facebook, realizza dei video, presto riunisce migliaia di sostenitori, persone malate o meno che chiedono consigli e ne danno agli altri.
    Il suo apparecchio per l'acqua alcalina fa furore, lo vogliono tutti e fanno bene, l'acqua alcalina è sana e può guarire molte malattie, costa tanto ma vuoi mettere il costo delle medicine?
    La pagina Facebook si riempie presto, migliaia di fans, tutti a tifare per Claudio, che qualche mese dopo annuncia: sono guarito.
    Gli esami del sangue sono perfetti, le TAC dicono che non c'è nessuna novità e questo significa che l'incubo è passato, Claudio aveva ragione e quella ragione la grida in faccia ai medici che gli davano pochi mesi di vita, a quelli che non ci credevano ed a quelli che dicono che queste cure naturali sono solo balle.

    Claudio capita anche in questo blog, legge tutto a proposito delle cure che sta seguendo e si rende conto che le segue proprio tutte: la dieta Gerson, il metodo Pantellini, la dieta alcalina, il bicarbonato, i clisteri di caffè, l'Essiac e tanti altri. Ovviamente in questo sito, si dice che è tutto un bluff, che queste cure non curano nulla e che le testimonianze sono purtroppo delle fregature ma Claudio se lo aspettava, non ha importanza, è ovvio che un medico non dica le cose come stanno e così prosegue.
    Il suo sito ha migliaia di contatti, la sua storia è raccontata da altri siti, Claudio diventa un mito e lo invitano anche a raccontare la sua storia in giro per l'Italia, chi l'avrebbe mai detto!
    Così continua a pubblicare referti, video, esami. Copia da altri siti delle storie, racconta gli improbabili meccanismi di funzionamento di una o l'altra cura naturale.
    Passano due anni, il tempo esatto in cui, secondo il suo medico, la storia avrebbe scritto la parola fine e Claudio, nonostante alcuni disturbi banali (dovuti secondo lui alla disintossicazione giornaliera) decide di fare nuovamente degli esami, è giunto il momento di capire chi aveva ragione. Nel frattempo alla cura si è aggiunto il Ganoderma, un fungo dalle proprietà miracolose e poi la melatonina, si dice sia fenomenale, i fitocomplessi e le tisane di carciofo ed aglio. Nel suo canale You Tube fioccano i video, ormai siamo ad oltre 200, in questi Claudio saluta, parla, consiglia, racconta, poi confronta un macchinario con un altro, spiega come si prepara una tisana curativa o una ricetta disintossicante, instancabile.

    Fino alla notizia che si aspettava, aveva ragione lui: gli esami non mostrano nulla di strano, tumore fermo al suo posto, qualche linfonodo ingrossato ma nemmeno tanto e condizioni generali buone.

    Si continua con la cura naturale, ormai anche altre persone hanno iniziato ad imitarlo visto il suo successo ma Claudio è onesto: non è un medico, non può dare consigli medici e prima di imitarlo pensarci bene, ognuno può reagire in maniera personale.
    Ma lui è lì, sta meglio, anzi, dopo qualche mese appare anche un po' ingrassato, con la pancetta che non vedeva da anni, sarà l'aggiunta degli epatoprotettori, della metionina o dei gemmoderivati che ha aggiunto nelle ultime settimane. Tutti vogliono parlare con Claudio, vogliono conoscere la sua storia, ne parlano come si parlerebbe di un guerriero che ha vinto la sua battaglia più difficile. Nei siti si usano termini importanti: "una storia a lieto fine", "la vittoria sulla malattia" o "come è guarito dal cancro".

    Tanti siti "alternativi" parlano di Claudio: è guarito, dicono (nell'immagine: composizione da vari siti).
    La debolezza però c'è, inutile negarlo ma per la medicina naturale può essere contrastata da un bicchiere di acqua e limone (acqua tiepida, mi raccomando) ogni mattina.
    Il mese successivo Claudio è ancora più debole, la pancia più grossa, secondo il figlio è aria nello stomaco, serve quindi integrare con carbone vegetale, alga spirulina, clorella ed aumentare le dosi di vitamina C. In pochi giorni le cose sembrano precipitare, Claudio non sta bene, il suo medico gli consiglia degli esami ma lui rifiuta, probabilmente non riesce a spurgare le tossine. Inizia il metodo Ashkar, si avvolgono dei ceci in foglie di cavolo e si inseriscono nella cute, tramite un foro fatto appositamente. Le ferite con i ceci si infettano, esce sangue e pus e Claudio mostra le foto, assieme a quelle della sua urina, su Facebook, ai suoi fans che nel frattempo lo seguono ed ognuno fornisce il suo parere: "aumenta l'artemisia, diminuisci la graviola!" o "chiama Di Bella, chiedi di Simoncini!".

    L'urina appare opaca, forse bisogna aumentare le dosi di bicarbonato.

    Ma non c'è tempo, le condizioni di Claudio sono peggiorate. Spontaneamente decide di fare degli esami, un'ecografia, poi una TAC, dicono la stessa cosa: ascite (liquido nell'addome). Un brutto segno.
    La TAC aggiunge che i linfonodi, che prima erano ingrossati di poco, ora sono molto voluminosi.
    Claudio lo comunica ai suoi seguaci i quali danno il loro consiglio: "rivolgiti alla Mereu! Chiama la Brigliadori! Segui la Nuova Medicina Germanica di Hamer!" Sono tutte false medicine, inutili illusioni, speranze per delusi. Una vale l'altra, tutte dicono di guarire, nessuna guarisce.

    Passa qualche giorno senza notizie, Claudio sta male ed è anche infastidito dalle centinaia di messaggi che riceve su Facebook e via mail: ognuno con il suo consiglio, qualcuno con una parola di conforto ma altri di rabbia, soldi donati, acquisto di macchinari per l'acqua alcalina, qualcuno si sente truffato, ha comprato la vita eterna ma a quanto pare questa non esiste. È arrivato il momento per annunciarlo, Claudio lo fa senza molti giri di parole: è finita amici, è finita.

    In un attimo le pillole, le diete, i libri, le vitamine ed i clisteri di caffè, sono sormontati dalla vita vera, dalla malattia, le illusioni sono frantumate di fronte alla realtà: è finita.
    Nella sua pagina è il caos, molti sembrano spettatori di una telenovela, c'è chi dice di averlo incontrato per strada, chi chiede notizie, chi manda saluti e preghiere. Qualcuno non ci crede, altri si arrabbiano e chiedono notizie.

    Passa qualche altro giorno, Claudio comunica il suo trasferimento in hospice, è un malato terminale. I messaggi dei fan si susseguono. Compare su Facebook anche il figlio che chiede di lasciare in pace il papà. Qualche altro messaggio di auguri e di coraggio. È finita.

    Claudio muore.

    Nel frattempo, si viene a sapere che anche quel medico che diceva di essere guarito con il bicarbonato è morto, anche quella signora del trasloco, nessuno però lo ha detto, nessuno ha corretto i siti o i video che ancora oggi li danno per guariti, pure la ragazza di 25 anni con il tumore alle ossa che si curava con i clisteri di caffè è morta, persino il bambino che si curava con il metodo Di Bella, è vivo ma solo perché ha abbandonato la pseudocura, che non dava nessun effetto, tornando a curarsi in ospedale.
    Di loro non ce l'ha fatta nessuno ed ora tocca a Claudio.

    Ma allora perché una persona rinuncia alle cure proposte dai medici e si butta a capofitto tra ciarlatani e finte terapie?

    Un messaggio sulla pagina Facebook di Claudio dice "grazie, ci hai aiutato tantissimo, ci hai dato speranza, ci hai aiutato a credere, a non mollare".

    Ecco, forse è qui tutto il riassunto di questa ed altre storie.

    Credere che un frullato di verdure, un clistere di caffè o una dieta, possano guarirci dal cancro è, onestamente, di un'ingenuità infinita.

    Purtroppo il cancro è una brutta malattia, difficile da curare e servono maniere molto forti. Credere che ci siano persone che hanno scoperto cure segrete, che la medicina non usa, che sono nascoste per oscuri interessi è altrettanto ingenuo. Se una cura funzionasse si userebbe, la useremmo tutti, medici e pazienti. Questi "geni incompresi" sono semplicemente dei ciarlatani, quei personaggi viscidi e patetici che abitano le stanze della disperazione e del dolore.
    Però sapere che da qualche parte c'è una speranza, che "di nascosto" si possa guarire" che "qualcuno" sa, ci fa sperare, ci illude, ci induce a lottare.
    Forse è questo il punto, quello che non si capisce.

    Il caso di Claudio è esemplare: la medicina ha fatto quello che ha potuto fare, ha probabilmente regalato qualche mese di vita in più, di famiglia ed affetti. Se si fosse usato il farmaco probabilmente Claudio sarebbe vissuto altri mesi, in buone condizioni, sei? Forse otto o un anno, non lo sappiamo.
    Scegliendo la via dell'illusione Claudio non ha accorciato i suoi giorni, probabilmente non ha danneggiato la sua salute, per niente, però non ha aggiunto un giorno in più, non è vissuto da sano (avreste dovuto vedere le foto del suo tavolo, tra una pillola e l'altra, un manuale e l'altro, non c'era uno spazio vuoto, tutto lo spazio era occupato da medicine, rimedi, metodi), ha foraggiato truffatori ed imbroglioni.

    Claudio ha speso tanti soldi, ci ha creduto, ha inseguito un sogno ma era chiaro sin dall'inizio che il sogno si sarebbe concluso.
    Cosa è giusto? Cosa è meglio?
    Ecco, qui devo fermarmi, io faccio il medico, non lo psicologo o il filosofo, devo dire cosa è meglio dal punto di vista medico, non da quello esistenziale.
    Storie come quella di Claudio in questi anni ne ho conosciute tante, tutte uguali, storie fragili ed è per questo che continuo a raccontarle, da un lato per mettere in guardia dai truffatori, dall'altro per dare un volto a chi, disperato, sembra troppo stupido per credere ad evidenti baggianate, il fatto è che non si augura a nessuno di arrivare ad essere tanto stupidi, è facilissimo esserlo in certe condizioni.

    Ovviamente non è giusto alimentare i ciarlatani o le truffe ma questo è il motivo per il quale non ho mai avuto una parola cattiva per chi ci crede, non ho mai criticato le vittime.
    Sono i carnefici da perseguire, non quelli che su di loro riversano soldi e speranze, ché già di lacrime ne hanno versate abbastanza.

    Alla prossima.

    Nota: qualcuno nei commenti ha trovato "strano" che Claudio fosse sopravvissuto per 4 anni dopo la diagnosi.
    Bisogna ricordare che il tumore che ha colpito Claudio è poco curabile ma consente (in certe condizioni e con intervento chirurgico) una buona qualità di vita con una sopravvivenza di alcuni anni. Uno studio del 2005 ad esempio, per una situazione simile, calcolava una sopravvivenza [mediana] di 52 mesi (circa 4 anni, esattamente la sopravvivenza di Claudio) in pazienti operati.

              Disaster Mental Health Conference Focuses On Radiological Readiness        

    There’s a conference tomorrow in New York that will focus on preparedness for nuclear disasters and other radiation emergencies. It’s an opportunity to think about and plan for some worst-case scenarios.

    It’s the Institute for Disaster Mental Health’s 10th annual conference, and this year’s topic is “Radiological Readiness: Preparing for Dirty Bombs, Nuclear Disasters, and Other Radiation Emergencies.” Dr. James Halpern is the director of the Institute at the State University of New York at New Paltz.


              Breast health center gives TGen new research opportunities        

    TGen partners with John C. Lincoln Health Network to prevent breast cancer



    PHOENIX, Ariz. – May 4, 2009 – Today's opening of a new breast health center next to John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital will provide significant research opportunities for the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).


    The 9,000-square-foot Breast Health and Research Center will include a tumor biorepository for TGen that will aid the non-profit research institute in discovering new ways to diagnose and treat breast cancer, which affects 1 in every 8 American women.


    "What this partnership means is that breast cancer research at TGen will be significantly accelerated, specifically in development of more accurate diagnostic tests and smarter treatment options for newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients,'' said Dr. Heather Cunliffe, head of TGen's Breast & Ovarian Cancer Research Unit.



    The new center is located in John C. Lincoln's Medical Offices 3, 19646 N. 27th Ave., just southwest of Interstate 17 and Loop 101, in northwest Phoenix.


    "Our new state-of-the-art medical equipment allows the earliest possible detection of breast cancers when survival rates are highest and treatment is less invasive," said Sherry Gage, Clinical Director of John C. Lincoln's new center.


    "But, our staff also knows the key component of the care they offer is their personalized and genuine concern for their patients. We're not just here to give the diagnosis, we're here to help patients at all stages," said Gage, a Registered Radiologic Technologist.


    Breast cancer patients at the new center who agree to donate their tumor tissues will boost TGen's abilities to use genomic and proteomic research toward development of new ways to combat breast cancer.


    TGen's role at the new center will be for research; not for TGen clinical trials.


    "We are thrilled that JCL and TGen have developed a strong strategic partnership to benefit breast cancer patients,'' said Dr. Cunliffe, who also is an Investigator in TGen's Computational Biology Division.



    The new center provides TGen with yet another avenue of assisting local hospital and research networks, including Arizona's three major universities, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Banner Health and Scottsdale Healthcare.


    "This is another example of how Arizona is forging new ground through fostering broadly the alignment of clinical centers of excellence, such as John C. Lincoln, with biomedical research organizations, such as TGen. The ultimate beneficiaries are of course our patients who have cancer and other debilitating diseases," said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen's President and Research Director.


    ###


    About TGen

    The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is a Phoenix-based non-profit organization dedicated to conducting groundbreaking research with life changing results. Research at TGen is focused on helping patients with diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders and diabetes. TGen is on the cutting edge of translational research where investigators are able to unravel the genetic components of common and complex diseases. Working with collaborators in the scientific and medical communities, TGen believes it can make a substantial contribution to the efficiency and effectiveness of the translational process. TGen is affiliated with the Van Andel Research Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan. For more information, visit: www.tgen.org.


    About John C. Lincoln

    John C. Lincoln Health Network is an acclaimed not-for-profit system of hospitals, physician practices and community outreach programs. Honored for excellence by independent experts, John C. Lincoln doctors use advanced medical technology to deliver superior health care every day. Its focus on quality has earned John C. Lincoln Health Network the trust and respect of the patients and community members it serves. For more information visit JCL.com.


              Botulinum Toxin A as an Adjunct to Abdominal Wall Reconstruction for Incisional Hernia        
    imageBackground: Repair of large incisional hernias remains a surgical and costly challenge. Temporary paralysis of the lateral abdominal wall muscles with topical administration of botulinum toxin A (BTA) is a new therapeutic concept, which may obviate the need for component separation technique (CST) for repair of large incisional hernias. Current literature on the administration of BTA as adjunct to surgical repair of abdominal incisional hernias was investigated. Methods: The electronic databases PubMed and Embase were searched for eligible studies. Two independent investigators evaluated the literature. Data were sought regarding primary fascial closure with and without CST, safety, hernia recurrence, method of application, and preoperative radiological imaging. Results: Six cohort studies including a total of 133 patients receiving BTA were identified. No randomized or case–control studies were found. In total, 83.5% of the patients achieved primary fascial closure. Supplemental CST was necessary in 24.1% of the patients. Two patients developed hernia recurrence during follow-up. No postoperative complications or adverse events were considered related to the administration of BTA, except for impairment of postoperative coughing and sneezing. Additionally, radiological imaging showed that BTA increased the length of lateral abdominal muscles before surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative administration of BTA increases muscle length and may facilitate primary fascial closure. Optimal administration is at least 2 weeks before repair, whereas the optimal dose of BTA remains to be defined. Carefully designed randomized controlled trials are warranted to identify patients who would benefit from BTA and to eliminate the confounding effect of CST.
              Radioactive strontium-90 found in fish in Vermont, USA        

    Vermont health officials have found radioactive strontium-90 in a smallmouth bass taken from the Connecticut River. The fish was collected 9 miles upstream from the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plant, but William Irwin, the state’s chief radiological health officer, says it’s not certain where the strontium-90 comes from. It might come from the power plant, it might come from the […]

    The post Radioactive strontium-90 found in fish in Vermont, USA appeared first on Fish and aquatic news.


              Ucyfrowienie pracowni RTG        

    Ucyfrowienie pracowni RTG , szybsza i dokładniejsza diagnostyka radiologiczna.

    Artykuł Ucyfrowienie pracowni RTG pochodzi z serwisu Przychodnia Weterynaryjna w Wesołej.


              Certified Radiologic Technologist I - Wahiawa General Hospital - Wahiawā, HI        
    CT Scan, ultrasound, mammography). Under the general supervision of the Diagnostic Imaging Manager and Senior Radiologic Technologist, performs a variety of...
    From Indeed - Wed, 02 Aug 2017 23:24:25 GMT - View all Wahiawā, HI jobs
              Commenti su Terrorismo: il rischio radiologico di Terrorismo: il rischio radiologico - Analisi Di...        
    [...]   [...]
              Importance of Periodical Health Check up in Industrial Employees - Healthy worker healthy industry        

    Importance of Periodical Health Check up in Industrial Employees Author – 1. Dr. Niraj Pandit, Professor, Community Medicine, SBKS MIRC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth, Piparaia 2. Dr. Hiren Patel, Resident Doctor, Community Medicine, SBKS MIRC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth, Piparaia The modernisation and innovation in industries and rapid increase in chemical, hazardous, and polluting industries in recent years has not only resulted in unsafe working conditions but has created problems of occupational health hazards. The incidence of occupational diseases is much higher in developing countries than developed ones. In developing countries the workers most exposed to occupational risks are those employed in agriculture, chemical and primary extraction industries and heavy manufacturing. Quite apart from this poor equipment, heavy workload and even poisoning due to pesticide's and organic dusts take their heavy toll on workers, health and safety. Further, work related hazards are changing with the introduction of new chemical substances which pose a threat to community and workers alike. Moreover, occupational risks such as temperature (excessive heat or cold), humidity of air, dampness inducing chill, low air movements and defective lighting in the work place affect the workers. Further other factors like noise, sustained vibration, excessive uncontrolled ionizing radiation, high voltage electric current and abnormal air pressure produce damaging effects on certain organs of the body. Apart from this certain substances cause poisoning or disease in industry. It is, therefore, essential to take effective measures to protect the workers from such risks and dangers. Many disease of occupational origin require months or even years for their development. Their slow development, very often leads to their non reorganisation in early stages and that is harmful to worker, that is the reason in addition to pre-employment medical check up, the periodical medical check up of worker is very necessary. Importance In India various Committees and Commissions were appointed from time to time by the Government of India to inquire into the problems of health of industrial workers. Health monitoring or health surveillance at work site is an integral component of health promotion (HP).As per the amendments in 1987 to the Factories Act, more and more vigilance is required to keep track of the health of the employees working in hazardous operations. Health monitoring is the forerunner of all HP activities. In today’s occupational health practice, factory medical officers have the daunting task of promoting the health of employees in industry. Health promotion concept incorporates programmes of health monitoring of employees exposed to potential hazards, general health screening, hypertension, diabetes control programmes, nutrition surveillance programme, stress management programme, fitness programme, etc. Irrespective of the type of HP programme, its potential benefits are plenty. Improvement in productivity is achieved by reducing absenteeism, improving morale of employees, improvement in the ability of performance and developing higher quality staff. HP concept establishes the fact that the organization has concern for the health and welfare of its employees. The supervision of the health of workers is specifically carried out by means of medical check-up periodically. Such periodic tests have become particularly important today because these tests help us to diagnose the earliest deviations in health and permit prevention of illness. Chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes can be detected at an early stage. Thus, occupational health service is able to supervise an important sector of the population but the supervision takes place on the spot, thus making it possible to protect and improve workers health without incurring loss of time or absenteeism which would be the case if they had to go to health centers for that purpose. When the examination should carried out? The frequency & content of periodical examination will depend upon the type of occupational exposure. Ordinarily workers are examined once a year. But in certain occupational exposures like lead, toxic dyes, radium monthly examination are indicated. Even daily examinations may be needed such as when irritant chemicals like dichromate. Particular care should be given to workers returning from medical leave, to assess the nature and degree of any disability and to assess suitability or otherwise of returning to the same job. Who should carry out the periodic health check up? Ideally the Factory Medical Officer should carry out the check up. But many time the industry is large and large number of employees are working, in such scenario they can out source the work to the agencies. They are many agencies and consultant who are working for the periodic health check up. They have full back up of laboratory, radiological, audiometry and other tests. In small industry the FMO is part-time in such scenario also the management can opt services of such agency.

              El enigma del caso Dyatlov (II parte)        
    Pericia de la tienda de campan-a

    Cuando se constato visualmente que la tienda de la expedicion de Dyatlov estaba cortada y con amplios trozos arrancados los investigadores criminales, al no comprender el origen de esta circunstancia, comenzaron a buscar rastros de un delito suponiendo que alguien habia atacado la tienda. Sin embargo, una costurera profesional les haria cambiar de opinion, cuando al ver, casualmente, la tienda afirmo que los 3 cortes en el costado (de 32, 89 y 42 cm) habian sido hecho por un cuchillo desde dentro y no desde fuera. Por ello, sorprendidos, enviaron la tienda para el analisis de una experta, Genriette Eliseeva Churkina, quien confirmo la observacion de la costurera.


    El analisis de la tienda mostro que la lona evidenciaba los intentos de los expedicionarios por abandonar desesperadamente el interior de la tienda para lo cual probaron con distintas formas de romper el genero de la misma hasta que por medio de varios cortes lograron rajarla y asi finalmente evacuarla.

    Ese mismo hecho deja en evidencia que el acceso a la tienda estaba obstaculizado por nieve pues en vez de salir por el con toda calma tuvieron que insistentemente y de diversos modos intentar abrir un costado de la tienda. Y no solo abrirlo sino que rajarlo de modo de poder tener espacio suficiente para abandonar la tienda.

    Autopsias
    El cuerpo de Igor Dyatlov antes de la autopsia. Tras el se aprecia el cuerpo de Krivonishchenko, cuya autopsia se realizaria tambien el mismo dia.

    El 4 de marzo de 1959 el experto del Buro provincial, el perito forense Boris Alekseevich Vozrozhdenni y el perito forense de la ciudad de Severouralsk, Ivan Ivanovich Laptev realizaron el analisis de 4 cuerpos de los turistas fallecidos llevados a Idvel. El trabajo se realizo en la morgue del hospital central penitenciario de la ciudad.

    Ninguno de los cuerpos llevaba calzado al ser encontrado y solo llevaba cubierta su cabeza la chica, Kolmogorova.

    Doroshenko: Dan-os corporales (contusiones y rasgun-os) que pudieron surgir como resultado de una caida o de una contusion sobre una piedra, el hielo, etc. Se revelaron innumerables rastros de congelamiento de las extremidades ("las falanges finales de los dedos de las manos y del pie presentaban un tono verde oscuro"), edema de las meninges, presencia en los organos internos de sangre. No se consignaron fracturas de huesos o roturas de los cartilagos.


    Krivonishchenko: Innumerables rasgun-os, excoriaciones, raspaduras, congelacion de las extremidades, ausencia de la punta de la nariz. Se consignaron 2 quemaduras, una del muslo de la pierna izquierda, de 31x10 cm, y otra del pie izquierdo, de 10x4 cm, un edema de las meninges y presencia de sangre en los organos internos. No se consignaron fracturas de huesos o roturas de los cartilagos.


    Dyatlov: Innumerables rasgun-os, excoriaciones, raspaduras, congelamiento de las extremidades de 3-4 grado, en la palma de la mano izquierda se consigna una herida superficial de los dedos, del 2do al 5to, de una profundidad de hasta 0,1 cm, un edema de las meninges y organos internos cubiertos por sangre. No se consignaron fracturas de huesos o roturas de los cartilagos.


    Kolmogorova: Congelamiento de 3-4 grado de las falanges de los dedos de las manos, innumerables excoriaciones de taman-o 1,5x1,0 hasta 0,3x3,0 cm en las manos y las palmas, una herida de 3,0x3,2 cm con perdida del cuero cabelludo y de un trozo de piel en la mano derecha, estrechamiento de la cadera derecha, extendiendose hacia la espalda una excoriacion de la piel de 29,0x6,0 cm, edema de las meninges y presencia en los organos internos de sangre. No se consignaron fracturas de huesos o roturas de los cartilagos.


    Se concluyo que la muerte de todos ellos fue por accion de las bajas temperaturas y se produjo de 6-8 horas despues de tomar su ultima comida.

    El 8 de marzo se realizaria la autopsia de Rustem Slobodin (imagen inferior) en el mismo recinto de la ciudad de Ivdel, que concluiria que la causa de su muerte fue tambien por congelamiento.


    La autopsia establecio, ademas, que Slobodin tenia una fractura del hueso frontal izquierdo que pudo surgir como producto de una caida o de una contusion del craneo contra un objeto duro como una piedra, hielo, etc. El TEC cerrado fue producido por un cuerpo obstuso que, sin duda, le hizo perder la consciencia por un instante y ayudo a que su cuerpo se congelara mas rapidamente. La ausencia de una hemorragia interna bajo la meninge permite suponer que la muerte de Slobodin se produjo, precisamente, como resultado de congelamiento.

    Adicionalmente, su cuerpo presentaba rasgun-os, excoriaciones, raspones causados por un objeto obstuso como resultado de una caida o de una contusion sobre una piedra, hielo, etc.

    Las lesiones se produjeron mientras permanecia vivo, pero tambien en condicion de agonia y post-mortem.

    Se agrego, ademas, que a pesar de sus severas lesiones pudo desplazarse y arrastrarse por algunas horas.


    El 9 de mayo de 1959 el perito forense, Boris Alekseevich Vozrozhdenni (imagen superior), junto con la experto criminalista Genriette Eliseeva Churkina (quien realizo el peritaje de los cortes de la tienda), se realizaria en la morgue penitenciaria de Ivdel la autopsia y analisis de los cuerpos hallados el 5 de mayo en el arroyo, es decir, de los restantes 4 miembros de la expedicion. 

    Kolevatov: Tras el pabellon derecho de la oreja se observo en la zona del apofisis mastoideo del hueso temporal una herida de forma no definida de 3,0x1,5x0,5 cm que penetro hasta el hueso (es decir, hasta la apofisis mastoieda del hueso temporal). En el sector de la cuenca del ojo y de los arcos sobre las cejas habia ausencia de tejidos blandos con afloramiento de los huesos del craneo. Se encontraron ademas otras alteraciones de los tejidos blandos en la cabeza, sin embargo, todas ellos constituyen cambios post-mortem del cadaver. No se consignaron fracturas de huesos o roturas de los cartilagos.

    Zolotarev, en el area de la cuenca del ojo y el arco sobre las cejas, falta de tejidos blancos con afloramiento de los huesos del craneo, faltan las cejas, fracturas de las costillas 2, 3, 4 , 5 y tambien de la costilla 6 derecha con hemorragia interna en los musculos intercostales. Se encontraron alteraciones de los tejidos blandos en el lado derecho en la nuca y en el area de los arcos superciliares y ausencia de globos oculares a consecuencia de cambios post-mortem en el cadaver.

    Tibo-Brinyol. Hemorragia interna sobre el musculo del hueso temporal a consecuencia de una fractura por presion de la region parietal-temporal de 9,0x7,0 cm. Presencia en la cavidad craneana media de una fractura del hueso temporal izquierdo con el paso de la fractura del hueso a la cavidad craneana delantera al area derecha , sobre el ojo del hueso frontal, otra fractura con divergencia de los extremos de 0,1-0,4 cm, en la superficie trasera de de la silla turca con transferencia a la cavidad craneal media. Una serie de alteraciones de los tejidos blandos a consecuencia de cambios post-mortem en el cuerpo.

    Dubinina: En la superficie delantera y exterior de la superficie del muslo izquierdo y en el tercio medio se observa un cardenal de color violeta-lilaceo, con extension de 10x5 cm, con hemorragia interna en el espesor de la epidermis. Innumerables fracturas bilaterales de las costillas derechas 2,3, 4 y 5 por la clavicula media y la linea delantera submuscular. En el lado izquierdo fracturas de las costillas 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 y 7 de la linea clavicular media, en los lugares de las costillas se presentan hemorragias en los musculos intercostales, en el area de la empun-adura del esternon en el lado derecho hay una hemorragia interna, una hemorragia interna en el area del ventriculo derecho del corazon con una dimension de 4x4 cm, ausencia de tejidos blandos en el area de los arcos supraciliares, del caballete de la nariz, en las orbitas y en el area temporal-malar izquierda (por causas post-mortem). Se observa en el area del hueso parietal izquierdo una alteracion de tejidos blandos de 4,0x4,0 cm, en cuyo fondo se encuentra el hueso parietal, ausencia de sus globos oculares, cartilagos de la nariz aplastados (pero el tabique nasal esta intacto), ausencia de tejidos blandos del labio superior derecho con descubrimiento de la mandibula superior y los dientes, lengua en la cavidad bucal ausente. 

    Los expertos concluyeron que:

    La muerte de Kolevatova fue producto de congelacion.

    La muerte de Dubninina fue producto de una extensa hemorragia interna en el ventriculo derecho del corazon, de innumerables fracturas bilaterales de las costillas y una hemorragia abundante en la region toracica todo lo cual pudo ser fruto de la aplicacion de una fuerza intensa sobre la cavidad toracica.

    La muerte de Zolotarev fue resultado de innumerables dan-os corporales.

    La muerte de Tibo-Brinyol fue producto de una fractura por presion en el area de la boveda y la base del craneo que produjo una hemorragia interna sobre las meninges y en la sustancia del encefalo en conjunto con la accion de bajas temperaturas.

    El perito forense Vozrozhdeni se refiriria a las heridas corporales de Tibo-Brinyol, Dubinina y Zolotarev de la siguiente forma al ser interrogado por el fiscal Ivanov el 28 de mayo de 1959.

    Bajo la accion de que fuerza Tibo-Brinyol pudo recibir una herida de ese caracter?

    Como resultado de una caida, pero no desde la altura de su estatura como resultaria a consecuencia de tropezar y caer y golpearse con un objeto duro. La extensa y profunda fractura de la cavidad y de la base del craneo es fruto de un golpe igual en fuerza a ser impactado por un automovil que se mueve a gran velocidad.

    Se puede suponer que Tibo se golpeo con una piedra que estaba en la mano de alguien?

    En ese caso se hubieran dan-ado tejidos blandos y no es el caso.

    Como se puede explicar el origen de las lesiones de Dubinina y Zolotarev, podrian tener una causa comun?

    Considero que el caracter de las lesiones de ambos ... confirma que sucedieron mientras estaban vivos y son resultado de la accion de una gran fuerza, semejante a la que se aplico sobre Tibo. Las lesiones indicadas, y la ausencia de dan-os en la integridad de los tejidos blandos de la cavidad toracica, son muy similares a un trauma producto de una onda explosiva en el aire.

    Ese mismo dia 28 de mayo de 1959 concluiria la investigacion judicial.

    Funerales

    En un principio el Comite provincial del PCUS, con el apoyo de los empleados del UPI, intentaria convencer a los padres de los fallecidos para sepultar en una fosa comun en Ivdel los cuerpos de los primeros 5 excursionistas encontrados y, ademas, levantar un memorial. Sin embargo, la postura insistente de los padres y el apoyo del secretario del Comite provincial del PCUS, Kuroedov, permitio organizar los funerales en Sverdlovsk. Alli las autoridades hicieron lo posible para obstaculizar los intentos de hacer publica la fecha y el lugar de los funerales para darle menos resonancia ciudadana al hecho y evitar, de ese modo, el menor asomo de critica a las autoridades de la epoca por eso se recomendaba a los estudiantes no asistir a los funerales mientras que testigos oculares recuerdan que habia personas que arrancaban los avisos sobre las exequias, las que contarian, finalmente, con la presencia de miles de personas.

    Los primeros funerales se realizaron el 9 de marzo de 1959, siendo sepultados Kolmogorova, Doroshenko y Krivonishchenko. Dyatlov y Slobodin el 10 de marzo.

    Memorial frente a la tumba de 7 miembros de la expedicion de la agrupacion de Dyatlov. El obelisco 
    contiene las fotografias y nombres de sus 9 integrantes mientras que en su parte superior exhibe el emblema del Instituto politecnico de los Urales, el UPI.

    Kolmogorov, Doroshenko, Dyatlov y Slobodin fueron sepultados en Sverdlovsk, en el Cementerio Mixaylovski mientras que Krivonishchenko fue sepultados por sus padres en el Cementerio Ivanovski, de Sverdlovsk.


    El entierro de los cuerpos hallados a principios de mayo se efectuo el 12 de mayo de 1959. Tres de ellos, Dubinina, Kolevatov y Tibo-Brinyol, fueron sepultados cerca de las tumbas de sus compan-eros de excursion, en el cementerio Mixaylovski mientras que Zolotarev (imagen superior) fue sepultado en el cementerio Ivanovski, junto a la tumba de Krivonishchenko (imagen siguiente). Todos estos 4 fallecidos serian sepultados en tumbas de zinc.


    Investigacion oficial

    Se inicio despues de la apertura de la investigacion criminal por el fiscal de la ciudad de Ivdel, Vasili Ivanovich Tempalov tras el hallazgo de los cuerpos el 26 de febrero de 1959 y se extendio por 3 meses. Tempalov inicio la investigacion de las causas de la muerte de los excursionistas, realizo un analisis de la tienda, del lugar donde se hallo el cuerpo de 5 excursionistas del grupo de Dyatlov y ademas interrogo a una serie de testigos.

    Sin embargo, a partir de marzo de 1959 la investigacion fue encargada al fiscal-criminalista de la fiscalia de Sverdlovsk, Lev Nikitin Ivanov.

    La investigacion considero en un principio la version de un ataque y asesinato de los muchachos por parte de representantes de la etnia local de los Urales del norte, los mansi, pero los interrogatorios mostraron su ausencia en la region de la montan-a Otorten a inicios de febrero, y que tampoco habian visto a los estudiantes ademas de que la montan-a sagrada para ellos, para orar, se encontraba en otro lugar. 

    Los mansi aportarian, sin embargo, con la mencion de algunos de los riesgos de la region que visito la agrupacion de Dyatlov, destacando la presencia de fuertes vientos en las laderas expuestas de las montan-as, que podian alcanzar tal intensidad que podian rapidamente congelar a una persona si no lograba bajar en tiempo suficiente hasta el bosque para protegerse entre las quebradas. Ademas, dijeron que esos vientos podian extenderse por periodos de hasta 10 dias o incluso mas. 

    Algunos de ellos afirmaron que a principios de febrero se habian observado vientos inusualmente intensos y mucho frio, incluso menos de 30° bajo cero.

    Los mansi son una poblacion originaria de los Urales del Norte que surgio de su cruce con tribus ugrias provenientes del oeste de Siberia y del norte de Kazaxstan.
    Su poblacion en 1959 alcanzaba poco mas de 6 mil personas. En la actualidad constituyen poco mas de 12 mil, solo 200 de los cuales viven hoy en los Urales del Norte. Actualmente, su representante mas destacado es Sergey Sobyanin, alcalde de Moscu.
    Profesan el cristianismo ortodoxo, pero conservan tradiciones shamanicas. A pesar de contar con su propia lengua un 60% usa en su vida cotidiana la lengua rusa.

    Como el peritaje de la tienda mostro que se habia rasgado desde dentro, tras reiterados intentos,y en tanto la autopsia revelo como causa de muerte el congelamiento no solo no se presentaron cargos contra los mansi sino que, ademas, se descarto la version de un ataque.

    Como se establecio que Dubinina no podria haber sobrevivido mas de 10-20 minutos debido a su lesion en el corazon se descarto que las lesiones se hubieran producido en el area de la tienda. Ademas, tampoco se creia que con las lesiones que tenian Tibo-Brinyol, Dubinina y Zolotarev pudieran bajar por la pendiente de la montan-a ni tampoco les parecio que se hubieran encontrado rastros de que los heridos hubiesen sido transportados o arrastrados.

    En relacion a una posible avalancha, se considero inicialmente que la pendiente oscilaba entre 15-20 grados, es decir, no era muy significativa. Ademas, dada la cubierta de nieve en forma de una costra endurecida no parecia viable la posibilidad del deslizamiento de una avalancha sobre la tienda. Tampoco se habia encontrado ninguna huella de avalancha aunque la verdad es que tampoco se busco considerandose la pendiente no suficientemente inclinada.

    Trazada en rojo la ubicacion de la tienda de la agrupacion. 
    Evaluaciones posteriores estimarian la pendiente entre 20°-25°

    En cuanto a la hora de muerte, las autopsias establecieron que la agrupacion murio unas 6-8 horas despues de la ultima comida. En relacion a los 4 relojes que se encontraron en los cuerpos 3 mostraban una hora similar: Tubo-Brinyol, las 8:14 y las 8:39 (tenia 2 relojes), Slobodin, las 8:45 horas mientras que el reloj de Dyatlov indicaba las 5:31. De acuerdo a los servicios de rescate los relojes se detenian en condiciones de muy bajas temperaturas usualmente 1 hora despues de la muerte de una persona, por lo que se planteo que tal vez murieron entre las 7-8 de la man-ana del 2 de febrero.

    Ante la presion de las autoridades el fiscal Lev Nikitich Ivanov, que no podia encontrar la causa del accidente comenzo a sospechar que la tragedia podria haberse debido a la prueba de algun arma secreta en consideracion de los diversos testimonios del avistamiento de un globo de fuego el 17 de febrero y de un fenomeno similar el 31 de marzo. Asi, en mayo de 1959 encontrandose en el lugar de los hallazgos de los cuerpos investigo de nuevo el bosque, junto a E. P. Maslennikov, en las proximidades del lugar de los hechos.

    Alli comenzo a buscar elementos que pudieran servirle para apoyar la tesis de una prueba militar fallida, entonces se encontro en la frontera del bosque con algunos abetos que presentaban apariencia de quemaduras aunque la nieve no estaba fundida en el entorno. Como, ademas, los fallecidos presentan una coloracion no habitual en la piel y algunos presentaban fracturas oseas decidio someter los cuerpos a pruebas de radioactividad para lo cual reviso muestras de sus ropas y de sus organos internos y los comparo con muestras equivalentes de personas fallecidas bajo otras circunstancias. 

    El principal especialista en radioactividad de la ciudad de Sverdlovsk, de apellido Leshavov, llego a las siguientes conclusiones:

    Los biosustratos solidos investigados contiene sustancias radioactivas dentro de los limites de rangos naturales de irradiacion con Calcio-40.

    Distintas muestras de vestuario investigadas contienen algunas cantidades elevadas de sustancias radioactivas que son emisoras de radiacion beta.

    El aumento de radioactividad se encontro solo en 3 fragmentos de ropa: En el sweater cafe oscuro encontrado en Dubinina (9900 desintegraciones por minuto, o 165 Bq), en la parte inferior de los pantalones encontrados en Kolevatov (5000 desintegraciones por minuto, o 64 Bq), en la vuelta del sweater encontrado en Kolevatov (5600 desintegraciones por minuto, o 94 Bq).

    La contaminacion radioactiva resulto muy insignificante ademas, pues un nivel de 5 mil desintegraciones  (64 Bq) es un nivel normal para personas que trabajan con radiacion como sucedia con Kolevatov, ademas de Krivonishchenko.

    Como resultado, en la resolucion final del caso no se considero informacion sobre contaminacion radioactiva por cuanto no tenia un significado decisivo en la muerte de los afectados.

    El 28 de mayo de 1959 se concluyo con la investigacion ante la ausencia de un componente criminal. En la resolucion, Lev Ivanov concluyo que la tragedia ocurrio en la noche del 1 al 2 de febrero a partir de las ultimas fotografias de las cintas de los participantes de la excursion (visibles a continuacion).



    La investigacion establecio que la carpa se instalo subitamente y simultaneamente por todos los miembros de la excursion y que el retiro de la carpa se realizo de manera organizada. No hubo una huida de la carpa en condicion de panico y desorganizada:

    "La disposicion y la presencia de objetos en la carpa (casi todos los zapatos, todas las chaquetas, los objetos personales y los diarios) testimonian que la carpa fue dejada subitamente y de manera simultanea por todos los turistas. Ademas, como se establecio en el peritaje criminalistico posterior, el lado de la carpa en la direccion opuesta al viento (sotavento), hacia donde los turistas tenian dispuestas sus cabezas resulto rasgada desde dentro en 2 sectores, que permitia una salida comoda de una persona a traves de estos cortes.


    Mas abajo de la carpa, a una distancia de unos 500 metros habia en la nieve rastros de personas que iban desde la carpa tanto hacia el valle como hacia el bosque ... La revision de las huellas mostro que algunos de ellos iban casi descalzos (por ejemplo, con un calcetin de algodon), otros tenian una forma similar a una bota de fieltro, etc. Las rutas de las huellas iban cerca entre si, se acercaban y de nuevo se distanciaban de manera no significativa. Mas cerca de la frontera del bosque las huellas resultaron cubiertas por la nieve. Ni en la carpa ni cerca de ella se encontraron rastros de lucha o de presencia de otras personas".


    Esto fue confirmado por las pruebas del investigador Vasili Ivanovich Tempalov, quien trabajo en el lugar de la tragedia durante los primeros dias: "A los pies de la carpa, a unos 50-60 cm de nosotros, en la pendiente encontre 8 pares de huellas de personas que observe atentamente pero estaban deformadas por el viento y las variaciones de temperatura. No pude determinar una 9 huella, no existia. Las huellas fueron fotografiadas por mi. Se dirigian hacia abajo, desde la carpa. Las huellas me mostraron que las personas iban a paso normal hacia abajo por la montan-a. Las huellas eran visible solo por espacio de 50 metros, mas alla no existian puesto que mientras mas se bajaba por la monta-na habia mas nieve".

    En la sentencia se destaco que los excursionistas cometieron una serie de errores:

    "Al regresar al 31.I.1959, al valle del rio Auspiya y saber sobre las complejas condiciones del relieve de un altura 1079, hacia donde se disponian a ascender, Dyatlov como lider del grupo, cometio otro error que se expresaba en el hecho de que el grupo comenzo el ascenso el dia 1.II.59 solo a las 15:00.

    Posteriormente, y de acuerdo a la huella de sus skies, que se conservaban al momento de iniciarse la busqueda, se logro establecer que se desplazaban hacia el valle del 4to afluente del rio Lozva, es decir, se desplazaban 500-600 m mas hacia la izquierda y en vez de ir por el paso, formado por las cumbres 1790 y 880 ascendieron por la ladera oriental de la cumbre 1079. Ese fue el segundo error de Dyatlov".


    El grupo contaba con 2 alternativas: Desplazarse sin desvio alguno a lo largo del rio Lozva, tal como se acordo con los organos superiores o reducirla significativamente desplazandose a lo largo del rio Auspiya. El amateurismo de los lideres del grupo dice relacion con el hecho de que escogieron la ruta mas corta al Otorten. Ivanov, llamaria a la excursion del grupo de Dyatlov una iniciativa personal para destacar que el cambio de ruta fue el detonante de la tragedia.

    Al culpar en su resolucion, en dos ocasiones, al lider del grupo, Igor Dyatlov, por tomar decisiones equivocadas, el fiscal Ivanov buscaba destacar que la ruta escogida por los excursionistas, no era la acordada y, por consiguiente, no era conocida por las autoridades dejando caer toda la responsabilidad por la muerte del grupo en su lider.

    "Al utilizar el resto de la luz de dia en el ascenso a la cumbre 1079 en condiciones de fuerte viento, lo que resulta comun en esa region, y una temperatura muy baja, del orden de -25 a -30°C, Dyatlov se encontro en condiciones inapropiadas para pasar la noche y tomo la decision de instalar la tienda de campan-a en la ladera de la cumbre 1079 de modo de que a la man-ana del dia siguiente, y sin perder altura, pudiera partir a la montan-a Otorten, hasta la cual quedaba, en linea recta, cerca de 10 km".

    En consideracion de los hechos presentados en la sentencia se concluyo:

    "Considerando la ausencia en los cadaveres de heridas corporales externas y de sen-ales de lucha, la presencia de todas las pertenencias del grupo y, ademas, tomando en consideracion la conclusion del peritaje forense sobre las causas de muerte de los turistas se debe considerar que la causa de su fallecimiento fue un fenomeno de la naturaleza que no estuvieron en condiciones de superar" (Texto destacado mas abajo)

    Por otra parte, la oficina del Comite urbano de Sverdlovsk del PCUS en consideracion de las insuficiencias en la organizacion de la excursion y el debil control de la misma sancionaria a las siguientes autoridades:

    El director del UPI, N. S. Siunov, el secretario del buro del Partido, F. P. Zaostrovski, el presidente del comite del sindicato del UPI, V. E. Slobodin, el presidente del Soyuz ciudadano de las sociedades de voluntarios deportivos, V. F. Kurochkin, y el inspector del Soyuz, V. M. Ufimtsev.

    Adicionalmente, el presidente del consejo administrativo del club deportivo del UPI, Lev Semenovich Gordo, seria destituido de su cargo.

    Ivanov informo el resultado de la investigacion al 2do secretario del Comite provincial de Sverdlovsk, A. F. Eshtokin, quien con autorizacion del 1er secretario, A. P. Kirilenko, ordeno dejar la investigacion con la categoria de secreta, lo que finalmente no se concretaria.

    Despues de la revision de la investigacion judicial en Moscu por la Fiscalia de la Republica socialista federal sovietica de Rusia (RSFSR) la causa fue devuelta a Sverdlovsk el 11 de julio de 1959. Junto con esto la Fiscalia de la RSFSR despues de la revision de la causa no aporto ningun nueva informacion y no dio indicacion alguna de dar el caracter de secreto a la causa. 

    Por disposicion del fiscal de la provincia de Sverdlovsk, N. Klinov, la causa se conservo por algun tiempo en un archivo secreto (las fojas 370-377 de la causa, que contenian los resultados del peritaje radiologico, se entregaron a un sector especial) pero luego fue desclasificada y entregada al archivo de la provincia de Sverdlovsk donde se encuentra actualmente.

    Se afirma que se habria solicitado la reserva total de lo sucedido a todos los participantes de los grupos de busqueda durante un periodo de 25 an-os pero la verdad es que a nadie se le solicito ni nadie acordo algo semejante.

    Las autoridades prohibieron durante varios an-os visitar la region del accidente por grupos de excursionistas oganizados. 

    En cuanto a las fotografias de las camaras de los excursionistas quedaron en manos de Ivanov quien despues de analizarlas  permitio a Vadim Brusnitsyn y Yuri Yudin realizar fotos para los parientes de los fallecidos. De ese modo, surgieron colecciones de fotos de la excursion en manos de cercanos, rescatistas e investigadores del caso. Es decir, no hubo ningun secreto en torno a ellas. 

    Entre los objetos del grupo se encontrarian 4 camaras fotograficas marca Zorki, que fueron devueltas a los parientes de los fallecidos.

    El eco del accidente en la sociedad

    La muerte del grupo de excursionistas de Dyatlov sacudio a todo un pais. Se sabe que el mismo Nikita Xrushchev siguio personalmente el curso de la investigacion. 

    Para los medios de comunicacion de la epoca la historia fue inmediatamente prohibida pero se transmitio de boca en boca provocando temor entre las personas que hacian toda clase de suposiciones. Corrian rumores de que los chicos habian sido testigos involuntarios de la prueba de un arma secreta, por lo que fueron muertos por fuerzas especiales. Se sospechaba de reos fugitivos y de cazadores furtivos del Comite provincial del partido como tambien de cazadores comunes. Se hablaba incluso de la participacion de espias norteamericanos y hasta de OVNIs que sobrevolaron la zona. 

    A pesar de todo su dramatismo la muerte de la agrupacion no es un hecho unico ni para la epoca en que sucedio ni para el turismo deportivo, en general. La popularidad precisamente de este caso esta relacionada con la accion activa de amigos y cercanos de los fallecidos que aplicaron esfuerzos significativos para mantener el recuerdo de los fallecidos y de dar cobertura de prensa a las condiciones de la tragedia. Un rol no menor lo jugo ademas el desconocimiento de la principal causa de la tragedia: El motivo del abandono de la tienda.

    Tampoco debe obviarse que en la epoca no habia rescatistas profesionales en la composicion del grupo de busqueda, que incluida a bastantes representantes de club deportivo del UPI, es decir, estudiantes, amigos o conocidos de los fallecidos.

    Despues de 25 an-os tras el cierre de la causa sobre la muerte del grupo de Dyatlov podria habersela eliminado al cumplirse el periodo de conservacion de los documentos, sin embargo, el fiscal de la provincia, Vladislav Ivanovich Tuyskov  ordeno no hacerlo por la importancia publica que habia tenido alguna vez el caso lo que permitio conservar la investigacion en el archivo de la provincia de Sverdlovsk, ademas de manera integra. Hoy es posible acceder a la causa de manera restringida tras autorizacion de la fiscalia de la provincia de Sverdlovsk.

    El material de la causa nunca se ha publicado de modo integro, sin embargo, se puede acceder a copias de los materiales disponibles en diversos sitios de internet.

    Condiciones meteorologicas



    Junto con la grafica superior podemos considerar tambien un testimonio tomado el 6 de febrero a Vasili Andreevich Popov, jefe de la unidad de comunicaciones de la unidad forestal de Vizhay:

    " ... Los primeros dias de febrero de 1959, en la aldea de Vizhay hubo fuertes vientos. El viento levanto una gran masa de nieve y genero grandes acumulaciones de nieve, cubriendo sectores expuestos del camino a pesar de que practicamente no precipito nada. Yo vivo en la aldea de Vizhay desde 1951 y no recuerdo que hubiesen habido vientos tan intensos como los que vi en febrero de 1959".

    Con esa informacion se puede plantear el siguiente esquema meteorologico para el dia 2 de febrero:


    De acuerdo a este esquema (1 am del dia 2 de febrero en mapa de la izquierda y 7 am en mapa siguiente) ese dia se produjo un incursion de aire del Artico debido a fuertes vientos en la troposfera (la capa de la atmosfera mas cercana a la superficie terrestre) que desplazaron aire muy frio, y con bajo contendo de humedad, desde las costas del Mar de Barents (borde superior de los mapas) hasta el extremo norte de la provincia de Sverdlovsk (marcado con una estrella).

    Esos vientos intensos, usualmente ubicados entre 8-10 km de altura, cuando estan asociados a masas de aire muy frias en ocasiones penetran a niveles mas bajos de la troposfera incrementando el viento significativamente cerca de la superficie, 1-3 mil metros de altura y se ubican en el Hemisferio norte al sur de las areas de aire frio.

    Es decir, el rapido ingreso de un area de aire polar pudo haber producido vientos muy intensos y arrastre de nieve depositada en las montan-as de los Urales del norte desde el dia 1° y esa condicion deberia haberse debilitado el dia 2 en la tarde o el dia 3.


    En esta carta propuesta para el dia 2 de febrero a las 13 horas se puede apreciar que el aire del Artico dejo de avanzar mas al norte debido a la barrera orografica interpuesta por los Urales por lo que se estaciono en las regiones mas septentrionales, lo que probablemente, provoco la disminucion del viento en el area del accidente, cuando horas antes ya toda la agrupacion habia fallecido.

    Si se considera que los integrantes de la agrupacion Dyatlov se quejaron en su avance hacia el Otorten de que el invierno no habia sido tan frio, por lo que los rios solo presentaban capas parcialmente congeladas, que hacian mas complejo su desplazamiento se puede considerar que el fenomeno del dia 2 debe haber sido una situacion que tendio a regular termicamente un invierno, hasta entonces, mas calido en el norte de los Urales de ese an-o, 1959.

    Adicionalmente, las cartas de las 1 y las 7 horas permiten estimar la velocidad de desplazamiento del area de aire frio del Artico hacia los Urales en unos 60 km/h. Es decir, se puede considerar que en la noche del dia 1-2 de febrero de 1959 los expedicionarios de la agrupacion de Dyatlov escaparon de su tienda vestidos de manera no adecuada bajo temperaturas entre 20-30 grados bajo cero y con viento de 60 km/h, lo que provoco una sensacion de frio corporal en las partes expuestas al viento de hasta -60°C, circunstancia que permite entender con claridad porque los 9 expedicionarios murieron congelados.

    Explicaciones del accidente

    La no suposicion de una avalancha como causa de la muerte de la agrupacion ha generado un sinnumero de versiones explicativas de la tragedia de 1959, las que en total suman unas 65, las cuales se agrupan en causas vinculadas con un fenomeno natural, las menos, en el producto de una accion humana, la mayoria, y, tambien, como fruto de acciones sobrenaturales.

    Causas naturales

    Deslizamiento de una avalancha

    Esta version supone que la tienda quedo sepultada por una avalancha, luego de lo cual se mantuvo derrumbada por el peso de la nieve. Al evacuarla, los excursionistas rompieron un costado dado que permanecer en la carpa hasta el amanecer era imposible. Las acciones posteriores debido al sobreenfriamiento no fueron las mas adecuadas lo que definitivamente provoco la muerte de los turistas. Se considera que las severas lesiones recibidos por algunos excursionistas fueron producto de la avalancha.


    Se considera que una de las causas del deslizamiento de nieve fue el corte de la pendiente en el lugar de instalacion de la carpa lo que rompio la continuidad de la ladera y favorecio el deslizamiento de una capa de nieve endurecida hacia abajo mientras que los traumas de algunos de los excursionistas se explican por la carga de la gran masa de nieve debido a la accion de compresion entre los cuerpos y el fondo duro de la carpa.

    Esquema que plantea que los expedicionistas que recibieron fracturas estaban ubicados en el extremo norte de la tienda (frente a flechas rojas) dado el angulo en el deslizamiento del estrato de nieve endurecida por lo que hacia el medio y el extremo sur la nieve fue mas mullida y obstaculizo menor la salida de la tienda.

    El primero en plantear como causa del accidente una avalancha fue Moisey Abramovich Akselrod, maestro de deportes en excursiones. El considero que luego de la avalancha, que causo las lesiones de los excursionistas, estos intentaron encontrar el deposito de viveres y de otros elementos mientras cargaban tambien con los heridos pero en medio de la ventisca y la oscuridad se extraviaron. Sin embargo, el tampoco descartaba la presencia de un agente externo como detonante de la avalancha.

    Su version no soportaria los cuestionamientos a las que fue sometida, frente a los cuales no sabria como responder como el hecho de que la pendiente parecia insuficiente para permitir una avalancha, que la region no parecia presentar riesgo relevante de avalanchas, que las lesiones de algunos excursionistas eran tan graves que no les hubiesen permitido bajar por la ladera y que las huellas en la nieve daban a entender que todos bajaron en fila y de la mano. 

    Colapso de la carpa por un desplazamiento relativamente no significativo de nieve.

    Diversas variantes del deslizamiento de un estrato de nieve compactado que se desplazo hacia la tienda de la agrupacion, quebrandose en varias secciones.

    Las conclusiones de profesionales, tanto excursionistas como alpinistas, a pesar de algunas divergencias en las evaluaciones, en general, se reducen a que la instalacion de la tienda tras el cavado de una capa de nieve en una pendiente debil y en condiciones de tiempo que se volvieron complejas, con descenso de temperatura de 0°C a -30°C en el curso de la madrugada, pudieron permitir el deslizamiento de un estrato de nieve que impacto parcialmente la tienda y se partio en varios pedazos quedando alli estacionada.

    De acuerdo a sus partidarios la tienda resulto parcialmente cubierta por lo que luego de salir excavar algo de ella en la oscuridad y en condiciones de frio extremo y viento fuerte resultaba muy complejo.

    La nieve blanda de nuevo se desprendia ante los intentos de cavar en su interior, sin excluir un nuevo deslizamiento por la pendiente ni mencionar las lesiones que sufrieron ni el shock psicologico que permitio comprender que habia que abandonar la montan-a lo antes posible. Ademas, al encontrarse mal vestidos el permanecer por mucho tiempo en condiciones de muy baja sensacion termica era altamente riesgoso. Se debia buscar con urgencia un refugio que protegiera del viento y encender una fogata para intentar entibiarse. Precisamente, eso fue lo que intentaron hacer los miembros de la expedicion al dirigirse hacia abajo, hacia el bosque donde contaban con un deposito. Sin embargo, cometieron un error fatal, no bajaron por la pendiente correcta puesto que el deposito se encontraba en otro lado del paso lo que, seguramente, la agrupacion comprendio en el borde mismo del bosque. Despues de ello, dejaron a los heridos de mayor gravedad y algunos les dieron sus ropas mas gruesas a los mas fuertes para que partieran de regreso arriba, hacia la carpa donde murieron congelados.

    Pruebas en favor de la avalancha

    Se encontro una chaqueta junto a un corte del costado de la tienda que daba la impresion de que los miembros de la agrupacion la retorcieron con fuerza, con toda seguridad con las piernas, los brazos o la espalda cuando la tienda fue cubierta por la nieve para abrirse espacio al interior colapsado. 

    Ademas, las rajaduras de la tienda son una demostracion evidente de que la tienda fue aplastada por la nieve colapsando su unico acceso, situado a un costado. Ademas, para que se requerian esos cortes tan grandes, arrancar pedazos? Es evidente que para sacar con urgencia a los heridos, especialmente cuando hay que sacar heridos a la rastra.

    La linterna en la parte superior de la tienda sobre una capa de nieve es un signo indistinto de que sobre la tienda habia nieve cuando salieron de ella a traves de una rajadura.

    Por supuesto, los hechos mas importantes en favor de la avalancha son las lesiones de los excursionistas. Las lesiones evidentemente son de tipo compresiva, resultado de compresion por medio de una gran masa que se desplaza a poca velocidad. En caso contrario, los dan-os resultarian completamente distintos. Los efectos a gran velocidad provocan lesiones evidentes de los tejidos externos que no existieron. La rotura de la base del craneo de Tibo-Brinyol dice que su cabeza fue no solo comprimida por una carga determinada sino que, ademas, girada y desplazada lo que no pudo soportar la base del craneo.  Tampoco se le presto atencion a un rasgun-o con un cardenal en la superficie delantero interior de su hombro derecho, una lesion, a todas luces, consecuencia de su traslado en andas, sostenido por el lado del hombro.

    Las referencias a unos supuestos "expertos" que no encontraron rastros de avalanchas son infundadas.

    Los expertos Badrin, Baskin y Shuleshko de Moscu junto con el presidente de la Comision de rutas, Korolev estuvieron en el lugar del accidente solo del 5-8 marzo cuando la tienda habia sido ya retirada y la superficie habia sido vuelta a cavar en la busqueda de los fallecidos. Ya no podia haber alli rastros de avalancha en consideracion de la escala limitada de la misma.

    De acuerdo a la profesora y glaciologa de la Universidad estatal de Moscu, Natalya Andreeva Volodicheva fue el deslizamiento de un estrato de nieve recristalizada, el tipo de avalancha mas peligrosa, la mas probable causa del accidente de la agrupacion de Dyatlov de acuerdo a las caracteristicas de la pendiente y de la cubierta de nieve que sufrio durante algunas semanas diversos procesos de bruscas alzas y bajas de temperatura. Sus analisis y conclusiones las confirmaron otros especialistas ademas del hidrologo de los Urales, Klimenko, quien realizo una evaluacion del riesgo de avalancha en la noche del accidente  considerandolo como de riesgo medio.

    Segun los especialistas el riesgo de avalancha se incremento debido a 2 factores:

    La condicion de la capa de nieve.

    El corte profundo del estrato de nieve en el lugar de instalacion de la tienda.

    Asi se genero el desprendimiento de un estrato de hielo, cuyo gran peso, desplazandose a no gran velocidad, provoco graves lesiones debido a la capacidad de compresion debido al efecto martillo-yunque al apoyarse en el fondo duro de la tienda. 

    Gases volcanicos

    Esta version fue planteada en 2014 por el director de la unidad de traumotologia del hospital interprovincial de Kyshtym, Nikolay Tarasov, quien afirmo que el motivo de la muerte de la agrupacion fue envenenamiento por gases.

    El traumatologo estudio este caso por an-os y llego a la conclusion que en la noche del 1 al 2 de febrero los muchachos y muchachas resultaron intoxicados por gases mas pesados que el aire, en particular anhidrido carbonico y sulfuro de hidrogeno, ambas sustancias que resultan de la emanacion por fumarolas desde grietas y orificios ubicados en crateres, en pendientes y a los pies de volcanes.

    Segun Tarasov en el paso Dyatlov se conservaron muy bien las huellas de los rastros de los excursionistas pues debido a la actividad de los gases de las fumarolas el vapor de agua cubrio las huellas y se congelaron. Agrega que los excursionistas al principio se desplazaban por el sendero de los mansi pero delante de la montan-a la ruta de los pueblos aborigenes cambiaba bruscamente de direccion porque posiblemente los renos percibian con su olfato siempre algo inusual y decidian no seguir mas adelante por lo que cambiaban el rumbo de su desplazamiento.

    Esta version comenzo a surgir a partir de las palabras del fiscal de la ciudad de Ivdel, Vasili Tempalov, quien observando la montan-a desde un helicoptero afirmo: "-Alli cayeron cohetes, esta lleno de crateres de sus impactos. Yo soy artillero. Acaso seria capaz de equivocarme?"

    En su version, el traumatologo considera que los crateres no serian impactos de cohetes sino fruto de accion volcanica.

    Al comentar las palabras del fiscal el medico afirmo: "-En la ladera noreste del Xolat-Syaxyl* no se encontraron los crateres que menciona Tempalov. El no se referia a la ladera del Xolat-Syaxyl. No se debe olvidar que el investigador Lev Nikitich Ivanov tambien presto servicios en el frente como artillero y el no encontro huellas de esos crateres a pesar de que junto al coronel Ortyukov dedicaron bastante tiempo en el lugar para investigar el caso".
    *La elevacion en cuya ladera se encontro la tienda abandonada del grupo Dyatlov.

    "Mi version afirma que todo sucedio debido a la erupcion de un volcan inactivo. Esto explica los efectos luminosos, los destellos vistos por muchos durante los primeros dias de febrero, siendo vertidos de trozos de lava o de magma que se congelaban a la intemperie. Mucho mas probable es suponer que fueron esos trozos los que en vuelo cortaron las copas de decenas de abetos blancos y dejaron huellas carbonizadas. Aun mas, considerando que los arboles "decapitados" se encontraban lejos de los cuerpos de los fallecidos".

    "Los muchachos armaron su carpa en la pendiente oriental de la montan-a. Durante el sobrevuelo del territorio en el lado opuesto se encontraron compresiones con forma de crater. En sus diarios los participantes de la expedicion escriben sobre un penetrante viento del oeste. Los expertos forenses confirman sen-ales de de ligeros edemas toxicos en todos los fallecidos. Las lesiones las sufrieron quienes intentaron encaramarse a algun arbol y luego cayeron, perdiendo el conocimiento. De esa forma, sucedieron el ataque
              El enigma del caso Dyatlov (III parte)        
    Reconstruccion de los hechos de acuerdo a la version del deslizamiento de un estrato de nieve

    En la noche del 1-2 de febrero el grupo se establecio en la ladera de la montan-a. La carpa se enterro en la nieve para protegerse del viento lo que fracturo la capa de nieve facilitando su derrumbamiento con el brusco descenso de temperatura y el aumento de la intensidad del viento que se produjo durante la noche.

            Tienda al momento de su instalacion y, a continuacion, tras su colapso, por el deslizamiento de un estrato de nieve endurecida y que se desplazo mayormente por su costado norte.

    Tras la avalancha parte de los expedicionarios quedaron lesionados y para liberarse de la tienda aplastada y sacar a los heridos cortaron y rajaron la carpa. La agrupacion permanecio por algun tiempo enfrentando los fuertes vientos y el frio, ayudando a los afectados a recobrar el conocimiento e intentando sacar las cosas de la carpa cubierta de nieve pero apenas lograron sacar un par de chaquetas, una manta y un par de botas de fieltro, que fue con lo que pudieron vestirse por sobre la ropa con la que ya dormian.

    Se debe entender que la situacion despues de la avalancha y de retirar a los heridos era tan compleja que practicamente cualquier decision del grupo implicaba un riesgo mortal. Ademas, la capacidad del grupo habia resultado fuertemente socavada debido a la presencia de 3 heridos, a la destruccion de la tienda y a la incapacidad de extraer con urgencia sus pertenencias.

    Se requeria tiempo para salir de la tienda, para extraer a los heridos y que recobraran el sentido y para retirar algunas prendas de la tienda con las cuales abrigar a los heridos pero solo podrian sacar aquellas pertenencias que no estaban aplastadas por la tela de la tienda. Segun todas las evidencias todo esto tomo no menos de 20-30 minutos, por lo que todos comenzaron a congelarse expuestos al viento y al frio.

    Extraer las cosas de una tienda aplastada por la nieve era dificil, porque estaban aplastadas no solo por la nieve sino ademas por el genero de la tienda. La practica de otros accidentes muestra que esta tarea no es de las mas simples especialmente en consideracion de que las fuerzas eran extremadamente limitadas y que el frio alcanzaba al menos -28°C. Ademas de ser de noche soplaban vientos intensos por lo que la sensacion termica era inferior a 60° bajo cero.

    En esas condiciones el grupo o el cabecilla tomo la decision, espontanea o meditada, de partir inmediatamente hacia abajo llevando a los heridos para luego regresar a la tienda tras sus pertenencias y otros objetos.

    Aqui, sin duda, jugo un papel importante tambien algunos factores psicologicos que obligaron al grupo a actuar asi y no de otro modo. Algunas de esas razones son evidentes: El riesgo del deslizamiento de una nueva avalancha, el riesgo de rapido congelamiento de los heridos y de toda la agrupacion en un espacio abierto de la montan-a y el riesgo de la perdida de la capacidad de desplazarse de los heridos, en cuyo caso ellos podrias fallecer rapidamente en un lugar expuesto debido al frio incluso si vestian ropas gruesas.

    Lo serio de la situacion agudizo la incomprension, la indefinicion. Era incomprensible cual era el riesgo de una nueva avalancha, no se comprendia bien cuales eran las lesiones de la agrupacion y que riesgo contenian? En general, la presion de la situacion exigia llevar al grupo a un lugar sin riesgo y esta consideracion se impuso.

    Es claro que el descenso tambien se retraso por cuanto los heridos no podian desplazarse con rapidez. Tibo-Brinyol, evidentemente, fue llevado en andas.

    Los traumas, el frio, el viento y la oscuridad volvieron las acciones mas lentas por lo que no quedo ni tiempo ni energia para regresar a la tienda. Intentaron encender una fogata pero apenas lograron recolectar algo de len-a. Entonces, decidieron refugiarse en un lugar mas a salvo del viento y junto a un arroyo cercano hicieron una abertura en la nieve y pusieron sobre una cubierta de ramas a los lesionados para que se entibiaran entre si.

    Probablemente, el primero en morir fue Tibo-Briniol o Ludmila Dubinina, puesto que tenian lesiones muy graves. Dyatlov junto con otras dos personas tomaron la decision desesperada de regresar a la tienda tras sus equipos pero desplazarse a traves de la profundidad de la nieve les resultaria apenas por un corto tramo. Los fue consumiendo el agotamiento y el frio y al descansar, tendidos en la nieve, se quedaron dormidos para no despertar jamas.

    Tragedias similares se han producido en innumerables ocasiones. Asi murio un grupo de alpinistas en la cumbre del Victoria, en 1955, un equipo femenino en la cumbre del Lenin, en 1974, un grupo de turistas en el Elbrus, en la decada de los ´90 como tambien un grupo de expedicionistas de Chelyabinsk, en 2005. El cuadro general en todos esos accidentes es identico hasta en los mas pequen-os detalles: Alguien iba vestido muy bien abrigado mientras que los otros apenas llevaban ropa interior, o se desplazaban descalzos. Y al final el tragico desenlace: Siempre acciones confusas, no demasiado pensadas y las personas mueren derrotadas por el frio.

    La tragedia del grupo de Dyatlov se cubrio por rumores misticos debido a la falta de calificacion de los investigadores en temas especificos de excursiones, en formacion de avalanchas, en meteorologia y en medicina. La responsabilidad de los fiscales en esta situacion esta ausente. Ni siquiera son culpables los mismos fallecidos, incluyendo a Dyatlov. Ese tipo de expediciones se volvio popular en la URSS pero aun se encontraban en un periodo embrionario. No existia la experiencia actual  en ese tipo de expediciones ni conocimiento de porque y bajo que condiciones se producian accidentes. En 1959 en la Union Sovietica murieron 50 excursionistas y en 1960 mas de 100,a los que se sumarian cerca de 200 en 1962.

    Entrevistas con especialistas

    Experto forense Yuri Morozov

    Yuri Evseevich tomo conocimiento de los informes de los forenses que en 1959 analizaron los cadaveres y dividieron las actas post-mortem en 2 grupos. El primero consideraba a los fallecidos por de congelamiento y el segundo a los casos en que la muerte fue producto de lesiones.

    Igor Dyatlov, lider del grupo, 23 an-os.

    "Posicion del cadaver. El cadaver yace de espalda, los brazos estan doblados en los codos, los pun-os estan apretados contra el pecho. La cabeza del cadaver esta ligeramente inclinada hacia atras, las piernas estan dobladas ... Los pies estan doblados hacia dentro y estan en contacto con los pulgares".

    Morozov: Esta posicion es muy caracteristica para una muerte por congelamiento.

    -Existe la sospecha de varios especialistas de que Dyatlov murio con el abdomen hacia abajo pero que, por alguna razon, lo giraron dejandolo sobre su espalda.

    Morozov: Entonces las manchas del cadaver debian encontrarse tambien en la parte superior del cuerpo, pero en el acta de analisis del cadaver se dice que las manchas solo se encuentran en la parte posterior del cuello, del tronco y de las extremidades por lo que murio apoyado en su espalda.

    Yuri Doroshenko, 21 an-os

    Del acta del perito forense:

    "... Contusiones y heridas de la piel aplicadas por un objeto obtuso que, ademas, pudieron surgir producto de una caida sobre una piedra, hielo, etc. Ese tipo de lesiones se le produjeron tanto mientras seguia vivo como despues de fallecido... Ingirio alimento entre 6-8 horas antes de morir. No se encontro presencia de alcohol".

    Georgi Krivonishchenko, 23 an-os.

    "La muerte se produjo por congelamiento. Esto queda testimoniado por el edema de las meninges, la presencia de manchas en el cadaver ..."

    -Yuri Evseevich, los rescatistas afirmaron la presencia de una inusual color rojo de la piel en Doroshenko y otros fallecidos. Que significa eso? Podria ser producto de alguna accion quimica?

    Morozov: El color rojo de la piel se observa a menudo en los fallecidos por congelamiento. En cuanto a una posible accion de un quimico, la verdad es que no se realizaron analisis toxicologicos por lo que no podria decir nada al respecto.

    Rustem Slobodin, 23 an-os.

    "... En la piel de hueso temporal izquierdo en direccion hacia arriba y hacia abajo se encuentra una fisura del hueso con una diferencia entre los extremos de hasta 0,1 cm de largo, y un largo de la fisura de 6 cm. Los huesos de la base del craneo estan enteros".

    Morozov.: Esta fisura aislada pudo formarse por un golpe con un objeto duro y obtuso. Se pudo tratar de la caida sobre una piedra lisa. No se excluye que la fisura se formase tambien despues de la muerte. Si esta lesion fue causada en vida, entonces hubiesen quedado cardenales o rasmillones.

    -Pero si la lesion se produjo cuando vivia entonces cuanto podria vivir una persona con ella?

    Morozov: No es peligrosa para la vida porque no habia dan-o del cerebro.

    Lyudmila Dubinina, 20 an-os.

    "Sin ojos. Faltan los tejidos blandos del labio superior. La lengua en la cavidad bucal esta ausente... En el area del ventriculo derecho hemorragia de una dimension de 4x4 cm... Partes del hueso sublingual se encuentran inusualmente sueltas. Innumerables fracturas en ambos costados de las costillas, costillas derecha 2, 3, 4 y 5 e izquierdas 2, 3, 4,5 ,6 y 7. En los lugares de las fracturas hay hemorragias".

    Morozov: Son fracturas muy graves en las costillas de Lyuda Dubinina y que recibio mientras estaba viva. Ademas, no se trata solo de fracturas sino de deformaciones de la cavidad toracica.

    -Que significa eso?

    Morozov: Que el golpe fue de tal fuerza que las costillas se rompieron simultaneamente, como si alguien hubiese saltado con todas sus fuerzas sobre la cavidad toracica de Lyuda, cuando ella, por ejemplo, estaba tendida en la tienda.

    -Y con tales lesiones, podria ella haberse desplazado por su propia voluntad?

    Morozov: Si. Pudo moverse sola durante algunas horas porque las funciones vitales no se habian interrumpido.

    -Y que pasa, entonces, con la hemorragia en el corazon?

    Morozov: Supongo que no fue muy profunda, ya que, en el acta no se menciona su espesor y no se analizo con el microscopio. En todo caso, es una lesion muy grave.

    -Y la falta de ojos y lengua?

    Morozov: Se trata de dan-os posteriores a su muerte. Pienso que los responsables fueron roedores. Si hubiesen sido lesiones recibidas en vida hubiesen quedado hemorragias en la piel y en los tejidos blandos.

    -Pero en el acta se menciona el desplazamiento del hueso sublingual.

    Morozov: Usted quiere dar a entender que ella fue sofocada y la dan-aron el hueso sublingual? Dificilmente eso fue asi pues hubieran quedado cardenales en el cuello y no se menciona algo parecido en el acta.

    Semen Zolotarev, 37.

    "Faltan las cejas. Las orbitas estan abiertas. La muerte se produjo como resultado de innumerables fracturas de costillas junto a hemorragia internas. Las lesiones surgieron en vida como resultado de una gran fuerza en el area de la caja toracica. La muerte de Zolotarev fue violenta.

    Morozov: Estos dan-os pudieron formarse por un golpe con un objeto obstuso y duro en la mitad derecha de la cavidad pectoral. Los dan-os encontrados en la cabeza del cadaver, en particular la ausencia de globos oculares, son post-mortem y probablemente fueron producto de animales salvajes (zorros o aves). Sorprende que Zolotarev tuviese la segunda costilla fracturada, pues se trata de la costilla tras la clavicula y fracturarla no es tan simple. Se puede suponer que le cayo desde arriba algo muy pesado. Debe destacarse que las costillas de las personas jovenes son completamente elasticas por lo que frente a los golpes se doblan. Romperlas solo sucede, por tanto, a traves de una accion muy violenta.

    Nikolay Tibo-Briniol, 23

    "Fractura por presion en la zona del hueso temporal derecho de 9x7 cm. El area indicada del hueso fue presionada contra la cavidad craneana... una fractura conminuto... La fractura anterior se produjo antes de morir y fue resultado de la accion de una gran fuerza y una caida posterior, o un salto.

    Morozov: A Nikolay Tibo, de acuerdo al acta forense, se le produjo un TEC en vida. Cuanto tiempo puede sobrevivir una persona con ese tipo de lesion ahora es dificil de explicarlo. Se trato de un golpe de gran fuerza, que le pudo ocasionar perder la capacidad de desplazarse. Sin embargo, hay ocasiones en que la gente a pesar de tener ese tipo de heridas no pierden su capacidad para acciones conscientes. No se excluye que Tibo pudiera moverse, a pesar del trauma, por algun tiempo.

    -Pudieron ser estas lesiones post-mortem producto de la presion de la nieve, por ejemplo?

    Morozov: No, porque en en el area en que se produjeron se encontraron hemorragias.

    Ademas, me llama la atencion cierta falta de logica, la presencia de confusion en el actuar del grupo. Por que al salir de la carpa nadie intento salir a traves de la salida de la tienda? Estaba obstruida? Y por que no tomaron consigo ropas abrigadas? Por que no encendieron una gran fogata encontrandose en el bosque... Bueno, y aun otros detalles.

    Ese comportamiento del grupo se puede explicar por alguna falla del sistema nervioso central, que provoca alteraciones en la consciencia. Esto puede ser producto de intoxicacion o de factores que desconocemos. Ese comportamiento es propio de ebriedad o envenenamiento. Por eso llama la atencion de que la causa no contemplo analisis toxicologicos de los peritos.

    -Pero en las actas se afirmo que no habia presencia de ebriedad alcoholica.

    Morozov: Claro, pero junto con ello no se anexan los resultados de los analisis de laboratorio, lo que arroja dudas.

    -Existe la version de que no muy lejos de la carpa pudo caer una etapa de un cohete con combustible de heptil. Es posible que se hubiesen intoxicado con heptil, que se hubiesen sofocado y comportado como ebrios?

    Morozov: Pero es que es una version que ahora es imposible de confirmar. Los gases volatiles desaparecen rapidamente del organismo. Una exhumacion no ayudaria. Sin embargo, tampoco hay datos como para refutar esta teoria.

    Comentario de un especialista en caza

    Andrey Dorofeev, inspector de gobierno del servicio de conservacion del mundo animal de la provincia de Irkutsk:

    Pudieron haber sido ratones las que dejaron a los expedicionarios sin ojos y lengua. Un cadaver, que se encuentra varios meses en la nieve se transforma en su botin y lo primero que tienen al alcance de sus dientes son los ojos, las mejillas y la lengua. La mandibula estaba abierta por lo que para los ratones fue facil ingresar. Arrancar los ojos no es algo que un raton pueda realizar, pero hacerse con los tejidos blandos no les resulta complejo. Un oso podria dan-ar los huesos del rostro pero no es este el caso. Un gloton (especie de marta) tambien podria roer los huesos fruto de lo cual podria quedar muy poco del cadaver.

    Entrevista con un responsable de la investigacion judicial en 1959

    Evgeni Fedorovich Okishev tiene 94 an-os y vive fuera de Rusia. En 1959  era vice-director de la Unidad de investigacion de la Fiscalia de la provincia de Sverdlovsk.

    Okishev: Cuando quedo claro que los turistas habian muerto organizamos un grupo de investigacion bajo direccion del fiscal criminalista Lev Ivanov y que era supervisado por mi. Al revisar la tienda de campan-a con sus cortes y sus restos de comida en el interior nos quedo la impresion de que los muchachos habian comenzado a cenar y de un momento a otro habian entrado en panico lo que los forzo a huir hacia el exterior.

    Entonces comenzamos a dilucidar de que tipo de paso* se trataba y logramos saber que se trataba de un lugar sagrado para los mansi en el cual se prohibia la presencia de mujeres en tanto que entre los excursionistas habia dos de ellas. Por eso al principio comenzamos a sospechar de los mansi aunque pronto quedo descartado.
    *Se refiere al Paso en la montan-a, cerca del cual se levanto la tienda, hoy llamado Paso Dyatlov.

    -Y como fue que analizaron esta version y a partir de que la descartaron?

    Okishev: Yo llame al fiscal de la region de Ivdel y le pedi contactar a algun mansi que supiera leer y escribir, con el cual fuera posible conversar. Cuando llegue a Ivdel ante solicitud del fiscal habian llegado 3 mansi, entre los cuales habia una persona competente, diputado del Soviet de la region. yo reserve para ellos en Ivdel 3 habitaciones en un hotel, pero se rehusaron y fueron a pasar la noche en la calle, en la nieve junto con perros. El diputado me dijo: "Yo, incluso, voy a las sesiones del Soviet de la provincia con perros y duermo con ellos porque no puedo acostumbrarme en un lugar cerrado". Cuando comenzamos a hablar con los mansi sobre sus costumbres el me dijo que el lugar donde murieron los excursionistas no era para nada sagrado, pero si lo era la presencia en el de una persona rusa. Decia que trataban de acercarseles e incluso de invitarlos porque les parecia que traia suerte en la vida. Me quedo completamente claro por su conducta que decia la verdad. Despues de esta conversacion la version de un ataque de parte de los mansi se derrumbo por si sola. Quedaba entonces la version del panico. Era interesante que en el bosque bajo el cedro encontraron a dos personas que por alguna razon no pudieron encender una fogata, como quedaba atestiguado por la gran cantidad de fosforos quemados desparramados alli.

    -Usted recuerda con precision que alli habia fosforos quemados?

    Okishev: Claro y los fosforos aparecian tambien en el acta de la inspeccion del lugar de los hechos.

    -Pero despues de un mes no tenian que estar cubiertos por la nieve?

    Okishev: Yo creo en el acta.

    -Por que en la busqueda de los excursionistas tomaron parte militares?

    Okishev: Nosotros mismos les pedimos que nos ayudaran. Esto se hizo con un gran proposito. Nosotros interrogamos a un trabajador de uno de los campamentos del norte, quien indico que cuando regresaba a su casa junto a su esposa desde el cine vieron al caer la noche destellos que les llamaron la atencion y que venia desde el lugar donde desaparecieron los excursionistas.  Ademas, hubo otras personas de la localidad que confirmaron este hecho. Todos estos testimonios quedaron registrados en el acta. Entonces nos surgio la duda: No habra alli algun poligono militar? O tal vez el lanzamiento fallido de algun cohete mato a los excursionistas?

    -Pero esta acta no aparece en la causa penal. Y que sucedio despues?

    Okishev: El grupo de militares llego al lugar bajo el mando del coronel Artyukov, si no me equivoco. Hable con el y le me convencio de que no habia ningun objeto, ningun cohete volando por la zona. Sin embargo, nos puso en alerta que cuando se encontraron en mayo los ultimos cuerpos se dio la orden de que todos los objetos encontrados en el paso se debian enviar a examenes de radiacion. Y ademas todos nuestros funcionarios, que trabajaban con estas cosas de la tienda y en otros lugares, fueron tambien obligados a que se examinaran sus niveles de radiacion. Asi se hizo aunque sin informarse de los resultados. Entonces, comenzamos de nuevo a sospechar que en el paso podria haberse realizado alguna prueba militar secreta. Enviamos una carta firmada por el fiscal de la region a un general o, no recuerdo bien, al fiscal de la republica para comprender que estabamos investigando y de que forma estaba relacionado con radiacion? No se habria realizado alguna prueba de armamento que podia desconocer incluso la circunscripcion militar de los Urales? Como respuesta a nuestra carta recibimos la visita del suplente del fiscal de la Federacion rusa, el camarada Urakov quien ordeno decirles a todos que los excursionistas habian muerto a consecuencia de de un hecho fortuito. Ante todas nuestras preguntas directas sobre la prueba de un arma Urakov guardo simplemente silencio. Es decir, no refuto nuestra version, simplemente callo. Pero lo principal es que Urakov no demostro ningun interes en el curso de nuestras investigaciones creando la impresion de que estaba al tanto de toda la situacion. Tomo la causa y se la llevo consigo. Alli termino nuestra investigacion. Imaginese que en pleno curso de la investigacion, cuando se habian encontrado los cadaveres con lesiones incomprensibles se confisco nuestra investigacion! Y yo recuerdo que cuando firmabamos la carta del fiscal de la region, Klinov, el comenzo a dudar: Quiza revisen aun eso y eso otro? Nosotros hablamos de que si la direccion rechaza la version militar entonces habria que revisar las restantes. Nosotros lo convencimos y el firmo la carta. Moscu, lo repito, nunca refuto nuesta version sobre una prueba militar.

    -Usted piensa que Urakov les ordeno a todos decir que se trataba de un accidente?

    Okishev: Se trataba, evidentemente, de una orden del Comite central del PCUS.

    -Piensa que tal vez la KGB, u otra estructura similar, realizo junto con ustedes una investigacion paralela?

    Okishev: Creo que lo hacian pero no fui informado al respecto. Los agentes de la KGB debian forzosamente ocuparse de este asunto. Existia esa practica. Yo sospecho que entonces, cuando nos devanabamos los sesos intentando explicar los hechos ellos sabian ya mucho mas dadas todas sus capacidades.

    -Nosotros, recientemente, nos comunicamos por telefono con el entonces jefe de la Unidad de investigacion de la KGB de la provincia de Sverdlovsk y nos respondio que "Claramente no nos ocupamos de ese asunto" aunque la verdad es que rehuso darnos una entrevista.

    Okishev: Saquen ustedes sus propias conclusiones, por que rehuso encontrarse con ustedes si la KGB no se ocupo del tema? Acaso se le dificulta decir esto abiertamente? Posiblemente, su unidad no se ocupo de este asunto pues es un trabajo de los agentes del comite. Se trata de una labor secreta y su interlocutor no tiene derecho de contarles al respecto.

    Si se considera que la causa de la tragedia fue alguna prueba militar el asunto quedo en manos de la KGB desde un principio. Y ellos rapidamente establecieron que un avion, supongamos, no arrojo alli una bomba. Y esta verguenza se debe ocultar. Y entonces, posiblemente, los cadaveres mas lesionados los enterraron en la nieve a 4 metros considerando que mientras los buscaban se podia inventar algo. Pero la causa se la entregaron a la fiscalia civil que, por indicacion de Urakov, todo lo considera como un accidente ...

    Aqui se puede suponer muchas cosas, pero no lo hare sin tener pruebas.

    -Los testigos afirman que cuando encontraron los ultimos cuerpos el juez instructor Ivanov cambio bruscamente. Pudo esto pudo tener relacion con la indicacion de Urakov de vincularlo todo con un accidente?

    Okishev: No lo se. Nuestro relacion con Ivanov era entonces muy dificil. Recuerdo que los padres de los fallecidos entraron a mi oficina, otros gritaban y nos llamaban fascistas porque les escondiamos la verdad. Yo por las noches no dormia debido a sus acusaciones. Pero no les podia decir nada fuera de las indicaciones de la jefatura. Imaginese usted una situacion en que llega a una cita el padre o la madre, lloran, dicen que murio su unico hijo o u unica hija y se dice que usted no quiere resolver nada y que todo lo vincule con un accidente. Digame, entonces, de que accidente se trataba. Nosotros deciamos: Quiza un terremoto, un huracan o todo junto... Y que podriamos decir si no sabiamos nada? Los padres apelaban a todas las instancias, creo que hasta al mismo Xrushchev, exigiendole continuar con la investigacion. Sin embargo, la causa fue cerrada y no por iniciativa nuestra.

    -Muchos destacan el inusual color rojo en la piel de los fallecidos.

    Okishev: Si, tenian un color inusual. Ivanov me informo al respecto. El habia combatido en la guerra y era criminalista, habia visto a muchas personas congeladas, pero nunca habia visto algo parecido.

    -Que pudo haber pasado, entonces?

    Okishev: Estoy casi seguro despues de todos los peritajes, especialmente despues del peritaje radiologico que se realizo por orden superior, que alli se realizo la prueba de un arma secreta o se produjo el lanzamiento fallido de un cohete. Entonces, entre los Estados Unidos y la Union Sovietica se habia firmado un acuerdo que prohibia la prueba de armas nucleares y la reduccion de su produccion. Habia, entonces, que crear algo distinto pero igualmente poderoso. Y puede ser que debido a la confidencialidad de las pruebas se realizo en poligonos no conocidos. Quiza, los muchachos se vieron atrapados en una prueba y por eso recibieron ese tipo de lesiones de los fragmentos de un cohete o de algo parecido.

    -Claro, el perito forense Vozrozhdenni afirmo que ese tipo de lesiones pudieron haber ocurrido solo de un golpe con un automovil. Pero si, consideramos, de los fragmentos de un cohete, donde quedaron esos fragmentos?

    Okishev: Los pudieron recoger militares.

    -Donde pudieron quedar los libros de notas de otros turistas? Y ademas varios rollos de fotos de los turistas?

    Okishev: Ud. me pone en una posicion incomoda pues debo revelar mis metodos de trabajo. Todo puede ser. Pudieron tomar los documentos y los objetos. Todo lo que se menciona en la version es incomodo para nuestra direccion y pudo haber sido destruido.

    -Pero al mismo tiempo en la carpa aparecieron algunos rollos no revelados que tomaron ustedes. Los militares o quien fuera no podrian haberles dejado los rollos en los cuales podria haber habido imagenes de pruebas de armamentos.

    Okishev: Probablemente no recibieron ordenes de hacerse con los rollos. Para ellos era importante pruebas evidentes como fragmentos pero tambien podria haber influido la prisa y el descuido de parte de ellos.

    -Es posible que los empleados de la KGB manipularan los rollos haciendo pasar por no reveladas fotos que ya habian sido reveladas y manipuladas?

    Okishev: Yo no se en que medida es eso tecnicamente posiblemente pero si creo en el hecho de que los trabajadores del Comite* en esos an-os eran capaces de hacer milagros. Le contare una situacion de ese mismo an-o 1959 cuando Richard Nixon visito la URSS y estuvo en Sverdlovsk. Alli dijo que queria visitar la construccion de la Central hidroelectrica-atomica Beloyarskaya. Todos estabamos muy confundidos. Incluso yo y otras altas autoridades no sabiamos que existia, y resulta que Nixon lo sabia. Que ibamos a hacer, entonces? Finalmente, se lo permitimos con el permiso de Moscu asi que el junto a un sinnumero de periodistas partieron alli. La gente de la KGB se las ingenio para que ningun periodista pudiera fotografiar nada. No se como con sus cuerpos cubrieron todo o que cosa inventaron. Nixon tambien era un amante de la fotografia y no le podias tapar el objetivo y el fotografio alli muchas cosas secretas. Esa misma noche convencieron a Nixon de visitar un sauna ruso en el que todos eran miembros de la KGB, y mientras estaba alli junto con ellos los otros velaron sus fotos.
    *Se refiere al Comite de seguridad gubernamental, es decir, la KGB.

    -Dicen que en los ´50 despues de sacar a la guardia Berievskaya los miembros de la KGB terminaron siendo solo gente sin experiencia y asustadiza.

    Okishev: Claro, habia entre ellos tambien militares con bajo nivel educacional pero tambien habia bastantes agentes especiales.

    -Existe la opinion de que si hubiese habido algun ocultamiento de los hechos en el paso entonces hubiera participado mucha gente y alguno de ellos, en alguno momento, hubiese hablado, lo que nunca sucedio.

    Okishev: Y usted sabe, acaso, por ejemplo, del destino de los soldados que tomaron parte en los trabajos de busqueda? Yo personalmente no lo se. Donde esta, por ejemplo, el coronel Artyukov?

    -Segun nuestros informes el moriria pronto de cancer?

    Okishev: Saque usted, entonces, sus conclusiones.

    Entrevista con un experto en avalanchas

    Una de las versiones sobre la muerte de los excursionistas habla de una avalancha de nieve que rodo sobre la tienda y forzo a los muchachos a huir. La siguiente es una entrevista con un especialista de nieve y avalanchas, PhD y docente de la catedra de Criolitologia y glaciologia de la Facultad de geografia de la Universidad estatal de Moscu, Viktor Vladimirovich Popovnin.

    Popovnin: Yo supe por primera vez de la muerte del grupo de Dyatlov  a mediados de los ´80. Se comentaba en nuestros circulos porque habia sucedido algo parecido tambien en Abxaziya. Alli, un grupo de espeleologos habia partido en invierno a las montan-as y tambien se habia perdido en la region de la cueva Snezhnoe, donde se encuentra una de las mas grandes cuevas de hielo. Se perdio toda comunicacion con el grupo y partieron los rescatistas quienes encontraron la tienda cubierta bajo la nieve, que estaba abierta y vacia. Los cadaveres se encontraron no muy lejos. Recuerdo vagamente sobre esa tragedia dado que paso hace mucho tiempo y conozco la historia solo por relatos de personas pero tengo presente que estaban practicamente desnudos. Aparentemente se encontraban en sus sacos de dormir o semicubiertos por ellos pero lo principal era que por alguna razon estaban fuera de la tienda. En un principio todos pensaron que se trataba de una avalancha.

    -Cuantas personas habia alli?

    Popovnin: No se con precision pero no 2 ni 3, sino mas. Por cuanto estas 2 historias evidentemente tienen cierta semejanza yo le preste atencion a la tragedia del grupo de Dyatlov pues son muchisimas las analogias.

    -Y que pudo pasar con el grupo de Abxazia?

    Popovnin: Segun los relatos verbales puedo concluir que no se parecia a una avalancha.

    -Y hubo una investigacion?

    Popovnin: No lo se.

    -En relacion al grupo de Dyatlov segun una de las innumerables versiones se trataria de una pequen-a avalancha. Usted ha estudiado cuan correcto es eso considerando que la tienda seguia en pie?

    Popovnin: No es similar a una avalancha clasica tomando en consideracion las fotografias de la tienda y la inclinacion de la pendiente. Si una avalancha cubre una tienda junto con quienes estan en su interior entonces simplemente no pueden escapar. Podria haber otra explicacion. Analizando la informacion meteorologica, ese dia habia descendido fuertemente la temperatura. Veamos las fotos que se hicieron la noche anterior, cuando ellos levantaron la tienda. Estaba ventoso, el viento arrastraba nieve.

    Al menos se observan claramente cordones de nieve, sectores de nieve congelada compactados, semejantes a pequen-os peines encorvados y pequen-os microrelieves de nieve. Esto significa que la capa nivosa superior ya se habia transformado en lo que se conoce como placa de nieve, es decir, en nieve mas densa bajo la cual permanecia nieve granulosa (blanda). Como resultado de la brusca caida de temperatura la capa de nieve pudo agrietarse e inestabilizarse en la pendiente y asi surgir una avalancha. 

    Pero la pendiente aqui no era muy significativa, cercana a 15°*. Sucede a veces que se desencadena una avalancha con pendientes de 14-15° pero son de menor importancia. Si con esa pendiente la capa pierde estabilidad no puede desplazarse muy lejos. Pero recordemos que los muchachos levantaron su tienda luego de haber cortado la capa, por lo que ellos mismos pudieron involuntariamente haberla provocado, facilitando el desplazamiento de un estrato de nieve desde un sector adyacente, de mayor altura en la pendiente luego de lo cual alcanzo la tienda. Este desplazamiento de una capa a consecuencia del movimiento pudo ser poco significativo en cuanto a distancia, no se acelero sino que simplemente se movio un poco. Ademas, la tienda estaba dispuesta a lo ancho de la pendiente y la capa en movimiento pudo ejercer influencia mecanica solo en un sector. Por ello, quienes por infortunio se encontraban en aquella parte de la tienda a la cual ingreso la capa pudieron resultar heridos, recibiendo fracturas debido al desplazamiento de esta lamina de hielo.
    *Afirmacion errada pero que en algun momento se manejo como cierta, pues la pendiente iba de 20-25°

    Preste atencion al curioso eje en forma de arco de la foto de Brusnitsyna, que en el campo visual de la foto comienza a observar la tienda aproximadamente en linea con el esqui vertical derecho, mas alla coincide con el extremo aguzado del baston clavado y sale hacia la izquierda en el cuadro a nivel de la mitad del esqui izquierdo. El arco del terraplen sube en alguna parte hacia el centro de la tienda o mas cerca hacia su extremo mas lejano y puede marcar completamente el flanco derecho del limite inferior del bloque de nieve que se habia deslizado. El terraplen se constituye de fragmentos alzados de la lamina de nieve por el frente de desplazamiento de la capa, una especie de tempano de hielo de nieve. Si eso no es asi entonces resulta comprensible porque resultaron lesionadas personas que yacian en el extremo mas lejano de la tienda y porque el poste de la entrada mas lejana se quebro y el mas cercano no.

    -Realmente un deslizamiento de una capa de nieve pudo, por ejemplo, romperle la cabeza a Nikolay Tibo-Brinyol y a otros excursionistas romperles las costillas?

    Popovnin: La pregunta sobre las lesiones no se puede responder de una sola forma. Una avalancha le causa a sus victimas toda clase de lesiones graves y mortales. A un conocido mio una avalancha casi le arranco una pierna. Pero en caso del grupo de Dyatlov a ese deslizamiento de nieve no se le puede llamar avalancha en un sentido canonico. Por eso no se puede afirmar con certeza que las lesiones fueron provocadas por el deslizamiento de un estrato de nieve a pesar de que es una causa verosimil. 
    En el caso de las avalanchas clasicas las personas se lesionan con su incorporacion a su movimiento o por la accion de golpe de la onda de choque de aire mientras que en el avance sobre la tienda de un estrato de nieve el rol principal lo juega el peso de la nieve que ingresa. No es necesario considerar que esto es una tonteria. La verdad es que si, supongamos, ingresa a la tienda una capa de 50 cm de espesor desde una porcion no significativa del campo de nieve, con una dimensiones de solo 10 x 10 metros, entonces el peso de este bloque depositado con bordes puntiagudos, incluso considerando una densidad de la nieve no muy alta, de 0,3 gr/cm3, alcanza 15 toneladas, lo que es 50% mas que el peso de un autobus internacional Irakus-250! Imaginese, entonces, que le pasaria a usted si esta acostado en una tienda y le cae un autobus! Bajo la accion de ese peso se puede dañar seriamente cualquier objeto duro dentro de la tienda, una camara fotografica, una linterna. A fin de cuentas una persona puede, simplemente, comprimirse encima de uno de los esquies situados sobre el suelo de la tienda (alli a menudo se instalan cuando se instala una tienda en la nieve) y el resultado sera muy lamentable.

    -Y en la historia con avalanchas sucedio algo similar, que las personas resultaron deformadas al interior, precisamente, de la tienda?

    Popovnin: Las catastrofes por avalanchas suceden con alpinistas en las montan-as muy a menudo, sin embargo, no podria decir con precision que hubo situaciones similares con la penetracion de una capa de nieve sobre una tienda.

    -Si incluso se supone que la capa de nieve realmente lesiono a algunas personas pero pudo esto espantar tanto a los muchachos  que salieron huyendo a 1 km y medio de la tienda sin siquiera arriesgarse a coger sus zapatos? Ellos deben haber visto que ya no habia mas nieve que cayera sobre ellos, por lo que podrian haberse vestido...

    Popovnin: Yo tampoco lo entiendo. Se trataba de un grupo experimentado de excursionistas. Cuando se trata de novatos podrian asustarse en las montan-as pero ellos eran personas fuertes psicologicamente.

    -Y en relacion a las huellas bien conservadas, como pudo suceder eso?

    Popovnin: La verdad es que las huellas se conservan por largo tiempo.

    -Entonces si se formo una capa de hielo deberian hacerse conservado las huellas?

    Popovnin: Exactamente eso sucede. El pie presiona una capa de nieve helada sin mucha fuerza y deja una pequen-a cavidad. Todas estas perturbaciones de la cubierta de nieve se reconocen por bastante tiempo y se conservan en el microrrelieve nivoso. Tengo un esplendido ejemplo de una ocasion en que recorri en skies un glaciar en la Patagonia y al regresar un mes mas tarde seguia la impresion de mis skies a pesar de que tras todo ese tiempo habia habido tanto derretimiento de nieve como ventiscas!! 

    Para mi resulta extran-o que se hable de huellas con impresiones dactilares que se conservaron despues de la caida de nieve. En las fotos que aparecen en internet es como si aparecieran impresiones dactilares de los dedos de los pies. Pero eso pudo ser resultado de un arrastre selectivo realizado por el viento que provoco pequen-as asperezas en el fondo de las cavidades, con los granulos de nieve. Con una cierta dosis de fantasia se los puede considerar como huellas de dedos. Por eso yo no estoy seguro de que en las huellas los rescatistas encontraron precisamente huellas dactilares.

    -Interesante! Hay muchas suposiciones de que alli habia tambien mas gente que forzo a salir de la tienda a los turistas o que aparecieron alli despues de la muerte de los turistas. Y entonces resulta que estas podrian ser incluso huellas de personas que nos resultan desconocidas. Como fuera, la naturaleza esculpio estas huellas para hacerlas aparecer como rastros de pies desnudos...

    Popovnin: Podrian haber sido huellas de los excursionistas pero quiero reiterar que las huellas que vemos en las fotografias no se pueden interpretar univocamente como huellas de pies desnudos. En relacion a la presencia de otras personas, si estuvieron alli, entonces porque no se observan otras huellas, que surjan desde el costado?

    -Para nosotros tambien resulta extraño que se conservaran solo estas huellas? Ademas, que los muchachos tambien salieron de la tienda. Debian tambien dejar huellas en torno a la tienda. De acuerdo al testimonio de los rescatistas las huellas comenzaban solo a varios metros de la tienda.

    Popovnin: Si ellos salieron desde los cortes hechos en la tienda entonces debieron las huellas debieron surgir de inmediato desde alli. La tienda en ese caso es un obstaculo para el flujo del viento y de la nieve. 

    Debido a que el perfil de descenso por el bosque tiene forma escalonada en algunas partes se ven las huellas y en otras no. La verdad es que la capa de nieve helada en algunos lugares estaba dura dado que pudo sostener el peso de un pie pero habia tambien bastantes acumulaciones de piedras asi que la discontinuidad de las huellas no me sorprende.

    -Pero si se supone que se acercaron algunas personas y expulsaron a los excursionistas y luego esas personas se fueron entonces sus huellas tambien deberian haber quedado marcadas?

    Popovnin: Claro, las huellas de esas personas, cuando se dirigian hacia la tienda, debieron haber quedado impresas. El problema es que los primeros que llegaron al lugar eran investigadores sin experiencia por lo que pudieron dejar pasar detalles y podrian incluso haber notado solo huellas en una sola direccion y no haber prestado atencion a otros rastros.

    -Pero la verdad es que los investigadores tampoco vieron huellas de los excursionistas yendo hacia la tienda. Por lo tanto, quedaron cubiertas por la nieve por lo que las huellas de otras personas tambien podrian haber quedado cubiertas por la nieve.

    Popovnin: En sus reflexiones hay un error logico. Los chicos se desplazaron en skies por la capa de nieve helada por eso no podrian haber quedado marcas y si hubiesen quedado marcas serian discontinuas.

    -Pero tambien otras personas pudieron llegar en skies.

    Popovnin: Es una posibilidad, que llegaran en skies y se fueran en ellos.

    -La pregunta no entra en su ambito profesional sino que es mas bien de la montan-a. Hay en el paso algunos obstaculos en los cuales se forman torbellinos y sopla el viento de manera inusual. Hay una teoria de que ese viento pudo generar infrasonidos que pudieron hacer perder la cordura a los excursionistas.

    Popovnin: La verdad es que hay una frecuencia caracteristica que, realmente, influye fisiologicamente para generar sensacion de panico en las personas. Yo, recuerdo, tenia un despertador hecho en el extranjero. Hacia algo de ruido pero su zoomer estaba dispuesto en una frecuencia de autooscilacion del organismo humano por lo que despertaba instantaneamente y totalmente agitado. Pienso que la pregunta del infrasonido habria que estudiarla con seriedad. Aunque me deja muchas dudas que una desviacion psicomotora temporal como un despertar catatonico, y de todos a la vez, pudiese provocar tales lesiones fisicas.

    El hijo de Nikita Xrushchev

    -Los veteranos del tema del accidente de la agrupacion de Dyatlov afirman que la investigacion de la tragedia estuvo bajo control del mismo Nikita Sergeevich Xrushchev (imagen siguiente). Luego la investigacion concluyo y la causa judicial quedo bajo el sello de secreta. Por ello se creo la impresion de que los excursionistas resultaron victimas inocentes de la prueba de algun arma secreta. Quiza alli cayo un cohete y los muchachos resultaron envenenados por gases emanados del combustible del cohete. Quiza por error se precipito alli algun arma. Tal vez Ud. conozca la razon de esta tragedia?


    Xrushchev: Si, algo he leido del tema pero no conozco la solucion a este enigma. Un cohete con gases de heptilo no podria haber volado hasta esa zona porque en 1959 los cohetes despegaban desde Tyurtam o desde Kapustin Yar. Los lanzaban a Kazaxstan por lo que no pasaban por el norte de los Urales.

    -Usted habla como especialista, como PhD experto en cohetes.

    Xrushchev: Especialista que sabe hacia donde lanzaban los cohetes P-12, P-14. Los disparaban a 
    Kazaxstan, es decir, no podian caer al norte de los Urales. Volaban muchisimo mas al sur.
    Ahora si estaba la investigacion o no bajo control de Nikita Sergeevich no lo se. Pero que estuviese bajo su control no significa necesariamente que hubiese estado bajo su control personal. Podria haber estado a cargo algun ayudante o alguna otra persona mas. Tambien puede ser que se exagere.

    -Su padre nunca le dijo algo al respecto?

    Xrushchev: No. Casos como ese eran innumerables. Y en ese tiempo todo adquiria el sello de secreto. 

    Le dire como especialista que nosotros preferiamos darle el sello de secreto a todo porque los documentos secretos tenian un lugar donde conservarse, la primera seccion, donde estaba todo ordenado y podia conservarse en el tiempo.

    -Se trataba de la KGB?

    Xrushchev: Y por que la KGB? En cada establecimiento hay una I seccion. Alli se conservan documentos, habian archivos. Siempre los encontraba, los tomaba. En cambio, los documentos que no eran secretos andaban por cualquier lado, siempre se perdian. Por lo tanto, recuerdo que todo lo que podiamos lo dejabamos bajo el sello de secreto. Por eso volver algo secreto no significaba nada de misterioso.

    -Digame como especialista si Ud. escucho de esta historia y que podria haber sucedido con los excursionistas?

    Xrushchev: Todo lo que se le ocurra. Ustedes dijeron que cayo un cohete, un meteorito, que los ataco un oso, que bebieron de mas. Quien sabe? Algo, por supuesto, los asusto. Yo no soy experto en psicologia humana pero me parece que se trata de un mero problema psicologico.

    -Ud. no solo hablo con su padre sino que con colegas de Nikita Sergeevich, con el mismo Anastas Ivanovich Mikoyan*. Tal vez ellos sabian algo?
    *Politico sovietico. En tiempo del accidente de Dyatlov era Primer vicepresidente del Soviet de Ministros de la URSS.

    Xrushchev: Si yo supiera lo diria con gusto pero nunca escuche algo al respecto.

    -En el invierno de 1959 hacia donde lanzaron cohetes?

    Xrushchev: Comenzamos a probar el cohete P-7 probablemente en 1958. El P-14* aparecio despues. Los disparabamos a Kazaxstan. Mientras que el P-12, el unico, que podria ... era de 1 etapa por lo que toda esta barra de hierro gigante cayo y se precipito aproximadamente alli donde cayo la cabeza, en el campo militar. El P-14, a proposito, tambien era de 1 sola etapa y tambien cayo en el campo militar, la misma etapa. Por lo tanto, no podria haber caido en ninguna parte de los Urales por meras consideraciones de mecanica celeste.
    *El cohete P-14 realmente realizo su primera prueba en 1960 por esto no pudo ser causa de la tragedia en el paso. Un cohete anterior, el unico que podia hacerlo segun opinon de S. Xrushchev, tenia un alcance de 2 mil km. Es decir, pudo llegar hasta el paso desde Tyurtam, 1800 km, o desde Kapyar, 1700 km. Pero, como asegura Sergey Xrushchev, estos cohetes se lanzaban solo en poligonos de Kazaxstan. Aunque otros especialistas en cohetes nos dijeron que el P-12 se lanzaba desde diferentes plataformas de lanzamiento y en diferentes regiones de la URSS a pesar de que no contamos con documentos que lo respalden. Sin embargo, hay una documento muy curioso del cohete P-7 del cual se sigue que se lanzaba no solo hacia Kazaxstan sino ademas hacia Kamchatka.

    Cohete P-7 (Se lee R-7), en version de 1957

    Integrante de los grupos de busqueda, Vladimir Askinadzi

    En 1959 era estudiante de V an-o de la UPI y un excursionista experimentado y tomo parte en la busqueda de los excursionistas del paso Dyatlov. Esto es lo que recuerda Vladimir Mixaylovich sobre los hechos.

    Askinadzi: A mediados de abril me llamaron al Comite del Partido del UPI y me ordenaron reunir a un grupo de estudiantes para la busqueda de los excursionistas. Debiamos relevar al grupo de Blinov, que se habia ocupado por largo tiempo de la busqueda pero sin lograr encontrar un cuerpo. Con dificultad logre reunir a 5 estudiantes dado que nadie queria ir pues se nos venia encima el periodo de examenes. Yo le propuse a la direccion esperar para la busqueda mientras la nieve se derretia pero en el Comite del Partido no quisieron escucharme. Solo me prometieron vacaciones y conservarme la beca en caso de que nos atrasaramos con la busqueda. Antes de la partida me llamaron de nuevo del Comite del Partido y me dijeron en texto claro: Observen la posibilidad de la huida de los excursionistas a los Estados Unidos a traves del Polo Norte. Y si encuentran algunos detalles que revelen su huida a los Estados Unidos no se lo informen a nadie mas. Cuando le comunique a los demas chicos sobre la fuga a los Estados Unidos se rieron porque les parecia sin sentido, ademas sin skies! pues todos los skies se habian encontrado junto a la tienda de campan-a de la expedicion.

    -Que tipo de personas en el Comite partidario habia que pensaron en esa absurda posibilidad?

    Askinadzi: Habian pasado 6 an-os de la muerte de Stalin y el pais aun vivia en el temor por eso en los comites partidarios se habian seleccionado ese tipo de personas, no muy inteligentes, que no fueron capaces de comprender claramente la situacion pero que, por otra parte, eran obedientes y capaces de cumplir instrucciones. No los puedes poner entre la espada y la pared. Ademas, estoy seguro de que lo de la fuga a los Estados Unidos no lo pensaron los miembros del comite partidario sino autoridades superiores del Partido.

    -Usted conocio personalmente a Lyudmila Dubinina. Como fue eso? A nosotros nos cuesta imaginar en terminos tecnicos como con una varilla metalica se pudo sondear bajo la nieve y comprender que se estaba en contacto con un cuerpo humano y no con tierra. Ademas, que los cuerpos estaban congelados, endurecidos.

    Askinadzi: Nosotros teniamos sondas profesionales de urgencia, de alpinistas, disen-adas para la busqueda de cuerpos. En un extremo cuentan con una gancho. Hay que hundirlo, girarlo y tirar hacia arriba. Usualmente se consigue solo musgo. Pero entonces tire y logre arrancar un trozo de carne... y comenzamos inmediatamente a cavar. Asi encontramos a Lyuda Dubinina. Estaba de rodillas en el arroyo. Cavamos un poco mas y a medio metro de Lyuda habia una cabeza. El cadaver de Lyuda nos incomodaba y la arrastramos a un lado. Cavamos un poco mas y encontramos los otros cuerpos.

    -Cuando los desenterraron aparentemente Semen Zolotarev tenia en una mano un libro de notas y en la otra un cuaderno?

    Askinadzi: Si, lo tengo grabado en la memoria porque el coronel Ortyukov, quien dirigia las busquedas, se comporto de manera poco adecuada en ese momento pues salto como un loco de alegria cuando vio que en las manos de uno de los cuerpos habian una libreta de notas. No podria decir de quien en concreto pues no conociamos a los muchachos, ademas de que estaban practicamente irreconocibles. Asi que Ortyukov agarro la libreta y comenzo a hojearla como loco. Yo estaba a un lado. Pero el hojeo y hojeo y no encontro nada, estaba vacia! Entonces, Ortyukov comenzo a maldecir, no se con que palabras exactamente pero algo asi como: "Pero como, baboso, no pudiste decirnos nada !! "

    -La libreta estaba en el agua? Puede ser que por eso se borro todo?

    Askinadzi: Tal vez.

    -Se conoce el destino posterior de esta libreta de notas?

    Askinadzi: Lo desconozco pero hay una fotografia donde aparece Ortyukov sosteniendola con su mano derecha.

    -Encontraron los cuerpos, pero que mas habia?

    Askinadzi: Despues se planteo la pregunta de quien sacaria los cuerpos? Lo echaron a la suerte y le toco a los soldados sacarlos mientras observabamos su trabajo. El operador de radio, Nevolin, envio un telegrama y a la man-ana siguiente llegaron volando las autoridades desde Sverdlovsk.


    -Entre ellos estaba el fiscal de la region, Klimov?

    Askinadzi: Habia mucha gente. Quienes eran no lo se porque no se presentaron. Solo reconoci al fiscal Ivanov, quien rehuia a los demas, para sorpresa mia. Ni siquiera tomo fotografias de manera adecuada. Si yo hubiese sido el fiscal entonces me hubiese tirado al suelo a fotografiar todo. Pero el, en cambio, se comporto con indiferencia, con las manos en los bolsillos. Evidentemente, sabia todo y por eso era indiferente. Me parece que ni siquiera se acerco a ver los cuerpos. A proposito, ese dia Ivanov se fue volando del lugar. Nosotros hablamos con el antes de que se fuera y me dijo que me prometia como recompensa fotografias del rollo de Dyatlov, pero no cumplio.

    -De que hablaron?

    Askinadzi: Yo le conte como realizamos las operaciones de busqueda. Como primero habiamos encontrado una cubierta de ramas y despues los cuerpos. A proposito, descubrimos esa cubierta gracias a los mansi. Yo veia que hablaban en su idioma e indicaban unas ramitas de abeto rotas no mas grandes que un dedo men-ique y que surgieron con el deshielo de la nieve. Era como si las ramitas indicaran el sendero de los abetos cortados hacia el barranco. Resulto que los excursionistas cortaron ramitas y las arrastraron al barranco perdiendo en el camino parte de ellas. Alli, donde se formaba un sendero comenzamos a cavar. La nieve estaba humeda y comprimida. Fuimos cortando bloques y quitandolos. De esa forma, encontramos esa cubierta hecha con ramas. Con nuestras manos que temblaban de frio retirabamos la nieve, pensando que de un momento a otro encontrariamos los cuerpos pero cuando vimos el enramado vacio sentimos mucha desazon. Donde estaban los cuerpos, entonces? Pero estaban cerca. Basto con cavar un poco mas con las manos, y los encontramos.

    -No pudo suceder que cavaron un foso y pusieron en el fondo un trapo y luego decidieron cavar una cueva? Asi estaria mas tibio. Ellos no sabian que cerca, un poco mas abajo, corria un arroyo. Apenas lo descubrieron cayeron a el y se les vino la nieve encima. Eso podria explicar que tuvieran las costillas fracturadas y la cabeza rota por el impacto sobre una piedra del fondo, por ejemplo.

    Askinadzi: No creo que con sus manos desnudas hubiesen podido cavar un foso y una cueva. Ellos, probablemente, excavaron un foso pequen-o bajo la cubierta de ramas y luego la nieve lo cubrio. Por eso surgio esa cavidad. Y para que entonces encender una fogata junto al cedro? La cabeza de Nikolay Tibo-Brinyol estaba rota, probablemente, por un culatazo. El taman-o y la forma de la herida son muy similares.

    Si se asume que los turistas levantaron la cubierta de ramas en el barranco y luego excavaron una cueva entonces los pudo aplastar la nieve que se derrumbo. Por ello las fracturas de costillas y el trauma craneano.

    -Existe la opinion de que bajo el cedro habia viento muy fuerte por lo que no pudieron encender una fogata grande pues el viento la apagaba. Ademas, de que ellos mismos estaban congelados de frio por accion del viento. Sin embargo cuando estuvimos en el paso, tanto en verano como en invierno, observamos con sorpresa que en la misma ladera del monte Xolat-Syaxyl, donde estaba la tienda de campan-a, soplaba un viento increiblemente intenso pero al bajar junto al cedro habia calma absoluta, y el fuego no se apagaba. Cuando estuvieron alli, soplaba viento bajo el cedro?

    Askinadzi: Tambien observe lo mismo. En la ladera soplaba viento con gran intensidad pero junto al cedro no soplaba viento.

    -Que produjo la tragedia, en su opinion?

    Askinadzi: Me convence la idea de una nube venenosa, que los cubrio pero solo si no prestamos atencion a las causas de sus lesiones. Entonces, comenzaron a asfixiarse y Dyatlov les ordeno a todos rasgar la tienda y huir. Pero no entiendo el origen de las lesiones. Creo que los mataron pero quien y por que no lo se. Toda esta epopeya de abandonar la tienda antes de que les dieran muerte no parece dar pie para unir los hechos. Muchos consideran que se trato de un asunto criminal, y yo tambien lo pienso asi. Tengo fotografias de los cuerpos bajo el cedro, hasta ahora desconocidas al publico donde se ve huellas de otras personas cerca de los cuerpos, cubiertas por la nieve.

    -Podrian haber sido huellas de los excursionistas?

    Askinadzi: No, porque tienen bordes muy bien definidos. No se trata de huellas de personas heridas. Son, probablemente, huellas de los asesinos.

    -En sus memorias el investigador Ivanov cuenta que vio en el paso ramas de arboles quemadas. Otros testigos afirman que vieron nieve fundida.

    Askinadzi: Yo no lo vi ni tampoco ninguno de mis conocidos. Si hubo alguna explosion que les rompio las costillas entonces hubiese sido de tal magnitud que hubiese arrancado las ramas del cedro.

    -Trabajaron muchos soldados?

    Askinadzi: Cuando nuestro grupo estaba realizando labores de busqueda habian 5 soldados pero inicialmente eran muchos mas. Los primeros dias existia la esperanza de encontrarlos con vida.

    -Y que paso con el escandalo con los pilotos de helicoptero que rehusaron transportar los cuerpos de los ultimos excursionistas que fueron hallados . Aparentemente, temian que esos cuerpos estuvieran con radiacion?

    Askinadzi: Si, asi sucedio. Para el transporte de los cuerpos, segun las instrucciones, se requeria una envoltura especial con la que no contabamos. Y aqui por primera vez el coronel Ortyukov saco su pistola y amenazo a los pilotos. Yo no sabia que el tenia una pistola. Sin embargo, a pesar de la amenaza los pilotos rehusaron llevar los cuerpos sin que fueran envueltos. Solo se los llevaron al dia siguiente cuando trajeron unos sacos especiales.

    -Examinaron los niveles de radiacion de ustedes?

    Askinadzi: No lo hicieron. Yo supe del tema de la radiacion solo cuando la causa dejo de ser secreta. La verdad es que en el paso habia un radiologo con un dosimetro que habia llegado desde Moscu. El realizo mediciones pero sin informarnos sobre los resultados.

    -Que teorias se plantearon inicialmente sobre la muerte del grupo de excursionistas?

    Askinadzi: Al principio en Sverdlovsk todos hablaban de que habia explotado un cohete en el paso, en la montan-a. La misma informacion nos entrego el coronel Ortyukov. Posiblemente, tenia esa labor. A las autoridades les resultaba provechoso diseminar el rumor sobre la version del cohete porque justificaba todo el silencio en torno al caso. Esto en cierta medida calmo a la gente e incluso a los parientes de los fallecidos pero esa version nos aparto de la busqueda de la verdad. Si hubo un cohete entonces habia alli un secreto estatal y por eso no se debia exigir de las autoridades explicacion alguna. Pero entonces nadie creia en las autoridades pues todos entendian que los funcionarios de gobierno mentian. Cuando regresamos de las labores de busqueda al instituto nos hicieron pedazos exigiendonos informacion. Mi amigo Moisey Akselrod, tambien estudiante del UPI, habia dicho que se habia tratado de una avalancha y entonces yo le pregunte que si se hubiera aterrado con una avalancha? Y el movio la cabeza. Y, claro, tampoco Dyatlov se hubiese asustado.

    -Por que decidieron que en el paso habia sucedido un crimen?

    Askinadzi: Despues de analizar todo conclui que no habia habido ningun hecho natural que les dio muerte. No se podrian haber congelado en esas circunstancias aunque de nuevo, claro, aparecian esas lesiones sin explicacion. No se que los mato pero me parece que un asesinato es la unica explicacion posible.

    La tragedia de Xamar-Daban

    Si bien la tragedia del grupo Dyatlov es la tragedia acaecida en la montan-a mas conocida en Rusia quisiera relatar brevemente otra historia menos cono
              Video clip transfer of radiological images using a mobile telephone in emergency neurosurgical consultations (3G multi-media messaging service)        
    Ganesan, D.; Waran, V.; Bahuri, N.F.; Narayanan, V.; Kadir, K.A. (2012) Video clip transfer of radiological images using a mobile telephone in emergency neurosurgical consultations (3G multi-media messaging service). British Journal of Neurosurgery , 26 (2). pp. 199-201.
              How Tough Is it to Build a Dirty Bomb? | PBS NewsHour | Feb. 8, 2011 | PBS        
    Science correspondent Miles O'Brien examines the threat that radioactive "dirty bombs"could pose to cities in the U.S., and what's being done to prevent a radiological attack from happening. When David Hahn was young, he was fascinated by science, a well-worn copy of "The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments" his scientific bible. He was most fascinated with the story of Pierre and Marie Curie's discovery of radioactive elements. So, on his way to becoming an Eagle Scout, he naturally decided to get his atomic energy merit badge. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/science/jan-june11/dirtybombs_02-08.html
               The radiological investigation of constipation.         
    Halligan, S; Bartram, CI; (1995) The radiological investigation of constipation. Clin Radiol , 50 (7) pp. 429-435.
              PHY 106 - Radiological Physics Theory        

    Document


              GD Awarded Contract to Develop Modeling Software for US Army        
    General Dynamics Information Technology, a business unit of General Dynamics (NYSE: GD), was awarded the Joint Effects Model (JEM) program contract by the U.S. Army Contract Command. JEM is the U.S. Department of Defense's primary web-based software system for modeling the effects of chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapon strikes and Toxic Industrial Chemical and Material incidents. The single-award indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity contract has a ceiling value of $4...
              Sandburg Foundation Awards Pair of $2,000 GTI Scholarships        
    The Carl Sandburg College Foundation, in collaboration with Green Thumb Industries, LLC (GTI), awarded two new scholarships worth $2,000 each for the 2014-2015 academic year to Sandburg students Whitney Freeman and Robert Robinson. Freeman, a graduate of Spoon River Valley High School and now a Galesburg resident, is enrolled in her first year pursuing an Associate in Applied Science in radiologic technology. A graduate of ROWVA High School, Robinson returned to college after gaining several
              Reduced Spinal Cord Movement With the Straight Leg Raise Test in Patients With Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation        
    imageStudy Design. Controlled radiological study. Objective. To explore whether impairment of neural excursion during the straight leg raise test occurs in patients with sciatic symptoms secondary to lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (LIDH). Summary of Background Data. Earlier studies have shown that during the straight leg raise (SLR) test in asymptomatic volunteers tensile forces are consistently transmitted throughout the neural system and the thoracolumbar spinal cord slides distally. Methods. Fifteen patients with sciatic symptoms due to subacute LIDH were studied with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner. First, a spine specialist diagnosed the LIDH using conventional scanning sequences. Following this subjects were scanned using different scanning sequences for planning and measurement purposes. Displacement of the conus medullaris during the unilateral and bilateral SLR was quantified reliably with a randomized procedure and compared between manoeuvres. Results. The results showed 66.6% less excursion of conus medullaris with SLR performed on the symptomatic side compared with excursions measured with SLR performed on the asymptomatic side (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion. In patients with LIDH, the neural displacement on the symptomatic side is significantly reduced by the compressing IVD herniation. To our knowledge, these are the first data in intact human subjects to support the limitation of neural movements in the vertebral canal with LIDH. Level of Evidence: 3
              Are There Differences in the Progression of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Following Laminoplasty Versus Fusion?: A Meta-Analysis        
    imageStudy Design. Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies for the treatment of cervical myelopathy with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) treated with laminoplasty or fusion. Objective. To delineate whether OPLL continues to progress after laminoplasty compared with fusion and to clarify the relationship between radiological progression of OPLL and neurological decline. Summary of Background Data. Laminoplasty is usually performed in patients with multilevel OPLL due to the surgical morbidity of anterior surgery. However, the disadvantage of laminoplasty is that the remaining OPLL can progress after the surgery. Methods. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane library was performed to identify investigations concerning the progression of OPLL after laminoplasty or fusion. The pooled results were analyzed by calculating the effect size based on the event rate and the logit event rate. Results. We included data from 11 studies involving 530 patients, of whom 429 underwent laminoplasty and 101 underwent fusion surgery. The prevalence of radiological OPLL progression was 62.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] 55.3%–69.3%) for the laminoplasty group and 7.6% (95% CI 3.4%–15.9%) for the fusion group. The laminoplasty displayed substantially high prevalence of the progression of OPLL compared with the fusion group. In the laminoplasty group, the prevalence of OPLL progression increased with time and reached 60% at about 10-year follow-up. The prevalence for neurological decline was similar for about 2 years, 8.3% (95% CI 3.7%–17.9%) for the laminoplasty group and 3.8% (95% CI 1.3%–10.2%) for the fusion group. Conclusion. Laminoplasty frequently induces progression of OPLL compared with fusion surgery, but does not make significant clinical deterioration. However, laminoplasty may not be recommended for OPLL patient because it can be getting worse with time. Level of Evidence: 1
              Spondylectomy for Giant Cell Tumor After Denosumab Therapy        
    imageStudy Design. A case report. Objective. To report a case of the lumbar giant cell tumor (GCT) utilizing a new clinical treatment modality (denosumab therapy), which showed a massive tumor reduction combined with the L4 spondylectomy. Summary of Background Data. There are some controversies about spinal GCT treatments. Denosumab has provided good clinical results in terms of tumor shrinkage, and local control in a short-time follow-up clinical study phase 2, although for spinal lesions, it has not been described. Nonetheless, “en bloc” spondylectomy has been accepted as being the best treatments modalities in terms of oncological control. Methods. A case study with follow-up examination and series radiological assessments 6 months after therapy started, followed by a complex spine surgery. Results. The denosumab therapy showed on the lumbar computed tomography scans follow-up 6 months later, a marked tumor regression around 90% associated to vertebral body calcification, facilitating a successful L4 spondylectomy with an anterior and posterior reconstruction. The patient recovered without neurological deficits. Conclusion. A new therapeutic modality for spinal GCT is available and showing striking clinical results; however, it is necessary for well-designed studies to answer the real role of denosumab therapy avoiding or facilitating complex spine surgeries as spondylectomies for spinal GCT. Level of Evidence: 5
               Differences in oligoclonal bands and visual evoked potentials in patients with radiologically and clinically isolated syndrome         
    Gabelić, Tereza and Radmilović, Marin and Posavec, Vanja and Škvorc, Ana and Bošković, Mateja and Adamec, Ivan and Milivojević, Iva and Barun, Barbara and Habek, Mario (2013) Differences in oligoclonal bands and visual evoked potentials in patients with radiologically and clinically isolated syndrome. Acta Neurologica Belgica, 113 (1). pp. 13-7. ISSN 0300-9009
              Patient Prompt Shares How Patient Engagement is a Radiology Organization’s Competitive Advantage at RSNA This December        

    Patient Prompt, by Prompt Alert Inc., demonstrates how patient engagement increases infrastructure utilization, patient satisfaction scores, and revenue cycle at the Radiological Society of North America's Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL December 1st to 6th, 2013 at Booth #5822.

    (PRWeb November 21, 2013)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11351446.htm


              Atlas of Advanced Operative Surgery, 1 Edition        
    Advance your surgical expertise with Atlas of Advanced Operative Surgery! This new resource picks up where other surgical references leave off, providing highly visual, step-by-step guidance on more than 100 advanced and complex procedures in both general and subspecialty areas.
    • Visualize every procedure thanks to more than 1,000 illustrations, most in full color - including intraoperative photos, beautifully illustrated color drawings that highlight the relevant anatomy and techniques in specific surgeries, and radiologic images that help you identify variations in anatomy prior to surgery.
    • Grasp each procedure and review key steps quickly with a consistent, highly focused, bulleted format.
    • See the advantages and disadvantages of variations in technique with a Pro/Con section written by expert surgeons.
    • Focus on the advanced practice skills that are of particular value to those poised to begin practice, as well as surgeons who are already in practice.
    • Benefit from the masterful guidance of Dr. Vijay Khatri, a respected expert and experienced mentor of trainees, junior faculty, and community surgeons.
    • Learn new procedures or refresh your memory on operative details prior to surgery with an easy-to-follow, step-by-step format: pre-operative preparation, operative technique, position, incision, main dissection, closure, alternative technical approaches (with pros/cons), and post-operative care.
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              Netter's Surgical Anatomy and Approaches, 1e (Netter Clinical Science)        
    Netter's Surgical Anatomy and Approaches is your quick reference to the key anatomical landmarks and operative techniques needed to best perform general surgical operative procedures! This one-of-a-kind resource combines the unmatched surgical anatomy illustrations of Frank H. Netter, MD with endoscopic, laparoscopic, and radiologic images - integrated with expert descriptions of each operative procedure - to provide a clear overview of the exposures, incision sites, surgically relevant landmarks, structures, fascial planes, and common anatomical variants and operative methods that are critical to your success in the operating room.
    • Vividly visualize the surgical anatomy you need to know through the uniquely detailed, memorable artwork of Dr. Netter, Carlos Machado, MD, and other anatomy illustrators working in the Netter tradition.
    • View surgical anatomy from a clinical perspective through photographs and endoscopic, laparoscopic, and radiologic images that capture important landmarks and anatomy and are integrated into an expert description of each operative procedure.
    • Access the complete contents online for quick look-ups, including videos of relevant surgical dissections to help you review approaches to common operations.

    Download Link:

    or Buy from Amazon:

              Clinical Imaging: With Skeletal, Chest, & Abdominal Pattern Differentials, 3rd Edition        
    Clinical Imaging seamlessly integrates plain film with MRI and CT. And with more than 3,500 illustrations all contained in one volume, this trusted text offers the most effective, realistic and comprehensive approach available today.
    • Combines the innovative pattern approach with more traditional detailed descriptions to emulate real-world patient interaction without sacrificing more in-depth content on disease states.
    • Innovative Pattern Approach uses the patterns that link similar abnormalities to help you learn to identify, and just as importantly, differentiate abnormalities.
    • Extensive cross-referencing from pattern to disease descriptions enables the reader to quickly find more detailed information.
    • Dedicated chapter on the key subject of radiology physics, including algorithms for improving film quality.
    • A glossary of nearly 500 radiological terms.
    • NEW! Over 800 new or updated images.
    • NEW! State-of-the-art MRI images deliver more comprehensive content for this growing field within imaging.
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    Clinical Imaging: With Skeletal, Chest, & Abdominal Pattern Differentials, 3e



              31st MEU's WMD and HazMat Teams Practice Night Operations        
    Chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense specialists with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit practice night-time reconnaissance and detection. The Marines donned full protective suits and oxygen tanks to simulate being called to a site with unknown and potentially dangerous substances. Also available in high definition.
              Radiologic Technlgst PD - (Fountain Valley, California, United States)        
    At MemorialCare Health System, we believe in providing extraordinary health care to our communities and an exceptional working environment for our people. Whether it's our recognition as one of the nation's Top 100 Health Systems or outcomes that repeatedly exceed the expected, you'll be energized by our commitment to innovation, continuous learning and your professional and personal growth. Position Summary: Under general supervision, he/she is competent to perform all routine radiology procedures within the scope of the Imaging Services Department to include fluoroscopic procedures, Emergency Department imaging and portable imaging. This position requires full understanding of all operating room protocols and c-arm equipment. This position will cover evenings, weekend and graveyard shifts. The qualified candidate will be able to work independently and without supervision as well as perform with the following qualities: Ability to effectively communicate pertinent patient information to the radiologist. Ability to evaluate the demands of Physicians, Patients, staff and superiors. Ability to effectively identify and implements performance improvement techniques. Ability to deliver quality customer service. Experience: One year experience in all areas where routine diagnostic radiographic procedures are provided to include geriatric, adult, adolescent and neonate patient populations or s tudent with clinical rotation completed at the hospital . Education/Licensure: · CRT - required · ARRT Certification - required · California Fluoroscopy Certification - required · IV Certification - preferred · BCLS (CPR for Health Care Provider) - required
              Radiation Physicist - Per-Diem - (Laguna Hills, California, United States)        
    Saddleback Memorial’s centers of excellence are renowned for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, stroke, pulmonary disease, orthopedics and diabetes; and for leadership in emergency medicine, critical care medicine, breast health, outpatient rehabilitation, advanced imaging, women’s health, geriatric care and surgery, including robotic-assisted procedures. Saddleback Memorial Medical Center (Orange County, CA) has consistently been named one of Healthgrades’ America’s 50 Best Hospitals, an achievement gained by just 1% of the nation’s hospitals. It has also been honored among Truven Health Analytics’ Top 50 Cardiovascular Hospitals in the U.S., consecutively voted Orange County’s #1 Best Hospital in the Orange County Register’s Best of Orange County poll of readers and has appeared on both Becker’s Hospital Review and Thomson Reuters’ lists of America’s Best Hospitals. Saddleback Memorial’s U.S. News & World Report “high-performance” ranking categories included Heart Failure, Hip Replacement, Knee Replacement and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Position Summary: Medical physicists will apply their knowledge of physics to specialized equipment that helps examine, diagnose and treat patients. Assist the Physicians and Radiation Therapist in matters pertaining to the physical aspects of the use of radiation sources/machines in the treatment of patients; responsible for directing, controlling and coordinating the radiation safety program. Will help plan radiation treatments for cancer patients using external radiation beams or internal radioactive sources. Experience 3-5 years of clinical experience in Radiation Physics and Radiation Safety. Calculate radiation doses utilizing Eclipse and BrachyVision. Education • High School Diploma. • M.S. in Radiologic Physics • Board Certified, strongly preferred. • Certified in Basic Life Support (BLS)
              Radiologic Technologist - General Section (PD Variable) - (Long Beach, California, United States)        
    At MemorialCare Health System, we believe in providing extraordinary healthcare to our communities and an exceptional working environment for our employees. Memorial Care stands for excellence in Healthcare. Across our family of medical centers, we support each one of our bright, talented employees in reaching the highest levels of professional development, contribution, collaboration and accountability. Whatever your role and whatever expertise you bring, we are dedicated to helping you achieve your full potential in an environment of respect, innovation and teamwork. Position Summary: The Radiologic Technologist is responsible for performing diagnostic radiology procedures in a variety of clinical settings. In this role, the Radiologic Technologist positions patients and adjusts equipment for proper exposure and for digital image processing. The Radiologic Technologist records pertinent information pertaining to the production of the radiograph/scan. Minimum Requirements: 2+ years of experience as a full time Radiologic Technologist student in CAHEA (JRCERT and AMA) approved School of Radiologic Technology. Graduate of CAHEA (JRCERT and AMA) approved school of Radiologic Technology. Current licensure required for specific area of expertise (CRT, Fluoroscopy, Mammography). Current American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (CPR & AED) certification is required.
              Radiologic Technologist - Per-Diem, Varies - (Laguna Hills, California, United States)        
    Saddleback Memorial’s centers of excellence are renowned for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, stroke, pulmonary disease, orthopedics and diabetes; and for leadership in emergency medicine, critical care medicine, breast health, outpatient rehabilitation, advanced imaging, women’s health, geriatric care and surgery, including robotic-assisted procedures. Saddleback Memorial Medical Center (Orange County, CA) has consistently been named one of Healthgrades’ America’s 50 Best Hospitals, an achievement gained by just 1% of the nation’s hospitals. It has also been honored among Truven Health Analytics’ Top 50 Cardiovascular Hospitals in the U.S., consecutively voted Orange County’s #1 Best Hospital in the Orange County Register’s Best of Orange County poll of readers and has appeared on both Becker’s Hospital Review and Thomson Reuters’ lists of America’s Best Hospitals. Saddleback Memorial’s U.S. News & World Report “high-performance” ranking categories included Heart Failure, Hip Replacement, Knee Replacement and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The RadiologicTechnologist is responsible for performing technical duties utilizing radiologic imaging equipment and supplies to obtain satisfactory imaging for exams and procedures performed on patients of all ages. The Radiologic Technologic is also responsible for performing clerical duties specific to all areas of the Imaging Services Department. This position requires the full understanding and active participation in fulfilling the mission of Saddleback Memorial Medical Center. It is expected that the employee demonstrate behavior consistent with the core values. The employee shall support Saddleback Memorial Medical Center’s strategic plan and the goals and direction of the performance improvement plan. The employee will also be expected to support all organizational expectations including, but not limited to: Customer Service, Patient’s Rights, Confidentiality of Information, Environment of Care and MemorialCare initiatives. Experience Minimum of 1 year acute care hospital experience or equivalent. Education/Licenses/Certificates Current CRT license for the State of California required Current ARRT (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists) certification required California Fluoroscopy permit required within 3 months of hire date Current BCLS card required from AHA
              Radiologic Technologist - PD, Varies - (Laguna Hills, California, United States)        
    The RadiologicTechnologist is responsible for performing technical duties utilizing radiologic imaging equipment and supplies to obtain satisfactory imaging for exams and procedures performed on patients of all ages. The Radiologic Technologic is also responsible for performing clerical duties specific to all areas of the Imaging Services Department. This position requires the full understanding and active participation in fulfilling the mission of Saddleback Memorial Medical Center. It is expected that the employee demonstrate behavior consistent with the core values. The employee shall support Saddleback Memorial Medical Center’s strategic plan and the goals and direction of the performance improvement plan. The employee will also be expected to support all organizational expectations including, but not limited to: Customer Service, Patient’s Rights, Confidentiality of Information, Environment of Care and MemorialCare initiatives. Experience Minimum of 1 year acute care hospital experience or equivalent, highly preferred. Hospital training experience required. Education/Licenses/Certificates Current CRT license for the State of California required Current ARRT (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists) certification required California Fluoroscopy permit required within 3 months of hire date Current BCLS card required
              Rad Tech Per Diem - (Fountain Valley, California, United States)        
    At MemorialCare Health System, we believe in providing extraordinary healthcare to our communities and an exceptional working environment for our employees. MemorialCare stands for excellence in Healthcare. Across our family of medical centers and physician groups, we support each one of our bright, talented employees in reaching the highest levels of professional development, contribution, collaboration and accountability. Whatever your role and whatever expertise you bring, we are dedicated to helping you achieve your full potential in an environment of respect, innovation and teamwork. Specific job responsibilities: Select correct exposure factors based on established procedures to produce good quality diagnostic images. Display knowledge of and follow standards for radiation protection, utilization of lead shields appropriately. Knowledge and consistent use of permanent film identification devices. Critique film quality and adjust technical factors to improve image quality. Ensure proper use of lead markers, proper film exposure, and proper positioning. Determine film quality affected by non-technical factors (i.e. Processor, darkroom artifacts, inherent film defects, etc.). Maintain basic knowledge of Processor Mechanics and follow established posted procedures for operating. Use equipment according to manufacturer specifications and established department policies and procedures. Promptly report any equipment deficiencies/malfunctions to Team leader and/ or supervisor. Maintain exam room cleanliness, stock supplies, and ensure room readiness for all exams and patients. Follow procedure manual for radiological examinations providing acceptable views for diagnostic interpretation based on requested exam. Utilize positioning books supplied by company when not able to produce routine Radiologic views. Maintain current knowledge of signed consent requirements and ensure a signed consent is completed when appropriate. Process appropriate paperwork for examinations. Maintain current license including obtaining CEU’s to meet licensure renewal requirements. Maintain current knowledge of computer systems including scheduling functions, check in process, using proper registration protocols with all new patients, existing patient data and proper visit types and times. Knowledge of and completion of all exams with the billing process as required. Have knowledge of film management system for all locations. Knowledge of report management which may include scanning into EMR/ICS and tasking radiology reports to providers. Perform any additional/miscellaneous duties (not inclusive of job description) as requested by the management team within the scope of knowledge/ability. Qualfications/Skills: Must have a current California CRT license and CPR for healthcare provider card. Additional licenses recommended: A.R.R.T. Mammography, Fluoroscopy, and Dexa experience a plus. Qualified candidate must excel in interpersonal communication and customer service and be able to work both independently and as part of a team. They must excel in organization and attention to details and follow through. Additionally, they must have the ability to problem solve to logical conclusion and demonstrate initiative and responsibility. Must be able to effectively and clearly communicate (written and verbal.) Experience: One year of experience in a clinical/hospital setting, OB office preferred. Education: High school graduate or equivalent. Graduate of an accredited school of Radiologic Technology. MemorialCare Medical Group is a physician-based organization established to provide advanced comprehensive, effective and efficient health care. With over 30 locations from Long Beach to Dana Point, MemorialCare Medical Group includes more than 250 physicians in the areas of internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, geriatric medicine, cardiology, cardio thoracic surgery, gastroenterology, neurology, pulmonology, psychiatry, psychology, rheumatology, sleep medicine and therapeutic acupuncture. In addition to multiple locations throughout Orange County, MemorialCare Medical Group offers Urgent Care Centers that are open 365 days-a-year, Telephone Advice Nurses available 24 hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week; and lab and digital X-ray services available on-site at most locations.
              LTd. X-ray/MA - (Westminster, California, United States)        
    At MemorialCare Health System, we believe in providing extraordinary healthcare to our communities and an exceptional working environment for our employees. MemorialCare stands for excellence in Healthcare. Across our family of medical centers and physician groups, we support each one of our bright, talented employees in reaching the highest levels of professional development, contribution, collaboration and accountability. Whatever your role and whatever expertise you bring, we are dedicated to helping you achieve your full potential in an environment of respect, innovation and teamwork. Position Summary: This position requires the full understanding and active participation in fulfilling the mission of the Memorial Care Medical Foundation. It is expected that the employee demonstrate behavior consistent with our core values: Accountability, Best Practices, Compassion and Synergy. The employee shall support Memorial Care Medical Foundation strategic plan and participate in and advocate performance improvement/patient safety activities. A Limited X-ray/CRT/Medical Assistant is an employee who performs radiological duties in compliance with x-ray department and legal requirements. Help patients feel comfortable during entire process. Perform medical assisting and administrative/clerical duties that assist in the delivery of primary health care and patient care management under the direction of a physician. Essential Job Outcomes & Functions: · Ability to safely and competently perform assigned duties · Ability to take responsibility when supervisor is not available · Ability to demonstrate tact, sensitivity and discretion · Ability to adhere to the highest level of company standards · Ability to meet department scheduling and attendance requirements Job Specific Competencies: Consistently applies infection control policies/procedures. Attends department specific education/training, in service, staff meetings. Demonstrates the ability to safely and competently perform assigned tasks/duties according to policies and procedures. Utilizes effective communication with patients, families and staff members. Projects as assigned by supervisor. Efficiently performs radiological procedures practicing radiation safety and protection Demonstrates the ability to safely and competently use equipment in the performance of assignment. Effectively performs medical assisting and administrative duties Works closely with the physician to receive guidance and instruction for treating patients. Manage time effectively to complete all patient treatments and related activities as assigned. Minimum Requirements / Work Experience: 3 years current experience as a Medical Assistant/Ltd X-ray Tech or CRT. Good communication skills. Must be able to speak, read and write in the English language. Experience with EPIC electronic medical records is a plus. Education / Licensure / Certification: High School Diploma or equivalent. Completion of a course in limited-scope/basic/LMRT/NCT radiological course or completion of CRT radiological course. Completion of Certified Medical Assistant Program. Limited/Basic/NCT/LMRT permit in Radiology or CRT permit in Radiology. Certification obtained from an accredited Medical Assisting Program. Current BCLS certification. MemorialCare Medical Group is a physician-based organization established to provide advanced comprehensive, effective and efficient health care. With over 30 locations from Long Beach to Dana Point, MemorialCare Medical Group includes more than 250 physicians in the areas of internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, geriatric medicine, cardiology, cardio thoracic surgery, gastroenterology, neurology, pulmonology, psychiatry, psychology, rheumatology, sleep medicine and therapeutic acupuncture. In addition to multiple locations throughout Orange County, MemorialCare Medical Group offers Urgent Care Centers that are open 365 days-a-year, Telephone Advice Nurses available 24 hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week; and lab and digital X-ray services available on-site at most locations.
              Rad Tech Computer Tomography - CAT Scan (PT Nights) - (Long Beach, California, United States)        
    Under the direction of a radiologist, and reporting to the lead technologist, this position is responsible for providing safe and cost effective patient care at the MemorialCare Imaging Center. The Radiologic Technician operates specialized imaging equipment including angiography, Computerized Axial Tomography, Breast Ultrasonography and Mammography equipment, at proficient levels and functions under minimal supervision. The position performs duties directly involved with a variety of technical procedures applying ionizing radiation on both pediatric and adult patients. 3+ years of experience in CT special procedures preferred. 2+ years of continuous full time Radiologic Technologist experience. Ability to work independently and maintain high standards of accountability. Ability to delegate and provide direction through demonstrated leadership and training. Graduate from a Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation (CAHEA), Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT) and American Medical Association (AMA) approved school of radiologic technology. Current licensure required for specific area including CRT, Fluoroscopy. Satisfactory completion of formal radiologic technology training in AMA approved school. Registered with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) and certified by the State of California Bureau of Radiological Health.
              MRI Technologist - Per-Diem, Varies - (Laguna Hills, California, United States)        
    Saddleback Memorial’s centers of excellence are renowned for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, stroke, pulmonary disease, orthopedics and diabetes; and for leadership in emergency medicine, critical care medicine, breast health, outpatient rehabilitation, advanced imaging, women’s health, geriatric care and surgery, including robotic-assisted procedures. Saddleback Memorial Medical Center (Orange County, CA) has consistently been named one of Healthgrades’ America’s 50 Best Hospitals, an achievement gained by just 1% of the nation’s hospitals. It has also been honored among Truven Health Analytics’ Top 50 Cardiovascular Hospitals in the U.S., consecutively voted Orange County’s #1 Best Hospital in the Orange County Register’s Best of Orange County poll of readers and has appeared on both Becker’s Hospital Review and Thomson Reuters’ lists of America’s Best Hospitals. Saddleback Memorial’s U.S. News & World Report “high-performance” ranking categories included Heart Failure, Hip Replacement, Knee Replacement and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The MRI Technologist is responsible for performing technical duties utilizing magnetic resonance imaging equipment and supplies to obtain satisfactory imaging for exams and procedures performed on patients of all ages. The MRI Technologic is also responsible for performing clerical duties specific to all areas of the Imaging Services Department. This position requires the full understanding and active participation in fulfilling the mission of Saddleback Memorial Medical Center. It is expected that the employee demonstrate behavior consistent with the core values. The employee shall support Saddleback Memorial Medical Center’s strategic plan and the goals and direction of the performance improvement plan. The employee will also be expected to support all organizational expectations including, but not limited to: Customer Service, Patient’s Rights, Confidentiality of Information, Environment of Care and MemorialCare initiatives. Experience Minimum of 1 year acute care hospital experience or equivalent, preferred. Education/Licenses/Certificates Venipuncture certificate required Current ARRT (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists) certification required or ARMRIT certification required Current BLS card required from AHA
              LTd. X-ray/MA - (Fountain Valley, California, United States)        
    At MemorialCare Health System, we believe in providing extraordinary healthcare to our communities and an exceptional working environment for our employees. MemorialCare stands for excellence in Healthcare. Across our family of medical centers and physician groups, we support each one of our bright, talented employees in reaching the highest levels of professional development, contribution, collaboration and accountability. Whatever your role and whatever expertise you bring, we are dedicated to helping you achieve your full potential in an environment of respect, innovation and teamwork. Position Summary: This position requires the full understanding and active participation in fulfilling the mission of the Memorial Care Medical Foundation. It is expected that the employee demonstrate behavior consistent with our core values: Accountability, Best Practices, Compassion and Synergy. The employee shall support Memorial Care Medical Foundation strategic plan and participate in and advocate performance improvement/patient safety activities. A Limited X-ray/CRT/Medical Assistant is an employee who performs radiological duties in compliance with x-ray department and legal requirements. Help patients feel comfortable during entire process. Perform medical assisting and administrative/clerical duties that assist in the delivery of primary health care and patient care management under the direction of a physician. Essential Job Outcomes & Functions: · Ability to safely and competently perform assigned duties · Ability to take responsibility when supervisor is not available · Ability to demonstrate tact, sensitivity and discretion · Ability to adhere to the highest level of company standards · Ability to meet department scheduling and attendance requirements Job Specific Competencies: Consistently applies infection control policies/procedures. Attends department specific education/training, in service, staff meetings. Demonstrates the ability to safely and competently perform assigned tasks/duties according to policies and procedures. Utilizes effective communication with patients, families and staff members. Projects as assigned by supervisor. Efficiently performs radiological procedures practicing radiation safety and protection Demonstrates the ability to safely and competently use equipment in the performance of assignment. Effectively performs medical assisting and administrative duties Works closely with the physician to receive guidance and instruction for treating patients. Manage time effectively to complete all patient treatments and related activities as assigned. Minimum Requirements / Work Experience: 3 years current experience as a Medical Assistant/Ltd X-ray Tech or CRT. Good communication skills. Must be able to speak, read and write in the English language. Experience with EPIC electronic medical records is a plus. Education / Licensure / Certification: High School Diploma or equivalent. Completion of a course in limited-scope/basic/LMRT/NCT radiological course or completion of CRT radiological course. Completion of Certified Medical Assistant Program. Limited/Basic/NCT/LMRT permit in Radiology or CRT permit in Radiology. Certification obtained from an accredited Medical Assisting Program. Current BCLS certification. MemorialCare Medical Group is a physician-based organization established to provide advanced comprehensive, effective and efficient health care. With over 30 locations from Long Beach to Dana Point, MemorialCare Medical Group includes more than 250 physicians in the areas of internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, geriatric medicine, cardiology, cardio thoracic surgery, gastroenterology, neurology, pulmonology, psychiatry, psychology, rheumatology, sleep medicine and therapeutic acupuncture. In addition to multiple locations throughout Orange County, MemorialCare Medical Group offers Urgent Care Centers that are open 365 days-a-year, Telephone Advice Nurses available 24 hours-a-day, 7 days-a-week; and lab and digital X-ray services available on-site at most locations.
              The burning problem of hazardous waste        

    Whatever the cause and however extensive, a fire’s sheer destructive power always captures attention. The recent explosion and fire at a New Mexico oil field quickly grabbed headlines with images of roiling flames, thick smoke, and stories of residents forced to evacuate. Concerns remain about air quality, the lack of any evacuation plan, and health as WPX Energy, owner of the site, let the fire burn itself out—releasing toxins into the air in the process.

    It’s logical and not that unusual for a drilling site to catch fire; both oil and natural gas are highly combustible and flammable. Yet photos from the New Mexico fire reveal that several tanks used to store waste were also burning intensely.

    It appears that the waste on fire may have been “produced water,” fluid contained in geological formations that’s brought to the surface during oil and gas production. Although the industry often refers to it by the innocuous term “brine,” this waste product often contains much more than high levels of salt, including metals, oil, grease, and radiological material. As it flows upward, produced water can also mix with fluids and chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing.

    Given its chemistry, even liquid oil and gas field waste can go up in flames. Federal regulators have long been aware that extraction and production wastes can spontaneously combust. Some examples of this happening include:

    Ignitability is one of the four technical criteria that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses to determine if a waste is hazardous. (The others are corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity.) Yet nearly 30 years ago, the EPA, created a loophole exempting oil and gas waste from the protections of our federal hazardous waste law, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).  

    But legal fictions do not render waste benign. EPA has stated very clearly that some oil and gas waste would meet the definition of hazardous were it not for the exemption. In addition, a growing body of science has demonstrated the hazardous qualities of oil and gas waste.

    The nature of waste certainly didn’t prompt the RCRA exemption; it was the cost of compliance. EPA concluded that characterizing oil and gas wastes as hazardous would be unduly burdensome for industry, and that state regulators could manage the problem.

    Nevertheless, the result of these assumptions is that polluters don’t pay for the waste they create—instead leaving the public footing the bill of dealing with oil and gas waste. RCRA requires waste tracking, testing, and disposal practices that operators rarely practice, and which states rarely require.

    WPX Energy says that as soon as it determines that cause of the Chaco Canyon fire, it will share that information with the public. But will the company—and the oil and gas industry overall—ever admit that one of the reasons operations pose a fire hazard is the ignitability of growing volumes of hazardous waste?

    The oil and gas industry has been pushing hard to expand drilling in the Chaco area and surrounding Navajo communities. But wherever drilling goes, large volumes of polluting wastes follow. For decades, oil and gas companies have gotten away with improperly managing their waste—and our water, air, land, and health continue to pay the price. How many more polluting events will it take to light a fire under industry and regulators, and finally start treating hazardous oil and gas waste as hazardous?


              Radiographer Accused Of Sexual Contact With 11-Year-Old Patient        
    A medical radiologic technologist's license was suspended after he allegedly engaged in sexual contact with an 11-year-old patient.
              Comment on Accredited Ultrasound Technician Schools 2017 by Lisa Parmley        
    Thank you for your question. We always enjoy hearing from someone interested in becoming a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer. It does not matter whether your degree is an AA or AS degree, but each of the online programs have admission and clinical training requirements. For example, The Washburn University online program is a certificate program and requires the applicant to have an Associate degree or higher in a healthcare program and have completed required courses. Based on the information you provided, you could consider getting a degree in a healthcare program first and plan on attending Washburn University’s online program to earn a Certificate in Diagnostic Medical Sonography. The Washburn University online program will recognize hands-on patient care clinical rotations completed for degrees in various disciplines like Radiologic Technology, Physical Therapy Assistant, Respiratory Therapy, Registered Nurse and others. Good luck in your future endeavors. Jackson College in Mississippi offers an online program, but only the didactic courses can be taken online. The clinical training must be completed at an approved medical facility. The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee offers Baccalaureate degrees in various sonography concentrations, but each concentration has a different mix of online and in-classroom requirements. However, once again, clinical training must be completed at one of the university’s approved sites in the Chicago or greater Milwaukee area. It is important to visit each college and university website and read the admission requirements. You can also call or email the program staff at each school and explain your situation. The staff can provide guidance as to the best route for you to take. Good luck in your future endeavors!
              Direct messaging: Radiological communications at the speed of bytes        
     - Vijay Ramanathan

    The ubiquity of mobile computing across society and throughout healthcare has sharply raised expectations around the speed of communications. Where once referring physicians anticipated waits of several days to receive radiology reports, whether by courier, fax or sometimes even snail mail, they now bristle at lag times measured in hours or even minutes. Increasingly, patients want the same for themselves.


              Video Discussion: Breast Augmentation Using Preexpansion and Autologous Fat Transplantation: A Clinical Radiological Study – Maurice Nahabedian, MD        
    In this video, Maurice Nahabedian, MD, PRS Section Editor- Breast, discusses the article “Breast Augmentation Using Preexpansion and Autologous Fat Transplantation: A Clinical Radiographic Study” by Del Vecchio et al. appearing in the June 2011 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Volume 127, Issue 6.
              Cool New Heart Scan Technology        
    In another sign that Dr. Davis and Track Your Plaque had it right all along, a small study at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center of the RCadia Automated CT Analyzer provided a high negative predictive value and may help move patients quickly through the emergency room.

    "the algorithm of ECG, serial enzymes, and perfusion imaging is both expensive as well as time-intensive, so clearly there is a need for a quick noninvasive test, and recent studies have shown that [coronary computed-tomography angiography] CCTA fits the bill very nicely. But there are problems with CCTA—one of them is the off-hours availability of expert coronary CTA readers,"

    The automated analyzer could have a role as a second reader in the emergency-department setting as an aid to normal expert CCTA readers. It's available at all hours, it interprets raw data—there's no waiting for 3D reformats—and there are cost savings to be had from rapid triage of this group of patients,"


    Dr Girish Tyagi
    Radiological Society of North America 2009 Scientific Assembly.

    The study pitted the analyzer the consensus interpretation of two expert readers. For 100 analyzable studies, the automated analysis yielded a negative predictive value of 98%. The COR Analyzer's overall sensitivity was 83% and its specificity was 82%. RCadia Analyzer identified five of the six patients with significant stenosis found by the expert readers (five true positives, one false negative) and yielded 16 false positives and 78 true negatives.

    Not perfect but the fact that "big money" is starting to invest in the technology and hospitals are beginning to use CCTA as a replacement for the expensive, time-consuming (and wasting) series of ECGs, enzyme tests, and perfusion studies speaks volumes!

    Looking out for your heart health,


    HeartHawk
              We Are Unique        
    Last week after the Dr. Perman lecture, I stopped to thank him.  He was engaged in a conversation with Hans Killius, the WMHS Director of Pastoral Care.  Hans had a cell phone and a pager on the table in front of him.  I commented that I didn't realize that we still use pagers at WMHS.  We all laughed.  

    The next morning, I received an email from Hans commenting on the preceding evening's event and asked that if I ever wanted to take chaplaincy call that I could and it would be assuredly eyeopening.  I responded that my days of "on call" were over, excluding urgent or emergent situations involving the CEO.  I explained that my start in health care was processing bedpans in Central Sterile Service as an equipment orderly.  I continued that throughout my career from that entry-level health care position to CEO and every position in between (Equipment Technician; Equipment Supervisor; Manager CSS; Assistant Director, Materials Management; Director, Materials Management; Assistant VP; VP; Chief Operating Officer; and CEO), that I had not only spent decades on call but also worked years of weekends and holidays.  During such time, I had to deal with some very interesting and enlightening situations over my 41 years in health care.  I told Hans that I would leave the eyeopeners of today to both him and his associates.  

    Hans responded that he was glad that I knew health care from the front lines.  He said that knowing my career path will empower his advocacy of health care leadership and our health system going forward in the presence of occasional negative and ill willed messages.  (Very well stated.)  

    Hans' response got me to thinking as to how fortunate and unique we are to have an administrative team that pretty much began their careers in health care at levels well below administration.  Many in health care leadership upon completion of their graduate degrees (MBAs, MHA, MPH, etc.) go directly into administration and never experience the "front lines," using Hans' terminology.  Personally, I have found working at every level of health care has been exceedingly beneficial and rewarding, as have my colleagues at WMHS.  The following is a list of our Senior VPs and VPs at WMHS and where they started in the front lines of health care:

    • Nancy Adams, Chief Operating Officer and Chief Nurse Executive - EEG Technician at Sacred Heart
    • Dr. Jerry Goldstein, Chief Medical Officer - Dishwasher at Baltimore County General Hospital
    • Kim Repac - Chief Financial Officer - Staff Accountant at Sacred Heart
    • Bill Byers - Chief Technology Officer - Computer Systems Manager at Memorial
    • Jamie Karstetter, Vice President Patient Care Services - EVS Assistant
    • Michele Martz, Vice President, Clinics and Practices - Staff Accountant at Memorial
    • Kevin Turley, Vice President, Operations - Manager, Sacred Heart Home Medical Equipment
    • Jo Wilson, Vice President, Operations - Radiologic Technologist
    Impressive to say the least!




              From Orlando to Toronto: Two Weeks in the ORPC Vortex of Activity        

    Admittedly, the title is a little “cheese ball” but the past two weeks have been a whirlwind of activity in the Office for Research Partnerships and Commercialization (ORPC) as staff members have been involved in numerous events that promote the visibility and mission of our office. 

    The office hosted the second annual Inventors’ Dinner on October 11th in the Huddleston Ballroom.  The evening, orchestrated by Paige Smith (ORPC Senior Program Support Assistant), was a great success recognizing numerous UNH faculty members, researchers and students for their intellectual property contributions during fiscal year 2012.  Included in the audience of approximately 100 attendees were first-time disclosers on a copyright, creative work, innovation, software or trademark; lead principal investigators to one of the aforementioned categories; innovators of recently licensed technology; and licensees of a UNH-developed technology. UNH professor of mathematics, Kevin Short, was presented with the evening’s Innovator of the Year Award in honor of his discovery of chaotic compression technology and its applications in signal processing.

    In the days following the Dinner, Timothy Willis (ORPC Licensing Manager – Creative Works), flew to Toronto to take part in the annual Licensing Executives Society (LES) Meeting held October 14 – 17th.  During the course of the meeting, Tim partook in a survey course on intellectual property and licensing that focuses on both the business and legal perspectives involved in licensing. In addition, he attended a number of workshops on emerging licensing and technology concepts, such as mobile app development and 360 packaged licensing, as well as workshops on branding and creating models for public private partnerships between industry, university and the government.  Joining Tim for a portion of the LES Annual Meeting was Executive Director Marc Sedam.  Marc was a featured speaker at the October 16th workshop entitled “The AIA's Post-Grant Proceedings as Effective Valuation and Negotiation Tools”.  The workshop addressed key provisions to come out of the 2011 U.S. America Invents Act, which will switch U.S. rights to a patent from the present "first-to-invent" system to a "first inventor-to-file" system for patent applications filed on or after March 16, 2013.  Additional information about the America Invents Act was discussed in a previous blog post written by Christopher Baxter (ORPC Licensing Intern) and can be found at here.

    Back in the States, the “New Technology for Radiological Hazards and Threats in New Hampshire – A Symposium on the Detection of Radioactive and Fissile Materials for First Responders” was co-hosted by the UNH Police Department, Division of Emergency Management and the NH National Guard Civil Support Team and held at the NH National Guard Armory. The October 18th event, organized by Maria Emanuel (ORPC Senior Licensing Manager), introduced UNH’s NSPECT technology which was developed by Dr. James Ryan of UNH’s Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) under a subcontract to Michigan Aerospace Corporation funded by a DTRA SBIR contract.  The Symposium highlighted the technology’s features and capabilities and included a video demonstration of the instrument in a scenario involving the UNH Police Department, Durham Fire Department, and the NH National Guard Civil Support Team.

    Elsewhere in New Hampshire, NH Innovation Research Center (NHIRC) Program Manager Gretchen Smith co-hosted the NH Inspires Innovation workshop held October 16 – 17th at Dartmouth College with Heidi Edwards Dunn of the NH Small Business Development Center. “How to Write an SBIR/STTR Proposal to the National Institutes of Health” was the third in a series of agency-specific workshops sponsored by the NHIRC and delivered by Lisa Kurek of BBC Entrepreneurial Training and Consulting.  SBIR/STTR’s awards are non-dilutive capital that fund feasibility and commercial potential of revolutionary innovations for small companies.  Of the attendees, four were Dartmouth faculty who are developing spin-off companies, two represented companies and their academic partners who had received NHIRC awards and intend to leverage those state funds with federal SBIR dollars, and a representative with commercialization expertise was on hand from Vermont’s SBDC.  All NH Inspires Innovation workshops are on videotape, available to past attendees. 1:1 consulting and future workshops are available to any NHIRC awardee or NH faculty at no cost, thanks to the sponsorship of the NHIRC whose goal is to use research to increase revenues and jobs in NH companies.

    Representing ORPC from the Sunshine State, Tristan Carrier (ORPC Licensing Manager) is currently attending the American Biological Safety Association’s 55th Annual Biological Safety Conference being held October 19 – 24th in Orlando, FL on behalf of ORPC and the Research and Computing Instrumentation Center.  Tristan is managing an exhibit that promotes UNHCEMS®, a barcode-based software system which records and manages information about the quantity, location and properties of chemicals, biological agents, radioactive materials, and hazardous wastes throughout campus. UNHCEMS® has been endorsed by the federal Environmental Protection Agency as a ‘Best Management Practice’ and is currently licensed by UNH to nearly 20 different higher education institutions across the United States.

    Please check back in the coming weeks for more detailed information on the above summarized events.  In the meantime, join us this week as we host October’s Innovation Catalyst Seminar featuring Brian Coffenberry, Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning & Business Development for Albany Engineered Composites, who will speak on Innovations in Materials Science. The event begins at 4pm in the UNH Elliott Alumni Center – 1925 Room and is FREE and open to the public.  Please stay for beer and networking immediately following the event.

     

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              A New Optical System Can Detect Cancer in Real Time With High Accuracy During Surgery        

    ​​PHILADELPHIA — An intraoperative, multimodal optical cancer detection system detected cancer with high degrees of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity in real time during surgery in a validation study among patients with brain tumors, according to results published in Cancer Research, a journal of the Americ​an Association for Cancer Research.

    “With brain cancer, near-perfect detection is important so that we can remove as much cancer as possible, without removing healthy tissue,” said Kevin Petrecca, MD, PhD, a neurosurgeon at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, and associate professor of neurology and neurosurgery at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. “Residual cancer post-surgery is associated with decreased time to recurrence and lower survival.” Kevin Petrecca, MD, PhD

    “Raman spectroscopy (RS) alone can achieve 90 percent detection accuracy, but by combining RS with intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DFS), we are excited that our results showed 97 percent accuracy, 100 percent sensitivity, and 93 percent specificity,” said Frédéric Leblond, PhD, director of the Laboratory for Radiological Optics, associate professor in the Department of Engineering Physics at Polytechnique Montreal and a researcher at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre, who developed the tool together with Petrecca. Frédéric Leblond, PhD

    Petrecca explained that the optical detection system consisted of a handheld probe coupled with an analytics platform on a mobile cart. He noted that the probe contains miniaturized RS, IFS, and DFS technology, and has a tip the same size surgeons use to remove brain cancers. “The probe can scan a 500 micron-diameter area of tissue, and since a cell is roughly 10 microns across, the tool is able to detect down to small numbers of cancer cells,” said Petrecca. Leblond developed the platform’s machine-learning algorithm using archived tissue samples of brain cancer and normal cells from brain surgeries classified by standard pathology.

    In the validation study, Petrecca, Leblond, and colleagues investigated the use of the optical system among 15 patients with grade II-IV gliomas and metastatic brain cancers (from primary lung or colon cancer or melanoma), who were undergoing open cranium surgery at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital. They interrogated 10 to15 sites in each patient, 161 sites in total, taking optical readings of normal and tumor tissue regions at each site for blinded post-analysis to determine if cancer cells were present, and compared the data to corresponding spectral data.

    Image analysis demonstrated improvements, measured as area under the curve, by as much as five percent from 95 percent for RS alone compared to up to 100 percent for RS combined with IFS and DFS, approaching the threshold for complete resection. Further, the optical system detected cancer with virtually the same degree of accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity among all cancer types investigated.

    “Our findings are novel since optical techniques are not standard in any surgeries at present,” said Petrecca. “The results also indicate a strong potential for this technology to be adapted to a wide range of surgical and detection applications, including laparoscopic and robotic surgeries, and colonoscopy.”

    The study was supported by funds from the New Researchers program from the Fonds de recherche du Québec - Nature et technologies (FRQNT), the Discovery Grant program from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Collaborative Health Research Program by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and NSERC. Petrecca serves as chief medical officer and Leblond serves as chief technical officer at ODS Medical Inc., a diagnostic medical device company they founded in 2015.

    Press Release Published Date: 6/27/2017 8:05 PM
    Display on Homepage: Yes

              Smiths Detection Supplies Portable Radiation Detectors for Canadian Border Security        
    Toronto, ON -  Smiths Detection has won an order for RadSeeker, its next-generation, portable radiation detector and identifier, from the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). The hand-held devices will be used to enhance security and screening measures throughout Canada, including key entry points at Montreal, Vancouver, and Halifax. RadSeeker provides a superior capability to distinguish radiological and nuclear threats from naturally occurring radiation or other legitimate radiological materials by ...
              Radiological English        

    Radiological English Author: Ramón Ribes , Pablo R. Ros Publisher: Springer ISBN: 978-3540293286 Date: 2007 Pages: 324 Format: PDF Size: 12.2MB This is an introductory book to radiological English on the basis that there are a lot of radiologists, radiology residents, radiology nurses, radiology students, and radiographers worldwide whose English...
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              FLIR Receives FRP Decision Accompanied by $18 M in Contracts for DR SKO Program        
    WILSONVILLE, OR -  FLIR Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: FLIR) today announced a full-rate production decision from the U.S. Department of Defense for FLIR's integrated chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE) threat response system for the Dismounted Reconnaissance Sets, Kits, and Outfits (DR SKO) program. Additionally, FLIR® has been awarded a $12.3 million order from the U.S. Army for low-rate initial production of DR SKO systems as well as a $5.8 million development contract from th...
              LIST OF CLINICAL INDICATOR KANDANG KERBAU HOSPITAL ( CIAF SYSTEM )        
    Obstetrics & Gynecology

    1. Unplanned re-admission related to the previous hospitalisation within 15 days of inpatient discharge

    2. Unplanned removal, injury or repair of organ during surgery

    3. Unplanned return to operation theatre for complications during the same admission

    4. Unplanned admission within 48 hours following ambulatory procedure

    5. Any serious or unexpected complication from surgery / pre-operative or during post-operative recovery

    6. Cardiopulmonary arrest

    7. Eclampsia

    8. Peri-operative Deep Vein Thrombosis /Pulmonary Embolism

    9. Death

    Anaesthesiology

    1. Trauma to organ e.g. broken tooth, lip abrasion

    2. Awareness while under general anaesthesia

    3. Any procedure that caused transient or permanent neurological problems / deficits in patient

    4. Any problems arising from apparatus or equipment failure that have resulted or may resulted in hypoxaemia to patients, physical injuries, esp. neurological injuries

    Radiology

    1. Any serious or unexpected complication from radiological procedure

    Neonatology

    2. Birth trauma

    3. Apgar score <4 at 5 mins, HIE Samat II

    4. and above

    5. Term infant, >7 days length of stay in NICU

    6. Massive aspiration syndromes

    7. Missed congenital malformation

    8. Deaths excluding stillbirth

    Paediatric Medicine

    1. Unplanned re-admission related to the previous hospitalisation within 15 days of inpatient discharge

    2. ICU admission exceeding 14 days

    3. Paediatrics admission exceeding 30 days

    4. Serious complication including collapse from any procedure / medication.

    5. Deaths

    Children’s Emergency

    1. Deaths

    Paediatric

    2. Surgery Unplanned re-admission related to the previous hospitalisation within 15 days of inpatient discharge

    3. Unplanned removal, injury or repair of organ during surgery

    4. Unplanned returns to operating theatre for complications during the current admission

    5. Unplanned admission within 48 hrs following ambulatory procedure

    6. ICU admissions exceeding 14 days

    7. Wound Complications

    8. Sepsis related to instrumentation, catheters & devices

    9. Deaths


               PROTON SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BRAIN IN HIV-INFECTION - CORRELATION WITH CLINICAL, IMMUNOLOGICAL, AND MR-IMAGING FINDINGS         
    CHONG, WK; SWEENEY, B; WILKINSON, ID; PALEY, M; HALLCRAGGS, MA; KENDALL, BE; SHEPARD, JK; ... HARRISON, MJG; + view all <#> CHONG, WK; SWEENEY, B; WILKINSON, ID; PALEY, M; HALLCRAGGS, MA; KENDALL, BE; SHEPARD, JK; BEECHAM, M; MILLER, RF; WELLER, IVD; NEWMAN, SP; HARRISON, MJG; - view fewer <#> (1993) PROTON SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BRAIN IN HIV-INFECTION - CORRELATION WITH CLINICAL, IMMUNOLOGICAL, AND MR-IMAGING FINDINGS. In: RADIOLOGY. (pp. 119 - 124). RADIOLOGICAL SOC NORTH AMER
              Explaining a breast MRI        

    About 10 million patients undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans each year. The technique uses a magnetic field and radio waves to create high-resolution images of internal organs and tissues to help diagnose a variety of problems. For example, MRI can be done to identify brain tumors, assess structural problems in the heart, check for abnormalities in the lungs or kidneys, or evaluate joint disorders. A breast MRI scan may help detect breast cancer in addition to mammography.

    Breast MRI generally is not recommended as a replacement for mammography because it can miss some cancers that could be detected during a mammogram. However, when done in conjunction with mammography, a screening MRI may benefit women who are at high risk for breast cancer or have dense breast tissue. Additional uses for breast MRI include:

    • Checking to see if cancer has spread

    • Evaluating abnormalities previously identified through mammography or ultrasound

    • Distinguishing between scar tissue and recurrent tumors

    • Finding any remaining cancer after surgery or chemotherapy

    • Assessing the integrity of breast implants

    • Determining the size and location of any abnormality that appears to be malignant

    Rather than using radiation like X-rays or computed tomographic scans, MRI produces a magnetic field that is about 10,000 times greater than the earth’s. This powerful magnetic field is combined with radio frequency pulses to produce cross-sectional images that can be stored on a computer or printed on film. A contrast material called gadolinium may be injected to improve the detail in the area being studied.

    Undergoing a breast MRI typically involves wearing a hospital gown or other clothing that does not have any metal fasteners. All metal objects, such as glasses, hearing aids, zippers, snaps, jewelry, hairpins or safety pins need to be removed before the scan. Patients who are pregnant, have any metal in their body (such as a pacemaker) or breast implants should inform the technologist prior to the scan. Unless informed otherwise, most patients can follow their normal routine before having a MRI.

    A MRI of the breast involves lying face down on a padded platform with the breasts hanging into cushioned openings. The narrow table then slides into the MRI machine. Patients must remain very still during the exam, which can last from 30 minutes to one hour. Earplugs may be worn to reduce the loud thumping and humming noises produced by the machine during the exam. The scan is non-invasive and causes no pain, although some patients may be anxious about being within a confined space.

    There is no recovery time following a MRI scan. Regular activities, diet and medications can be resumed immediately after the exam. Test results are reviewed by a radiologist, a physician specially trained to analyze and interpret radiology examinations, who then sends a summary report to the primary care or referring physician that is shared with the patient. For more information about breast MRI, talk with your physician or visit the www.radiologyinfo.org Web site sponsored by the American College of Radiology and the Radiological Society of North America.

    ABOUT DR. CRANNY

    Dr. Jennifer Cranny, is a board certified and fellowship trained interventional radiologist. She earned her medical degree from the University of Texas Medical Center in Houston and completed residency at Baylor College of Medicine. She completed her fellowship training in interventional radiology at Emory University. She specializes in breast imaging and is the Lead Interpreting Mammographer for Hilton Head Hospital. Dr. Cranny is a board member of the Susan G. Komen Foundation, Lowcountry Affiliate.

    Section: 
    Content Watch Publication ID: 
    10594736

              Iliopsoas Sarcoma–Induced Femoral Mononeuropathy Radiologically Presenting as Focal Myositis of the Thigh: A Case Report        
    imageNo abstract available
              Scholarship Luncheon Recognizes Donors, Recipients        
    game changer scholarship July 28, 2017 Scholarships were presented to students and donors were recognized at the recent scholarship luncheon.

    Scholarships were presented to students and donors were recognized at the recent scholarship luncheon.

    Piedmont Technical College student and Greenwood resident Yarely Palacios, right, was recently awarded the Game Changer Scholarship. Congratulating her is Susan Thompson, scholarship donor. This scholarship is for a senior female athlete at Greenwood High School who is in good standing with the school. Student should be an active member of Fellowship of Christian Athlete Huddle and demonstrate leadership skills through involvement in extra-curricular activities. A recommendation is required from a Coach or Guidance Counselor. 

     

    lpga symetra scholarshipTwo Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the LPGA Symetra Health Classic Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, from left, Roxie Rushton, a radiologic technology student from Ninety Six; Briana Coates, an associate degree nursing student from Abbeville; and Josh Black, associate vice president for enrollment and communications. A portion of the proceeds from the annual LPGA Self Regional Healthcare Classic at The Links at Stoney Point are donated to the Piedmont Technical College Foundation for scholarships. Awards are available to a students enrolled in the Allied Health or Nursing programs.

     

    fujifilm scholarshipTwo Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the Fujifilm Manufacturing Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, from left, Christopher Corley, computer technology student from Little Mountain; and Darrell Terry with Fujifilm Manufacturing. Not pictured is Joshua Harrison, an electronic engineering technology student from Greenwood. The scholarship is based on academic achievement, financial need and leadership.

     

     

    rad tech scholarshipPiedmont Technical College student and Greenwood resident Brianna Getsinger, center, recently received the Rad Tech Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Getsinger, a radiologic technology student, is congratulated by Susan and Bil Heath, scholarship donors. This scholarship is restricted to a student in their senior year of the Rad Tech Program (4th or 5th semester) with a Rad Tech specific GPA of 3.0 or higher. Preference is given to a single custodial parent first. Second preference is an adult student returning due to career change.

     

    la puerta de esperanza scholarshipFive Piedmont Technical College students recently received the La Puerta de Esperanza Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, from left, Carol Gray, scholarship donor; Martha Martinez Simon, an accounting student from Greenwood; Jennifer Garcia Orosco, an administrative office technology student from Greenwood; and Cynthia Palmerin, a business major from Greenwood. Not pictured are Dilan Maldonado, a mechanical engineering technology student from Greenwood; and Eloisa Santiago, a business management student from Cross Hill. La Puerta de Esperanza "The Door of Hope" is a compassionate ministry of the Greenwood Community Church of the Nazarene. The La Puerta de Esperanza Scholarship was established to help students who do not qualify for state or federal tuition aid.

     

    lakelands homebuilders scholarshipTwo Piedmont Technical College students recently received the Lakelands Homebuilders Association of Greenwood Scholarship at the annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are Andrew Smith, a building construction technology student from Cross Hill; and John Cobb, LHA representative. Not pictured is Chad Ott, a BCT student from Greenwood. The scholarship is awarded annually to BCT students based on academic achievement.  

     

     

    henry blohm scholarshipFour Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the Henry Blohm Leadership Scholarship. Pictured are, from left, David Rosenbaum, associate dean of students; Sherman Culbertson, an associate in science student from Greenwood; Jessie Russell, an associate in science student from Pomaria; and Ethan Meetze, a computer technology student from Newberry. Not pictured is Jessica Osborne, a cardiovascular technology student from Clinton. The scholarship is available to a student who has exhibited academic achievement, leadership abilities and financial need. 

     

    strom thurmond scholarshipNine Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the Strom Thurmond Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, front from left, Stephanie Johnson, an occupational therapy assistant student from Prosperity; Tinslie Wagler, an associate degree nursing student from Cross Hill; Heather McNally, an associate in arts student from McCormick; and Ashley Shepheard, a diversified agriculture student from Laurens. Back, Garrett Wachtel, a gunsmithing student from Greenwood; Denise Freeman, a medical assisting student from Abbeville; Jessica Bowie, a commercial art student from Abbeville; and Doug Whitesides, Capsugel representative. Not pictured are Melissa Scott, an occupational therapy assistant student from Clinton; and Latishwa Veal, a practical nursing student from Greenwood. The scholarship, which is named for Senator Strom Thurmond, is awarded annually to students who display leadership abilities and maintain a minimum 3.5 grade point average. The scholarship is also based on academic achievement and financial need.

     

    Piedmont Technical College welding student and Greenwood resident Joseph Fleming was recently awarded the G.B. Elledge Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship is available to students enrolled in the Welding program. Selection is based on academic achievement and financial need. 

    Two Piedmont Technical College students recently received the Jeanne Florence Scholarship Award. The students are Marva Burnside, an associate in arts student from Abbeville; and Taylor Riggins, a computer technology student from Greenwood. This scholarship is available to past Educational Talent Search or Upward Bound students or a Student Support Services participant and is based on financial need, academic achievement and recommendation by Student Services director and staff.

    Abbeville County Greenwood County Laurens County McCormick County Newberry County No
              Scholarship Luncheon Honors Donors, Recipients        
    ptc foundation board scholarship July 7, 2017 Scholarships were presented to students and donors were recognized at the recent scholarship luncheon.

    Scholarships were presented to students and donors were recognized at the recent scholarship luncheon.

    Four Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the PTC Foundation Board Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, from left, Jessi Boland, a welding student from Little Mountain; and Rocky Dunkman, Piedmont Technical College Foundation Board member. Not pictured are Brandon Ouzts, an associate in arts student from Saluda; David Risner, Jr., a horticulture student from Abbeville; and Nicholas Stevenson, an associate in arts student from Greenwood. The scholarships are awarded to an outstanding high school graduate from each of the college's supporting counties based on academic achievement while in high school.

     

    sterilite scholarshipFour Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the Sterilite Corporation Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, from left, Daniel DeLong, a welding student from Clinton; and David Kibler, HVAC instructor. Not pictured are Megan Bass, an associate in arts student from Clinton; Melissa Homovich, an administrative office technology student from Greenwood; and Lindsay Miller, an administrative office technology student from Joanna. This scholarship is available to Sterilite employees and members of their immediate family from Laurens and Greenwood who show academic achievement and financial need.

     

     

    agape scholarshipFour Piedmont Technical College occupational therapy students were recently awarded the Agape Senior Occupational Therapy Assistant Scholarship. Pictured are, from left, Cindy James from Agape Senior; and Lauren Suggs, an occupational therapy student from Donalds. Not pictured are Yashara Avery from Greenwood; Kathy Lang from Gray Court; and Whitney Pough from Batesburg. Agape Senior has established a scholarship to assist a student majoring in the Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Criteria includes academic achievement and financial need. Preference is given to Agape Senior employees.

     

     

    capsugel scholarshipNine Piedmont Technical College students were awarded the Capsugel Scholarship at a recent scholarship luncheon. Pictured, front from left, are Brandi Lambert, a medical assisting student from Greenwood; Heather Benshoof, a human services student from Abbeville; and Meredith Beiler, an associate degree nursing student from Abbeville. Back, Doug Whitesides, Capsugel representative; Janeva Lindler, a patient care technician student from Newberry; and Lourdes Corona, a computer technology student from Hodges. Not pictured are Renee Giovengo, an associate degree nursing student from Lincolnton, Ga.; Ashley Jackett, an associate in science student from Greenwood; Joseph Jones, a welding student from Whitmire; and Kate Lynn, an associate degree nursing student from North Augusta. Awarded annually, the scholarship is based on academic achievement and financial need.  

     

    allred scholarshipFour Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the Allred Leadership Scholarship. Pictured are, from left, Rella Allred, scholarship donor; and Megan Deason from Pomaria. Not pictured are Kristopher Gilmer from Honea Path; William Lever from Pomaria; and Carly Wright from Lexington. The scholarship is awarded annually to high school seniors, based on academic achievement, financial need and leadership. 

     

     

    laurens rotary scholarshipPiedmont Technical College student and Laurens resident Michelle Izaguirre, left, was recently awarded the Laurens Rotary Club Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Izaguirre, a mechatronics technology student, is congratulated by Marc Coker from the Laurens Rotary Club. This scholarship is available to Laurens County students showing academic achievement and financial need. 

     

     

    newberry county hospital scholarshipThree Piedmont Technical College students recently received the Newberry County Memorial Hospital Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, from left, Rhonda Belk, an associate in arts student from Ninety Six; Bruce Baldwin from Newberry County Memorial Hospital; and Michelle Dill, a veterinary technology student from Wagener. Not pictured is Rachel Brandis, a veterinary technology student from Columbia. Newberry County Memorial Hospital established this scholarship in 2016 to help support the students in the Health Science or Nursing programs with a minimum 2.5 program GPA. Selection is based on financial need and leadership ability.

     

    olly garrison scholarshipTwo Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the Olly Garrison Memorial Scholarship. Pictured are, from left, Diane Jackson, scholarship donor; and Justin Bladon, a diversified agriculture student from Abbeville. Not pictured is Cassandra Cheatham, a cardiovascular technology student from Edgefield. The scholarship is awarded annually to a returning adult student who is changing careers and maintains a minimum 3.0 grade point average.

     

     

    w a klauber scholarshipTwo Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the W. A. Klauber Memorial Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, from left, Tom Klauber, donor; Allison Lake, a radiologic technology student from Saluda; Christina Dominick, a radiologic technology student from Greenwood; and Bill Klauber, donor. Awarded annually to radiologic technology majors with at least one semester in clinical, the scholarship is based on academic achievement and financial need.           

     

     

    ptc golf scholarshipTen Piedmont Technical College students were recently awarded the PTC Golf Classic Scholarship at the college’s annual scholarship luncheon. Pictured are, front from left, Christopher Greenway, an associate in arts student from Greenwood; and O’Shaunaessy Spann, a cardiovascular technology student from Aiken. Back, Helen Williams, a business student from Greenwood; Fran Wiley, assistant vice president for development; and Luke Seigler, a mechanical engineering technology student from Plum Branch. Not pictured are Destiny Cockrell, an early care and education student from Greenwood; Erica Ford, a medical assisting student from Ninety Six; Bridgette Morris, an associate in science student from Whitmire; Michael Richey, a mechatronics student from Clinton; Jesse Smith, a diversified agriculture student from Belton; and Tianna Wooten, a respiratory care student from Honea Path. The scholarship is awarded annually and is based on academic achievement and financial need.

     

    Piedmont Technical College associate in arts student and Saluda resident Linda Sorcia was recently awarded the Annie Lee Swygert Scholarship. The scholarship is awarded each year based on academic achievement and financial need to a South Carolina resident.

    Piedmont Technical College human services student and Greenwood resident Velvet Gresham recently received the Greenwood Vocational Rehabilitation Advisory Board Scholarship. Awarded annually to second-year human services students from Greenwood, Abbeville, McCormick or Saluda County, the scholarship is based on academic achievement and financial need.

    Abbeville County Edgefield County Greenwood County Laurens County McCormick County Newberry County Saluda County No
              Military Story time #2        
    (This is a repost from an old Fark Thread but worth the read, yes it's all me and really happened.)

    Having been in the navy for years and spent almost all of my at sea time on Carriers i can confirm that they are on fire pretty much daily. I've put out a few and helped with a few not to mention sleeping in the hanger bay because of at least one really bad one. Not to mention burst sewage / steam / water or fuel lines. Carriers are very complex and generally spend too much time deployed and not enough time being maintained by people who actually give a damn. Worst was the USS America (Satans Flagship) and the best without a doubt was the USS Independence (Indy Pride) because the Japanese were doing all the important maintenance.

    Some of the nicknames we called them while i served.
    Enterprise (Mobile Chernobyl)
    Saratoga (Sinking Sara)
    Forestal (Forest Fire)
    Roosevelt (FascistshiatholeoffarkingAssholes)
    KittyHawk (****** Cawk)
    Reagan (Ronnie Raygun)

    Is firefighting one of the first things you learn in the Navy?
    Short answer is yes.
    Long Answer is of course it is, Both shipboard and Aircraft firefighting were mandatory. If you're at sea in your house and the house is on fire where the fark do you think you are going? If you are at blue water ops going in the ocean is BAD especially in the north atlantic (near instant hypothermia and death) or the med ( SHARKS! SHARKS EVERYWHERE!) Gotta learn firefighting / DC (Damage Control) and First aid and stay qualified at those things if you expect to Function, hell those things were required for advancement when i served. Participation in shipboard drills was MANDATORY. During Desert storm and the workup prior to it CBR (Chemical Biological Radiological) training was necessary also and unfortunately we actually had to use our CBR gear a couple times during all that. Fortunately it turned out they were unnecessary but better safe than sorry. (GO GO TICONDEROGA!)
              Virtual Phantoms at RSNA 2016        
    Virtual Phantoms Chief Technology Officer, Dr. Peter F. Caracappa, will be at the Radiological Society of North America annual meeting in Chicago, IL on November 29 & 30, 2016.   If you would like to participate in a live demonstration of VirutalDoseCT, or discuss the VirtualDose system, contact peter.caracappa@virtualphantoms.com to schedule an appointment.  
              Find Virtual Phantoms at RSNA 2015!        
    Virtual Phantoms Chief Technology Officer, Dr. Peter F. Caracappa, will be attending the Radiological Society of North America annual meeting, November 29-December 4 in Chicago, IL.   If you would like to participate in a live demonstration of VirutalDoseCT, or discuss the VirtualDose system, contact peter.caracappa@virtualphantoms.com to schedule and appointment.   See you in Chicago!
              Estudio radiologico de la columna cervical        
    La columna vertebral Está dividida en cinco regiones: cervical, torácica o dorsal, lumbar, sacra y coxígea. Cada una de estas regiones tiene funciones y características específicas (ver Imagen 1)
              Examen radiologico del colon por enema: preparacion y procedimiento        
    Este trabajo pretende brindar un protocolo detallado acerca de la realización del examen radiológico de colon por enema, de tal manera que facilite y agilice el trabajo de preparación  del paciente para la buena obtención de los resultados, así como de resolver las dudas que al paciente le puedan surgir, creando un ambiente de confianza, colaboración y satisfacción.
              Medios de contraste radiologicos. Protocolos de actuacion        
    Estas sustancias pueden tener efectos adversos que pueden ser minimizados con medidas preventivas. La extravasación de medios de contraste intravenoso es una complicación poco frecuente aunque actualmente su incidencia ha aumentado con el uso generalizado de inyectores automáticos.
              Radiographs of higher quality thanks to CSIC        

    The system is based on a new imaging modality, densitometric image, which has industrial and medical applications.

    Radiation imaging systems are based on the absorption suffered by X-ray or gamma ray photons passing through tissue or objects which is related to the shape of the object and the electron density of the material (electrons per unit volume) therethrough. The result is a projective image, which represents the sum of the structures of the object projected onto a two dimensional surface.

    "The new system also incorporates spatial information about the patient or object explored. The integration of this information with conventional radiological information allows us to obtain a new imaging modality with multiple industrial and biomedical applications, "says Germán Rodrigo CSIC researcher.

    In clinical diagnosis, this type of image incorporates information from the face of the patient, facilitates image interpretation and decision aid radiologist, speeding up the diagnosis. This improvement in the quality of image is produced by means of a spatial correction, and not by mathematical filters which could lead to errors in interpretation of injury. The system also allows more accurately quantify absorption calibrated and parameterized systems absorbance values ​​obtained depending on the thickness of the material.

    In industrial applications, densitometric information to determine the composition of the object that can not be inferred from the existing X-ray systems used for object inspection and quality control. By introducing new information about the scanned object, this system facilitates the exploration, being able to distinguish, for example, the amount of fatty tissue in meat pieces.

    The new system has been developed by researchers of the Institute of Corpuscular Physics (joint CSIC and University of Valencia), the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (CSIC) and the Institute of Telecommunications and Multimedia Applications (Polytechnic University of Valencia) . The company will be someone dealing ISTmedical this technology in the clinical setting.


              Common Lead Test Can Give False Results, FDA Warns        
    Common blood tests for lead can give falsely-low results in certain cases, according to a new warning from the Food and Drug Administration. The tests, manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics , are commonly used in doctors' offices and clinics, and on its website the company calls itself "the most trusted name in lead testing." But the FDA now says that its tests can give inaccurate results when used to test blood drawn from a vein. The majority of lead tests are not conducted with that kind of blood sample, but rather blood from a heel or finger prick, says Dr. Jeffrey Shuren , director of the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "We have no evidence that Magellan's tests, when used with blood obtained from a finger or heel stick, are impacted," says Shuren. "We believe most people will not be affected by this issue." For example, in 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that all children under the age 6 years in Flint, Mich., get re-tested as part
              Proteccion radiologica al paciente pediatrico        
    Mantener el tiempo de exposición a la radiación tan corto como sea posible. Mantener la distancia tan lejos como sea posible entre la fuente de radiación y la persona expuesta. Insertar material de blindaje entre la fuente de radiación y la persona expuesta. Criterio Alara: Mantener las exposiciones de la radiación tan bajas como sean razonables (As Low Reasonably Achievable).
              Medios diagnosticos y hallazgos radiologicos en el cancer de mama        
    El cáncer de mama es la proliferación acelerada, desordenada y no controlada de células con genes mutados, los cuales actúan normalmente suprimiendo o estimulando la continuidad del ciclo celular pertenecientes a distintos tejidos de una glándula mamaria, es sinónimo de carcinoma, se aplica a los neoplasias malignas que se originan en estirpes celulares de origen epitelial o glandular. La palabra 'cáncer' es griega y significa 'cangrejo'. Se dice que las formas corrientes de cáncer avanzado adoptan una forma abigarrada y con ramificaciones similar a la de un cangrejo marino y de ahí deriva su nombre (Cáncer).
              The Role of the Athletic Trainer in Patient-Centered Care         

    Patient-Centered Care (PCC) is a philosophy within the healthcare system that is becoming more of the accepted norm amongst health professionals. While PCC has slowly become an accepted model for standard deliverance of care, it is recently gaining attention as the ideal and preferred system for improving patient health outcomes and overall quality of life. The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine), defines PCC as “providing care that is respectful of, and responsive to, individual patient preferences and needs, ensuring that patient values and best interests guide all clinical decisions1.”

    There are three categories of providers that play an integral role in PCC: the role of the patient, the role of the primary care physician and the role of the additional healthcare professionals that will be involved in the patient’s care. Within athletic training, PCC is paramount to the success of the athlete. The PCC team may include, but is not limited to, the Athletic Trainer (AT), the team doctor, physical therapist and nutritionist, in addition to the athlete. In a high school or middle school setting, the parents also provide an important role, in addition to the coaching staff.

    From the patient’s perspective, the goal of PCC is to “empower patients to become active participants in their healthcare,” which can be achieved through education, online resources and easy access to knowledgeable professionals.2 From the perspective of the athlete, understanding their health history, as well as, any medical limitations or complications secondary to an injury, will enable him or her to make informed decisions when not in the presence of a clinician (i.e. home exercises, food choices, etc.).

    From the perspective of the Primary Care Physician (PCP), PCC requires that the PCP become an advocate for the patient, ensuring that all medical professionals that the patient may see provide healthcare that is not only safe, but is also effective.2 Additionally, it is the responsibility of the PCP to be the front runner on communication with other medical professionals, to ensure that all the patient’s needs are being addressed effectively and in a timely manner.

    Lastly, from the perspective of additional medical professionals that are involved with an individual patient, it is paramount that the patient feel a sense of satisfaction, fulfillment and approval with the standard of care, as well as, the outcome. For PCC to be effective, the patient must feel that every professional they interact with helps them feel valued, comfortable and cared for.2 All clinicians should be familiar with and be prepared to distribute material that is appropriate for various patient populations. These materials include, but are not limited to: pamphlets, online programs, community events or group education sessions.3

    Often, ATs can be in a unique position to work with additional medical professionals either through patient referral or through working with a special population and by being a part of the PCC team, enables the athlete to return to optimal functioning following an injury, health concern or lifestyle alteration.

    An AT can be prepared to work with the PCC team through checking that all athlete information is readily available to share with medical specialists that may be involved. Additionally, an AT should have the contact information of specialists on hand for better inter-specialist communication. Since the AT will most likely have the most face to face contact with the athlete, this communication is vital to ensure that the AT can help facilitate the appropriate course of action and that the athlete’s health and medical needs are being met. This will assist all individuals involved in making appropriate and informed decisions regarding the athlete’s care.

    A vital aspect of PCC and the importance of each medical professional associated with a patient, is to ensure that patients are “being educated and motivated to become better stewards of their health and more active participants in the management of their current or oncoming diseases.” 3 This can be done through ensuring that all patient materials and documents given are culturally relevant, incorporate goal setting and acknowledge patients as partners, rather than mere recipients, of their care.3 Within the context of goal setting, objective data is necessary to assist the patient in achieving self-driven, intrinsic motivation towards a healthier lifestyle - this can be accomplished through “easy-to-use and inexpensive self-management systems that are readily available to patients.” 3 This will ensure that there is a constant line of communication between clinician and patient, which can allow the clinician to provide feedback based on the patient’s objective data and will then allow the patient to be aware of the positive and potentially harmful lifestyle choices they may be engaged in.

    PCC is a vital part of 21st century healthcare. In a time where knowledge is easily accessible, it is the responsibility of the healthcare team (AT, PT, PCP, Patient and additional health professionals) to ensure that patients and athletes are aware of their lifestyle choices and how those choices are regularly and actively contributing to their global health. The medical and healthcare industry are centered on knowledge; if knowledge is power, then we as ATs have the opportunity and responsibility to empower our patients through education and help each individual we encounter achieve their greatest self.

    1. National Institute of Medicine
    2. Reynolds, A. (2009). Patient-centered care. Radiologic Technology, 81(2), 133-147.
    3. Walsh, M. N., Bove, A. A., Cross, R. R., Ferdinand, K. C., Forman, D. E., Freeman, A. M., & MacDonnell, B. (2012). ACCF 2012 health policy statement on patient-centered care in cardiovascular medicine. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 59(23), 2125-2143.

              Exam Security: Protect Athletic Training Candidates and Yourself        
    Sharing is usually a good thing, but this is not the case when preparing students for the BOC exam or discussing it with them after. It is illegal and unethical to memorize and discuss questions that are on the BOC exam, and both candidates and Program Directors are reminded to keep exam information confidential

    Prior to sitting for the BOC exam, candidates agree in the Candidate Attestation to not disclose information about items or answers in any format to anyone. This includes, but is not limited to:

    - Educators

    - Past or future examinees

    - Co-workers

    - Test preparation companies

    The Candidate Attestation asserts that no part of the exam may be copied or reproduced in any way before, during and after exam. This includes, but is not limited to, emailing, copying or printing electronic files, reconstructing content through memorization and/or dictation.

    BOC exam content is exclusive copyrighted property of the BOC and protected by federal copyright laws. The BOC will prosecute violations of this agreement. Violation of the agreement is also a violation of BOC Standards of Professional Practice, which can result in suspension or revocation of certification, if applicable, or suspension or denial of a candidate’s eligibility for future exams. It can also do the same for a candidate’s colleagues.

    The below table presents common scenarios that could violate exam confidentiality. Read on for guidance in each scenario. More information is also available in the BOC Exam Candidate Handbook.

    ScenarioWhen it’s OKWhen it’s not OKBottom line

    1. Educator asks candidates to “stop by” after the exam to “let me know how it went.”

    If the invitation and the feedback to the educator relates to their general experience (“I thought the test was not as difficult as I expected…”).

    This type of invitation from an educator may be misinterpreted by the candidate – and the student may think that the educator is asking the student to reveal copyrighted information.

    If the candidate is asked to reveal questions or their answer options, then he or she will need to report the educator to the BOC. The educator should stop the candidate immediately from revealing any exam content, since doing so may subject both the candidate and educator to the BOC’s ethics process.

    2. Candidate tells another candidate, “The test was very difficult – I felt like I didn’t have enough time.”

    The candidate is simply telling another candidate how they felt about the exam. This is all right because the candidate is not revealing any of the questions or the answer options.

    One candidate (or potential candidate) asks another candidate about the specific questions.

    If the questions or answer options are shared, these individuals may find themselves part of a BOC ethics investigation and/or legal complaint.

    3. Candidate to educator: “You didn’t teach me about this question that asked [specific question]. I felt unprepared.”

    Never.

    It is not all right and it will never be all right to reveal the BOC’s copyrighted questions (or answer options) to anyone.

    Candidates sign documentation stating that they will not share exam questions, and the BOC expects the candidates to abide by this contract. Those who don’t may find themselves part of a BOC ethics investigation and/or legal complaint.

    4. A future candidate learns from a past candidate that, "Your BOC exam will have both multiple choice and the new multiple response kind of items. I think there were a little over 100 questions on each session.”

    Candidates are welcome to discuss any information that is found on the BOC website, including the TYPES of items used on the various exams.

    If the conversation goes beyond exam format and the past candidate begins to describe exam questions and answers to the future exam-taker, a breach of ethics has occurred.

    As long as the conversation is limited to public information that anyone can read on the BOC website, such as exam format and style of item presentation, there is no problem. However, the past candidate should refrain from sharing specific exam content with the future candidate to protect not only the past exam-taker but also the future one.

    5. A future candidate is in class when the professor announces, "Everyone pay attention to this example. It came from a BOC exam. It will show up on another exam someday soon." In another class, the professor insisted that, "This is ALWAYS guaranteed to be a BOC exam question. This is one concept that you don’t want to forget.”

    There is no acceptable circumstance in which it is OK for an educator to offer to any class or audience any item or material directly linked to any BOC exam.

    Since all BOC exam material including all items (questions and answers) is copyrighted, it is illegal for anyone to reproduce and use these items in any manner whatsoever. Candidate exposure to BOC exam items is legally and ethically limited to candidates'' time spent taking BOC exams. Sample items available on the BOC website are not active items and may be shared.

    All candidates should be aware that unsolicited classroom exposure to BOC exam material may result in cancellation of their own exam scores and/or may lead to being barred from taking the BOC exam in the future. It also should be remembered that new exam items constantly are being generated and can deal with any topic in the BOC practice analysis.

    Sources: Scenarios 1-3 are from American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Scenarios 4 and 5 are from National Board of Examiners in Optometry, Inc. Content has been adapted for the BOC.
              Tractografia. Técnica neurorradiologica aplicada al estudio de la neuroanatomia        
    La tractografía es una nueva técnica de neuroimagen que deriva de la resonancia magnética. Por medio de técnicas no invasivas, permite obtener información de la organización de la sustancia blanca en el cerebro humano. En el trabajo que presentamos se utiliza la tractografía para elaborar un pequeño atlas en el que resultan evidentes algunas de las principales vías de conexión.
              The Yin to my Yang: Privacy and Confidentiality in the Athletic Training Facility        
    By Adaeze Teme, JD, PE-ATC

    If home is really where the heart is, then the athlete is certainly at home in an athletic training facility.  The notoriety of the facility rivals that of a panic room because of its ability to shelter the athlete’s health information against third parties.  The facility is not merely a functional hub for information gathering; indeed, it is the epicenter of the athlete’s pertinent health history.  Whether it is discussing injury status, treatment or surgery updates, the facility possesses content that must be kept confidential to maintain its integrity and to protect the privacy of the athletes and the Certified Athletic Trainer (AT) in the facility.

    In so many ways, confidentiality is the yin to privacy’s yang, and though used interchangeably, they could not be more different in application.  At first glance, the 2 terms seem similar, but understanding confidentiality and privacy is appreciating the legal significance of both terms.

    Confidentiality is a core ethical duty in the athletic training profession that is essential to the athlete and AT relationship.  Confidentiality, in this setting, refers to personal information shared between an athlete and AT that cannot be disclosed except by the express consent of the athlete.  Essentially, confidentiality between the athlete and the AT is perpetual or until otherwise agreed to or breached.  Although courts do not expressly recognize a confidentiality privilege between athletes and ATs, they will, however, uphold confidentiality agreements between the 2 parties.

    On the other hand, privacy is not just a prerogative, but a protected Constitutional right that grants freedom from interference into a person’s personal affairs.  For instance, there is a reasonable expectation of privacy during pre-participation physicals, as they are conducted in seclusion and away from the public view.  Privacy, as it relates to the athletic training profession, is an obligation to protect the athlete, while maintaining their dignity during evaluation, treatment and rehabilitation.

    If you have any concerns about privacy and confidentiality in your athletic training facility, then take a look at the BOC Facility Principles document and Facility Principles Assessment Tool.  There you will find easy-to-use checklists with more information on accessibility, privacy and confidentiality, employee safety, safe handling of hazardous materials, emergency preparedness and more.

    *This blog only reflects the author’s views on this subject and not the confidentiality or privacy agenda of the US FDA.

    Adaeze Teme, JD, PE-ATC is an orthopedic physician extender and certified athletic trainer.  She serves as Regulatory Counsel at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH).

    Resources

    1. Gary Stuart, The Ethical Duty of Confidentiality, ETHICS LAW.COM,  http://www.ethicslaw.com/dutycon.html (last visited Aug. 24, 2015).

    2. OHIO REV. CODE ANN. §1347.15 (A)(1) (West 2009); Is there a Difference Between Confidentiality and Privacy? THOMSONREUTERS.COM, http://criminal.findlaw.com/criminal-rights/is-there-a-difference-between-confidentiality-and-privacy.html (last visited Aug. 24, 2015).

    3. Jere Webb, A Practitioner’s Guide to Confidentiality Agreements, STOEL.COM, http://www.stoel.com/files/confidentialityagreementguide.pdf (last visited Aug. 24, 2015).

    4. “[T]estimonial privilege, is a concept from the law of evidence and present in common law and statutes of the fifity states . . . [that] appl[ies] in judicial and other proceedings in which a lawyer may be called as a witness or otherwise required to produce evidence concerning a client.” Sue Michmerhuizen, AMERICANBAR.COM, http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/professional_responsibility/confidentiality_or_attorney.authcheckdam.pdf (last updated May 2007).

    5. Eric Weiss and Debra Slifkin, Enforceability of Rule 26(c): Confidentiality Orders and Agreements, FEDERATION.ORG, http://www.thefederation.org/documents/weiss.htm (last visited Aug. 24, 2015).

    6. Griswold v. Connecticut, 381 U.S. 479, 483 (1965).  Right to privacy as a right to "protect[ion] from ... in the "penumbras" and "emanations" of other constitutional protections.

    7. Sanchez Scott v. Alza Pharmaceuticals, Cal.Rptr. 2d 410, 414 (Cal. Ct. App. 2d 2001) (“ [R]easonable expectation of privacy in the medical examination room . . .”).

     

     

              Hernia diafragmatica postraumatica cronica no complicada. Presentacion de caso radiologico        
    Las hernias diafragmáticas, a través de los tiempos, han sido bien documentadas y a pesar que su diagnóstico puede conllevar a retrasos en el mismo, se realizan sin un máximo de problemas. Los traumatismos de la región toracoabdominal, tanto abiertos como cerrados, pueden producir lesiones del diafragma que se acompañan o no de una migración de vísceras abdominales al tórax, la que puede ser mono o multivisceral. Se presenta estudio tomográfico de una paciente con masa cardiofrénica derecha con antecedentes de accidente de tránsito años anteriores y que presenta una hernia diafragmática postraumática crónica no complicada.
              PF18. Angiosarcoma primario cardiaco en paciente varon joven con diagnostico clinico y radiologico de tromboembolismo pulmonar agudo. Sesion de poster forum XI Congreso de la Sociedad Andaluza de Cirugia Cardiovascular (SACCV)        
    Presentamos el caso de un paciente con clínica de dolor torácico de características pleuríticas, cuadro sincopal y disnea. Ante un primer diagnóstico mediante ecocardiografía transtorácica de trombosis intracavitaria en cámaras derechas y tromboembolismo pulmonar, se realiza fibrinolisis. Tras empeoramiento clínico, ausencia de respuesta al tratamiento y realización de angioTC que confirma el diagnóstico de tromboembolismo pulmonar submasivo, se decide intervención quirúrgica urgente.
              Hernia lumbar grasa. Presentacion de caso radiologico        
    Se conoce genéricamente como hernia a la salida espontánea o provocada del contenido de una cavidad o espacio orgánico al exterior. Las hernias lumbares grasas son de las más raras y su diagnóstico es clínico/radiológico; pueden exteriorizarse al espacio lumbar superior o en el espacio lumbar inferior. Se sabe aparecen al nacimiento o adquirirse por traumas, iatrogenias o posquirúrgicas. En ocasiones pueden presentarse como un cuadro de oclusión intestinal mecánica. El diagnóstico en su presentación clásica suele ser fácil y su conducta final es quirúrgica por lumbotomía posterior.
              Convulsiones inducidas por medios de contraste radiologicos. Revision bibliografica a partir de un caso clinico        
    La administración de un medio de contraste radiológico yodado es seguida de un cuadro convulsivo que apareció poco tiempo después de la administración del mismo para la realización de una mielografía en una paciente femenina de 15 años de edad, con historia de salud anterior que sufrió un trauma en la columna lumbosacra producto de una caída de sus propios pies presentando, aumento de volumen en la zona como consecuencia de esto. Recibiendo tratamiento inmediato y mantenido para las convulsiones, lográndose la recuperación satisfactoria y su posteriormente alta médica sin secuela alguna
              Escoliosis dorsal congenita en el adulto. Presentacion de un caso clinico-radiologico        
    La Escoliosis es la desviación lateral de la columna vertebral, asociada a la rotación de los cuerpos vertebrales y la alteración estructural de ellos. Esta entidad se clasifica desde el punto de vista etiológico en: Idiopáticas, Congénitas, Neuromusculares y Escoliosis de la neurofibromatosis. La Escoliosis congénita es una enfermedad poco frecuente, que se produce a causa de anomalías congénitas de la columna vertebral, como la falla total o parcial de formación de una vértebra (hemivértebra), la falta de segmentación total o parcial de la columna y las mixtas.
              New Hybrid Cardio-Vascular Laboratory is first in the private sector        
    The new £1.2 million laboratory is now being used to image any part of the body and supports the integration of interventional and surgical teams to perform some of the most complex procedures available today. It is designed for TAVI, Endovascular Repair of Aortic Aneurysm, Vertebroplasty-Kyphoplasty and Femoral Endarterectomy with dilatation and stenting. A number of other procedures performed in a general angiography department benefit from the hybrid lab, such as aortic stenting and other conditions including those that are liver related (HPB), orthopaedic and even gynae procedures such as Fibroid Embolisation. The state of the art imaging available in the hybrid lab allows for simultaneous display of live imaging with 3D reconstruction to provide and determine projection angles during complex interventions. There are also dose saving features including a laser positioner and last image hold positioner which facilitate configuration of images in sections displayed on a 56 inch monitor. London Bridge Hospital’s Chief Executive Officer, Mr John Reay said the new laboratory was an important addition to the state of the art facilities at the hospital. “It is all about providing the best patient care and the best facilities for our consultants and medical teams. This hospital has long had a reputation for introducing the latest techniques and technology and it has often been first to provide new services for private patients.” “We were the first private hospital to carry out minimally invasive heart valve repairs; one of the first to install 64 slice CT imaging technology, the first to develop dual ablation procedures for arrhythmias and the first to carry out the TAVI procedure in the private sector. Our hybrid lab is another first and it is already bringing major benefits for patient care in a wide range of disciplines,” said Mr Reay. Consultant Interventional Radiologist Dr Tarun Sabharwal feels that the new facility will bring many benefits to patients and doctors alike: “This new laboratory enables us to carry out very complex procedures which combine both surgical and radiological techniques so we can help more patients.” “We will be able to carry out more minimally invasive procedures which could include things like aortic stentgrafts, combined surgical endartectomy and radiological stenting as a single procedure, and spinal procedures such as osteoid osteoma ablation and kyphoplasty" he said. London Bridge Hospital recently opened its new 15 bed critical care unit, the most up to date and the largest private unit in South East England
              From Brookhaven Lab: “The Science of Detecting and Defeating Radiological Threats”        
    Brookhaven Lab April 18, 2014 Kay Cordtz If you were at the Super Bowl in New Jersey in February, or at the concurrent “NFL Experience” in Manhattan, you may have spotted some elite Brookhaven Lab employees. Not cheering in the stands or even inside the stadium, these members of the Lab’s Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) […]
              The Parapharyngeal Compartment and its Fascial Relations        
    The Parapharyngeal Compartment and its Fascial Relations 2013 Guidera, Alice K Introduction An accurate understanding of the arrangement of cervical fascia and its associated compartments is essential for differential diagnosis, predicting the spread of disease and surgical management. As surgical technology advances it becomes imperative to have a thorough understanding of the anatomy of these compartments. Current descriptions of one such compartment, the parapharyngeal compartment (PPC), are inconsistent in terms of its borders, communications and contents. Methods This thesis comprises two main elements. Firstly, a review of descriptions of cervical fascia in contemporary reference texts recommended by the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons, followed by a detailed review of the scientific and clinical literature. Secondly, an investigation of the anatomy of the PPC utilising a combination of techniques: cadaver dissection of 10 half heads (eight embalmed, two fresh; 3 male, 7 female; mean age 81 years) via several different approaches (lateral to medial, medial to lateral [transoral], and posterior to anterior); serial histological sections in two additional half heads; and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cadaver specimens and 20 patients (9 male, 11 female; mean age 53 years) independently and blindly analysed by an experienced head and neck radiologist and the author to compare fascial arrangements seen on MRI and dissection. Results The current terminology used to describe the cervical fascia and its compartments is replete with confusing synonyms and inconsistencies, creating important interdisciplinary differences in understanding. Analysis of the scientific and clinical literature revealed numerous anatomical controversies relating to the PPC. Dissection findings showed that the PPC has a dihedral shape, tapering to a point superiorly at the skull base, widening in its central portion, and tapering to its inferior limit at the greater cornu of the hyoid bone. The lateral and superior boundary of the PPC was formed by the tensor veli palatini muscle, which was intimately related to the medial pterygoid muscle. Structures lying between the tensor veli palatini and medial pterygoid muscles were contents of the masticator compartment. The carotid sheath formed a distinct, robust fascia separating the PPC and carotid compartment. There was no ‘styloid diaphragm’ encompassing the styloid process and its associated muscles. However, the styloid muscles are key contents of the PPC that can be used to guide surgical dissection. The PPC also contained fat and neurovascular structures. It communicated with the submandibular compartment in all specimens, with the parotid compartment in some, but a communication with the carotid and retropharyngeal compartments was not identified. Conclusions A revised nomenclature underpinned by evidence-based anatomical and radiological findings is proposed in order to enhance understanding of the cervical fascia and its compartments and facilitate clearer interdisciplinary communication. The three-dimensional anatomy of the PPC is complex; it is a deep compartment that is difficult to access and not oriented along traditional imaging planes. This study has clarified the borders, communications and contents of the PPC, which should help to optimise minimally invasive surgical approaches (particularly transoral approaches), intraoperative orientation within the compartment, and reduce the risk of inadvertent damage to regional neurovascular structures.
              Radiology/Mammography Tech        
    CA-Dublin, GLC Group’s Government Services Division, GLC On-The-Go is hiring a Multi-Modality Tech (General Radiology/Mammography Tech) for a long-term contract with the FCI in Dublin, CA. Technologist will perform a variety of radiology procedures and mammography examinations. Duties to include but not limited to: · Perform routine radiologic procedures ordered by the medical staff for the inmate population
              FREE-LANCE INTELLIGENCE UPDATE JANUARY 2013: ‘ON THE BRINK’ Global Nuclear Scenario        
    “In March of 2011 enough plutonium blew out of the reactors to kill all life on Earth. Radiation poisoning doesn’t kill right away. It will take about 5 years for the deaths to start, then in about 20…well lets just say we need to change this reality we are being force-fed. Yes…the whole ‘collapse of […]
              â€˜THROUGH A NARROW WINDOW’ Chapter 13, ‘Silent Spring’, Rachel Carson (excerpts)        
    http://rachels-carson-of-today.blogspot.co.nz/2009/11/silent-spring-rachel-carson-1962.html THROUGH A NARROW WINDOW (chapter thirteen) For mankind as a whole, a possession infinitely more valuable than individual life is our genetic heritage, our link with past and future. Shaped through long aeons of evolution, our genes not only make us what we are, but hold in their minute beings the future – be […]
              â€œHOT LEGACY”, ‘THE WORLD WITHOUT US’, Alan Weisman (chap. 15)        
    “…used nuclear fuel, some of it decades old, languishes in holding tanks. Oddly, it is up to a million times more radioactive than when it was fresh. While in the reactor, it began mutating into elements heavier than enriched uranium, such as isotopes of plutonium and americium…At WIPP…the U.S. Department’ of Energy is legally required […]
              â€˜GLOBAL RADIO-LOGICAL UPDATE: NUCLEAR PLAGIARISM, HYSTERIA, & DEPOPULATION” Jeff Phillips        
    GLOBAL RADIO-LOGICAL UPDATE: PLAGIARISM, HYPE, HYSTERIA, HIDDEN AGENDAS and DEPOPULATION NUCLEAR PLAGIARISM HYPE, HYSTERIA and HIDDEN AGENDAS ‘POPULATION REDUCTION’ THROUGH NUCLEAR POLLUTION ‘COMING FORTH BY DAY’ NUCLEAR PLAGIARISM Last week Dr. Alexey Yablokov, co-author of  Chernobyl:  Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment emailed to thank and compliment for and on my ‘global […]
              â€œGLOBAL RADIO-LOGICAL CATASTROPHE and ‘CATACLYSMIC EVOLUTION’ ” Jeff Phillips        
    http://geo-terrorism.blogspot.co.nz/2012/05/global-radio-logical-catastrophe-and.html GLOBAL RADIO-LOGICAL CATASTROPHE and ‘CATACLYSMIC EVOLUTION’ “Great catastrophes of the past accompanied by electrical discharges and followed by radioactivity could have produced sudden and multiple mutations of the kind achieved today by experimenters, but on an immense scale.  The past of mankind, and of the plant and animal kingdoms, too, must now be viewed […]
              research scientist, biochemistry        
    Vancouver, BC - Job requirements Languages English Education Master's degree or equivalent experience Experience 3 years to less than 5 years Work Setting University or college; Research institute, laboratory or centre Radiological Technologist Specific Skills Operate X-ray, ...
               ITPR1 gene deletion causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia 15/16: a genetic, clinical and radiological description of a novel kindred         
    Novak, M, Davis, M, Li, A, Goold, R, Tabrizi, S J, Sweeney, M G, Houlden, H, Treacy, C and Giunti, P (2010) ITPR1 gene deletion causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia 15/16: a genetic, clinical and radiological description of a novel kindred. In: Association of British Neurologists Annual Meeting 2010; 11-14 May 2010, Bournemouth, U.K..
               An ITPR1 gene deletion causes spinocerebellar ataxia 15/16: a genetic, clinical and radiological description.         
    Novak, Marianne J.U., Sweeney, Mary G., Li, Abi, Treacy, Colm, Chandrashekar, Hoskote S., Giunti, Paola, Goold, Robert G., Davis, Mary B., Houlden, Henry and Tabrizi, Sarah J. (2010) An ITPR1 gene deletion causes spinocerebellar ataxia 15/16: a genetic, clinical and radiological description. Movement Disorders, 25(13), pp. 2176-2182. ISSN (print) 0885-3185
              Countdown to Hiroshima, X-Minus-21 Days: Unholy Trinity and the Birth of the Atomic Age        
    While most people trace the dawn of the nuclear era to August 6, 1945, and the dropping of the atomic bomb over the center of Hiroshima, it really began three weeks earlier, in the desert near Alamogordo, New Mexico, with the top-secret Trinity test. Its 71st anniversary will be marked—or mourned today.

    Entire books have been written about the test, so I’ll just touch on one key issue here briefly (there’s much more in my book with Robert Jay Lifton, Hiroshima in America, and my own recent book and ebook Atomic Cover-Up). It’s related to a hallmark of the age that would follow: a new government obsession with secrecy, which soon spread from the nuclear program to all military and foreign affairs in the cold war era.

    In completing their work on building the bomb, Manhattan Project scientists knew it would produce deadly radiation but weren’t sure exactly how much. The military planners were mainly concerned about the bomber pilots catching a dose, but J. Robert Oppenheimer, “The Father of the Bomb,” worried, with good cause (as it turned out) that the radiation could drift a few miles and also fall to earth with the rain.

    Indeed, scientists warned of danger to those living downwind from the Trinity site but, in a pattern-setting decision, the military boss, General Leslie Groves, ruled that residents not be evacuated and kept completely in the dark (at least until they spotted a blast brighter than any sun). Nothing was to interfere with the test. When two physicians on Oppenheimer’s staff proposed an evacuation, Groves replied, “What are you, Hearst propagandists?”

    Admiral Williams Leahy, President Truman’s chief of staff—who opposed dropping the bomb on Japan—placed the bomb in the same category as “poison gas.” And, sure enough, soon after the shot went off before dawn on July 16, scientists monitored some alarming evidence. Radiation was quickly settling to earth in a band thirty miles wide by 100 miles long. A paralyzed mule was discovered twenty-five miles from ground zero.

    Still, it could have been worse; the cloud had drifted over loosely-populated areas. “We were just damn lucky,” the head of radiological safety for the test later affirmed.

    The local press knew nothing about any of this. When the shock wave had hit the trenches in the desert, Groves’ first words were: “We must keep the whole thing quiet.” This set the tone for the decades that followed, with tragic effects for “downwinders” and others tainted across the country, workers in the nuclear industry, “atomic soldiers,” those who questioned the building of the hydrogen bomb and an expanding arms race, among others.

    Naturally, reporters were curious about the big blast, however, so Groves released a statement written by W.L. Laurence (who was on leave from the New York Times and playing the role of chief atomic propagandist) announcing that an ammunition dump had exploded.

    In the weeks that followed, ranchers discovered dozens of cattle had odd burns or were losing hair. Oppenheimer ordered post-test health reports held in the strictest secrecy. When W.L. Laurence’s famous report on the Trinity test was published just after the Hiroshima bombing he made no mention of radiation at all.

    Even as the scientists celebrated their success at Alamagordo on July 16, the first radioactive cloud was drifting eastward over America, depositing fallout along its path. When Americans found out about this, three months later, the word came not from the government but from the president of the Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, New York, who wondered why some of his film was fogging and suspected radioactivity as the cause.

    Fallout was absent in early press accounts of the Hiroshima bombing as the media joined in the triumphalist backing of The Bomb and the bombings. When reports of thousands in Hiroshima and Nagasaki afflicted with a strange and horrible new disease emerged, General Groves, at first, called it all a “hoax” and “propaganda” and speculated that the Japanese had different “blood.” Then the military kept reporters from the West from arriving in the atomic cities, until more than a month after the blasts, when it controlled access in an early version of today’s “embedded reporters” program.

    When some of the truth about radiation started to surface in the U.S. media, a full-scale official effort to downplay the Japanese death toll—and defend the decision to use the bomb—really accelerated, leading to an effective decades-long “Hiroshima narrative.” But that’s a story for my Atomic Cover-Up book—which also covers the suppression of film shot by the US Army in Hirohsima and Nagasaki—and for another day here.
              Impact of the Introduction of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination on Pneumonia in The Gambia: Population-Based Surveillance and Case-Control Studies        

    Author: Mackenzie GA, Hill PC, Sahito SM, et al.

    This article, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, assessed the impact and effectiveness of routine infant vaccination with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) on pneumonia in children in The Gambia, a low-income country with a high burden of pneumonia. The authors conducted population-based surveillance and case control studies to measure the impact of PCV13, introduced in The Gambia in May 2011, on the incidence of World Health Organization-defined radiological pneumonia. Findings indicate that the introduction of PCV13 was associated with modest reductions in hospitalized cases of pneumonia and substantial reductions in severe pneumonia in young children four years after introduction.
          

              Common Lead Test Can Give False Results, FDA Warns        
    Common blood tests for lead can give falsely-low results in certain cases, according to a new warning from the Food and Drug Administration. The tests, manufactured by Magellan Diagnostics , are commonly used in doctors' offices and clinics, and on its website the company calls itself "the most trusted name in lead testing." But the FDA now says that its tests can give inaccurate results when used to test blood drawn from a vein. The majority of lead tests are not conducted with that kind of blood sample, but rather blood from a heel or finger prick, says Dr. Jeffrey Shuren , director of the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. "We have no evidence that Magellan's tests, when used with blood obtained from a finger or heel stick, are impacted," says Shuren. "We believe most people will not be affected by this issue." For example, in 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended that all children under the age 6 years in Flint, Mich., get re-tested as part
              Artrografia MR stawu biodrowego lub barkowego za 749 zł pod kotrolą tomografii komputerowej lub usg w Radiologica o/Wola        
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              A2LA Accredits First Forensic Inspection Body        

    The American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) is proud to announce the accreditation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Chemical Biological Radiological and Nuclear Sciences Unit (CBRNSU) to ISO/IEC 17020 for Forensic Inspection.

    (PRWeb August 07, 2015)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/08/prweb12892896.htm


              MZ o badaniach psychiatrycznych i psychologicznych        
    Na stronie internetowej Ministerstwa Zdrowia ukazał się projekt rozporządzenia ministra zdrowia w sprawie badań psychiatrycznych i psychologicznych mających na celu zapewnienie bezpieczeństwa jądrowego i ochrony radiologicznej.
              Conference Highlights: RSNA 2010        
    RSNA 2010, the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, was held from November 29 to December 3 in Chicago. The features below highlight just
              Artrografia MR stawu biodrowego lub barkowego za 749 zł pod kotrolą tomografii komputerowej lub usg w Radiologica o/Wola        
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              A New Orleans Chiropractor's View On Changing Perceptions Of Chiropractic In The US        
    The art and science of the chiropractor has often been maligned by the western health establishment. The historical animosity is mostly due to the fact that western medicine tends to employ a philosophy of reductionism, which states that the best way to understand how the human body works, how pathologies originate, and how to treat them can best be accomplished by reducing the body to its component parts. The body is classified into organ systems, then into individual organs, which are then divided into their component tissues, and finally individual cells themselves. Traditional western medicine seeks to localize the cause of pathology and then treat the disorder at the narrowest level of scope possible. This reductionism is in direct contrast to the holistic approach taken by the chiropractor. The chiropractor, much like the traditional Chinese medicine practitioner, realizes that the body can not be effectively reduced into component parts. The chiropractor views life as an emergent phenomenon that both encompasses and transcends its component parts. In recent years, many western science practitioners have begun to appreciate the holistic approach of the chiropractor and chiropractic treatments are starting to find their rightful place in the medical mainstream.

    The chasm between holistic health care and traditional western medicine is narrowing. Just as physicians are beginning to appreciate the benefits of holistic approaches to health, some chiropractors are also employing some of the techniques and tools of conventional western medicine in their practice. Traditional spine manipulation techniques are combined with modern radiological diagnostic equipment to determine the most effective treatment for the patient. Chiropractors are also trained to recognize the symptoms of serious conditions, such as cancer, and when they detect such a disorder they refer the patient to a health care provider that specializes in that condition. Clearly, chiropractic practice is increasingly being seen more as a complement to traditional health care rather than a direct competitor.

    The public has taken note of the changing relationship between the chiropractor and the physician. For this reason, many insurance policies now provide coverage for chiropractic treatments. Additionally, the United States Armed Forces now mandates that all service men and women must have access to a chiropractor while in active service. Many athletes also take advantage of chiropractic treatment, both professional and amateurs. The United States Olympic team keeps a number of chiropractors on staff and chiropractic care is now seen as an integral part of the modern athletic training regimen.

    The increased acceptance of chiropractic along with other holistic therapies is not accidental. Scientific studies have shown that holistic techniques are highly effective at treating certain kinds of disorders, including some disorders that can not be easily treated using standard medical techniques. Holistic medicine, once viewed as a fringe pseudoscience, is enjoying an increasingly positive reputation among the general public as well as professional health care providers. Since chiropractic care is now more widely available than in days past, and since many insurance policies now cover the services of a chiropractor, the health care consumer finds that he or she has more options than before and is therefore able to take a more active role in planning his or her own health care.



    Chiropractor Manipulation

    Chiropractic Service
              New Radiological Techniques To Tackle Prostate Cancer        
    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers among men.

    Interventional Radiology (also known as IR or Special Procedures) is the section of the department that use imaging equipment to perform procedures ("intervene") that directly treat a disease.

    Dr. Omar Yumen is here to discuss all the latest radiological advancements  for the treatment of prostate cancer.
              Mason General and Metrasens Celebrate National Radiologic Technology Week Together        

    Rad Tech Week celebration at Mason General Hospital is contributed to by leading FMD manufacturer Metrasens.

    (PRWeb November 04, 2013)

    Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/11/prweb11286138.htm


              KaVo zaprasza na szkolenia i warsztaty        
    Diagnostyka radiologiczna to niezwykle prężnie rozwijająca się dziedzina, która znajduje coraz szersze zastosowanie w stomatologii. Punktowe zdjęcia wewnątrzustne to już codzienność, jednak w wielu przypadkach niewystarczająca do postawienia kompletnej diagnozy.
              Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: "Medication errors in hospitals don’t disappear with new technology". Government: "It's the doctors' fault." I am cited.        
    The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette published an article on EHR problems yesterday entitled "Medication errors in hospitals don’t disappear with new technology."  It is based on a recent study by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, retrievable here:  http://patientsafetyauthority.org/ADVISORIES/AdvisoryLibrary/2017/Mar;14(1)/Pages/01.aspx

    I am cited.  Also cited is an HHS official, Dr. Andrew Gettinger, acting deputy national coordinator for health information technology in the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, who disagreed with my views.  I am familiar with Dr. Gettinger's views.  More on that later.

    Medication errors in hospitals don’t disappear with new technology
    Steve Twedt
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
    http://www.post-gazette.com/business/healthcare-business/2017/04/10/medication-error-electronic-health-record-hospitals-patient-safety-authority/stories/201704090072

    In the first six months of 2016, Pennsylvania hospitals reported 889 medication errors or close calls that were attributed, at least in part, to electronic health records and other technology used to monitor and record patients’ treatment.

    A majority of the errors pertained to dosages — either missed dosages or an administration of the wrong dose. Of the 889 errors, nearly 70 percent reached the patient. Among those, eight patients were actually harmed, including three involving critical drugs such as insulin, anticoagulants and opioids.

    The extent of the injuries was not detailed, although no deaths were recorded.  Those are the stark numbers in a new analysis by the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority, an independent state agency that looks at ways to reduce medical errors.

    But interpretations of the report’s significance — and specifically the overall benefits and risks of information technology in a hospital setting — cross a wide spectrum.

    The wide spectrum is the gap between those who believe in what might be called cybernetic supremacy (that is, the hyper-enthusiasts who ignore the real-world downsides of technology such as today's EMRs) versus those who promote what I call cybernetic sobriety (a more candid, mature attitude fostered by actual knowledge of the long history of cybernetic failures and the myriad causes of such failures).

    Some view reports such as that of the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority (PPSA) in a reasonably patient rights-oriented manner, including the PPSA itself:

    “This is the classic ‘tip of the iceberg,’” said pharmacist Matthew Grissinger, manager of medication safety analysis for the Patient Safety Authority in Harrisburg and co-author of the analysis with fellow pharmacist Staley Lawes. “We know for a ton of reasons not every error is reported.”

    I've written extensively at HC Renewal on the "tip of the iceberg" issue, a phrase also used in the past by the FDA CDER (Center for Devices & Radiological Health) director Jeffrey Shuren MD JD and others.  See for example my February 28, 2010 post "FDA on Health IT Adverse Consequences: 44 Reported Injuries And 6 Deaths In Two Years, Probably Just 'Tip of Iceberg'" at  http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2010/02/fda-on-health-it-adverse-consequences.html as well as my January 8, 2016 post "Yet another observation that known health IT-caused injuries and deaths are 'the tip of the iceberg'" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2016/01/yet-another-observation-that-known.html.

    Of course, a PPSA disclaimer was issued, in my view perhaps to placate the health IT industry:

    ...Mr. Grissinger cautioned that the findings are “absolutely not” an indicator that patients are less safe, as hospitals have moved from paper to electronic records incorporating health information technology...the authors did conclude that technology meant to improve patient safety “has led to new, often unforeseen types of errors” due to system problems or user mistakes.

    A more correct statement might have been that "these most current findings are yet another red flag that patients could be less safe with bad health IT, but since there are a 'ton of reasons' not every error is reported, we just don't know - and we truly need to devote a great deal of effort towards filling the gaps in our limited knowledge."

    I've written on the issue of not jumping to health IT safety conclusions, one way or another, based on current data, especially when that data is admittedly limited.  For example, see my April 9, 2014 post "FDA on health IT risk:  "We don't know the magnitude of the risk, and what we do know is the tip of the iceberg, but health IT is of 'sufficiently low risk' that we don't need to regulate it" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2014/04/fda-on-health-it-risk-reckless-or.html.

    In that post I noted that a secret 2010 FDA internal report on health IT risk (marked "not for public use") unearthed by investigative reporter Fred Schulte stated that "...In summary, the results of this data review suggest significant clinical implications and public safety issues surrounding Health Information Technology...The absence of mandatory reporting enforcement of H-IT safety issues limits the number of relevant MDRs [device reports] and impedes a more comprehensive understanding of the actual problems and implications."

    We don't know what we don't know, but to date the efforts to robustly learn the truth has been milquetoast to non-existent.  "Proof (of safety) by lack of evidence" - in an area where we admit the evidence is likely severely deficient - seems to be the default industry go-to position.  "Proof by lack of evidence", of course, is a logical fallacy.

    Back to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:


    ... Frustration with the technology
    In January 2015, 35 physician groups — including the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Society of Anesthesiologists — sent a nine-page letter about electronic health records to the national coordinator for health information at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    Their purpose was to convey their “growing frustration with the way EHRs are performing,” the letter stated.

    “Many physicians find these systems cumbersome, do not meet their workflow needs, decrease efficiency, and have limited, if any, interoperability. Most importantly, certified EHR technology can present safety concerns for patients.”

    That Jan. 2015 letter is at http://mb.cision.com/Public/373/9710840/9053557230dbb768.pdf and speaks for itself.  Kudos to the Post-Gazette for citing it; the public is largely unaware of its existence.

    I am then cited in the Gazette article:

    Physician Scot Silverstein, a Philadelphia-based consultant and independent expert in electronic health records and vocal critic of such systems, calls the software “legible gibberish” better designed for handling warehouse inventory than managing and monitoring patient care in a clinical setting.

    “Electronic health records are a massively complex computer application, far too complex than is needed for a clinic taking care of patients,” he said in a phone interview. “EHRs need to be toned down, be less complex, and be used less.”

    Opportunities for mistakes are numerous, he said, as a physician may have to scroll through multiple screens, while each screen with a dozen or more columns plus an array of drop down menus. Some systems, he said, allow doctors to keep screens on multiple patients open simultaneously, increasing the chances of a medication mix-up.

    “The software needs to be designed better.”

    I am a vocal critic of bad health IT, and actually called the output of the systems to be "legible gibberish" as at my Feb. 27, 2011 post "Two weeks, two reams" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2011/02/electronic-medical-records-two-weeks.html, but the quote is close enough.

    Indeed, today's EHRs seem more designed for mercantile, manufacturing and management settings, and "calm, solitary office environments" (channeling Joan Ash) rather than the incredibly complex, poorly bounded and unpredictable environment of clinical medicine.

    I am quoted accurately on the complexity and overuse issue, although the issue of preventing  physicians from having multiple patient screens open was actually a short term workaround known to me to have been put in effect some years back.  This was done when a major EHR was unpredictably transposing orders into wrong charts when multiple patient's screens were open (creating two potential patients at risk).

    The software indeed needs to be designed better, to meet clinical needs.


    Dr. Silverstein, who says his mother’s death was precipitated by a heart medication mix-up involving her electronic health record, cites federal initiatives giving hospitals financial incentive to implement electronic health systems as pushing the programs without sufficient vetting.

    “The thinking was, ‘Computers plus doctors equals better medicine,’ period. But the technology was not and is still not ready for that kind of push.”

    Indeed it was not ready, being experimental technology. Further, vetting in real-world settings via robust premarket surveillance, and postmarket surveillance of any rigor were, in fact, absent when massive incentives (and penalties) were announced as part of the so-called Economic Recovery Act and its "HITECH" component.

    Instead, he recommends some combination of paper, with paper imaging capability so records are accessible, and electronic systems. “I don’t think paper should or ever will go away completely,” he said.

    On this issue, and for a highly successful real-world example, see my August 6, 2016 post "More on uncoupling clinicians from EHR clerical oppression" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2016/08/more-on-uncoupling-clinicians-from-ehr_91.html.

    I note with some irony about the above linked post (regarding a highly successful EMR that protected clinicians from oppressive clerical burdens) that the newly-appointed Director of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC), Dr. Donald Rucker (http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/donald-rucker-named-new-national-coordinator-onc), was formerly the Chief Medical Officer of Shared Medical Systems, a hospital infrastructure IT provider.  He then became CMO of the failed Siemens Healthcare EMR effort after SMS was bought out ca. 2000.  Siemens Healthcare officials told me ca. 2007 that the real-world, highly successful invasive cardiology information system I'd developed as shown in the aformentioned Aug. 2016 post was "impractical" for commercial emulation.

    Back to the Post-Gazette article.  In it, a government health IT official blames the doctors, a line I've heard dating back to the early 1990s when I was a postdoctoral informatics fellow at Yale:

    A need for better training

    Anesthesiologist Andrew Gettinger, acting deputy national coordinator for health information technology in the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, disagrees with Dr. Silverstein.

    He identified three key components to a successful electronic health record system — good design and implementation and the users’ good understanding of the system.

    I have no disagreement there, only on the route to achieve those goals.

    “What we find is that many clinicians who complain vociferously about the software and how many clicks it takes, and how user unfriendly it is, have not actually taken the time to understand the system,” he said.

    This seems the "blame the physicians, they're just complainers and Luddites" canard I've written about for almost 20 years now.

    Gettinger seems to ignore the issue of bad health IT and use error:

    • Bad Health IT is health IT that is ill-suited to purpose, hard to use, unreliable, loses data or provides incorrect data, is difficult and/or prohibitively expensive to customize to the needs of different medical specialists and subspecialists, causes cognitive overload, slows rather than facilitates users, lacks appropriate alerts, creates the need for hypervigilance (i.e., towards avoiding IT-related mishaps) that increases stress, is lacking in security, lacking in evidentiary soundness, compromises patient privacy or otherwise demonstrates suboptimal design and/or implementation.   (S. Silverstein and J. Patrick).
    • Use error (as opposed to user error) is defined by another U.S. government agency, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as follows: "Use error" is a term used very specifically by NIST to refer to user interface designs that will engender users to make errors of commission or omission. It is true that users do make errors, but many errors are due not to user error per se but due to designs that are flawed, e.g., poorly written messaging, misuse of color-coding conventions, omission of information, etc. From "NISTIR 7804: Technical Evaluation, Testing and Validation of the Usability of Electronic Health Records." It is available at
    http://www.nist.gov/healthcare/usability/upload/Draft_EUP_09_28_11.pdf (PDF).

    No amount of "training" can compensate for those issues.  Further, physicians and nurses just don't have abundant time for such training about mega-complex systems, on which they're already spending 50% or more of their time.  They especially don't have the time to learn multiple EHR's, a situation that exists for clinicians who work on more than one hospital.  I possess the physician and nurse user guides for a number of EHRs though my forensics work.  A manual for an EHR is as complex as a manual for an office suite like MS Office, or an OS such as Windows.

    There's also the fact that physicians and nurses are not reimbursed for the hours they spend feeding the payers and other profit-makers the data, for free.

    “Quite frankly, doctors are not always the best at signing up for training and taking the training...

    Blaming the doctors again.

    ... , and some of the training is not always the best.”

    Not that, as mentioned previously, "training" is at the root of the EHR problem.


    He allowed that the usability criticism “is a very legitimate thing to look at”... 

    How kind of Dr. Gettinger to acknowledge what has been known in the IT world for decades about poor usability, e.g., this mid 1980's wisdom written for the U.S. Air Force on user interfaces:



    GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNING USER INTERFACE SOFTWARE
    ESD-TR-86-278
    August 1986
    Sidney L. Smith and Jane N. Mosier
    The MITRE Corporation
    Bedford, Massachusetts, USA
    Prepared for Deputy Commander for Development Plans and Support Systems, Electronic Systems Division, AFSC,
    United States Air Force, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts.
    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited.
    SIGNIFICANCE OF THE USER INTERFACE

    The design of user interface software is not only expensive and time-consuming, but it is also critical for effective system performance. To be sure, users can sometimes compensate for poor design with extra effort. Probably no single user interface design flaw, in itself, will cause system failure. But there is a limit to how well users can adapt to a poorly designed interface. As one deficiency is added to another, the cumulative negative effects may eventually result in system failure, poor performance, and/or user complaints.

    Outright system failure can be seen in systems that are underused, where use is optional, or are abandoned entirely. There may be retention of (or reversion to) manual data handling procedures, with little use of automated capabilities. When a system fails in this way, the result is disrupted operation, wasted time, effort and money, and failure to achieve the potential benefits of automated information handling.

    In a constrained environment, such as that of many military and commercial information systems, users may have little choice but to make do with whatever interface design is provided. There the symptoms of poor user interface design may appear in degraded performance. Frequent and/or serious errors in data handling may result from confusing user interface design [in medicine, this often translates to reduced safety and reduced care quality - ed.] Tedious user procedures may slow data processing, resulting in longer queues at the checkout counter, the teller's window, the visa office, the truck dock, [the hospital floor or doctor's office - ed.] or any other workplace where the potential benefits of computer support are outweighed by an unintended increase in human effort.

    In situations where degradation in system performance is not so easily measured, symptoms of poor user interface design may appear as user complaints. The system may be described as hard to learn, or clumsy, tiring and slow to use [often heard in medicine, but too often blamed on "physician resistance" - ed.] The users' view of a system is conditioned chiefly by experience with its interface. If the user interface is unsatisfactory, the users' view of the system will be negative regardless of any niceties of internal computer processing.

    Back to Dr. Gettinger for a somewhat non-sequitur 'BUT' disclaimer:

    ... BUT he defended the federal incentives, saying they defrayed the cost to hospitals while encouraging vendors to develop better systems.

    I would say the incentives, just like the spectacularly failed subprime mortgage market a decade ago, just incented the health industry to waste hundreds of billions of dollars on half-baked, experimental technology, alienating physicians and nurses (cf.: the 2015 Medical Societies letter mentioned above).  The incented effort even put some organizations in financial jeopardy, e.g.,

     "MD Anderson to cut about 1,000 jobs due to 'financial downfall officials largely attributed to its EPIC EHR implementation project'
    " at
    http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2017/01/heath-it-mismanagement-md-anderson-to.html

    "What is more important in healthcare, computers, or nurses and other human beings? Southcoast Health cutting dozens of jobs on heels of expensive IT upgrade" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2016/04/what-is-more-important-in-healthcare.html

    "Lahey Health: hospital jobs lost, but computer vendors prosper" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2015/05/lahey-health-hospital-jobs-lost-but.html,

    "Monetary losses and layoffs from EHR expenses and EHR mismanagement" (http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2013/06/monetary-losses-and-layoffs-from-ehr.html),

    "Financial woes at Maine Medical Center: Reading this blog might have saved them millions of dollars, and prevented massive 'cost saving initiatives'" (http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2013/05/financial-woes-at-maine-medical-center.html),

    and "In Fixing Those 9,553 EHR "Issues", Southern Arizona’s Largest Health Network is $28.5 Million In The Red" (http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2014/06/in-fixing-those-9553-ehr-issues.html)

    I also believe the easy money disincented the vendors from improving the techology, instead selling what they had on hand and acting to discourage innovation and competition to maximize their profits, e.g., see my April 16, 2010 post "Healthcare IT Corporate Ethics 101: 'A Strategy for Cerner Corporation to Address the HIT Stimulus Plan'" at
    http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2010/04/healthcare-it-corporate-ethics-101.html and my August 31, 2012 post "Health IT Vendor EPIC Caught Red-Handed: Ghostwriting And Using Customers as Stealth Lobbyists - Did ONC Ignore This?" at http://hcrenewal.blogspot.com/2012/08/health-it-vendor-epic-uses-clients-as.html.

    Finally, I regrettably note that Gettinger seems to possess a rather hard-nosed attitude about health IT harms.  I have contributed, of course, to articles about EHR's in other publications, including, among many others, Politico.  Arthur Allen at Politico wrote me this in 2015 regarding my opposition to the toothless "Health IT safety center" concept, and my promotion of a need for true HIT regulation:


    On Wed, Jun 17, 2015 at 1:13 PM, Arthur Allen <aallen@politico.com> wrote:
    I’m putting together a piece on the safety center with some notes from an interview I did with Andy Gettinger a few weeks ago. I asked him whether he though the RTI panel (which RTI named, apparently) would have come to the same consensus – that the safety center should be a safe harbor, not an investigatory agency – if you [i.e., me - Scot  - ed.] had been on the panel.

    He said,
    “he [i.e., me - Scot - ed.] may have heard what we were intending and been able to step back from specific things relative to his mother’s care and gotten to a space to see that this initiative has the potential of making real change in the EHRs used throughout the country. I would have loved to have Scot at the table.”

    Any response?


    In other words, if only I was able to "step back" from my mother's severe injury, year's worth of horrible suffering as a cripple before she died as a mentally-impaired vegetable, and my lovely mother being taken away from my home in a body bag as a result of a health IT mishap, I'd be able to see just how wonderful a toothless HIT safety center would be.  (Also, I was never asked to be "at the table".)

    What a kind comment that was. 

    In conclusion:

    While I wish the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article was longer, in its limited space its author did touch upon the major relevant issues well regarding the PA Patient Safety Authority study and its implications towards national Health IT policy.

    ONC's Dr. Andrew Gettinger's responses, however, seems to reflect an unwillingness of he and the government to acknowledge Bad Health IT.  His repsonses also appear to show a lack of appreciation of the complaints about EMRs from nearly 40 medical societies.  "It's the doctors fault" for not training enough.

    He does acknowledge that better IT would be a good thing, but to date the best HHS could come up with to achieve that goal is a toothless Safety Center. Healthcare IT would be the only healthcare device sector afforded that extraordinary regulatory accommodation.

    The notion that all that is needed to solve EMR problems is clerical training of (resistant) physicians seems that of a computing dilettante, and/or a health IT hyperenthusiast.  Such a view ignores decades of knowledge of bad IT, and in multiple sectors.

    The blaming of physicians is also decidedly unhelpful towards the reputation of the technology and its enthusiasts in government.  Bad enough that physicians are already spending 50% or more of their time at computers, distracting from patient care.  Gettinger's "solution" also fails to acknowledge that physicians often work in multiple hospitals with different EHRs. They don't have the time to become clerical experts in multiple mega-complex systems.

    Claiming the national incentives promoted the vendors to make better health it is also absurd. It actually promoted them to sell the bad health IT they had on hand, and lessened any motivation to improve the technology.

    What the issues really boil down to is a conflict between those who believe in cybernetic supremacy (the hyperenthusiasts who ignore the real-world downsides) versus those who promote what I call cybernetic sobriety (a more candid, mature attitude fostered by actual knowledge of the long history of cybernetic failures and the myriad causes of such failures).

    -- SS
              RADIOLOGIA DEL TORAX        


    CONCEPTOS TÉCNICOS

    En radiología convencional disponemos de cinco densidades, que de menos a más son:

    1) aire
    2) grasa
    3) agua
    4) calcio
    5) metal



    En la radiografía de tórax dichas densidades corresponden:


    Aire:  Pulmones, vísceras huecas abdominales, vías aéreas, cierta patología.
    Grasa:  Planos fasciales entre los músculos, tejido subcutáneo y alrededor de órganos.

    Agua: Musculos, vasos sanguineos, corazon, vísceras sólidas abdominales de asas intestinales rrellenas de liquido, lesiones sólidas y quísticas del parenquima pulmonar

    Calcio: Esqueleto, Calcificaciones normales y patologicas.

    Metal: Cuerpos extraños, grapas Qx, Bario y Contrastes Yodados.




    La técnica adecuada de una radiografía de tórax es aquella que permite visualizar simultáneamente los campos pulmonares, mediastino y columna dorsal con la menor dosis de exposición radiologica, las proyecciones empleadas habitualmente son:



    PA.
    Ambas se obtienen en bipedestación y en inspiración máxima suspendida.

    La PA se denomina así porque el paciente se sitúa con el pecho en contacto con el Bucky de pared por lo que el haz de rayos x penetra por la parte posterior del cuerpo ( espalda y sale por la parte anterior, ventral o delantera del cuerpo).

     La lateral se obtiene, pegando el lado izquierdo en contacto con el bucky de pared (lateral izquierda). Dado que las estructuras que quedan más lejos de la placa se magnifican, es posible diferenciar el lado derecho del izquierdo en la lateral:

    la pared torácica, hemidiafragma y demás estructuras se visualizan de mayor tamaño en le lado derecho que en el izquierdo en condiciones normales.

    Lateral.
    La lateral permite no sólo localizar lesiones identificadas en la proyeccion PA, sino  demostrar patología en áreas más o menos ciegas a la PA:

    Esternón
    Columna vertebral
    Area retroesternal
    Retrocardíaca
    y lengüeta pulmonar posterior


    La lateral puede obviarse en preoperatorios de pacientes sanos menores de 35 años.
    Otras proyecciones son:


    AP supino:
    Se usa en niños y pacientes que por su gravedad no pueden mantener la bipedestación, en
    Ella la silueta cardíaca y el mediastino superior se magnifican hasta un 20 %, por lo que hay que valorar su tamaño con precaución; además en decúbito, el flujo vascular se realiza preferentemente hacia los vasos pulmonares superiores, por lo que están ingurgitados.

     
    Oblicua:
    Útil para confirmar la presencia de nódulos, anomalías mediastínicas ocostales. No está indicado su uso rutinario.
    Lordótica: identifica mejor patología del vértice y del lóbulo medio.
    Decúbito lateral derecho o izquierdo:
    Permite detectar pequeños derrames pleurales y valorar su movilidad, así como la movilidad de formaciones nodulares dentro de cavidades.

    Espiración:
    Se usa en la detección de pequeños neumotórax y en la valoración del atrapamiento aéreo y de los movimientos diafragmáticos.


    PLEURA Y CISURAS
    La pleura es una capa de mesotelio formada por dos hojas: la parietal, que recubre por dentro la cavidad torácica, el mediastino y el diafragma, y la visceral que recubre los pulmones, existiendo entre ambas un espacio virtual.

    Estas hojas no son visibles en la radiografía de tórax ya que su sombra de densidad agua se funde con la misma densidad de la pared torácica, mediastino y diafragma.

    Sin embargo, la pleura visceral forma las cisuras que separan los distintos lóbulos pulmonares y, al estar rodeada por ambos lados de densidad aire, es visible si el haz de rayos x es tangencial a la misma. De esta manera, es pulmón derecho queda dividido en tres lóbulos: el superior y medio, separados entre sí por la cisura menor u horizontal, y ambos separados del inferior por la cisura mayor u oblicua.

    En el lado izquierdo existen únicamente dos lóbulos, superior e inferior, separados por la cisura mayor u oblicua.



    La cisura mayor
    No es visible en la proyección PA, pero en la lateral queda tangencial al haz de rayos y por tanto puede identificarse como una línea oblicua que se extiende desde la quinta vértebra dorsal hacia delante y abajo para acabar en el diafragma unos centímetros por detrás de la pared torácica anterior.

    La manera de diferenciar la izquierda de la derecha en la radiografía lateral es demostrando la unión de la cisura mayor derecha con la menor, o la unión de alguna de ellas con el diafragma homolateral.

    Hay que tener en cuenta que las cisuras tienen una morfología ondulada, helicoidal, y no plana, por lo que en determinadas situaciones puede visualizarse la porción superomedial de la cisura mayor en la proyección PA al orientarse paralela al haz de rayos.



    La cisura menor
    Se ve en ambas proyecciones en la mitad de los sujetos, en un plano horizontal a nivel del arco anterior de la cuarta costilla, sin embargo su tamaño y posición son muy variables.

    Existe un cierto número de cisuras accesorias, siendo las más frecuentes:
    Cisura de la ácigos: no es una verdadera cisura, ya que está formada por 4 hojas de pleura (2 de la parietal y 2 de la visceral), que se reflejan a nivel de la vena ácigos, la cual se encuentra en un lugar anómalo. Ocupa una porción variable de LSD, formando el lóbulo
    de la ácigos.
    Cisura accesoria superior: separa el segmento superior del lóbulo inferior, el 6, del resto de los segmentos del lóbulo inferior.

    Cisura accesoria inferior: separa el segmento basal medial, el 7, del resto de los segmentos del lóbulo inferior.

    Cisura menor anómala: en el lado izquierdo, separa la língula del resto de los segmentos del lóbulo superior.

    Es importante conocer la marcada profundidad de la reflexión posterior de la pleura sobre el diafragma, de tal manera que cantidades relativamente grandes de líquido pleural pueden acumularse sin que se demuestre en la radiografía PA.





    ESPACIOS AÉREOS.

    La vía aérea comprende tres zonas:

    1) Conductora: tráquea, bronquios principales, lobares, segmentarios, subsegmentarios y bronquíolos terminales.

    2) Tránsito:(con funciones tanto conductora como respiratoria) bronquíolos respiratorios, conductos alveolares y sacos alveolares.

    3) Respiratoria: alvéolos.

    Desde el punto de vista radiológico es más útil la división en tráquea y bronquios principales, bronquios lobares y segmentarios y anatomía subsegmentaria.




    Tráquea y Bronquios  Principales.
    La tráquea es una estructura cartilagomembranosa tubular que desde la laringe (altura del cuerpo vertebral C6) se extiende hasta la bifurcación de la carina (altura de D5). Se sitúa en línea media, delante del esófago y, al entrar en el tórax, se desplaza ligeramente a la derecha.

    En la carina se divide en los dos bronquios principales, derecho e izquierdo, con un ángulo medio de 70º. La pared traqueal es fina y presenta leves indentaciones producidas por los anillos cartilaginosos, que pueden calcificar en personas mayores.

    El diámetro traqueal normal oscila entre 25-27 mm en los varones y entre 21-23 mm en las mujeres.

    El bronquio principal derecho (BPD) presenta un trayecto más vertical que el principal izquierdo (BPI); además el BPD es más corto y ancho.



    Bronquios Lobares y Segmentos Broncopulmonares
    Los bronquios principales se dividen en bronquios lobulares o lobares, dos en el lado izquierdo, lóbulo superior izquierdo (LSI) y lóbulo inferior izquierdo (LII), y tres en el derecho, (lóbulo superior derecho (LSD), lóbulo medio (LM) y lóbulo inferior derecho (LID). Éstos a su vez se dividen

    En bronquios segmentarios, a cada uno de los cuales corresponde un segmento pulmonar.


    En el lado derecho, el bronquio del LSD sale del principal a unos 2,5 cm de la carina y se ramifica en tres bronquios segmentarios: apical (o segmento 1), anterior (2), y posterior (3).

    En algunas escuelas el anterior se denomina 3 y el posterior 2. El árbol bronquial derecho se continúa en el bronquio intermediario (BI) que se dirige caudalmente; a los 3-4 cm, el BI se bifurca en el bronquio del LM y el bronquio del LID. El primero se divide en dos bronquios segmentarios (lateral ó 4 y medial ó 5). Del bronquio del LID se origina inicialmente el bronquio segmentario superior (6), que nace de la cara posterior, más inferiormente se divide en los bronquios de la pirámide basal:

    medial (7),
    anterior (8),
    lateral (9) y
    posterior (10).

    En el lado izquierdo, el BPI es más largo que el contralateral. El bronquio del
    LSI se subdivide en dos: la subdivisión superior origina dos bronquios segmentarios (ápico-posterior ó 1+3 y anterior ó 2).

    En otras escuelas, el ápico-posterior corresponde al 1+2 y el anterior al 3. La subdivisión inferior, llamada bronquio de la língula (equivalente al LM del lado derecho), tiene dos segmentos: superior (4) e inferior (5). Las divisiones del bronquio del LII son superponibles a las del lado derecho, excepto por el hecho de que el bronquio segmentario anterior se origina conjuntamente con el medial. Por tanto en el LII los segmentos son: superior (6), antero-medial basal (7+8), lateral basal (9) y posterior basal (10).

    En la radiografía PA podemos identificar la salida de ambos bronquios lobares superiores, el bronquio intermediario, el lobar inferior izquierdo y eventualmente algún segmentario.

    Los lóbulos pulmonares están separados por las cisuras tal y como se describe en el apartado “pleura y cisuras”.





              CISTOURETROGRAFIA        
     (Cistouretrografia retrograda)
    Comenten al final porque es radiologicamente pediatrica (observen los huesos)???
























              RADIOLOGIA INTERVENCIONISTA        
    En años anteriores, la MIELOGRAFIA y la VENOGRAFIA se consideraron procedimientos excepcionales.

    Recientemente, el area de angiografia intervencionista terapeutica esta sufriendo un rapido desarrollo. Hoy dia poseemos habitaciones con programas de rayos X y un complejo equipamiento que ha sido especialmente diseñado para la radiologia intervencionista.

    Del mismo modo que la tecnologia radiologica se ha convertido, con mayor precision, en disiplinas, asi lo ha hecho nuestra tarea de obtencion de imagenes. Soliamos hacer procedimientos especiales, como:

    NEUMOENCEFALOGRAFIAS
    MIELOGRAFIAS y
    NEUROANGIOGRAFIAS

    El rapido desarrollo de la obtencion de imagenes vasculares y la intervencion terapeutica agresiva a traves de los vasos sanguineos ha provocado la aparicion de habitaciones con equipamientos diseñados especialmente para los procedimientos de radiologia intervencionista. los tecnicos radiologos involucrados son tecnicos de radiologia intervencionista.
              CATETERES PARA RADIOLOGIA INTERVENCIONISTA        
    CATETERES.



    Exactamente como las guias de alambre, los cateteres estan diseñados con muchas formas y tamaños diferentes. Generalmente, el diametro del cateter se categoriza en tamaños franceses (Fr).

    Asi, 3 Fr equivale a 1mm de diametro.
            6 Fr equivale a 2mm de diametro. Y asi sucecivamente.

    La forma de la punta del cateter se requiere para la cateterizacion selectiva de Arterias Especificas, a continuacion se mencionan 4 formas comunes de cateter:

    - H1, HINCK Ã³ HEAD HUNTER
      La punta diseñada por Vincent Hinck se utiliza para acceder desde la Arteria Femoral a los vasos
      Braquicefalicos.

    - SIMMONS
      El cateter es muy curvado para acceder a vasos con angulaciones muy marcadas y tambien fue diseñado para Angiografia Cerebral, pero despues fue empleado para angiografia Visceral.

    - C2 ó COBRA.
       Este cateter tiene punta angulada unida a una curva menos marcada, y se utiliza para su introduccion
       en las Arterias Celiacas, Mesentericas y Renales.

    - PIGTAIL.

    - BERENSTEIN.

    - PIGTAIL (EN TRENZA)

    Los Cateteres de Trenza Pigtail tienen multiples agujeros a los lados para expulsar el MC en bolo compactos. Un Cateter con Multiples agujeros a los lados es fenestrado y ayuda a reducir el posible latigazo o chicoteo dentro del vaso y desgarrarlo o perforarlo.

    El efecto del chorro se minimiza con la trenza curvada, la cual previene la posible lesion del vaso.

    En cuanto el cateter se introduce en los vasos, se retira la guia alambre. Entonces el cateter debe ser inmediatamente enjuagado para impedir la coagulacion de la sangre dentro de este. Generalmente se utiliza la Heparina Sodica para enjuagar los cateteres.

    Despues de la colocacion del cateter, se lleva a cabo una inyeccion de contraste de prueba bajo fluoroscopia antes de la obtencion de imagenes estaticas para verificar que la punta de cateter no esta calzada y esta en el vaso correcto. Los flujos de inyeccion del inyector automatico se regian por la velocidad de circulacion de la inyeccion de prueba.




















    STEWART C. BUSHONG, MANUAL DE RADIOLOGIA PARA TECNICOS, OCTAVA EDICION, FISICA, BIOLOGIA Y PROTECCION RADIOLOGICA, ELSEVIER MOSBY
              FLEBOGRAFIA (extremidades inferiores)        


    "FLEBOGRAFIA DE LOS
    MIEMBROS INFERIORES"
    (TAMBIEN CONOCIDA COMO ASCENDENTE O PELVICO)



    La flebografia es un estudio radiologico el cual consiste en la Introducción de un MC hidrosoluble en el “Torrente Venoso” para observar radiologicamente los Transtornos de las Venas y de sus Valvulas.


    Mostrando el grado y magnitud del daño, asi como el tiempo de circulacion.del medio de contraste


    En las extremidades inferiores existen 2 sistemas venosos:


    SUPERFICIA: Situado por encima de la aponeurisis superficial y drena la piel y los tejidos subcutaneos. 
    PROFUNDO: Subaponeurotico se halla comunicado entre otras venulas y venas a niveles diferentes de las extremidades.














    CONTRAINDICACIONES:
    žTROMBOSIS RECIENTE
    žPACIENTES EN MALAS CONDICIONES.
    žREACCION AL MC (relativamente)
    COMPLICACIONES:
    žPerforacion de las 3 paredes venosas con el cateter
    žHematomas
    žTromboflebitis posflebografia
    Si durante el procedimiento hay sospecha de trombosis venosa se omitira el masaje y solo se pedira al pte que haga dorsiflexiones del pie.
    Produciendo una contraccion muscular que ayudara a vaciar el MC sin riesgos de despender trombos.


    INDICACIONES:
    žInsuficiencia venosa.
    žDemostrando la incompetencia de las venas comunicantes y del sistema venoso profundo.
    žEn presencia de EDEMA de causa no Linfatica.
    žValoracion de TROMBOSIS del sistema profundo

    Demostracion de desplazamientos y puentes anormales de comunicación.





    MATERIAL:

    žMinisets o Punzocats de diferentes calibres

    ž3 ligaduras para cada miembro pelvico

    žMaterial de asepcia


    ž8 jeringas de 20mL con MC (15 mL de MC y 5mL de solucion salina) cuando se exploran los miembros pelvicos


    žPlacas 14x17pulg o Fluroscopia (recomendable) 





    PREPARACION DEL PACIENTE :
    žAyuno de 8 horas, aseado bien limpiesito o limpiesita
    žSe debera informar al paciente la importancia del procedimiento y su posible resultado que obtendremos.
    žExplicando paso a paso la secuencia del estudio para brindarle confianza y seguridad.
    žPosicion de trendelemburg


    TECNICA:
    Canalizar una vena del dorso del pie del miembro a estudiar colocandole una venoclisis a goteo lento con el fin de mantener permeable el vaso.
    Colocar al paciente en posicion semirrecta, con vasculacion de la mesa 30° a 45° , sosteniendo la otra extremidad opuesta sobre un cojin para que el area a explorar no ejerza fuerza .
    Este metodo aumenta el llenado de las venas profundas y ayuda a distribuir el MC.


    Las ligaduras se colocan en 3 puntos estratejicos a la altura del:




    ž1. TOBILLO


    ž2. x DEBAJO DE LA RODILLA


    ž3. TERCIO MEDIO DEL MUSLO




    ("Puntos importantes que hay que considerar antes, durante y despues de una intervencion angiografiaca")







    INTRODUCCIÓN Y DEFINICIÓN

    Inicialmente empleada como una técnica de canalización percutánea de vías venosas centrales (yugular interna, femoral y subclavia).

    El procedimiento fue descrito por Seldinger en la década de los 50.

    Actualmente las indicaciones del empleo de esta técnica se ha extendido a procedimientos no vasculares (colocación de drenajes pleurales, pericárdicos etc).

    Se realiza la localización de la vena mediante una aguja fina.

    Una vez obtenido el flujo de sangre se introduce una guía metálica flexible con punta blanda a través de la aguja (o del catéter de punción venosa periférica) y se progresa un catéter apoyándose en la guía sujetando ésta de manera firme para que no se deslice al territorio venoso.

    Cuando el catéter ha progresado lo suficiente (dependerá del acceso, edad y tamaño del paciente) retiraremos la guía sin arrastrar el catéter que queda situado en posición intravascular. Se debe realizar una técnica de imagen (generalmente radiografía de tórax, ecocardiografía...) para comprobar su situación.

    De esta misma manera se localiza la zona adecuada para colocar los drenajes pleurales, pericárdicos etc y tras pinchar con aguja se introduce la guía y el catéter de drenaje comprobando su correcta ubicación.






    "EQUIPO HUMANO PARA LA REALIZACION DE UNA ANGIQGRAFlA"



    La ANGIOGRAFIA es realizada por un equipo de profesionales de la salud que incluye:
    I) Un Medico radiólogo (u otro angiografista calificado).
    2) Una enfermera que están preparados para este tipo de estudios intervencionistas.
     3) Un técnico radiólogo capaitado en este tipo de estudios.




    Según  el protocolo del servicio y la situación específica, tambien  pueden ser necesarios otro médico radiologo y otro especialistas, una enfermera o un técnico hemodinamista para ayudar con el procedimiento.
    La angiografia, a menudo, es un area especialidad para técnicos y otros profesionales de la salud. Un equipo eficiente y competente es crucial para el éxito del procedimiento.


    Equipo de imágenes angiográficas:
    Una sala de angiografía está equipada para todos los tipos de procedimientos angiograficos y tiene una amplia variedad de agujas, catéteres y alambres guia listos para usar.

    Es más grande que las salas de fluoroscopia convencionales y debe de tener asu disposiciom una pileta con área de lavado para el material y un área para mantener al paciente comodo antes del estudio.
     La sala debe tener salidas para oxigeno y aspiración, equipo de monitoreo de los signos vitales del paceinte y el equipo médico de emergencia (carro de paro) debe estar siempre próximo al paciente en caso de emergencia.




    "CONSENTIMIENTO  Y CUIDADOS DEL PACIENTE ANTES DEL PROCEDIMIENTO"

    Debe realizarse una anamnesis (es decir, antecedentes de alergia, condición cardíaca/pulmonar y funsión renal) antes del procedimiento, que debe incluir preguntas para evaluar la capacidad del paciente para tolerar la inyección del contaste .
    También se interrogará sobre antecedentes y síntomas producidos por medicaciones  porque algunas medicaciones son anticoagulantes y producen un sangrado excesivo durante el procedimiento y después de él.
    Se dará al paciente una explicación detallada del procedimiento, para  que el paciente este completamente informado antes de firmar el consentimiento.
    "Ayuno 8 horas antes del procedimiento para reducir el riesgo de aspiración. Sin embargo, es importante asegurarse de que el paciente esté bien hidratado para reducir el riesgo de un daño renal inducido por el contraste".
    Se obtienen y registran los signos vítales, y se controla el pulso en la extremidad distal al sitio de punción seleccionado.
    El sitio de punción es rasurado, limpiado y se le coloca un campo estéril.



    "ACCESO A LOS VASOS PARA LA INYECCIÓN DEL MEDIO DE CONTRASTE"


    Un método común para el cateterismo es la técnica de Seldinger.
    Esta técnica fúe desarrollada por el doctor Sven Seldinger en la década de 1950 y sigue siendo popular actualmente en las salas de intervencionismo radiologico. 


    Otra via de abordaje o acceso vascular es la Técnica Percutánea (a través de la piel) y puede ser utilizada para accesar alguna arteria o vena del sistema cardiovascular.
    En general, los angiografistas consideran 3 vasos importantes para el cateterismo vascular:
     1) la arteria femoral.
    2) la arteria braquial.
    3) la arteria axilar.
    La artería femoral es el sitio para la punción mas ideal, debido a su tamaño y a su localización fácilmente accesible; "Ojo Está contraindicada" la punción de una arteria femoral debido a: 
     a) injertos quirúrgicos previos.
    b) un aneurisma o enfermedad vascular oclusiva.
    "La vena femoral también será el vaso de elección para el acceso venoso en caso de una flebografia ascendente".

    "MATERIAL"

    •Medio de Contraste Hidrosoluble no iónico
    •Aguja de Seldinger de 7 cm. No 18
    •Alambre Guía
    •Catéter 3-5 French niños y 5-7 F Adultos
    "BANDEJA PARA ANGIÓGRAFÍA"

    Una bandeja estéril contiene el equipamiento básico necesario para un cateterismo de tipo Seldinger de una arteria femoral, los elementos estériles básicos son los siguientes:
    1). Pinzas hemostáticas
    2). Gasas para la preparación y solución antiséptica
    3). Hoja de bisturí
    4). Jeringa y aguja para anestésico local
    5). Bandejas y vaso para tomar la medicina
    6). Campos y apósitos estériles
    7). Apósitos
    8). Cubierta estéril para intensificador de imágenes








    "MEDIO DE CONTRASTE"
    El medio de contraste de elección es una sustancia yodada no iónica e hidrosoluble, debido a su baja Investigators Slip Radioactive Materials Past U.S. Border Patrol appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


              Train for a Career in Radiologic Technology. Learn More at an Info Session on August 8        
    directlink
              Greece: Lone Migrant Children Left Unprotected         

    Entrance into the Moria hotspot in Lesbos, Greece, where children registered as adults are accommodated with unrelated adult single men, exposed to very poor living conditions, including overcrowding, inadequate sanitation, and frequent incidents of violence.

    © 2017 Thanos Tsantas for Human Rights Watch

    (Athens) – Unaccompanied migrant children on the Greek island of Lesbos are being incorrectly identified as adults and housed with unrelated adults, leaving them vulnerable to abuse and unable to access the specific care they need, Human Rights Watch said today.

    “The misidentification of unaccompanied migrant kids on Lesbos as adults leads to real problems, including lumping them together with unrelated adults and denying them the care they need,” said Eva Cossé, Greece researcher at Human Rights Watch. “Greek authorities need to take responsibility for properly identifying unaccompanied children and providing them the protection and care every child needs.”

    On visits to Lesbos island from May 22 to 28 and June 27 to 30, 2017, Human Rights Watch spoke with 20 children, some as young as 15, who said they had been wrongly registered as adults by the Greek authorities.

    Flawed and inadequate procedures leave unaccompanied migrant children on the Greek island of Lesbos housed with unrelated adults, vulnerable to abuse, and unable to access the specific care they need.

    Under Greek and international law, unaccompanied children are entitled to special care and protection. But the flawed age assessment procedures that are being followed in practice mean that some of these children are wrongly deemed adults during registration, despite an assurance by Greek officials to Human Rights Watch that a proper, multidiscipline procedure is followed. Other children claim to be adults, believing it will allow them to avoid detention or because they follow bad advice from adults, but then realize they have made a mistake and try to persuade the authorities to register them correctly. They can spend months trying to change their official status, and in the meantime often continue to be treated as adults, or reach adulthood, known as “aging out,” while waiting for their correct age to be assessed.

    Human Rights Watch found that officials who register new arrivals sometimes arbitrarily record children’s ages as older than the children themselves give. Authorities also often require unaccompanied children to receive cursory dental examinations at the local hospital as a form of age assessment, following which authorities may insist the child is in fact an adult and register them as such. Human Rights Watch found this occurs despite a 2013 ministerial decision setting out a multidiscipline approach to age assessment, with medical examinations as an option of last resort and despite an assurance from Greece’s Reception and Identification Service (RIS), a Greek government agency, that the principle of the best interest of the child always prevails.

    On the other hand, reception service officials do not usually question unaccompanied children who claim to be adults even when their appearance strongly suggests that they are well under 18. In practice, authorities fail to provide children with adequate information about their rights during the reception and identification process on the islands and take no steps to verify whether an individual claiming to be an adult is a child, creating a risk that trafficked children will not be identified and protected from further harm.

    While registered unaccompanied children should be transferred to safe accommodation, Greece has a chronic shortage of space. Pending placement in a shelter, the authorities often detain unaccompanied migrant children in police stations, immigration detention facilities, and European Union-managed asylum processing centers. As of June 20, 1,149 unaccompanied migrant children were on the waiting list for shelter, including 296 detained in such facilities.

    Coastal area near Panagiouda village on Lesbos, Greece, one of the islands to which many asylum seekers, including unaccompanied children, have been confined with the aim of returning them to Turkey following a deeply flawed March 2016 EU deal.

    © 2017 Thanos Tsantas for Human Rights Watch

    The problem has grown more acute since the arrival of more than 1 million people in the Greek islands in 2015 and 2016. Border closures in countries to the north have effectively trapped asylum seekers and migrants in Greece, and a deeply flawed EU deal with Turkey, signed in March 2016, has led Greece to restrict asylum seekers to the Greek islands with the aim of returning them to Turkey.

    Nongovernmental organizations on Lesbos told Human Rights Watch they have identified at least 60 people registered as adults who claim to be children.

    Children registered as adults are left to fend for themselves and are vulnerable to exploitation, trafficking, and other abuse. They live in official and unofficial sites with unrelated adult single men; are exposed to inhumane living conditions, including overcrowding, unsanitary conditions, and frequent incidents of violence; and are unable to go to school or otherwise access education. They have little or no access to care, protection, or specialized services, and are excluded from accommodation for unaccompanied children.

    Once the Greek authorities register unaccompanied children as adults for whatever reason, it is difficult, if not impossible, for them to change their status. Even when nongovernmental groups identify children as wrongly registered as adults, it can take months to overcome the burdensome bureaucratic procedures to establish their real age and register them as children. The process of being recognized as children took so long in some cases Human Rights Watch examined that the children had turned 18 during the intervening period. This undermined their ability to reunite with family members in other EU countries or to get specialized housing or services for children.

    Statements from these children about how they feel suggest the situation in which they find themselves in Greece is causing psychological harm and exacerbates existing mental health conditions, Human Rights Watch said. All the children interviewed reported experiencing psychological distress, including symptoms such as anxiety, depression, headaches, insomnia, and loss of appetite. Two children reported harming themselves.

    Authorities in Greece should urgently improve the quality of their age assessment procedures, bringing them into line with international best practices, Human Rights Watch said. Greek authorities should take steps to identify children, give children whose age is disputed the benefit of the doubt in close cases, and ensure that unaccompanied children have access to decent accommodation where they can receive care, education, counseling, legal aid, guardianship, and other essential services. Those who are determined to be over 18 should be accommodated in special housing for young adults and given access to adequate services, including psychosocial support and mental health services.

    The European Commission and the European Asylum Support Office should make use of their presence on the islands to ensure that the Greek authorities’ age assessment methods and procedures fully comply with the legal safeguards provided by Greek and EU law, and that children are given the benefit of the doubt where results are inconclusive. The EU emergency relocation mechanism should also be urgently extended to unaccompanied children identified on the Greek islands, irrespective of nationality, and EU member states should accelerate relocation of unaccompanied migrant children.

    “Vulnerable kids in Greece who have endured dangerous journeys far from their families should not have to fight for months just to prove they are children,” Cossé said. “Greece should do a better job identifying these children so they get the care they need and deserve.”

    “Amadou,” a 16-year-old unaccompanied boy from West Africa standing by two other people in hammocks in Lesbos, Greece.

    © 2017 Thanos Tsantas for Human Rights Watch

    Registering Unaccompanied Migrant Children

    Greek authorities formally registered over 1,800 unaccompanied asylum-seeking and migrant children arriving in Greece in the first five months of 2017. Many of them are from Syria, Afghanistan, and Iraq, countries beset by armed conflict and serious human rights abuses. Some of the others, such as children from Pakistan, were escaping discrimination and poverty.

    Greek legislation recognizes the government’s obligations to care for and protect unaccompanied migrant children. Under Greek law the government is supposed to appoint a guardian for each child to represent them in any legal or judicial proceeding, to hear the child’s views prior to any decision-making, and to act in their best interests. But Human Rights Watch found that authorities in Lesbos often register unaccompanied migrant children as adults. Invisible as children, and outside of care arrangements, these children are particularly vulnerable to violence, exploitation, and abuse.

    The Greek Reception and Identification Service (RIS) is required to provide for the reception of third-country nationals entering the islands under conditions that guarantee human rights and dignity in accordance with international standards. New arrivals are brought to EU-managed asylum processing centers on the Greek islands, the so-called hotspots, for identification and registration.

    The RIS is responsible for identifying and registering people who belong to “vulnerable” groups upon their arrival, which should include unaccompanied migrant children. The agency is supported in doing this by the Greek police; EU agencies, such as the border agency Frontex; UNHCR, the United Nations refugee agency; the International Organization for Migration; and medical nongovernmental organizations. RIS is responsible for referring unaccompanied migrant children to social services and providing them with information on their rights, including their right to seek asylum. In a July 10 letter to Human Rights Watch, RIS said that particular attention is given to the procedures for unaccompanied children who “receive specific information adapted to their age or maturity about their legal status and the procedural possibilities offered at subsequent phases of the process.” In practice on Lesbos, though, Human Rights Watch found that RIS is failing to meet its responsibilities toward these children.

    “Zahid,” a boy from Pakistan who said he was 16 when he arrived on Lesbos in March 2016, described the inadequate procedure during his first encounter with the authorities:

    When I arrived, I was 16 but they [authorities] wrote on the papers 19. They didn’t even take me to the doctor. …. They asked me my name, my age, and then they took my fingerprints…. I told them I was 16. They separated me from the other people and took me where the unaccompanied children are [a restricted section for unaccompanied children inside the Moria hotspot]. They kept me there for 10 or 15 days and then they took me out again. They never explained to me why, they just took me out. Then I stayed with other people, outside [the children’s section]…. I don't know why they changed my age. I asked them many times and the only thing they told me is to sign some papers.  

    Fifteen months after his arrival, Zahid, today 17, was still being treated as an adult by the authorities and his real age hadn’t been formally recognized.

    “Amadou,” a 16-year-old unaccompanied boy from West Africa playing with a soccer ball in front of a container on Lesbos, Greece. Amadou, on Lesbos since October 2016, said the lack of adequate information and fear of detention, made him register as an adult but after a few days when he realized he made a mistake he was unable to register his real age.

    © 2017 Thanos Tsantas for Human Rights Watch

    Children Who Claim to be Adults

    Human Rights Watch spoke with six children in Lesbos who said they falsely claimed to be adults when they arrived in Greece. They did so, they said, because they feared detention or because they heard false information from smugglers or other migrants that registration as a child would lead to worse outcomes, such as separation from friends and distant family. When they realized the unpleasant consequences of being registered as an adult or because, finally, they were correctly advised, they said they told officials that they wanted to change their age to the correct one, but faced many obstacles.

    “Hassan,” a boy from Afghanistan, said he was 15 when he arrived in June 2016:

    Before doing my registration, several Afghans told me ‘don’t give your real age because they are going to keep you in the children’s section.’ … They [the authorities] told me ‘you look underage, if you have papers show them to us.’ I said I don’t have any papers and because the others had told me to not say I’m a minor, I said I’m an adult.

    He said it took two other unrelated adults traveling with him to say he is an adult to convince the authorities. The inadequacy of identification procedures means that there is a serious risk that trafficked children are not recognized as such.

    Hassan, who is now 16, lived for more than eight months with the general population of the Moria camp, mainly unrelated adult single men. At the time of our interview, in May, he had been living for two months in a protected area within the Moria hotspot that accommodates young men between the ages of 18 to 22 and some of those whose ages are disputed, run by the RIS. He said his age had been formally recognized by the Greek Asylum Service (GAS), in the context of the asylum process, but was still pending recognition by the RIS.

    “[RIS told me] ‘You are a guest in our space and we are not responsible for you anymore.’ I just wanted to know what will happen to me and whether I’ll be transferred to a house [for unaccompanied children] and go to school.”

    According to nongovernmental groups and children interviewed, when detention measures for unaccompanied children were relaxed on the island of Lesbos at the end of 2016, and children were allowed to go in and out of the section for unaccompanied migrant children, many children who had initially given a false age and registered as adults because of fear of detention said they changed their minds, wanting to register their real age. Others sought to do so when they received proper information from nongovernmental groups, which instructed them to tell the truth.

    Rubber boats full of asylum seekers and other migrants arriving on the shore of Lesbos Island, Greece.

    © 2015 Human Rights Watch

    Inadequate Age Assessment

    When authorities are in doubt as to whether a person is a child, Greek law requires that they must first give that person the benefit of the doubt, operating on a presumption of childhood, and second, perform a comprehensive age determination.

    UNHCR and the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child have instructed countries not to base age determinations solely on the child’s physical appearance or on a single medical test, but also to consider psychological maturity and the margin of error of medical exams (which can be up to five years), and to give the benefit of doubt in making a determination. In ethical terms, such exams offer no medical benefit and the margin of error is so broad that the exams can’t establish what they are intended to do.

    Best practices in age determination require a multidisciplinary approach. Any medical testing should be non-intrusive. X-rays for age determination are increasingly regarded as a violation of medical ethics because they expose children to radiological testing for no medical reason.

    While an age determination process is ongoing, the person should not be detained or otherwise accommodated with unrelated adults.

    As of October 2013, a decision by the health minister (MD 92490/2013) established for the first time an age assessment procedure applicable within the context of what was then called the First Reception Service, now the RIS.

    The ministerial decision says that in cases in which there is justifiable doubt about the age of a third-country national, and the person may possibly be a child, they are to be referred to the RIS medical control and psychosocial support team for an age assessment. Initially, the age assessment will be based on physical appearance, such as height, weight, body mass index, voice, and hair growth, following a clinical examination by a pediatrician. In case the person’s age cannot be adequately determined, the psychologist and the social worker will assess the person’s cognitive, behavioral, and psychological development.

    If a pediatrician is not available or the interdisciplinary staff cannot reach any firm conclusions – and only as a measure of last resort, the decision says – the person shall be referred to a public hospital for specialized medical examinations, such as dental or wrist X-rays. Staff there are to explain clearly their aims and the procedures to the person being examined.

    In a July 10 letter to Human Rights Watch, RIS said that, “In any case, the principle of the child’s best interests, equal treatment, and proportionality must prevail. During the age assessment procedure as well as in case of doubts after its completion, the minority presumption prevails.”

    Human Rights Watch found that the age assessment procedure provided in Greek law is not followed in practice on Lesbos. All 14 people interviewed who told the authorities they were under 18 when they arrived said they were registered as adults following a cursory age assessment, which in most cases consisted of a visit to the local hospital and a quick examination of their teeth. None of the children who had gone through this medical examination had first, or indeed ever, been interviewed by a psychologist or a social worker for an age assessment. Even though the procedure provided in Greek law had not been followed, RIS registered them as adults.

    “Akash,” who is from Bangladesh and said he turned 18 in March, arrived on Lesbos in the summer of 2016, when he was 17. He said the authorities registered him as 18 following a quick visit to the hospital. “In the beginning, they wrote I was 17 but then they took me to the doctor and wrote down 18.” He said:

    When they took me to the doctor, the doctor examined my teeth in order to define my age. But I don’t understand. There are people who have their wisdom teeth at the age of 17, others at the age of 18 and others at the age of 22. The doctor just examined my teeth. They changed my age [to 18] and took me out [of the children’s section].

    Akash said he lived for more than four months with the general population of the camp before being transferred to a protected area inside Moria run by the RIS for people between the ages of 18-22. In early June 2017, he was transferred again outside, with the general population, due to lack of space. His real age was never formally recognized. “I tried as much as I could, but they [authorities] never accepted my age,” he said.

    Contesting Designation as an Adult

    Once children are registered as adults, either following a cursory age assessment procedure, or because they initially claimed they were adults, it is difficult if not impossible for them to change their status to that of a child.

    Under Greek law, after a RIS age assessment procedure is completed, the person should be informed in a language they understand about the reasons for the decision. They have a right to appeal within 10 days, but RIS requires anyone who files an appeal to provide an original ID or original passport proving their age, which should be officially translated or verified, within this period.

    All children interviewed said they faced practical difficulties in getting identification documents proving their age within the 10-day period. Human Rights Watch found that all appeals brought by children interviewed, were rejected by RIS. In rejecting the appeals, RIS disregarded the proven and objective difficulties for children to verify or officially translate the documents or to get legal assistance.

    Some children said they had no parents or relatives in their home countries to provide the documents, and others had refugee profiles that could put them at risk if they contacted their embassies or relatives in their home countries.

    For most, their only chance to seek to establish their age was at a later stage, during the asylum interview, conducted either by Greek Asylum Service (GAS) staff or officers of the European Asylum Support Office (EASO). Greek law sets out guarantees for children in that procedure, including the appointment of a guardian to protect the child’s rights and best interests throughout the age determination procedure, and the guarantee that a person who claims to be a child should be treated as such until the completion of the age determination procedure. The law also explicitly provides the applicant with the benefit of the doubt even after the conclusion of the procedure if the person’s age has not definitively been determined.

    Human Rights Watch found that when it comes to children who have been wrongly registered as adults by RIS, the asylum service does not deviate from RIS findings unless explicit proof is provided. In a July 12 letter to Human Rights Watch, the asylum service confirmed that it cannot change data recorded by RIS and the police during initial registration “unless the applicant produces compelling evidence (e.g. an original passport not presented to RIS or the police) to the contrary.” The procedure before the asylum service can last for months, and while it is ongoing, children interviewed by Human Rights Watch were treated as adults.

    “Anush,” a boy from Afghanistan who said he initially registered as an adult in August 2016, tried to get his real age – 16 – recognized during his asylum interview in February 2017:

    Because I told them I am a child, they didn’t ask me many questions. Basically, they asked me why I came from Turkey and didn’t stay there…. The interview lasted for an hour. They asked ‘Why didn’t you stay in Turkey? Why you didn’t go to UNHCR offices and register there?’ I told them that when I was in Turkey, a guy [smuggler] had me as some kind of a prisoner and also because I am under age I couldn’t have access to school or go to the hospital.

    A worker with a nongovernmental group supporting “Anush” with his case said:

    He provided his original birth certificate more than two-and-a-half months ago. We went to EASO, provided it, and registered him as a minor. The document was checked by Frontex as to whether it’s original. After waiting for more than two months, Anush goes to renew his asylum card and is given an appointment for a second interview, as an adult…. We go again today, and the EASO officer says in front of Anush, and the lawyer, that we need to do a new registration and that they had forgotten we already submitted the papers. Today, Anush lost completely his trust in the system and us.

    At the time of our interview, in May, Anush was living with the adult population of the Moria camp and his real age hadn’t been formally recognized yet.

    In a July 12 letter to Human Rights Watch, the asylum service said that if it appears that the asylum seeker is a child traveling alone, its officers are instructed to treat the case as such. The officer is obliged to notify the public prosecutor, who will act as the temporary guardian, and the National Center for Social Solidarity. In more general terms, the asylum service said that its officers are instructed to conduct the asylum interview always bearing in mind the best interest of the child.

    Children at Risk

    Unaccompanied children are some of the most vulnerable migrants in the world; international and European human rights law, as well as EU law, recognizes that vulnerability, and obliges countries to provide unaccompanied children with care. International law stipulates that the child’s best interest is a primary consideration in any decision affecting the child and that children deprived of their family environment are entitled to special protection and assistance by the state.

    The failure to carry out proper age and vulnerability assessments means that many children are not recognized as children. Most find themselves without appropriate accommodation and therefore sleep in conditions that are overcrowded, unhygienic, and a risk to their physical health and mental well-being. They stay in open spaces on the Greek islands in official and unofficial sites, share tents or container housing with adult strangers, and are exposed to frequent incidents of violence. They are unable to go to school or otherwise access education.

    On an ad-hoc basis, and depending on capacity, authorities on Lesbos place people who are seeking to prove they are under 18 in protected areas within the Moria hotspot. Some of the children interviewed were accommodated there at the time of the interview. But increased arrivals and overcrowding have resulted in transfers of these children to places outside of the protected areas. Others have been living in the open space with unrelated adult single men since their arrival.

    There are no reliable estimates of the number of children who may be registered as adults but who haven’t been identified by nongovernmental groups or others or otherwise made themselves known to the authorities and are not receiving the special protection and care to which they are entitled under Greek and international law.

    Anthi Karangeli, the director of RIS, confirmed that the lack of dedicated space on the island for age-disputed cases is problematic. “We can provide them with special treatment to the extent that space allows us,” she said.

    “Samil,” from Afghanistan, said he was 14 when he arrived in Lesbos. He said he spent more than nine months living with the general population in the camp. At the time of the interview in May, it had been a month since he had been transferred, along with his 19-year-old brother, to the section for unaccompanied children inside Moria. He said his real age was formally recognized by the asylum service at the end of April:

    I spent nine months in the tent…and now I’ve been one month here [section for unaccompanied children]…. When we were living in the tent [with adults], every day we were living in fear because of the many fights. Intense fear. I’ve been injured on my shoulder during a fight. Our tent was in the middle and it had been broken and burned twice…. I’ve reached a point where I harmed myself three times.

    Recommendations

    The Greek government should:

    • Ensure that there are sufficient and suitable alternatives to detention and end the unjustified detention of unaccompanied children, which deters children from registering as such;
    • Establish suitable separate reception facilities for young adults and age-disputed cases on the Greek islands and mainland Greece, and in the meantime, ensure that there are adequate and protected places in existing facilities;
    • Train RIS officers conducting initial screening and other officials, including Frontex, the European Asylum Support Office staff, and Greek Asylum Service officers, to correctly identify unaccompanied children, trafficking victims, and children with special protection needs, and to refer them to services as warranted;
    • Ensure that qualified interpreters assist unaccompanied migrant children;
    • Provide unaccompanied children who are illiterate with verbal and age-appropriate information about their rights and entitlements in Greece as children;
    • Ensure that all age determination procedures use a multidisciplinary approach that does not rely solely on appearance or medical or dental examinations. In the limited instances in which medical tests are carried out, use non-intrusive and non-invasive examinations to the extent possible;
    • In the case of uncertainty, give children whose age is disputed the benefit of the doubt and treat them as children;
    • Treat those with age assessment pending cases before the Greek Asylum Service as children, until their case has been finally resolved;
    • Re-examine cases of anyone assessed as an adult following inadequate and summary age determination procedures and until then, treat them as children;
    • Reform Greek law to ensure that anyone contesting designation as an adult has reasonable and adequate time to provide identification documents proving their age;
    • Provide free legal assistance for unaccompanied children, including those who claim to be under 18, in all administrative and judicial proceedings;

    Expedite reunification processes for older children and, on an equitable basis, work with other EU member states to effect reunification in cases where the state’s delay has meant that children reach 18 during the process.


              Goals        
    I have been in the BA degree completion program since October '05. The first class in the program you are SUPPOSED to have is called Goals. I felt called to go into this program, although I had no idea what MY goal was. I did not have goals first, I entered the program mid-semester, and I have been looking forward to goals ever since. The first opportunity for me to take goals was my next to the last class. I am almost finished with the program and am anxious that I have not found/discovered my goal. Last friday was the day that I was recognized for my efforts with the students of the Rad Tech program and today on the way to work I discovered that I had a goal all along. Teaching students and helping them mature (Radiologically speaking) is and always has been my goal. It is so much a part of me that I did not recognize it. This program has helped me to fine tune my teaching skills and helped me to better approach the more difficult aspects of teaching. For as long as I have been in the Ministry program everyone I know has asked me what I was going to do when I finished and I had always told them 'I don't know.' Well now I know. I will be the best Rad Tech for the students that I can be. I will be patient and have confidence in them. This is what I am going to do!
    This IS my goal.

    BigMike
              The Fine Art of Mentoring        
    This is the speech that I gave (for the most part) at the Rose State College Radiologic Technology Graduation, July 27th, 2007. I hope you enjoy it.


    A fire started in the grasslands close to a farm. The county fire department rushed to the scene, but the fire was more than they could handle. Someone suggested calling the volunteer fire department. Despite some doubt that they would be of any assistance, they were called. The volunteers arrived in a dilapidated old fire truck. They rumbled straight towards the fire, drove right into the middle of the flames and stopped! The firefighters jumped from the truck and frantically started spraying water in all directions. Soon they had snuffed out the center of the fire and leaving two parts which were easily put out. As the farmer watched all this, he was impressed and grateful that his house and farm had been spared. He quickly got his check book and donated $1000 to the volunteer fire department. A local news reporter asked the volunteer fire captain how they planned to use the funds. The captain replied, "The first thing we're gonna do is get the brakes on our fire truck fixed!"

    Good evening. I am honored by the invitation to speak to you tonight. I have had the priveledge of teaching some of you when you rotated through Mercy and I'm proud to see and hear of how far you have come in just two short years. I want to speak to you tonight about mentoring. You will soon be in the position to help others who are now, or in the future will be, in the RADIOGRAPHIC TECHNOLOGY program. Hopefully all of you have benefited while in thIS program from the help of experienced technologistS guiding you through your learning process. As new technologist you will now have the opportunity to guide and mentor others while they progress through their learning process. The definition of a mentor is to: serve as a trusted counselor or teacher, especially in occupational settings. “Mentoring is a relational experience in which one person empowers another by sharing God-given resources.” Connecting; The Mentoring Relationships You Need To Succeed In Life by Paul D. Stanley and J. Robert Clinton. The basis of mentoring has to be a sound relationship between the mentor and the student or mentoree. Like any other relationship it must be based on trust.

    Having students to mentor does not come naturally to everyone. When you begin to mentor you must first assess the needs and learning habits of the student you are trying to help. You must recognize at what point they are in the program, and what needs they have that must be addressed. Mentoring students is not just an intellectual venture, it is emotional as well. One of the most basic needs that many students have is a lack of confidence. Not that the student has no confidence themselves but that the technologists at the clinical sites have a lack of patience and little confidence in the students abilities. This deficiency in the technologist is projected onto the student and thereby stunts the student’s growth. This equates to moving a plant into a dark closet and being angry with the plant for not growing. As new technologists I urge you to have patience with your future students; you must allow them to make mistakes. I tell students at the beginning of the semester, upon first meeting them, “I will make you make mistakes; small mistakes that you will learn from, and I will not let you hurt any patients.”

    Very early one morning in October of 1991, a first year x-ray student, on his first clinical rotation would learn a lesson that would impact other students for decades to come. This lesson had nothing to do with medicine or x-ray, but was a harsh life lesson in people relations. A technologist who had a severe dislike for students, was the epitome of everything I would strive to not become. It is the point that I was treated so harshly that made me promise myself that I would never treat another person, especially one who is trying to learn from my experience, like she treated me. I have learned to have the patience of Job and the mentoring love that Paul had for Timothy for all of my students and to respect them as fellow human beings.

    Surely each of you in this auditorium can remember a superior treating you rudely. It was once said that the moral test of someone is how one treats those who are in the dawn of life, the children; those who are in the twilight of life, the elderly; and those who are in the shadows of life, the sick, the needy and the handicapped. Hubert H. Humphrey. Well, now it is your turn. New technologists have the uncanny knack of forgetting in just a few short months how it felt to be a student. I work with technologists every day that have forgotten that just a short time ago they were the student complaining about being treated like an inferior. You can do something about it. Much like myself, each of you can make the decision to put forth the effort to reach out to a student, and enrich their learning experience.

    One of my favorite Bible verses says, Just as iron sharpens iron, friends sharpen the minds of each other, Proverbs 27:17. Mentoring does not end when a student graduates the program. My co-workers and I mentor each other. We share information that is needed and we continue to mentor one another with knowledge we acquire on a daily basis. I haven’t had the opportunity to reach out to each of you graduating tonight. However, I have had the opportunity to reach a few of you. If each of you that I have reached, reaches out to future students, the student mentoring pyramid will continue exponentially. Can you imagine the quality of students, and student mentors that can be created?

    All of you here tonight have gone through physics pertaining to radiology. The point of physics is to achieve the greatest effect with the least amount of effort. If you don’t sharpen your ax, it will be harder to use…... Mentoring should be like this as well. If you sharpen your ax before you chop down the tree, the job will require less effort. The best teaching style is often self-learning. To allow self learning shows the true patience of a mentor. If you allow students to make mistakes and learn from their mistakes, even though it may be painful for you to watch, you have reached the greatest potential for the student because they are not likely to forget their mistakes.I challenge you, find a student, come along side them and nurture them. Walk shoulder to shoulder with them and watch them experience the new ideas and concepts that you discovered just a few short years before.

    You do not have to know all the answers. Students need someone to have patience with them; to help them to learn from their mistakes and your experience. If you Take care of a tree, you will eat its fruit. Do it with a smile, and know that I am proud of you for the effort, and the student you have helped is appreciative of your time and patience. Some people call this ‘pay if forward’ I call it mentoring and together we are training better technologists for tomorrow.Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you, and congratulations.

    Michael H Kerr R.T. (R)
              Porównanie wstępnych kryteriów remisji ACR/EULAR z 2011 roku z kryteriami remisji opartymi na skali DAS28 w niewyselekcjonowanej grupie chorych z RZS        
    Europejska Liga do Walki z Reumatyzmem (EULAR) wspólnie z Amerykańskim Kolegium Reumatologicznum (ACR) zaproponowała niedawno nową definicję remisji RZS, tj. definicję Boole&#8217;a (obejmującą liczbę obrzękniętych i bolesnych stawów &#8211; każdy &#8804; 1, CRP &#8804; 1 mg/ml oraz ogólną ocena chorego [ang. patient global assessment, PtGA] &#8804; 1) lub definicję opartą na wyniku wskaźnika SDAI (ang. Simplified Disease Activity Index) &#8804; 3,3. Jednakże 20% - 30% chorych spełniających kryteria remisji wg którejkolwiek definicji wykazuje istotne radiologiczne cechy uszkodzenia stawów w ciągu 2 lat, podczas gdy 50% - 60% pacjentów niespełniających kryteriów remisji nie wykazuje istotnej progresji zmian radiologicznych.
              Electrical Engineer - Rapid Response - Bruce Power L.P. - Port Elgin, ON        
    The RRET section is primarily tasked with managing emergent station risks and operational challenges that impact the 4 pillars of nuclear safety - Radiological,...
    From Indeed - Wed, 02 Aug 2017 22:23:12 GMT - View all Port Elgin, ON jobs
              BI-RADS Category 4        

    In reply to BIRAD D4?

    According to the American College of Radiology - BI-RADS-Mammography, 4th Edition:

    Category 4
    Suspicious Abnormality—Biopsy Should Be Considered:
    (See Guidance Chapter*):


    This category is reserved for findings that do not have the
    classic appearance of malignancy but have a wide range
    of probability of malignancy that is greater than those in
    Category 3. Thus, most recommendations of breast
    interventional procedures will be placed within this
    category. By subdividing Category 4 into 4A, 4B and 4C as
    suggested in the guidance chapter, it is encouraged that
    relevant probabilities for malignancy be indicated within
    this category so the patient and her physician can make
    an informed decision on the ultimate course of action.

    GUIDANCE CHAPTER

    Category 4:


    Category 4 is used for the vast majority of findings
    prompting breast interventional procedures
    ranging from aspiration of complicated cysts to
    biopsy of pleomorphic calcifications. Many institutions
    have, on an individual basis, subdivided
    Category 4 to account for the vast range of lesions
    subjected to interventional procedures and corresponding
    broad range of risk of malignancy. This
    allows a more meaningful practice audit, is useful
    in research involving receiver-operating characteristic
    (ROC) curve analysis, and is an aid for
    clinicians and pathologists. The optional division

    of Category 4 into three subdivisions internally
    at the facility level helps to accomplish these goals.


    Category 4A
    Category 4A may be used for a finding needing
    intervention but with a low suspicion for
    malignancy. A malignant pathology report not
    expected and a 6-month or routine follow-up
    after a benign biopsy or cytology is appropriate.
    Examples of findings placed in this
    category may be a palpable, partially circumscribed
    solid mass with ultrasound features
    suggestive of a fibroadenoma, a palpable
    complicated cyst or probable abscess.


    Category 4B
    Category 4B includes lesions with an intermediate
    suspicion of malignancy. Findings in
    this category warrant close radiologic and
    pathologic correlation. Follow-up with a
    benign result, in this situation, depends on
    concordance. A partially circumscribed, partially
    indistinctly marginated mass yielding
    fibroadenoma or fat necrosis is acceptable,
    but a result of papilloma might warrant
    excisional biopsy.


    Category 4C
    Category 4C includes findings of moderate
    concern, but not classic (as in Category 5)
    for malignancy. Examples of findings placed
    in this category are an ill-defined, irregular
    solid mass or a new cluster of fine pleomorphic
    calcifications. A malignant result in this
    category is expected.
    These internal divisions of Category 4 should
    encourage pathologists to initiate further
    evaluation of benign results in a Category 4C,
    and should allow clinicians to better understand
    follow-up recommendations after biopsy for findings placed in each subset of
    Category 4.


              Quantitative modeling of responses to chronic ionizing radiation exposure using targeted and non-targeted effects        
    The biological effects of chronic ionizing radiation exposure can be difficult to study, but important to understand in order to protect the health of occupationally-exposed persons and victims of radiological accidents or malicious events. They include targeted effects (TE) caused by ionizations within/close to nuclear DNA, and non-targeted effects (NTE) caused by damage to other cell structures and/or activation of stress-signaling pathways in distant cells. Data on radiation damage in animal populations exposed over multiple generations to wide ranges of dose rates after the Chernobyl nuclear-power-plant accident are very useful for enhancing our understanding of these processes. We used a mechanistically-motivated mathematical model which includes TE and NTE to analyze a large published data set on chromosomal aberrations in pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis) embryos collected over 16 years from water bodies contaminated by Chernobyl fallout, and from control locations. The fraction of embryo cells with aberrations increased dramatically (>10-fold) and non-linearly over a dose rate range of 0.03–420 μGy/h (0.00026–3.7 Gy/year). NTE were very important for describing the non-linearity of this radiation response: the TE-only model (without NTE) performed dramatically worse than the TE+NTE model. NTE were predicted to reach ½ of maximal intensity at 2.5 μGy/h (0.022 Gy/year) and to contribute >90% to the radiation response slope at dose rates <11 μGy/h (0.1 Gy/year). Internally-incorporated 90Sr was possibly more effective per unit dose than other radionuclides. The radiation response shape for chromosomal aberrations in snail embryos was consistent with data for a different endpoint: the fraction of young amoebocytes in adult snail haemolymph. Therefore, radiation may affect different snail life stages by similar mechanisms. The importance of NTE in our model-based analysis suggests that the search for modulators of NTE-related signaling pathways could be a promising strategy for mitigating the deleterious effects of chronic irradiation.
              Assessing Agreement between Radiomic Features Computed for Multiple CT Imaging Settings        
    Objectives: Radiomics utilizes quantitative image features (QIFs) to characterize tumor phenotype. In practice, radiological images are obtained from different vendors’ equipment using various imaging acquisition settings. Our objective was to assess the inter-setting agreement of QIFs computed from CT images by varying two parameters, slice thickness and reconstruction algorithm. Materials and Methods: CT images from an IRB-approved/HIPAA-compliant study assessing thirty-two lung cancer patients were included for the analysis. Each scan’s raw data were reconstructed into six imaging series using combinations of two reconstruction algorithms (Lung[L] and Standard[S]) and three slice thicknesses (1.25mm, 2.5mm and 5mm), i.e., 1.25L, 1.25S, 2.5L, 2.5S, 5L and 5S. For each imaging-setting, 89 well-defined QIFs were computed for each of the 32 tumors (one tumor per patient). The six settings led to 15 inter-setting comparisons (combinatorial pairs). To reduce QIF redundancy, hierarchical clustering was done. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were used to assess inter-setting agreement of the non-redundant feature groups. The CCC of each group was assessed by averaging CCCs of QIFs in the group. Results: Twenty-three non-redundant feature groups were created. Across all feature groups, the best inter-setting agreements (CCCs>0.8) were 1.25S vs 2.5S, 1.25L vs 2.5L, and 2.5S vs 5S; the worst (CCCs<0.51) belonged to 1.25L vs 5S and 2.5L vs 5S. Eight of the feature groups related to size, shape, and coarse texture had an average CCC>0.8 across all imaging settings. Conclusions: Varying degrees of inter-setting disagreements of QIFs exist when features are computed from CT images reconstructed using different algorithms and slice thicknesses. Our findings highlight the importance of harmonizing imaging acquisition for obtaining consistent QIFs to study tumor imaging phonotype.
              The Atomic Bomb and Its Deadly Shadow        
    The March 8, 2014, episode of American Heroes Radio features a conversation with Dean Warren, Navy Veteran and retired Director of Strategic Planning for the Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles. About the Guest Pharmacist Mate Third Class Dean Warren, entered the United States Navy at the end of World War II.  He volunteered to be trained as a radiological technician and sailed to Bikini Atoll for the atomic tests. “As a young veteran of the Bikini Atom bomb tests, Dean Warren attended UCLA, The London School of Economics, and Harvard. While in London, he and two other graduate students drove from there to New Delhi, India. Later, he sold Lockheed aircraft in Southwest Asia and was promoted to Director of Marketing for Lockheed International. The State Department then lured him to run Program Planning for the Agency of International Development. He finished his working career as Director of Strategic Planning for the Lockheed Martin Electronics and Missiles Group in Orlando, Florida. In that role he helped bring his Group into the forefront of the precision guidance revolution. His experiences and writing skills have led him in retirement to publish illustrated memoirs of his nuclear and car trip adventures, as well as seven science fiction, speculative novels.”  Dean Warren is the author of The Bomb And Its Deadly Shadow: A Memoir; Imaginings: Selected Stories; the three volume work The Pacification of Earth which includes American Revolt, The Crescent Strikes and Imperial Power; From London to New Delhi by Car in 1951; Growing Young; The Last Underclass; and, Man over Mind.
              Aafia's Sister Speaks to CNN        

    Posted on CNN (link here fir Video  http://aafiamovement.com/aafia-siddiquis-sister-speaks-to-cnn/)  

    http://www.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/world/2014/08/28/pkg-mohsin-isis-aafia-siddiqui-sister.cnn.html

    By Sophia Saifi and Hilary Whiteman, CNN

    August 29, 2014

    Karachi, Pakistan (CNN) -- The sister of a Pakistani prisoner described as the "poster girl" for Islamic jihad has urged ISIS hostage-takers to let their captives go.

    Speaking exclusively to CNN from her home in Karachi, Pakistan, the sister of Dr. Aaifa Siddiqui said the jailed neuroscientist's family wanted "no violence in Aafia's name."

    "I'm Aafia's sister. We're Aafia's family. And we speak on her behalf as well. We want no violence in Aafia's name. Our whole struggle has been one that is dignified that is peaceful that is legal," Fowzia Siddiqui said.

    A jury in New York convicted Aafia Siddiqui on seven charges, including attempted murder and armed assault on U.S. officers, in 2010. No one was wounded in the incident. She is serving her 86-year sentence at a facility in Texas.

    At the time of the 2008 shooting, Siddiqui was in police custody after being arrested outside the Ghazni governor's compound in Afghanistan. She was said to be acting suspiciously and found to be carrying "numerous documents describing the creation of explosives, chemical weapons, and other weapons involving biological material and radiological agents," according to court documents.

    The papers included descriptions of various U.S. landmarks and military assets, excerpts from the "Anarchist's Arsenal," and a number of chemical substances in bottles and glass jars, the documents said.

     

    Siddiqui has never been charged with a terror-related offence, though U.S. authorities made the link long before her capture. In 2004, she was placed on an FBI alert list as a sought-after al Qaeda member.

     

    Why did ISIS want to free her?

    Her family has insisted she has no ties to terror.

    "There is no connection with al Qaeda, the Taliban or any terrorist organization. She wasn't even charged with terrorism," Fowzia said.

    However, Saddiqui's name has recently appeared on documents purportedly from Islamic militants in Syria. A letter sent to the family of U.S. journalist James Foley, before video of his beheading surfaced this month, said the U.S. government had been given "many chances" to negotiate for his release. It singled out Siddiqui by name.

    "We have also offered prisoner exchanges to free the Muslims currently in your detention like our sister Dr Afia Sidiqqi (sic), however you proved very quickly to us that this is NOT what you are interested in," the email said, which was published in full on the GlobalPost website.

    'She is an icon'

    Fowzia Siddiqui said her sister's name had been appropriated by terrorists to suit their own agenda. "Any kind of kidnappers, ISIS these days, the Aafia brigade, or whoever wants to claim Aafia," she said.

    I can't tell you how painful it was not knowing. You know if someone dies then you have a closure. Here, there was no closure.

    Fowzia Siddiqui

    She said labels like "Lady al Qaeda" and the "Grey Lady of Bagram," used by the media in reference to her sister made her cringe.

    "When I hear these things, like Lady al Qaeda --I don't even want to repeat that word -- and you know, it hurts. It really hurts."

    Deborah Scroggins, the author of "Wanted Women," said Siddiqui had become a cause de celebre for followers of jihad.

    "She is an icon, she is the poster girl for jihad, a rallying point ... she's not just any woman, she is the premier symbol of the Muslim woman in distress," she said.

    Conflicting accounts

    Fowzia, an accomplished clinical neurologist who trained at Harvard Medical School, said her family had suffered tremendously since Aafia vanished with her three young children in March 2003.

    She had just finished her thesis in cognitive neuroscience, and had left the family home to go to Islamabad, but never arrived. The youngest child was just six months old.

    "It's as if she had fallen off the surface of the Earth ... I can't tell you how painful it was not knowing. You know if someone dies then you have a closure. Here, there was no closure," Fowzia said.

    Five years of rumor and false leads ended in 2008 when news emerged that Aafia was in U.S. custody, accused of crimes for which she was later imprisoned.

    Prosecutors said Siddiqui shot at two FBI special agents, a U.S. Army warrant officer, an Army captain and military interpreters while she was being held unsecured at an Afghan facility on July 18, 2008. The warrant officer returned fire, shooting her in the torso, according to court documents.

    Her family said the official version of events was wrong.

    "She was in custody. How could she in custody snatch a rifle, or even pick up a rifle from six armed U.S. marshals, one woman?" she asked. "I mean, these are U.S. Marshalls, FBI agents trained in weaponry, how could she? It just doesn't make sense."

     

    Calls for release

    Fowzia said her sister was the victim of the "war on terror," that she said had created an atmosphere of fear and prejudice against Muslims.

    Protests calling for Siddiqui's release

    "It's like they are labeled guilty and not even given a proper chance to prove their innocence, and a similar kind of thing happened with my sister," she said.

    She said a lot of a misinformation had created a false impression of a woman who had wanted to use her degree to improve education in Pakistan. The family claims Aafia was never married to the nephew of 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Muhammad, as had been widely reported.

    A online petition to the White House seeking Aafia's release has received more than 100,000 signatures over several weeks, and her family is currently seeking her release on appeal.

    "Aafia should be released, but not for ransom, not in exchange, not for other people that are kidnapped by extremists, no. She should be released because that is the right thing to do," Fowzia said.


              Mahoney Serves as Leader for All Major National Radiological Societies         
    Mary Mahoney, MD, Benjamin Felson Endowed Chair and Professor in the Department of Radiology, was just named to the Board of Chancellors for the American College of Radiology.
              ADHD: Latest Treatments        
    adhd-latest-treatmentsDiscover the factors that contribute to ADHD, as well as the latest treatments.Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurobiologic disorder that most often occurs in children.

    Symptoms include difficulty staying organized, trouble paying attention, concentration issues and a hard time remembering details. 

    Eleven percent of children ages 4-17 have this issue. Children have a 50 percent chance of ADHD diagnosis if a parent also has ADHD.

    Looking at where these symptoms are potentially interfering can help with diagnosis. Academic performance, neuropsych testing, computer testing, radiologic studies, interviews with parents and children can all help inform the diagnosis. Reaching a diagnosis usually takes a few sessions and extensive research.

    Keep track of how your child is doing in class and outside of school.

    Kids with ADHD get a lot of negative reinforcement. Psychotherapy can help address these feelings so they feel more comfortable and confident.

    Listen in as Dr. Michael Feld shares which treatments can help address ADHD.
              Electrical Engineer - Rapid Response - Bruce Power L.P. - Port Elgin, ON        
    The RRET section is primarily tasked with managing emergent station risks and operational challenges that impact the 4 pillars of nuclear safety - Radiological,...
    From Indeed - Wed, 02 Aug 2017 22:23:12 GMT - View all Port Elgin, ON jobs
              July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result Top 10 Placers        

    The Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) and the Board of Radiologic Technolgy announces the July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result Top 10 Placers. Held in Manila, Baguio, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Iloilo, Legaspi and Tuguegarao last July 30-31, 2017. The result was released on August 3, 2017, in 3 working days.



    LIST OF TOP 10 PLACERS: July 2017 Radtech Board Exam

    1
     YNDHIRA XHEYENN CAGURANGAN LAYLO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY 91.60

    2
     ANNA MARGARITA VILLANUEVA CAMET DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY-HEALTH
    SCIENCES INSTITUTE 91.00

    3
     RIOLYN PALACIOS ALCAIRO DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY-HEALTH
    SCIENCES INSTITUTE 90.80

    4
     RYCE ANGELINE SUMALJAG AVES DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY-HEALTH
    SCIENCES INSTITUTE 90.40

    5
     JESRAEL GAWAEN PANDUYOS LORMA COLLEGE 90.20

    6
     ALEK JAN LAGUARDIA BARROZO SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY 89.60

    RYAN KENN HALASAN DELCO LICEO DE CAGAYAN UNIVERSITY 89.60

    ALYSSA KAYE IGHARAS VISTO SAINT GABRIEL COLLEGE-KALIBO 89.60

    7
     CAMILLE DIFUNTORUM FRIGILLANA LORMA COLLEGE 89.40

    VANESSA MAE BERNAS GALEON LICEO DE CAGAYAN UNIVERSITY 89.40

    ABEGAIL GRACE AGUAZON RIVERA SAINT JUDE COLLEGE-MANILA 89.40

    8
    FRANCESS LEIGHN CARINGAL AYSON CENTRAL LUZON DOCTOR'S HOSPITAL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION 89.20

    MARK KENNETH NEIDO QUIAPO HOLY INFANT COLLEGE 89.20


    CHRISTY MAE ANNE SIBULO CALAYAN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION INC.(for.
    MED.CTR.LUCENA) 89.00

    10
    KATRINA MAE ANDES ENGAY DE LA SALLE UNIVERSITY-HEALTH
    SCIENCES INSTITUTE 88.80

    MARK DENNIS PRADO LAMSEN SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY 88.80

    ANGELICA DELLORO LEJARDE UNIVERSITY OF PERPETUAL HELP
    SYSTEM-LAGUNA 88.80

    RALPH PATRICK CEZAR MOLINA SAINT JUDE COLLEGE-MANILA 88.80

    SYVEL VALENZUELA NATURAL MANILA ADVENTIST COLLEGE(FOR

    MLA ADV. MCSMA) 88.80

    ...END...



    LIST OF TOP 10 PLACERS: July 2017 X-ray Technologist Board Exam

    1
    MARY JOY VILLEGAS BUENCAMINO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES CABANATUAN CITY 84.50

    2
    AL-ROMAIZA KARINA ALAWADDIN UNTOY UNIVERSIDAD DE ZAMBOANGA
    (for.ZAEC) 83.75

    JOHN MICHAEL GAYA VILORIA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES  CABANATUAN CITY 83.75

    3
    MINDA JUHADIL ALIASGAR UNIVERSIDAD DE ZAMBOANGA (for.ZAEC) 83.50

    4
    MARK GIL MACTAL CUEVAS WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES CABANATUAN
    CITY 83.25

    5
    ALYSSA ZANDRA DELA CRUZ GARCIA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES CABANATUAN CITY 83.00

    6
    JOHN NIXON DOMINGO TALPLACIDO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES CABANATUAN CITY 82.25

    7
    LYSSA MEDINA GARCIA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES CABANATUAN
    CITY 82.00

    8
    TRISCIA REGUYAL ABENOJA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES CABANATUAN
    CITY 81.75

    JOSELITO DAYUNDON DE JESUS COLLEGE OF OUR LADY OF MERCY OF PULILAN FOUNDATION, INCPULILAN 81.75

    9
    DEAN CARLO REYES GREGORIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY-PHILIPPINES CABANATUAN CITY 81.00

    10
    JOHANNA SACRAMENTO FALDAS ILOILO DOCTORS' COLLEGE 80.50

    ...END...



    You may see also:
    LIST OF PASSERS: July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result


    For live updates of the upcoming July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result. You may LIKE US on Facebook or FOLLOW US in our Google+ Community Page.



              July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result        

    The Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) and the Board of Radiologic Technology announces the 1,945 out of 4,195 passers of July 2017 Radtech Board Exam Result and 61 out of 248 passers of July 2017 X-ray Tech Board Exam Result or also known as the July 2017 Radiologic Technologist and X-ray Technologist Board Exam Result. Held in Manila, Baguio, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Iloilo, Legaspi and Tuguegarao last July 30-31, 2017. The result is expected in three (3) woking days from the last day of examination. The result was released on August 3, 2017.

    Exam Coverage:
    July 30, 2017
    1. Radiologic Physics, Equipment and Maintenance, Radiobiology, Radiation Protection and Quality Assurance.
    2. Image Production and Evaluation
    3. Radiographic Procedures and Techniques

    July 31, 2017
    1. Patient Care, Management, Ethics and Jurisprudence, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Medical Terminology
    2. Radiological Sciences


    You may see also:
    LIST OF TOP 10 PLACERS: July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result

    PERFORMANCE OF SCHOOLS: July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result


    LIST OF PASSERS: July 2017 Radtech and X-ray Tech Board Exam Result
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 2 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         1 ABADIES, ALBERT CAMORISTA
         2 ABADILLA, JULIEANN NICOLE VILLANUEVA
        3 ABALOS, VAL JAYSON VENEZUELA
        4 ABANDO, GUILLNOR ACAYLAR
         5 ABANGIN, ANGELICA RUTH BACASON
         6 ABAS, ROHAMIA ABO
        7 ABASOLA, JUNNELCA CINCO
        8 ABATAYO, MARIA IRISH LOU DENUYO
         9 ABAYA, ALYSSA SORIANO
         10 ABAYA, ALYSSA CAMILLE BOLINAS
        11 ABBAS, JUNAID FONTANOS
        12 ABDON, HYNA DAYNE CARDENAS
        13 ABDUKAHIL, OMAR-YAKIN KAGAYAN
         14 ABDUL, SOHAIBEN MAROHOMBSAR
        15 ABDULHAMID, ABDULMOHAIMIN SOLAIMAN
        16 ABDULLA, KASHOGI MUHARANI
        17 ABDULLA, MOSMIRA CAWANAN
        18 ABDULLAH, SARAH MACASPAC
        19 ABDULWAHID, MUHAZIR ABDULLA
        20 ABDURAHIM, SITI RASIMA ABDUA
        21 ABELLA, JENNIFER VENTURA
        22 ABIA, MA JAVISA LOCSON
        23 ABIERA, ROVIEJANE CALIXTRO
        24 ABIOL, AIRA VIELE ORTEGA
        25 ABIS, ANGELICA ROSAL
        26 ABLIN, CHRISTIAN LOU CIRCULADO
        27 ABRANTES, CHARMAINE YU
        28 ABRENICA, LEONARD LUIS ABUEVA
        29 ABRILLA, WILMA CARREON
         30 ABUBACAR, AINOR ABDULLAH
         31 ACAPULCO, IRISH MAE BABIA
        32 ACEBRON, ROCHELLE ASUNCION
        33 ACMAD, HANNA PINATARA
         34 ACOMPAÑADO, CHRISTEL OMAMALIN
         35 ACOPE, RICHARD VIRADOR
        36 ACOSTA, MICHAEL HENRICH BUENAVENTURA
        37 ACOSTA, XAVIERI AMOR CALIZO
         38 ACQUIATAN, RAUL ERICKSON ADINO
         39 ACUT, ROCHELLE BALLENTES
        40 ACUÑA, KELVINCRIS LIPA
        41 ADIZAS, JENEL ANNE TILO
        42 ADJALAIN, DIZZA JULAILI
        43 ADJOK, KATRINA REMIGIO
        44 ADLAWAN, VINCENT VLADIMIR ACEDO
        45 ADLOC, EDRYL MIRANDA
        46 AGAJONA, MARICAR RAGUS
        47 AGAPAY, MARIA MELCHIE TALIC
        48 AGAUNA, DYANE JEAN VALDEZ
        49 AGCAOILI, CARINA MAY RAMEL
        50 AGCAOILI, LAWRENCE ROBES
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 3 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         51 AGRAAN, SHANE MOLYN VICENTE
         52 AGRIAM, KARL PHILIP DUBRIA
        53 AGTARAP, SHEILA RHEMA ABBATUAN
        54 AGUDA, CRIS NAVARRO
         55 AGUILA, LERNIE VILLAPANDO
         56 AGUILAR, ALEXANDER SALASAR
        57 AGUILLON, JULIE ANN
        58 AGUINALDO, ALWYN ED AQUINO
        59 AGUIRRE, DARVIN JAMES SIOSON
        60 AGUIT, CARYLL ANTHONY JUDE CASTILLON
        61 AGUS, ANGELICA GARCERO
        62 AGUSTIN, CELESTINO III MANIBOG
        63 AGUSTIN, JESLYN MAE VILLAREAL
        64 AGUSTIN, JULIE ANN TEVES
        65 ALACRE, KLINT RICHARD ANGELES
        66 ALAMO, ROCHELLE PINEDA
        67 ALAN, MARIA-CLARA BUENO
         68 ALAYZA, FRANCIS FERNAN PAGUIO
        69 ALBULADORA, ZYRAH ANGELA LEUTERIO
        70 ALCAIRO, RIOLYN PALACIOS
        71 ALCANAR, CLARISSE CONDECIDO
        72 ALDOHESA, KISHA ASIS
        73 ALEA, ENRICO PAPIO
        74 ALEJANDRO, ELREENE MARIE BAUTISTA
        75 ALERA, MARIA RONA GETANO
        76 ALERTA, PATRICK CUBA
        77 ALESNA, RACHELLE ANN MOLINO
        78 ALFECHE, KARLA MAE DELA CRUZ
        79 ALGARA, TRISHA MAE TERRENAL
         80 ALHARI, MYRNA USMAN
         81 ALIBADBARIN, LENNETH JUNE DARAUG
        82 ALIH, ABDUL-MUSLIMIN ANGGING
        83 ALIMON, JOSHUA KHRIS SUISON
         84 ALIMURUNG, RAYMOND ROBLES
         85 ALIPIO, EDHELYN GARCIA
        86 ALISON, QUEEN AN ARABIA
        87 ALLAUIGAN, MAY FAYE ATUAN
        88 ALMAIN, DHANA DUNKALANG
        89 ALMAZAN, ROSEMARIE REINTEGRADO
        90 ALMIRANTE, DERRICK GALON
        91 ALMIRANTE, VINCENT EHONG
        92 ALMONTE, JOSEPH AGNIS
        93 ALOOT, MARY LOUISE ENOY
        94 ALPAS, ROMULO III BELANDRES
        95 ALTUNA, KHRYSTIAN JESUS FINELLI OTANES
        96 ALVAREZ, JALEN ALODIA BORRES
        97 ALVAREZ, MICHELLE VELARIO
        98 AMA, HIACYNT RIOLA
        99 AMADA, MA RHIA ANTOINETTE FORTIN
         100 AMADO, ANNE KRISTINE AMBAS
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 4 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         101 AMADO, IRIS JANE HABON
        102 AMAGO, CHARMAINE ROSALIE CESISTA
        103 AMATONDING, ROFAIDA NG CU
        104 AMBOY, MYDELLE MARIE VILLARTA
        105 AMBRAD, MARY RUASSEL PINPIN
        106 AMIL, YUSOF MOHAMMAD
        107 AMPARO, ANINA CORINE JUATCO
        108 AMPLAYO, ORVILLE JOHN RUELAN
         109 AMPOLOQUIO, FRANK ERIK PAGUINTO
         110 AMPONG, NHEIL ERNI
        111 AMURAO, CYN JULIANNE SARMIENTO
        112 ANANAYO, PRECEL ADAWE
         113 ANAPI, RECY-JOY GOLLAYAN
         114 ANCHETA, MARK JUNICKO ESLABRA
        115 ANDAGAN, KAMILAH JOY BOLORON
        116 ANDAH, ADZMAN ESTIBAN
        117 ANDALES, CZA CZA TORREVILLAS
        118 ANDERSON, CHARLENE ANGELA GUTIERREZ
        119 ANDRES, ADORACION MARIE GARCIA
        120 ANDRES, CLAIRE ASUNCION
        121 ANDRES, JERICK PAUL GUIAB
        122 ANDRES, JEYSON QUEJA
        123 ANGALA, JANINE MINA
        124 ANGELES, ADRIANE LHESTER MARTIN
        125 ANGELES, BEA LIZZ QUINTO
        126 ANGELES, SHIENA MARIE POSADAS
        127 ANGHAD, SWANY GANO
        128 ANIB, ANSEL JOHN ANGELITUD
        129 ANICIETE, KRISTIEN CYRIL OBAR
        130 ANIDO, YANCY COLLAMAR
        131 ANNIBAN, NOVELYN DELA CRUZ
        132 ANOCHE, JOEL JR AMPALID
        133 ANOCHOSO, TRISHA MAE BETANSOS
         134 ANOPOL, CLARK JOSHUA AVILA
         135 ANTON, SYLVANA MARIE PRESAS
        136 ANTONIO, CARLA ANGELA PASCUAL
        137 ANTONIO, VENICE HARRIET CASTRO
         138 APOLONIO, CHARLES DANIEL AZARRAGA
         139 APOSTOL, ANDRE VILLAGRACIA
        140 APOSTOL, EDGARDO JR CONDECIDO
        141 APOSTOL, EDNA CAMARCE
         142 AQUINO, ANDRE IAN DANIEL ANGELO
         143 AQUINO, JEMIMAH AMPAGUEY
        144 AQUINO, MICHAEL BAUTISTA
        145 ARABE, NIKKA PAULA ANN ESTEVES
         146 ARADO, JIMVIE USMAN
         147 ARADO, REIL NICKOLSON MENCIANO
        148 ARAJANI, SCOH ATALAD
        149 ARANTE, ARMELA JEAN RAMOS
        150 ARANTE, KERVIE LOUISE EMMA
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 5 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         151 ARBIZ, JOHN MICHAEL CARAY
        152 ARBOLEDA, KHRISTINE ALVENDO
        153 ARBONEDA, MIA ROCHELLE TABAT
        154 ARBONIDA, LAARNI BORJA
        155 ARCAYA, DOMINIC MARI BENITO
        156 ARCEBAL, MARK JOSEPH MAQUIDDANG
        157 ARCEGA, NOVA JOY SANTUA
        158 ARCENA, ALVIN JUN SEBATON
        159 ARCEÑO, DOREES ANGELICA LARA
        160 ARENAS, AILA ABEGAIL ANDRIN
        161 ARENAS, MIRIAM DELOS SANTOS
        162 AREVALO, MARK JOSHUA ESGUERRA
        163 ARGA, ROCH JOVI PAUL ORBITA
        164 ARGUEL, MARIANN JOYCE BAGUINON
        165 ARIMAO, RAIHANA DIDATO
        166 ARIOLA, KEANNE LOUISE SUÑGA
        167 ARIOS, CHRISTIAN DALE GADINGAN
        168 ARIÑO, CELJHON BANTASAN
        169 ARJONA, JANICE PEARL MORCOZO
        170 ARLAN, BRET JUSTIN PRIETO
         171 ARRAZ, MARCHEL POTENCIANDO
         172 ARTEZA, DIANE KYLE MIRASOL
        173 ARTINE, EVERLYN KIDPALOS
        174 ASANION, MARIA JO ANN ATUN
         175 ASCAÑO, GINALYN AVILA
         176 ASKAL, SWEET RIVA CASEM
        177 ASPIRAS, ALLYSSA MARIE ANTONIO
        178 ASUNCION, AIZHA LEAH GALLERO
         179 ASUNCION, DEXTER VERZOSA
         180 ATENDIDO, JAMES PAUL SALAZAR
        181 ATTOS, LOVELY AN REGIDOR
        182 ATUTUBO, BRYAN MANZANO
        183 AURO, CAMILLE MONSOD
        184 AUSAN, ALEJANDRO MAYANG
        185 AUXTERO, SYBELLE MARIE CABATINGAN
        186 AVELLANA, JOCO PAUL JAN EDQUILANG
        187 AVENA, JAMES RAMOS
        188 AVES, RYCE ANGELINE SUMALJAG
        189 AVILA, JOBELLE ANN ARPILLEDA
        190 AVILLA, IAN PAUL CATUBIG
        191 AWA, ROCHELLE TIMBANGAN
        192 AYSON, FRANCESS LEIGHN CARINGAL
        193 AYUSTE, FRITZEL KARREN BAGULBAGOL
        194 AZARCON, CRISTIAN RICARDO II GARRIDO
        195 AZARES, ALBERT JR LAGMAN
        196 AZORES, JOSEPHINE METCHA
        197 AZUCENA, ERROL MERCADO
        198 AZUCENA, PRYLLE LORENZ EVANGELISTA
        199 AZURIN, IAM JERICO ESPARTERO
        200 BABARAN, JENNIFER PENULLAR
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 6 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         201 BABAY, JAMES CLARENCE FLOREZA
        202 BACOY, AARON MARK BADILLA
        203 BACULOD, CHRISHELLE ANN FERREOL
        204 BADANGAYON, RICA DALUYON
        205 BAGANG, KENNETH NEIL ZABALA
        206 BAGAY, BERNADETTE FABRO
        207 BAGO, ARSENIO JR NARAG
         208 BAGO, JOANNA ROSE DE LEON
         209 BAGONOC, ENA MYCA ALEGRE
        210 BAGTAS, JENNILYN ALBERCA
        211 BAGUHIN, RUBEMARK ROSAS
        212 BAGUIO, JORJAE ALAG
        213 BAGUIO, MARIELA SABROSO
        214 BAGUNU, LYRA DAOANG
        215 BALADHAY, RONELO JR DOMINGO
        216 BALADJAY, JOSE GERALD PARACUELES
        217 BALAGAPO, MIKAELA CASTRO
        218 BALAHADIA, JOBELLE JAURIGUE
        219 BALANSAG, JULIE JAN CLAUDINE EBARLE
        220 BALAONG, KYRENE MYRA GONZALES
        221 BALAS, CHARISSE MELODY PASCUAL
        222 BALAUAG, MA ANGELA PALATTAO
        223 BALBUENA, JOHNNY JR PEÑAFIEL
        224 BALCEDA, MARY NATHALIE BULWAG
        225 BALCITA, WENDY KHURT SEGUNDO
        226 BALDONA, JHONALIE CASTRO
        227 BALIDOY, JULIENNE
        228 BALINGIT, JONALYN CARCILLAR
        229 BALLESTEROS, JOY ANNE JACOB
        230 BALMELERO, PRINCESS ROSELYN BELAÑOS
        231 BALNAJA, MITCHLEA RITAMAE FLORES
        232 BALON, JAMILAH ROSE ROSALES
        233 BALORAN, NEALICA FRONDA
        234 BALTAZAR, BILLY JOY DIÑO
        235 BALUDON, KIMBERLY OLAO
        236 BALUYOT, MARJIEHL CAPARAS
        237 BAMBA, RAZEL MAE GELERA
        238 BANAYAT, TRISHA ERIKA CACHERO
        239 BANCILO, MESHACH KINAO
        240 BANDAYREL, IAN PASCUAL
         241 BANDINO, RODERICK BERSAMINA
         242 BANGUIS, SARAH FEL ZULUETA
        243 BANSEN, PATRICIO JR WAGANG
        244 BANTOLINO, KRISTINE GEE OFRANCIA
         245 BANZAGALE, ANGELO JACINTO
         246 BAPTISTA, ROBIN LUCAS
        247 BARA, AL-HAKIM ARASID
        248 BARAL, ANGELO REY CARANDANG
        249 BARANDON, BRIAN ALDWIN GAMET
        250 BARBOSA, ARMIE TURINGAN
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 7 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         251 BARCELONA, SWEEDEN CORDERO
        252 BARCENA, KRISTINA PULIDO
        253 BARIAS, LAURENCE DUMOL
        254 BARIRING, KIM HAROLD MELENDREZ
        255 BARIUAN, NATIVIDAD GOLINO
        256 BAROL, ALLANA MARIE COMPUESTO
        257 BAROSA, RAMON IVAN LEONOR
        258 BAROY, MARIONE TAÑALA
        259 BARRAQUIO, BEA MEI SAMIANO
        260 BARRETTO, JOSHUA TAPANGCO
        261 BARRETTO, MARK ANTHONY CEJO
         262 BARRIENTOS, BLAINSHEL MARIELLA BERNAL
         263 BARRIENTOS, JOHNE ANDRIE SUMILHIG
        264 BARRIENTOS, MYETH VALERIO
        265 BARRIETA, MA CRISELDA ESCAÑO
        266 BARROZO, ALEK JAN LAGUARDIA
        267 BARTOLOME, SHARON MAE LIM
        268 BASICULAN, CHERRY ANN ABISADO
        269 BATALAO, CRISTY CAWAS
         270 BATALLONES, ANGELICA NARAG
         271 BATISLA-ONG, ALVIN BELGIRA
        272 BATISLA-ONG, MAVI JANE BORROMEO
        273 BATOCABE, CAERAH ANNE LAGUERTA
         274 BATOTOC, LOUIE JOHN MONTAÑO
         275 BAUTISTA, JEFF LAUREN FLORENCONDIA
        276 BAUTISTA, KLAIRE JAMILEE SANTISTEBAN
        277 BAUTISTA, KLEIN REAGAN RANILE
        278 BAUTISTA, LELAND ARIEL LIWANAG
        279 BAUTISTA, MARIELLE LOUISE POBLETE
        280 BAUTISTA, ROBERTO BAYUNGAN
        281 BAUTISTA, VENESSA DELA CRUZ
        282 BAUTO, MARY ANN CRUZ
        283 BAYLON, JAYSON SAGUROS
        284 BAYON, NICOLAI GALE DAGUIO
        285 BAYSA, CHARISS JOY ADAN
         286 BAYSIC, LYNNAR MACASPAC
         287 BAÑANOLA, KIMBERLEY ORACION
        288 BAÑEZ, ANALYN SUYAT
        289 BEA, JEANINA MAE SANTOS
        290 BEATO, JOVYN KEANU DE JESUS
        291 BECYAGEN, IVY MACHOLI
        292 BELBEDER, HAPI CABRILLOS
        293 BELGA, HYGIENE ESPADA
        294 BELLEZA, KATHLEEN MAE MABANA
        295 BELLO, CHRISTIAN ESCABUSA
        296 BELMONTE, ANDRE ARAY
        297 BENDICIO, SHERIN FAYE BENEDICTO
        298 BENDICO, JINN CYRABELLE JABIAN
        299 BENEDICTO, RYCHILIEN PASUELO
        300 BENICARLO, KAREN ADAH MANTES
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 8 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         301 BENICO, MARY JOY MANGILIT
        302 BENIEGLA, ROMER BONIZA
         303 BENZON, KYOS SANTIAGO
         304 BERCASIO, JONALYN BARBOSA
        305 BERINGUEL, CARLOS ROMULO BALDEO
        306 BERMAL, JONATHAN MARION NAZAIRE
         307 BERMUDEZ, ALVIN CHARLES PUYAT
         308 BERNABE, DANILO JR CRUZ
        309 BERON, ROGEL VICTOR BABIDA
        310 BERTOLDO, TIEL QUIEL CALINDOG
         311 BERTUDAN, SHAIELLHA LUCMAN
         312 BIBAT, ALYSSA MAE ALAGANO
        313 BILAOEN, MARIANNE
        314 BILLONES, CHRISTINE RUFINO
        315 BILOG, JOHANES BULUSAN
        316 BINAS, FERNAN PAUL LAMPANO
        317 BINWAG, JOVY BANGO
        318 BIONG, RHODA MAE UGALI
        319 BIRONDO, JOHN BRYAN RESPALL
        320 BLANCA, CATHLYN LOU CANDOLE
        321 BLANCO, LESTER POLICARPIO
        322 BOADO, GLEN SHEARER
        323 BODIONGAN, JERICO VON QUIDER
         324 BOLANTE, JUSTIN PAOLO GONZALES
         325 BOLANTE, PAULINE MONIQUE GONZALES
        326 BOLAÑO, ANGEL MAE GENODIA
        327 BOMBAIS, RAMON JEKKO SESPEÑE
         328 BON, EDRIELLE JUSTINE PINEDA
         329 BONAOBRA, RENEL TAÑAMOR
        330 BONDAD, MELCHOR PORTUGAL
        331 BONDOC, CARLA GUEVARRA
         332 BONDOC, JAN CARLA MARTIN
         333 BONDOC, JULIUS CEASAR DOLLAGA
        334 BONGCAHIG, MADEL TUBA
        335 BOOTH, CHARLOTTE VILLANAS
        336 BORBON, ALYSSA MARIE LAMA
        337 BORCES, LOVELY JANE JAMERO
        338 BORDADOR, JUSTIN RUDOLPH EDWARD GARCIA
        339 BORDIOS, STEVEN LEE
        340 BORJA, YANNISE BLU VALDEZ
        341 BORRES, BEVERLY JOY ESPORTONO
        342 BRAVO, JERRY PHILVIN CABALES
        343 BRIEVA, MA CHRISTINA AGUILAR
        344 BRILL, MEGAN GHEA BONTOG
        345 BRIONES, DONNAH BLESS VILLAR
        346 BRIONES, MATTHEW ALDANESE NOCOM
        347 BRIÑOSA, VALERIE ANNE ISMAEL
        348 BRUEL, LILETTE ANN DELA CRUZ
        349 BUAYA, PATRICIA MAY MORALES
        350 BUAYA, SHASTA THERESE TEMPLADO
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 9 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         351 BUCAL, THEA NAELA ESGUERRA
        352 BUCO, JOHN DARYL GOROSPE
        353 BUDUAN, KRISTINE JOY LICERA
        354 BUENA, MARIE ROGELINE PAZ
        355 BUENAFE, JEZREEL BACOLOD
        356 BUENAFE, JULIUS CHRISTIAN DAVID LOZANO
        357 BUENAFE, MA NIKKA REGENIO
        358 BUENAVENTURA, BIANCA DASALLA
        359 BUENO, CHRISTIAN IVAN ANGELO TABAJEN
        360 BUENO, VERNAMAE PILEO
        361 BULATAO, JIDIDIAH ANN VILLASANA
        362 BUMAHIT, JOHNSON KIMMAYONG
        363 BUMAL-O, ELYZZA VIEL JACINTO
        364 BUNCIO, LACER AURORA MALUNES
        365 BUOT, DIANE JOYCE DELATOR
        366 BURAC, JUSTINE VAN ESPIÑA
        367 BURIAS, ADA ALMIRA LOGRONIO
        368 BUSTAMANTE, ARSDALE FLOYD
        369 BUSTILLO, DEANNE
        370 BUTIU, DINA NAVARRO
        371 BUYUCCAN, AILEEN PAGAL
        372 CABA-UT, JEFFERSON PUMIHIC
         373 CABAJES, JAIRA GENITO
         374 CABALUNA, CARMELO JOHN ARMECIN
        375 CABANAYAN, RICKA JEMIMAH AINA ALLAPITAN
        376 CABANILLA, CHRISTIAN CACHO
         377 CABANSAG, ALVIN JOHN JR MANARANG
         378 CABARDO, GAIZEL JOY DELA CRUZ
        379 CABASAN, SHARLAYNE ANNE DAGDAG
        380 CABATIAN, KIMPER MAICO SAQUITAN
         381 CABAUATAN, EUNICE ALIPOON
         382 CABAYAO, SHARMAINE FRUGALIDAD
        383 CABAÑOG, CLAVEL TORREGOSA
        384 CABERTE, LUKE JIELTON STA MARIA
         385 CABILIN, DEVINA JOSON
         386 CABRERA, CHRISTEN SANTOS
        387 CABRIGA, MARY CECILE ANN CABALSA
        388 CABUENAS, CHERRY MHEE SARAOS
         389 CABUGUASON, MA ERICKA DELA CRUZ
         390 CABUSAO, ANNA MAE MAGTO
        391 CACAYAN, NIKKA JEAN TOLENTINO
        392 CAGASAN, DEBBY GREEN PARONIA
         393 CAGOD, JESMAEL CASTILLO
         394 CAGURING, JULIUS ACALA
        395 CAHATOL, REXTER ENGLATERA
        396 CALAGUAS, CAMIELLE ANNE BANZON
        397 CALANDA, KENNETH ARANCILLO
        398 CALAYCAY, GERVY YANGAT
        399 CALEDA, RAN JIT DANGA
        400 CALI, JESSA MIRANDA
         Roll of Successful Examinees in the
         RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST LICENSURE EXAMINATION
         Held on JULY 30 & 31, 2017 Page: 10 of 42
         Released on AUGUST 3, 2017
         Seq. No. N a m e
         401 CALIMLIM, NORMAN PADILLA
        402 CALINA, TERENZ DANE LOZANO
        403 CALINGAYAN, ALMA BUYAGAWON
        404 CALIXTRO, AXL GAMBOA
        405 CALLUENG, ANTHONY DANGA
         406 CALMA, JAN GLENNDELL GOMEZ
         407 CAMACHO, DANIEL CATBAGAN
        408 CAMACHO, JESSELLE ESTEBAN
        409 CAMARAO, SHEMJAY BASAÑES
        410 CAMARUDIN, ASSEMAH BALABAGAN
        411 CAMBA, LEE ANTOINETTE LAMASAN
        412 CAMET, ANNA MARGARITA VILLANUEVA
        413 CAMIT, ZAIRA EUNICE CADAVEDO
        414 CAMPION, JONALOU BOJO
        415 CAMPOS, EDRASID HAJAN
        416 CAMUA, GIOVANY SAPLAN
        417 CANAPE, KARL KEVIN ALCOVER
        418 CANAPI, NERISSA NOLASCO
        419 CANAY, KAMILLE JOY GONZALES
        420 CANCEJO, JUSERELITO NABLEA
        421 CANCINO, RONALD JR GUIAMOY
        422 CANDIDO, JANINE LABINGHISA
        423 CANDOLE, KIENA STEPHANIE QUIMBA
        424 CANLAS, JOANNE BICONG
        425 CANO, PETER JOHN DE VEYRA
        426 CANO, SHARAH MAINE VELASCO
         427 CANTONG, SKY JAFFER TUPAZ
         428 CANUTO, KELVIN JOY NICOR
        429 CAPALES, CHRISTIAN ABOYME
        430 CAPITO, RONEL GALLEGO
         431 CAPULONG, MIKEE HERNANDEZ
         432 CAPUNO, ARIANE BEATRIZ CASANOVA
        433 CARDONA, WENCELIE RENZO CABELIN
        434 CARILLO, JAN VINCENT TIMBAS
         435 CARILLO, LORENCE MENDOZA
         436 CARISMA, FRANZ DARRELL SAYCO
        437 CAROMBANA, ARCHIE JALAMAN
        438 CARPIO, DARYL CARINGAL
        439 CARPIO, PILAR AUTOR
        440 CARPIO, SHELA MARIE BAUTISTA
        441 CARTAGO, JAMES KYLLE JARINGA
        442 CARTON, SAMANTHA ANGELI DONATO
        443 CASABUENA, FRANCIS JOHN ALIMODIAN
        444 CASASOLA, RAHMA RAPADA
        445 CASILANG, JIGGY BALOTITE
        446 CASISON, ALMIR
                  CPT code 97375, 93976, 93978 - Non invasive vascular studies        
        Procedure Codes

        93975 Duplex scan of arterial inflow and venous outflow of abdominal, pelvic, scrotal contents and/or retroperitoneal organs; complete study

        93976 limited study

        93978 Duplex scan of aorta, inferior vena cava, iliac vasculature, or bypass grafts; complete study

        93979 unilateral or limited study


        Indications

        This procedure is indicated in the evaluation and/or management of vascular disease involving vessels of the abdominal, pelvic, scrotal contents, and/or retroperitoneal organs.

        Limitations

        Duplex scanning in the evaluation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is of limited value unless there is a pulsatile abdominal mass and signs and symptoms of peripheral vascular disease are present.

        Noninvasive vascular studies are medically necessary only if the outcome will potentially impact the clinical course of the patient. For example, if a patient is going to proceed on to other diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures regardless of the outcome of noninvasive studies, noninvasive vascular procedures are usually not medically necessary. That is, if it is obvious from the findings of the history and physical examination that the patient is going to proceed to angiography, then noninvasive vascular studies may not be medically necessary.

        The accuracy of noninvasive vascular diagnostic studies depends on the knowledge, skills and experience of the technologist and interpreter. Consequently, the providers of interpretations must be capable of demonstrating documented training and experience and maintain documentation of such for possible audit. Further, noninvasive vascular diagnostic studies must be either (1) performed by persons with appropriate training that have demonstrated minimum entry level competency by being credentialed by a nationally recognized credentialing organization in vascular technology (e.g., American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) in vascular technology), (2) performed by or under the direct supervision of a physician, or (3) performed in facilities with laboratories accredited in vascular technology.


        Bill Type Codes:

        Contractors may specify Bill Types to help providers identify those Bill Types typically used to report this service. Absence of a Bill Type does not guarantee that the policy does not apply to that Bill Type. Complete absence of all Bill Types indicates that coverage is not influenced by Bill Type and the policy should be assumed to apply equally to all claims.

        999x Not Applicable

        Revenue Codes:Contractors may specify Revenue Codes to help providers identify those Revenue Codes typically used to report this service. In most instances Revenue Codes are purely advisory. Unless specified in the policy, services reported under other Revenue Codes are equally subject to this coverage determination. Complete absence of all Revenue Codes indicates that coverage is not influenced by Revenue Code and the policy should be assumed to apply equally to all Revenue Codes.


        Group 1 Codes:

        93975 Vascular study
        93976 Vascular study
        93978 Vascular study
        93979 Vascular study
        93980 Penile vascular study
        93981 Penile vascular study

        Billing and Coding Guidelines.

        93978 Duplex scan of aorta, inferior vena cava, iliac vasculature, or bypass grafts; complete study

        Aorta, inferior vena cava, iliac vasculature, or bypass grafts (procedure codes 93978 and 93979) Connecticut and Florida Medicare may provide coverage for duplex scanning of aorta, inferior venacava, iliac vasculature, or bypass grafts when performed for one or more of the following indications:

        • confirm a suspicion of an abdominal or iliac aneurysm raised by a physical examination or noted as an incidental finding on another radiological examination. The physical examination usually reveals a palpable, pulsatile and nontender abdominal mass;

        • monitor the progression of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. It is usually expected that monitoring occurs approximately every six (6) months;

        • evaluate patients presenting with signs and symptoms of a thoracic aneurysm. The symptoms usually associated with a thoracic aneurysm are substernal chest pain, back or neck pain described as deep and aching or throbbing as well as symptoms due to pressure on the trachea (dyspnea, stridor, a brassy cough), the esophagus (dysphagia), the laryngeal nerve (hoarseness), or superior vena cava (edema in neck and arms, distended neck veins);

        • evaluate patients presenting with signs and symptoms of an abdominal aneurysm. The symptoms usually associated with an abdominal aneurysm are constant pain located in the midabdomen, lumbar region or pelvis which can be severe and may be described as having a boring quality. A leaking aneurysm is characterized by lower back pain, whereas, acute pain and hypotension usually occur with rupture;

        • evaluate a patient presenting with signs and symptoms suggestive of an aortic dissection. A patient with an aortic dissection has symptoms such as a sudden onset of severe, continuous tearing or crushing pain in the chest that radiates to the back and is generally unaccompanied by EKG evidence of a myocardial infarction. On physical examination, the patient is agitated, has a murmur of aortic regurgitation.


        IV. Visceral Vascular Studies (93975, 93976, 93978, 93979)


        Indications:

        This procedure is indicated in the evaluation and/or management of vascular disease involving vessels of the abdominal, pelvic, scrotal contents, and/or retroperitoneal organs.


        Limitations:

        Duplex scanning in the evaluation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is of limited value unless there is a pulsatile abdominal mass and signs and symptoms of peripheral vascular disease are present. Follow-up of an abdominal aneurysm on a periodic basis using abdominal ultrasound rather than visceral vascular studies to determine growth and potential need for intervention is allowed.

        Vascular studies are not the initial diagnostic modality for the evaluation of abdominal pain/tenderness. There must be a high index of suspicion that the pain is caused by a vascular disorder, such as mesentery ischemia. Noninvasive vascular studies are medically necessary only if the outcome will potentially impact the clinical course of the patient. For example, if a patient is going to proceed on to other diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures regardless of the outcome of noninvasive studies, noninvasive vascular procedures are usually not medically necessary. That is, if it is obvious from the findings of the history and physical examination that the patient is going to proceed to angiography, then noninvasive vascular studies may not be medically necessary.



        V. Hemodialysis Access Examination (93990)

        Indications:

        Medicare will consider separate payment for vascular studies (CPT code 93990) on symptomatic ESRD patients, when Doppler flow studies are used to provide diagnostic information to determine the appropriate medical intervention. Medicare considers a Doppler flow study medically necessary when the beneficiary’s dialysis access Printed on 11/11/2014. Page 8 of 35
        • Elevated venous pressure > 200mm Hg on a 200 cc/min. pump;


        • Elevated recirculation of time of 12% or greater, and

        • Low urea reduction rate < 60%

        • An access with a palpable "water hammer" pulse on examination (which implies venous outflow obstruction)



        93975 DUPLEX SCAN OF ARTERIAL INFLOW AND VENOUS OUTFLOW OF ABDOMINAL, PELVIC, SCROTAL CONTENTS AND/OR RETROPERITONEAL ORGANS; COMPLETE STUDY

        93976 DUPLEX SCAN OF ARTERIAL INFLOW AND VENOUS OUTFLOW OF ABDOMINAL, PELVIC, SCROTAL CONTENTS AND/OR RETROPERITONEAL ORGANS; LIMITED STUDY

        93978 DUPLEX SCAN OF AORTA, INFERIOR VENA CAVA, ILIAC VASCULATURE, OR BYPASS GRAFTS; COMPLETE STUDY

        93979 DUPLEX SCAN OF AORTA, INFERIOR VENA CAVA, ILIAC VASCULATURE, OR BYPASS GRAFTS; UNILATERAL OR LIMITED STUDY



        Group 9 Paragraph: Visceral Vascular Studies (93975, 93976, 93978, 93979)

        Use ICD-9 codes 401.0, 403.00, 403.01, and 405.01 to report accelerated hypertension.

        Use ICD-9 code 456.8 for gastric varices.

        Use ICD-9 code 785.9 to report an abdominal bruit.


        Revision History Date Revision History Number Revision History Explanation Reason(s) for Change

        Typographical correction. ICD-9-CM code 440.0 (ATHEROSCLEROSIS OF AORTA) was incorrectly removed from the ICD-9 coding list for Visceral Vascular Studies (93975, 93976, 93978, 93979) and has been replaced. This code has been continuously covered.

        10/17/2011 - In accordance with Section 911 of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, fiscal intermediary numbers 00160 and 00332 are removed from this LCD. Effective on this date, claims processing for Kentucky – Part A and Ohio –Part A is performed by CGS Administrators, LLC, the Part A/Part B MAC contractor for these states.

        R9 (effective 10/01/2011): LCD revised for annual ICD-9-CM code updates for 2012. The “ICD-9-CM Codes That Support Medical Necessity” section of the policy was revised to add code 348.82 for CPT codes 93886, 93888. 93890, 93892, and 93893. For the Extremity Venous Evaluation (93965, 93970, 93971) coding list new ICD-9 codes 415.13 and V12.55 were added. For the Visceral Vascular Studies (93975, 93976, 93978, 93979) coding list new ICD-9 code 415.13 was added. ICD-9- code 444.0 was deleted and replaced with codes 444.01 and 444.09.




        ICD-10 CODE DESCRIPTION

        C56.1 - C57.4 - Opens in a new window Malignant neoplasm of right ovary - Malignant neoplasm of uterine adnexa, unspecified
        C62.00 - C62.92 - Opens in a new window Malignant neoplasm of unspecified undescended testis - Malignant neoplasm of left testis, unspecified whether descended or undescended
        D27.0 - D27.9 - Opens in a new window Benign neoplasm of right ovary - Benign neoplasm of unspecified ovary
        I10 - I11.0 - Opens in a new window Essential (primary) hypertension - Hypertensive heart disease with heart failure
        I12.0 - I15.1 - Opens in a new window Hypertensive chronic kidney disease with stage 5 chronic kidney disease or end stage renal disease - Hypertension secondary to other renal disorders
        I15.8 Other secondary hypertension
        I70.0 - I70.1 - Opens in a new window Atherosclerosis of aorta - Atherosclerosis of renal artery
        I70.90 - I70.91 - Opens in a new window Unspecified atherosclerosis - Generalized atherosclerosis
        I71.00 - I71.9 - Opens in a new window Dissection of unspecified site of aorta - Aortic aneurysm of unspecified site, without rupture
        I72.2 - I72.8 - Opens in a new window Aneurysm of renal artery - Aneurysm of other specified arteries
        I74.01 - I74.19 - Opens in a new window Saddle embolus of abdominal aorta - Embolism and thrombosis of other parts of aorta
        I74.5 Embolism and thrombosis of iliac artery
        I75.81 Atheroembolism of kidney
        I76 Septic arterial embolism
        I77.4 Celiac artery compression syndrome
        I77.72 - I77.73 - Opens in a new window Dissection of iliac artery - Dissection of renal artery
        I77.810 - I77.819 - Opens in a new window Thoracic aortic ectasia - Aortic ectasia, unspecified site
        I79.0 Aneurysm of aorta in diseases classified elsewhere
        I80.211 - I80.219 - Opens in a new window Phlebitis and thrombophlebitis of right iliac vein - Phlebitis and thrombophlebitis of unspecified iliac vein
        I81 - I82.1 - Opens in a new window Portal vein thrombosis - Thrombophlebitis migrans
        I82.220 - I82.221 - Opens in a new window Acute embolism and thrombosis of inferior vena cava - Chronic embolism and thrombosis of inferior vena cava
        I82.3 Embolism and thrombosis of renal vein
        I85.00 - I85.01 - Opens in a new window Esophageal varices without bleeding - Esophageal varices with bleeding
        I86.1 - I86.3 - Opens in a new window Scrotal varices - Vulval varices
        I87.1 Compression of vein
        K55.8 - K55.9 - Opens in a new window Other vascular disorders of intestine - Vascular disorder of intestine, unspecified
        K70.2 - K70.31 - Opens in a new window Alcoholic fibrosis and sclerosis of liver - Alcoholic cirrhosis of liver with ascites
        K72.00 - K72.91 - Opens in a new window Acute and subacute hepatic failure without coma - Hepatic failure, unspecified with coma
        K74.0 Hepatic fibrosis
        K74.60 - K74.69 - Opens in a new window Unspecified cirrhosis of liver - Other cirrhosis of liver
        K75.1 Phlebitis of portal vein
        K75.81 Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)
        K76.0 Fatty (change of) liver, not elsewhere classified
        K76.2 Central hemorrhagic necrosis of liver
        K76.6 Portal hypertension
        K76.89 Other specified diseases of liver
        M30.0 - M31.7 - Opens in a new window Polyarteritis nodosa - Microscopic polyangiitis
        M54.5 Low back pain
        N17.0 - N17.9 - Opens in a new window Acute kidney failure with tubular necrosis - Acute kidney failure, unspecified
        N26.2 Page kidney
        N27.0 - N27.1 - Opens in a new window Small kidney, unilateral - Small kidney, bilateral
        N28.0 Ischemia and infarction of kidney
        N44.00 - N44.04 - Opens in a new window Torsion of testis, unspecified - Torsion of appendix epididymis
        N45.1 - N45.4 - Opens in a new window Epididymitis - Abscess of epididymis or testis
        N48.30 - N48.39 - Opens in a new window Priapism, unspecified - Other priapism
        N50.1 Vascular disorders of male genital organs
        N50.9 - N51 - Opens in a new window Disorder of male genital organs, unspecified - Disorders of male genital organs in diseases classified elsewhere
        N94.89 Other specified conditions associated with female genital organs and menstrual cycle
        R09.89 - R10.33 - Opens in a new window Other specified symptoms and signs involving the circulatory and respiratory systems - Periumbilical pain
        R10.83 - R10.9 - Opens in a new window Colic - Unspecified abdominal pain
        R18.0 - R18.8 - Opens in a new window Malignant ascites - Other ascites
        R19.01 - R19.09 - Opens in a new window Right upper quadrant abdominal swelling, mass and lump - Other intra-abdominal and pelvic swelling, mass and lump
        S25.00XA - S25.09XS - Opens in a new window Unspecified injury of thoracic aorta, initial encounter - Other specified injury of thoracic aorta, sequela
        S35.00XA - S35.8X9S - Opens in a new window Unspecified injury of abdominal aorta, initial encounter - Unspecified injury of other blood vessels at abdomen, lower back and pelvis level, sequela
        Z95.820 - Z95.828 - Opens in a new window Peripheral vascular angioplasty status with implants and grafts - Presence of other vascular implants and grafts
        Showing 1 to 55 of 55 entries in Group 1
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                  Nowa ustawa: lekarze rodzinni będą zlecać więcej badań        
        Jak donosi Rzeczpospolita, lekarze podstawowej opieki zdrowotnej będą mogli zlecić wykonanie badań ultrasonograficznych i radiologicznych. Będzie to możliwe dzięki nowej ustawie o POZ.
                  Train for a Career in Radiologic Technology. Learn More at an Info Session on August 8        
        directlink
                  Commission launches call for tender for study on nuclear and radiation technology        
        Friday, 30 September 2016

        The European Commission has launched a new call for tender for a study on the medical, industrial and research uses of nuclear and radiation technology.

        The aim of this study will be to provide the Commission with up-to-date information on the non-power uses of nuclear and radiation technology in the EU. This study will then lay the foundations for a Commission proposal on a Strategic Agenda for Medical, Industrial and Research Applications of nuclear and radiation technology (SAMIRA) – set to be released in 2018.

        The study should include a particular focus on radioisotopes for medical uses.

        Nuclear and radiation technology has long been used in medicine for the diagnosis and treatment of some of the most common life-threatening diseases.  Moreover, the number of medical radiological procedures in Europe runs into the hundreds of millions per year and the medical sector accounts for more than 90% of man-made exposure to radiation in the EU.

        Radioisotopes are used in medical imaging to detect and track diseases. In the EU, about 40 research reactors are in operation, and some of them play a vital role in the supply of radioisotopes for medicine. But the European research reactor fleet is more than 40 years old and prone to unplanned outages.

        The situation is especially worrying in the production of the most widely used medical isotope, Molibdenum-99 / Technecium-99m. Investment is needed in order to avoid shortages of this isotope from 2025-2030.

        In order to address this issue, the Commission’s Directorate-General for Energy decided to develop its SAMIRA strategy which should define the Commission’s views on the major issues relating to the use of nuclear and radiation technology outside the nuclear energy sector. This study is part of the preparatory work for developing SAMIRA.

        The call for tenders closes on 31 October 2016.

        Call for tender


                  14. Piknik Naukowy w Warszawie: promieniowanie nie takie groźne?        
        O monitorowaniu promieniowania w Polsce mówili podczas 14. Pikniku Naukowego w Warszawie badacze Centralnego Laboratorium Ochrony Radiologicznej (CLOR).
                  Data Cleanup Project: Groundwater Basin Details        

        The California Department of Water Resources has 515 PDFs that give valuable descriptions and 'metadata' about the various groundwater basins across the state.

        We converted these PDFs to text files, and want to get them into tabular data format (well, CSV, comma-separated, data).

        The files are all in this git repository on Github.

        Yesterday, Laci called the DWR to ask them if they had this information in tabular format, and they don't - but people keep calling to ask. We would like to help them help the citizens of California.

        If you feel inclined to help clean up this data, please have at it!

        We are adding a README that lists the fields.

        The project

        1. Write a scraper in the language of your choosing (we prefer nodejs and python, but php and ruby are fine.)
        2. Parse the 515 text files:
        3. Create a CSV data table structure with machine-friendly column names.
        4. Populate the CSV with the data.

        Extra

        1. Convert also to a JSON document with an ID based on the basin unit ID.

        Sign up

        Just tweet at us or email us to let us know you want to volunteer to tackle this. You can fork the repo and send us a pull request.

        A preview of the data

        This is the text of one file. You can see how there is lots of useful information in it. If it were in tabular format, it could more easily be used in interactives that help us visualize and understand groundwater.

        Central Coast Hydrologic Region Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin
        Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin
        • Groundwater Basin Number: 3-1
        • County: Santa Cruz
        • Surface Area: 2,500 acres (4 square miles)
        Basin Boundaries and Hydrology
        The Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin is bounded to the south by Monterey Bay, and to the north by a series of hills that define the contact of Quaternary and Pliocene deposits (Purisima Formation) at or near the Zayante Fault.
        The western boundary coincides with the western boundary of the Soquel Creek Water District. The eastern boundary is generally the coastward projection of the drainage divide between the Soquel and Aptos Creek watersheds. In addition to the areas of Quaternary deposits, the eastern limit of the Soquel Creek and Central Water District’s service area may be considered the basin boundary for the purposes of managing and monitoring groundwater resources in the area. Soquel Creek is the major drainage in the Basin. Average annual precipitation is 25 inches along the coast to 29 inches inland.
        The adjoining basins include West Santa Cruz Terrace to the west and the Pajaro Valley to the southeast.
        Hydrogeologic Information
        Water-bearing sediments consist of the Pliocene Purisima Formation, which is overlain by Quaternary terrace deposits, and the Pleistocene Aromas Red Sands Formation. The Purisima and Quaternary terrace deposits have been locally incised by streams filled with Quaternary alluvium (Muir 1980). The Purisima Formation is exposed along Monterey Bay where it is a cliff- forming unit. The Aromas Red Sands Formation extends into the Pajaro Valley Basin.
        Water Bearing Formations
        The Purisima Formation, of Pliocene geologic age, is a sequence of gray, sometimes described as blue, moderately consolidated, silty to clean, fine to medium sandstone containing siltstone and claystone interbeds (Greene 1977). It has not been explored to basement north of the Soquel Creek Water District’s (SCWD) boundaries but is thought to terminate at or near the Zayante Fault. The granite basement surface, which is uniformly sloping to the southeast, is approximately 450 feet beneath sea level at the western SCWD boundary, and approximately 1,300 feet beneath sea level at approximately Valencia Creek. Farther to the southeast, the Purisima continues to dip at the same rate, but is overlain by predominantly unconfined Aromas Red Sands (SCWD 2003).
        Based on the lithologic and geophysical logs developed during the installation of SCWD’s network of production wells and monitoring wells, combined with other water well logs and a few geophysical logs of oil and gas borings in the vicinity, seven distinct subunits of the Purisima Formation have been identified and designated AA, A, B, C, D, E, and F, from deepest to shallowest (LSCE 1984). Groundwater occurs in all the subunits of the Purisima beneath the Soquel-Aptos area. Except in the vicinity of its outcrop
        California’s Groundwater Bulletin 118
        2/27/04
        Central Coast Hydrologic Region Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin
        at the surface, the Purisima subunits are confined by claystone or siltstone interbeds. In general, fresh water is introduced into the various Purisima subunits through the recharge areas, or outcrop locations, of the subunits and then flows through the respective subunits generally toward Monterey Bay (SCWD 2003).
        The Aromas Red Sands Formation is brown to red, poorly consolidated, fine to coarse-grained sandstone containing lenses of silt and clay (LSCE 1996). The formation consists of upper eolian and lower fluvial sand units that are separated by confining layers of interbedded clays and silty clay (RMC 2001). Based on limited lithologic and geophysical logs and other geologic data, the Aromas is underlain by the Purisima Formation throughout the eastern third of the Soquel-Aptos area, although the exact depth of the contact has not been identified. Essentially unconfined throughout the Soquel-Aptos area, the Aromas Red Sands contain fresh water above a wedge-shaped intrusion of seawater which is about 200 feet below sea level at the coastline and slopes away form the coast to nearly 500 feet below sea level in the vicinity of the SCWD Seascape and Altivo supply wells (SCWD 2003).
        Restrictive Structures
        There are no known restrictive structures in the Soquel Valley Basin. Groundwater flow in the Soquel Valley portion of the confined Purisima Formation is southward, toward and beneath Monterey Bay.
        Recharge Areas
        Recharge is from deep percolation of rainfall, especially near the upper watersheds of Soquel, Branciforte, and Arana-Rodeo Creeks. Recharge also occurs along the streambeds of Soquel and Aptos Creeks, and other minor creeks.
        Groundwater Level Trends
        Purisima Formation Coastal water levels have declined in the central portion of the Soquel Creek Water District between about New Brighton Beach and Aptos Creek, notably in the Purisima A subunit where water levels have been near historic low and continuously below sea level during the drought periods of the late 1980s and early 1990s. Groundwater levels have since partially recovered such that they fluctuate seasonally above and below sea level (SCWD 2003).
        Aromas Red Sands Groundwater levels throughout SCWD’s Aromas well field area remain above sea level. At one monitoring location at the southern end, coastal water levels were essentially at sea level until recently; presently, levels are about five feet above sea level (SCWD 2003).
        Groundwater Storage
        Groundwater Storage Capacity. The total storage capacity of the basin has not been determined.
        California’s Groundwater Bulletin 118
        2/27/04
        Central Coast Hydrologic Region Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin
        Groundwater Budget (Type C)
        There are not enough data to estimate a budget for this basin. Within the Soquel-Aptos area, pumpage in the Pursima Formation was estimated by the Santa Cruz County Environmental Health Department in October 1999 to be about 6,890 acre-feet, including 2,200 acre-feet for private pumping, about 910 acre-feet for the Central Water District and the City of Santa Cruz, and 3,780 acre-feet for the Soquel Creek Water District (SCWD 2001a). Pumpage from the Aromas Red Sands was estimated by SCWD in December 1998 to be about 6,240 acre-feet, including 3,650 acre-feet for private pumping, 490 acre-feet by Central Water District, and 2,100 acre-feet by SCWD (SCWD 2003).
        Groundwater Quality
        Characterization. Groundwater in the Purisima formation can generally be classified into two water quality types. In the Purisima A subunit, groundwater is a calcium-bicarbonate water; in the upper Purisima subunits, groundwater is generally a calcium-magnesium bicarbonate water (LSCE 1996). Based on data for the SCWD water supply wells, TDS values in the Purisima formation range from 310 to 850 mg/L, with an average value of 492 mg/L (based on 11 wells; SCWD 2001b). EC values range from 440 to 1,000 μmhos/cm, with an average value of 721 (SCWD 2001b). TDS values in the Aromas Red Sands Formation range from 160 to 290 mg/L, with an average value of 237 mg/L (based on 6 wells; (SCWD 2001b). EC values range from 240 to 425 μmhos/cm, with an average value of 348 μmhos/cm (SCWD 2001b).
        Impairments. Declining coastal groundwater levels in the area between New Brighton Beach and Aptos Creek are of concern. The Purisima Formation aquifer produces water with elevated levels of iron and manganese. Most municipal wells are treated for manganese and iron at the wellhead (SCWD 1999a and 2000b).
        Water Quality in Public Supply Wells
        California’s Groundwater Bulletin 118
        Constituent Group1
        Inorganics – Primary Radiological
        Nitrates
        Pesticides
        VOCs and SVOCs Inorganics – Secondary
        Number of wells sampled2 14
        10 10 8 8 14
        Number of wells with a concentration above an MCL3 0
        0 0 0 0 8
        1 A description of each member in the constituent groups and a generalized discussion of the relevance of these groups are included in California’s Groundwater – Bulletin 118 by DWR (2003).
        2 Represents distinct number of wells sampled as required under DHS Title 22 program from 1994 through 2000.
        3 Each well reported with a concentration above an MCL was confirmed with a second detection above an MCL. This information is intended as an indicator of the types of activities that cause contamination in a given basin. It represents the water quality at the sample location. It does not indicate the water quality delivered to the
        2/27/04
        Central Coast Hydrologic Region Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin
        consumer. More detailed drinking water quality information can be obtained from the local water purveyor and its annual Consumer Confidence Report.
        California’s Groundwater Bulletin 118
        Well Characteristics
        Well yields (gal/min)
        Municipal/Irrigation
        Total depths (ft) Domestic Municipal/Irrigation
        Range: 276 – 1,373
        Range: 316 – 930
        Active Monitoring Data
        Average: 662
        (16 SCWD wells)
        Average: 607
        ( 16 SCWD wells)
        Number of wells /measurement frequency
        10 Monthly
        34 Varies
        10 Annually 34 Varies
        16 Varies
        Agency SCWD SCWD
        Department of Health Services and cooperators
        Parameter Groundwater levels
        Mineral, nutrient, & minor element.
        Title 22 water quality
        Basin Management
        Groundwater management: Water agencies
        Public Private
        References Cited
        SCWD Adopted AB 3030 Plan, April 1996
        SCWD and Central Water District None
        California Department of Health Services (DHS), 2000. California Water Quality Monitoring Database; Division of Drinking Water and Environmental Management, Sacramento [on CD-ROM].
        California Department of Water Resources, San Joaquin District. Well completion report files.
        Green, Gary H. 1977. Geology of the Monterey Bay Region. USGS Open File Report 77-718.
        Luhdorff and Scalmanini, Consulting Engineers. 1981. Review and Analysis of Reports Relating to Ground-Water Resources in the Soquel-Aptos Area, Santa Cruz County, California. Soquel Creek Water District.
        ________ .1984. Groundwater Resources and Management Report, 1983, Soquel Creek Water District.
        ________. 1985. Groundwater Resources and Management Report, 1984, Soquel Creek Water District.
        ________. 1996. Soquel Creek Water District and Central Water District, AB3030 Ground- Water Management Plan Soquel-Aptos Area.
        Muir, K.S., 1980. Seawater Intrusion and Potential Yield of Aquifers in the Soquel-Aptos Area, Santa Cruz County, California; U.S.G.S. Water-Resources Investigation 80-84, 29 p.
        2/27/04
        Central Coast Hydrologic Region Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin
        Rains, Melton, Carella (RMC). 2001. Pajaro Valley water Management Agency-Revised Basin Management Plan (Draft).
        Soquel Creek Water District (SCWD), 1999a. SCWD February 16, 1999 news release.
        ________. 1999b. SCWD September 2, 1999 news release.
        ________. 2000a. 1999 Water Quality Report [prepared in compliance of annual public notification requirements].
        ________. 2000b. Unpublished data provided by District engineers.
        Thorup, R.R., 1981. Groundwater Review of the Soquel-Aptos Area, Santa Cruz County,
        California; consultant report prepared for the Santa Cruz Builders Exchange, 125p.
        ________. 2001a. Urban Water Management Plan Update 2000
        ________. 2001b. Title 22 Water Quality Data.
        ________. 2003. Comments and Corrections to B-118, Soquel Valley Groundwater Basin write-up.
        Additional References
        Akers, J.P. and Hickey, J.J. 1966. Geohydrologic Reconnaissance of the Soquel-Aptos area, Santa Cruz County, California: U.S. Geological Survey open-file report, 58 p.
        Bader, J.S. 1969. Groundwater Data as of 1967, Central Coastal Subregion, California. USGS Open file report. 16 p.
        Bloyd, R.M. 1981. Approximate ground-Water-Level Contours, April 1991, for the Soquel- Aptos Area, Santa Cruz County, California; U.S.G.S. 81-680.
        California Department of Water Resources (DWR). 1975. Bulletin No. 63-5. Sea-Water Intrusion in California, Inventory of Coastal Groundwater Basins. 394 p.
        California State Water Resources Board (SWRCB). 1953. Bulletin No. 5, Santa Cruz- Monterey Counties Investigation, 230 p.
        Hickey, J.J. 1968. Hydrogeologic Study of the Soquel-Aptos area, Santa Cruz County, California; U.S. Geological Survey open file report , 48 p.
        Jennings, C.W. and Strand, R.G. (compilers). 1958. Santa Cruz Sheet of Geologic Map of California. California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG). Scale 1:250,000.
        Luhdorff and Scalmanini, Consulting Engineers. 1987. Groundwater Monitoring and Management, Aromas Red Sands, 1987. Soquel Creek Water District.
        ________. 1990. Groundwater Monitoring and Management 1990 Update, Aromas Red Sands. Soquel Creek Water District.
        Muir, K.S. and Johnson, J.J., 1979. Classification of Ground-Water Recharge Potential in Three Parts of Santa Cruz County, California; U.S.G.S. Water-Resources Investigation Open file report 79-1065
        Thorup, R.R., 1987. Groundwater Review of the Soquel-Aptos Area, Santa Cruz County, California; consultant report for the Santa Cruz Builders Exchange, 125 p.
        Errata
        Changes made to the basin description will be noted here.
        California’s Groundwater Bulletin 118
        2/27/04


                  Un test de respiraÅ£ie poate detecta cancerul de sîn        
        Mamografia face parte dintre testele standard de detectare a cancerului, este un tip special de examinare radiologică a sînului cu ajutorului unui aparat special. Pe această cale femeile sînt expuse radiațiilor, deși numai într-o cantitate mică. În doze mari radiațiile acestea pot fi periculoase, dar dacă mamografiile nu sînt dese ele nu reprezintă nici un […]
                  Honey: The Natural Cure        
        Honey has been discussed in medical circles for many years. Made by the humble bee, this golden liquid has recently been studied and is receiving even more respect for its vast healing properties. From the healing of simple cuts and scrapes to being a significant cure for many gastrointestinal disorders, honey is finally getting the recognition that it deserves. Honey gives gastrointestinal disorders a healing touch For those who suffer with an excess or lack of stomach acid, it can be a painful condition. Too much or not enough gastric acid can cause GERD and even ulcers. Though antacid treatments have been around for years, many people do not like the side-effects, aside from the fact that these medications do not fix the root of the problem. With the latest research in honey cures, patients suffering from acid reflux and other stomach ailments now have a natural method of relieving their problems. Through both clinical and animal studies, researchers have found that honey, when used as a dietary supplement, has the ability to adjust stomach acid, either by increasing or reducing it. Not only does it adjust the acid, but it also has healing and antibiotic properties that have been successful in healing gastric ulcers. In a study, 600 gastric ulcer patients were given a daily oral dosage of pure honey. At the end of the study, radiological evidence proved that the ulcers completely disappeared in 59% of the patients. Through the study, 80% of patients recovered from their conditions. (Source: KANDIL, A; EL-BANBY, M; ABDEL-WAHED, K; ABDEL-GAWWAD, M; FAYEZ, M (1987) Curative properties of true floral and false nonfloral honeys and induced gastric ulcers. J.Drug.Res.Egypt 17 (1-2): 103-106.) Honey has been used as a remedy for diarrhea since the 8th century. The Roman physician named Celsus used honey to cure his patients when they were suffering from gastrointestinal stress, producing diarrhea. Through these early forms of treatment, scientists have continued being fascinated by honey and its characteristics of healing. Honey is an extremely potent inhibitor of one of the main causes of gastric ulcers, erosions, and gastritis. Greatly inhibiting Helicobacter Pylori, honey offers a soothing healing that works quite rapidly on healing ulcers and works almost instantly on relieving excess acid. In a recent study, 40 different gastric ulcer patients were studied at a Russian hospital. Those patients who were given 120 ml of honey had improved micro capillary blood circulation. This is believed to be extremely beneficial in healing gastric ulcers. Studies suggest that taking just 30 ml a day of honey can heal those who are suffering from gastritis, duodenal ulcers, and stomach ulcers. (Source: DUBTSOVA, E (2009) Clinical studies with bee products for therapy of some nutritional diseases (in Russian). Central Moscow Institute of Gastroenterology Moscow; pp 1-38.) Two Types of Honey are Creating Quite a Stir in the Medical Community There are two types of honey that are truly a cut above other honey types. Both Yemini Sidr and New Zealand Manuka have been found...
                  Technologist, Radiologic - Clinic - Park Nicollet - Saint Louis Park, MN        
        Must hold a current ARRT license, one year of experience is preferred. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and do not discriminate against any employee or...
        From Park Nicollet - Fri, 04 Aug 2017 21:00:14 GMT - View all Saint Louis Park, MN jobs
                  Hie Electronics Issued Food and Drug Administration Registration for TeraStack(R) Solution        

        Medical Records Active Archive™ Data Storage Solution Registered by FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health

        (PRWeb September 27, 2011)

        Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/9/prweb8833428.htm


                  Beyond Nuclear Bulletin, October 2009        

        Beyond Nuclear Bulletin   October 1, 2009

         

        The "peaceful" atom leading to war with Iran

         

        Background: The discovery of a second uranium enrichment facility in Qum, Iran prompted the government of Saudi Arabia to open its air spacefor potential Israeli air attacks on a growing number of nuclear infrastructure targets in Iran.

        Ironically, "atoms for peace" have often led to wars. In 1980, Iran attacked Iraq's partially-built Osirak reactor, but French engineers repaired the light damage quickly. The very next year, Israel bombed Osirak before it could be loaded with fuel. These attacks set the precedent for future conventional military pre-emptive strikes against commercial or research atomic facilities, as a non-proliferation tactic. In 1984, Iraq initiated several years ofattacks against Iran's partially-built Bushehr reactor complex, inflicting severe damage on the facility. The following year, Bennett Ramberg publishedNuclear Power Plants as Weapons for the Enemy: An Unrecognized Military Peril. In 1991, during the Persian Gulf War, the U.S. bombed Iraqi research reactors at Tuwaitha, possibly causing radiological releases. In 2007, Israel bombed an atomic reactor being secretly constructed by North Koreans in Syria. Last year, Ramberg warned about the radiological consequences should the Dimona reactor, at the heart of the Israeli nuclear weapons manufacturing complex, be bombed.

        read more


                  What the French Got Wrong        

        The Nuclear Engineering Institute on the French energy legacy:

         

        "French nuclear policy is neither green nor sustainable. The decision to separate and use plutonium – which French and UK accounts show at zero book value and negative market value – entails a radiological impact equivalent to all other nuclear activities in Europe combined."

         

        To read the full commentary, go to: 

        read more


                  TCL graduates largest health sciences class        
        • Michelle Flores/Bluffton Today MacLean Hall Auditorium was at capacity Thursday for TCL’s graduation ceremony.
        • Michelle Flores/Bluffton Today Dean of heath sciences Glen Levicki makes his opening remarks Thursday.
        • Michelle Flores/Bluffton Today Massage therapy graduate David Audelo was one the class speakers at TCL’s graduation ceremony Thursday.
        • Michelle Flores/Bluffton Today The ceremony honored graduates of the school’s massage therapy, medical assisting, surgical technology, radiologic technology, practical nursing and associate degree nursing programs.

        The Technical College of the Lowcountry graduated 53 health sciences students Thursday, its largest class to date.

        The ceremony honored graduates of the school’s massage therapy, medical assisting, surgical technology, radiologic technology, practical nursing and associate degree nursing programs.

        The MacLean Hall auditorium was at maximum capacity as visitors saw students receive their degrees.

        The ceremony included class speakers, pledges and graduation traditions unique to each program. For example, the nursing tradition involves lighting a lamp, a nod to Florence Nightingale, who carried a lamp to light her path as she cared for sick and dying soldiers in the Crimean War.

        In the last five years, TCL has graduated almost 500 health care professionals.

        Section: 

                  Miss Kamila Å tětařová: Soutěž nás učí vážit si sebe samých        
        /ROZHOVOR/ Práci radiologické asistentky vyměnila na chvíli za módní molo, práci v prostějovské nemocnici za castingy. Ovšem jen na chvíli. Přesto Kamila Štětařová nabrala v soutěži Miss prima křivky řadu zkušeností a navíc s ní směřuje k úspěchu: probojovala se totiž mezi dvanáct finalistek a nyní čeká, zda k práci v nemocnici nepřidá ještě působení v modelingu.
                  Oncological Results In High Grade Prostate Cancer Treated Surgically.        

         OBJECTIVES: Prostate cancer is considered a tumour with a long natural history. However, its highrisk variants exhibit variable behaviour. We analyse the factors that affect BR and CSS (multivariate, Kaplan Meier).

        METHODS: From 1997 to 2013, 657 patients were operated of a high-grade prostate cancer (pT2b 7.2%, pT3a 73%, pT3b 18.3%, pT4 1.5%). Gleason score was ≥8 in 23% of cases. Percentage of PSMs was 46.1%. Mean follow-up was 113 months (24-192).

        RESULTS: BR occurred in 36.5%. Patients with Gleason score <8, 31.7% had BR, Gleason ≥8 had BR in 48% (p<0.05). PSMs recurrence occurred in 48.9%, whereas 26.1% in NSM (p<0.05). If lymphadenectomy, BR occurred in 48.7%, if not 30.9% (p<0,05). In multivariate analysis, stage, Gleason≥8 and PSMs were independent factors for BR. Treatment of BR was 36.5% radiotherapy, 24.1% HT, and 21.2% both simultaneously. Active surveillance was performed in 13.3%. Disease progression (biochemical or radiological) occurred in 23.5%. CSS was 98.93%, pT4 was the stage with the greatest mortality (10%), followed by pT3b (3.4%), p<0.05. Patients with a Gleason score ≥8 accounted for 71% CSM (p<0,05). PSMs and lymphadenectomy didn´t have repercussions for survival. In multivariate analysis, Gleason≥8 was independent factor for CSM.

        CONCLUSIONS: Radical prostatectomy plays an important role in multi-modal approach with good oncological control at medium follow up. Gleason score ≥8 was the factor with the greatest effect on CSM. Lymphadenectomy didn´t affect CSS.


                  Other Radiological Lesions Of The Lower Urinary Tract In Patients After Isolated Pelvic Radiotherapy And Combined With Surgery.        

        who have undergone radiotherapy (RT)

        and pelvic surgeries is uncommon in the literature, not

        described in patients without complications, and mostly

        related to urinary fistulae.

        OBJECTIVE: The study of the lower urinary tract (LUT) by

        cystography in these patients, with a description of some

        other types of radiation lesions.

        METHODS: 127 cystographies have been performed

        (88 and 39 ) in consecutive patients undergoing

        radiotherapy (RT) (48 monotherapy and 79 cases

        combined with surgery), with a mean age of 69.6

        years, and a mean time from radiation of 215 months

        (17 years). A General Electric X ray equipment has been

        used. We studied: behavior of the bladder neck at rest

        and during micturition, assessment of vesicoureteral

        reflux (VUR), bladder morphology (BM), urethral strictures

        (UE) and fistulas (F).

        RESULTS: We observed: Filling phase bladder

        neck incompetence (BNI) (37.8%), bladder smooth

        morphology (60.6%), coughing urinary incontinence

        (UI) (26.4%), basal cystocele (64.7%) and Valsalva

        cystocele (96.6%), a normal opening bladder neck

        (96,1%), reduction of the urethral diameter during

        voiding (41.3%), and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR)

        (13.2%). Five cases of filling BNI, were all related to

        prostate cancer (PC) (one of them with colon cancer as

        well). There were six cases of fistulae (4.14%), five of

        them women. Forty two patients (28.96%) had reduced

        urethral lumen, thirty five of them affecting the posterior

        urethra (83%), five (11.9%) the anterior and, finally, two

        cases of mixed lesion (5%). 95% were patients with

        PC without concurrent interventions (67%). Significant

        differences were found regarding the gender and the

        background of pelvic surgery. The filling BNI (p=0.007),

        the irregular bladder morphology (p=0.004) and the

        reduction of the urethral lumen (p<0.001) have been

        found to be more common in male patients, while the

        coughing UI was more common in women (p=0.007).

        The study shows that BNI (p=0.046), VUR (p=0.02)

        and the IU due to cough (p=0.03) were more frequent

        in operated patients, while reduced urethral lumen was

        less common (p<0.01). Patients with VUR present more

        time from radiotherapy, but not in other cystography

        variables. There was a relationship between RT and the

        BNI, stress urinary incontinence, anterior urethral stricture

        and VUR. The risk factor was increased by surgery.

        CONCLUSIONS: Bladder neck incompetence, stress

        UI, anterior urethral stricture and VUR have been related

        to radiotherapy. Surgery increased the risk factor in

        operated patients.


                  A Standardized Scoring System In The Prediction Of Success And Complications Of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: Guy’s Stone Scoring System.        

        OBJECTIVES: In this study, our aim was to determine the role of Guy’s stone scoring system (GSS) in the prediction of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) success and its ability to foresee potential complications in consideration of Clavien grading system (CGS).

        MATERIAL AND METHODS: The data of 244 patients who underwent PNL between January 2009 and May 2014 were retrospectively examined. Renal stones were evaluated using GSS with the aid of the patients’ preoperative radiological evaluations and their postoperative complications were assessed with CGS.

        RESULTS: Mean age of the patients (men, n=166; 68% and women, n=78; 32%) was 46.50±13.12 years (range, 16-80yrs). Clinically significant residual stones were not detected in 195 (79.9%) patients, while they were found in 49 (20.1%) patients. Guy’s stone scores of 1, 2, 3 and 4 points were estimated in 21.3, 37.7, 29.9, and 11.1% of the cases, respectively. Based on modified Clavien complication grading system, complications were categorized as Clavien grade 1, 2 and 3 in 81.9, 17.2, and 0.8% of the cases, respectively. Clavien Grade 4 and 5 complications were not encountered. A statistically significant correlation was found between Guy’s Stone scores and Clavien grades (p<0.02). A statistically and highly significant difference was detected between Guy’s stone scores of the cases with respect to residual stones (p=0.001; p<0.01).

        CONCLUSION: Our study findings have revealed that GSS is a successful and easily applicable method for the prediction of success and likelihood of complications of PNL.


                  Common Malpractice Claims Against Radiologists        

        Advances in radiologic technology in recent years have led to an increase in the role of the radiologist related to patient care. Increasing numbers of legal claims against radiologists have naturally followed as radiologists take on additional responsibility for patient diagnoses. Based on recent statistics, 31% of radiologists can expect to be involved in a

        The post Common Malpractice Claims Against Radiologists appeared first on Lockton Health Professional Liability Insurance.


                  Nurses Honored at Baton Rouge General's 2014 Nurse Excellence Banquet        

        Baton Rouge, La. – Nurses, clinicians and ancillary professionals were honored for excellence in nursing at Baton Rouge General’s 2014 Nurse Excellence Awards Ceremony and Banquet on May 6, 2014 at the Renaissance Hotel. The annual event recognizes nurses and individuals whose contributions and leadership advance the practice of nursing, and support the health and wellness of our communities. The ceremony opened with a welcome by Anna Cazes, DNS, RN, Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer for Baton Rouge General. Mark F. Slyter, President and CEO of Baton Rouge General, Ernest Mencer, MD, Medical Director of Baton Rouge General’s Regional Burn Center, and Dhuval Adhvaryu, MD, also provided remarks for the awards presentation.

        A special presentation was given to honor this year’s “Hall of Fame” award recipients. Lucinda Clark, Ida Henderson, Catherine Jackson, Earl Dean Joseph, Gwendolyn Miller and Ethel Rucker were recognized for their dedication to providing exceptional care and for their pioneering roles as the local hospital community’s first African-American nurses at Baton Rouge General during the 1950s.

        Two nursing scholarships were also presented at the ceremony to support nurses advancing their nursing education. Andrew Olinde, MD, Chief of Medical Staff, Baton Rouge General, presented the nursing scholarship awards. Scholarships are awarded to nurses for their commitment to the highest nursing standards and providing exceptional patient care.

        The 2014 Baton Rouge General Nurse Excellence Award winners and Nursing Scholarship recipients are as follows:

         

        Hall of Fame Honorees

         

         

         

         

         

         

         
        (Pictured L to R): Catherine Jackson; Earl Dean Joseph; Lucinda Clark; Gwendolyn Miller; Ethel Rucker;
        Ida Henderson (award posthumously accepted by her daughter, Joan Forbes).

         

        Ancillary Friend of Nursing

        Jenny Chiasson
        Emergency Department

         

         

         

        Physician Friend of Nursing

        James Crowell, MD
        Emergency Medicine

         

         

         

        Physician Friend of Nursing

        Alicia Taylor, MD
        Obstetrics & Gynecology

         

         

         

        Edith LoBue Nursing Leadership

        Denise Bradford, MSN, RN
        Nursing Administration

         

         

         

        Nurse of the Year

        Traci Parrish, BSN, RNC/OB
        Birth Center

         

         

         

        Nurse of the Year

        Hassel Derouen-Miller, BSN, RN
        Telemetry

         

         

         

        Non-Traditional Nurse of the Year

        Todd Abington, RN
        Information Systems

         

         

         

        Nurse Rookie of the Year

        Hannah Daigle, BSN, RN
        Emergency Department

         

         

         

        2014 Nursing Scholarship Recipients:

        Tiffany Simon, RN
        Master of Science in Nursing-Family Nurse Practitioner, University of Louisiana-Lafayette
        Nursing Education Scholarship Recipient

        James Murphy Haydel, RN, CCRN
        Bachelor of Science in Nursing, University of Louisiana-Lafayette
        Nursing Education Scholarship Recipient

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Baton Rouge General Names Dr. Robert Kenney Vice President of Medical Operations        

        Baton Rouge, La. – Baton Rouge nephrologist Robert J. Kenney, MD, has been named Vice President of Medical Operations for Baton Rouge General/General Health System. An American Hospital Association sponsored National Patient Safety Fellow with nearly 30 years of nephrology practice experience as well as having served in clinical leadership roles, Dr. Kenney will lead Baton Rouge General’s patient care quality and safety operations and serve as a clinical liaison for hospital-based physicians. Focused upon improving patient care outcomes and enhancing service, his new executive role will entail the oversight of the General’s performance improvement initiatives called “Work Excellence” – a platform for improving the structure, safety and reliability of patient care processes and procedures that are based upon the best practice principles of Lean Six Sigma, a rigorous production model originally adopted by expert manufacturers GE and Toyota.

        Recently serving as Baton Rouge General’s Medical Director of Quality and Patient Safety, Dr. Kenney remains active in Graduate Medical Education, holding a core faculty membership position in Baton Rouge General’s Internal Medicine Residency Program affiliated with Tulane University School of Medicine. A Louisiana native, Dr. Kenney earned his medical degree from Tulane University School of Medicine, completing his residency training in internal medicine and his fellowship in nephrology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Dallas. Board certified in internal medicine and nephrology, he is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a member of the Renal Physicians Association, American Society of Nephrology, American Medical Association, and the National Kidney Foundation. Dr. Kenney has served as a national expert in his field and published multiple scholarly articles.



        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Baton Rouge General Recognized for Wellness Culture and Innovation        

        American Heart Association Honors Worksites for Commitment to Improving Employee Health

        Baton Rouge, La. – Baton Rouge General has been recognized as a Platinum Level Fit-Friendly Worksite and also earned the Worksite Innovation Award from the American Heart Association (AHA). The honors are given to organizations nationwide who demonstrate a commitment to promoting a culture of wellness and achieving measurable success in improving workplace wellness.

        “Baton Rouge General is proud to be recognized as a Platinum-Level Fit-Friendly Worksite and Worksite Innovation Award recipient,” noted President and CEO Mark Slyter. “We are committed to being a positive influence for improving the health of our community, and that begins inside our walls, where our culture of wellness ensures a healthy team of caregivers.”

        “We are dedicated to helping improve the health of each and every member of our team,” noted Dr. David Carver, family physician and medical director for the hospital’s employee wellness program Baton Rouge General Fit!. “Through our innovative wellness initiative, employees are incentivized to participate and have access to a variety of fitness and nutrition classes, smoking cessation program, as well as enhanced healthy food options in our cafeterias – all designed to promote physical activity and better nutrition.”

        Baton Rouge General’s employee wellness program has been a catalyst for the ongoing expansion of wellness offerings for the community. The General’s comprehensive wellness program includes a variety of educational and fitness resources that are open to the community:

        Weight management and individualized nutritional counseling – Click here for details and to schedule a consultation

        • Fitness testing and training (learn more here) and classes, such as Yoga and Boot Camp – Click here for upcoming classes

        • Free health seminars: Portion Control, Fitness 101, Recipe Overhaul, Food Label Reading and Stress Management – Click here to sign up for the next seminar

        • Smoking cessation program – Click here to sign up for the next 5-week series

        • Senior wellness program designed for seniors unique needs

          • Fitness classes: Gentle Yoga and Zumba Gold – Click here for class dates

          • Support groups for caregivers and stroke survivors – Click here to learn more

          • Educational courses: Healthy Heart Series, Body Mechanics and Lifting Techniques, and AARP Home Fit and Drive Smart programs


        Many American adults spend most of their waking hours at sedentary jobs and the lack of regular physical activity raises their risk for a host of medical problems, such as obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes. The good news is that research shows that even people who haven’t exercised regularly until middle age can reap significant benefits by starting a walking program.


        L to R: Dr. David Carver, family physician and BRGFit! medical director;
        Tomika Woods, employee health nurse; Terri Johnson, lead dietitian; Penelope
        Jarreau, nurse navigator; Jheri Bellard, fitness coordinator


        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.

         


                  Local Surgeon and Heart Team at Baton Rouge General Perform Region’s First Robotic Heart Surgery        

        Baton Rouge, La. – Local heart surgeon Dr. Azeem Khan with cardiologist Dr. Brian Swirsky and the heart care team at Baton Rouge General Medical Center performed South Louisiana’s first minimally-invasive hybrid coronary revascularization surgery using state-of-the-art robotic technology last week.

        The heart bypass procedure is a surgical treatment for coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common type of heart disease, which can lead to heart attack. Using a hybrid approach that includes surgical and cardiology teams, the surgery involves grafting a new blood vessel into place that bypasses the blocked artery to restore blood flow to the heart. During the procedure, the surgeon operates the robot’s arms from a console using 3D cameras that allow the surgeon to maneuver tiny robotic fingers in tight spaces with extreme precision.

        For patients, the advantages of robotic surgery are significant. During conventional bypass surgery, the heart is reached by opening the chest and dividing the breast bone. In the robotic surgery, several small incisions between the ribs allow the surgeon to access to the heart through the internal mammary artery.

        “As a surgeon, the sophisticated robotic capabilities allow us even greater control and the 3D cameras provide precise visualization – all of which help to achieve improved outcomes and quality for patients,” noted Dr. Khan. “This less invasive hybrid approach dramatically changes the impact of having major heart surgery – shortening patients’ hospital stay from 5 days to 3, and reducing full post-op recovery time to 2-3 weeks compared to traditional bypass surgery, which can take up to 3 months.”

        “Ultimately, the greatest value of this minimally-invasive technology is that it offers positive benefits for our patients,” said Dr. Swirsky. “They recover more quickly and have less pain and virtually no scarring, as well as a reduced risk for complications.”

        In patients with CAD, one or more of the coronary arteries have become narrowed by plaque build-up – reducing blood supply to the heart and weakening the heart muscle over time. About half of Americans (49%) have at least one of the three key risk factors for heart disease, which includes high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and smoking, and every year about 720,000 Americans have a heart attack *


        Dr. Azeem Khan (center) with heart team at Baton Rouge General.


        Dr. Azeem Khan (left) with Dr. Brian Swirsky (right).

        *Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Million Hearts: strategies to reduce the prevalence of leading cardiovascular disease risk factors, United States, 2011.

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.

        About Baton Rouge General’s Heart and Vascular Tower
        Baton Rouge General and its heart and vascular tower incorporates comprehensive cardiac and vascular services and specialists and provides care for people throughout our nine-parish metropolitan community. In 2007, Baton Rouge General dedicated its cardiology program to the late Milton J. Womack, Sr., a community leader, philanthropist and founder of Milton J. Womack, Inc. commercial contracting company. Womack suffered from heart disease, and in honor of her husband, Margaret Womack vowed to be an active part in ensuring that the Baton Rouge community have access to the highest caliber of heart care services. Baton Rouge General’s Womack Heart Center and its new heart and vascular tower offers comprehensive specialists, programs and services, and state-of-the-art technology and treatments all under one roof:

        • Full spectrum of multidisciplinary diabetes, lipid, cardiac, vascular and cardio thoracic experts and specialists
        • State-of-the-art Diagnostic Imaging Technology
          • Cardiovascular Ultrasound
          • Vascular Ultrasound
          • Stress Testing and Nuclear Medicine
        • Advanced Heart Catheterization Labs
        • Dedicated Heart Operating Rooms
        • Expanded Surgical Space including Hybrid Operating Suite for Minimally Invasive Interventions
        • 24 Hour Emergency Room with Specialized Training for Senior Care
        • Comprehensive Stroke Services
        • Fully Monitored Intensive Care and Telemetry Units
        • Cardiovascular Recovery Area
        • Inpatient & Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs
        • Limbs for Life Program
        • Screenings and Early Detection
        • Baton Rouge General Fit! Wellness Pilot
        • Prevention Programs, including Smoking Cessation Courses

        For more information, visit BRGeneral.org/Heart.


                  Baton Rouge General Celebrates Doctors’ Day with Successful Social Campaign        

        Baton Rouge, La. – In celebration of Doctors’ Day on March 30, Baton Rouge General launched a community-wide social media campaign to honor doctors in Baton Rouge and surrounding areas. With more than 1,000 Likes, 156 Comments, 30 Shares and a reach of over 60,000, the campaign was a huge success!

        “We are privileged to have some of the most skilled physicians in the country practice medicine at Baton Rouge General and we want to tell them how much they mean to our Community of Caring” says President and CEO Mark F. Slyter.

        Beginning Monday, March 24 Baton Rouge General posted pictures and comments on their Facebook page daily, inviting the community to share stories about their favorite doctor or just say thanks. The positive response was heartfelt…

        “Happy doctors’ day to all doctors! You are the backbone to our communities with the best knowledge for all who depend on your expertise! Thank you and God bless you and your families.”

        Others extended their thanks to “all the nurses & doctors in the ER on the night of March 16th who saved my daddy's life when his heart stopped & I thought I lost him... The immediate care my daddy received & the kindness extended to my mom & I meant the world to us.”

        Baton Rouge General Employees, visitors and patients were invited to sign an enormous 7x5 ft. Doctors’ Day card that was stationed near the entry of the cafeterias at the Mid City and Bluebonnet campus.

        The campaign wrapped on Monday, March 31 as all physicians were invited to a special lunch in honor of their commitment to providing compassionate, innovative, quality care to the community.


        From left, Baton Rouge General Chief Medical Officer Dr. Floyd
        Roberts, Dr. Maloa Chu, Dr. Venugopal Vatsavayi and Dr. Vasudev Tati
        pose with the special Doctors’ Day card signed by hospital Employees
        and staff.


        Physicians enjoyed a special Doctors’ Day luncheon on Monday,
        March 31. Pictured here are (from left) Dr. Amanda Watts, Dr. Hollis
        O’Neal, Dr. Ryan Richard and Dr. Bradley Blasiar.


        Physicians at Baton Rouge General’s Doctors’ Day luncheon on
        Monday, March 31. Pictured here (from left) Dr. Taylar Childress,
        Dr. Jo Anne Barrios and Dr. Angelique Goedeke.

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral  and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Proposed City of St. George: Joint Petition for Annexation into City of Baton Rouge        

        Baton Rouge, La. – After careful consideration of the potential impacts to the many communities we serve, and in alignment with the Baton Rouge Area Foundation (BRAF) and Baton Rouge Area Chamber (BRAC) white paper on the impacts of proposed new municipality in East Baton Rouge Parish authored by LSU Economists, led by Dr. Jim Richardson, Baton Rouge General’s Board of Trustees has decided to submit a joint petition with the Mall of Louisiana for annexation into the City of Baton Rouge.

        The General’s support in petitioning to annex into the City of Baton Rouge aligns with the BRAF and BRAC report that raised significant concerns about the viability of the existing city and the proposed City of St. George (Richardson, 2013):

        • Taking $85 million, or 30 percent, from the East Baton Rouge Parish General Fund. This is mainly because the General Fund is significantly supported by sales taxes, which are produced where retail outlets are located even though the sales taxes are paid by people who shop from all across the parish. The Mall of Louisiana, for instance, is a regional shopping destination that would be located in the proposed municipality.
        • Creating risk for increased taxes to make up for lost revenues and leading to significant reductions in public services, particularly police protection, which accounts for 29 percent of general fund expenditures.
        • Destabilizing and jeopardizing the unified plan of government from unsustainable retirement and post-employment benefit costs unless the new city shares in legacy costs. Totaling about $110 million a year, current retirement expenses and benefits are an obligation of all taxpayers in the parish.
        • Threatening economic development and job creation efforts due to fractured and duplicative regulatory and permitting processes and the interjection of sales tax competition between two cities currently considered one community.
        • Cutting funding for the EBRPSS even more than the breakaway district proposed in 2012 and 2013, mainly because the proposed city has a larger geographic area with major destination retailers that produce sales taxes from people all over the parish.

        “Baton Rouge General has served the surrounding 9-parish region for more than a century, and this decision will not distract from what we do every day – that is, putting patients and families first, across our entire service region, to deliver the highest quality of care possible. At the same time, we recognize the valid reasons that underlie this proposal, and support continued collaborative discussion that can inform and address the concerns of our citizens – namely our children and our schools,” said Evelyn Hayes, MD, Chair, Baton Rouge General Board of Trustees.

        Mark Slyter, Baton Rouge General/General Health System’s President and CEO added, “As a multi-campus health system within East Baton Rouge Parish, we are in the business of healthcare, and have served our entire community and region, regardless of boundary, for more than 100 years. Therefore, this has been a difficult and unusual political position for us – whether through informed judgment or silence, there is impact. Our organization does not want to stand in the way of the voting process, nor in the way of stakeholders who are acting in the best interests of their organizations’ collective wisdom.”

        “As our research indicates, the incorporation of the new municipality, which is proposed as a means to create a separate school district, would have significant and potentially damaging financial and socioeconomic consequences on the City of Baton Rouge, the existing public school system, as well as the residents of the entire parish, including those in the proposed new city,” said Adam Knapp, BRAC President and CEO. “We believe there are better solutions to enhance educational opportunities and a recent BRAC poll makes it clear that a majority of the residents within the boundaries of the proposed city of St. George agree – with nearly twice as many respondents preferring an approach that provides greater control over the community’s schools without creating a new city.”

        “We share the concern over quality of education in East Baton Rouge, which is why BRAF has supported reforms and created a new nonprofit to provide financial support and to recruit the best charter operator to take over failed EBR schools,” said John G. Davies, BRAF President and CEO. “We also agree with Dr. Jim Richardson’s analysis that forming a new city would scramble public finances, impacting public services and safety for both municipalities.”

        “The proposed incorporation would have detrimental impacts for all of the residents of our parish, including those who would be in the newly formed city,” said Mayor-President Melvin L. "Kip" Holden. “Our goal is to keep our communities together and we are committed to working collaboratively on a solution that will keep our parish whole and vibrant.”

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Baton Rouge General Welcomes New Class of Residents to Family and Internal Medicine Programs        

        Baton Rouge, La. – Sixteen new doctors will be coming to Baton Rouge General Medical Center’s campuses to complete residency training in family and internal medicine. National Resident Match Day results were announced last week at ceremonies for academic medical centers and graduate medical education programs across the country.

        “Baton Rouge General’s new physician residents represent the top medical talent selected among thousands of candidates nationwide and we are pleased to continue to expand our medical training programs with the addition of this year’s class of residents,” noted Dr. Floyd Roberts, Baton Rouge General’s Chief Medical Officer and Dean for Tulane University School of Medicine’s satellite campus at Baton Rouge General.

        “As a community hospital and serving as the inaugural satellite campus for Tulane University School of Medicine, Baton Rouge General is proud to support the cultivation of our community’s future clinical leaders and access to high-quality healthcare as well as the growth of advanced medical training and clinical research in Baton Rouge,” said Mark F. Slyter, President and CEO of Baton Rouge General.

        More than 100 residents and medical students train at Baton Rouge General each year, and through its education programs, the hospital trains a total of approximately 500 medical students, residents, fellows, nurses, pharmacists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and radiation technologists. In addition to its academic footprint, Baton Rouge General’s medical education and training programs support and strengthen the local and state economies. The annual economic impact of its physician residents upon graduation is more than $63 million and 252 full-time jobs.* Learn more at BRGeneral.org/Education.

        Baton Rouge General welcomes the following new residents:

        Family Medicine Residency Program

        Matthew Bumgardner
        Louisiana State University School of Medicine – Shreveport

        Timothy Durel
        University of Queensland

        Lauren LaCoste
        Louisiana State University School of Medicine – New Orleans

        Edith Mbagwu
        Louisiana State University School of Medicine – New Orleans

        Daniel Naul
        Louisiana State University School of Medicine – New Orleans

        Maryann Sandy
        American University of the Caribbean

        Jason Schrock
        American University of the Caribbean

        Kristen Thomas
        Louisiana State University School of Medicine – Shreveport

        Internal Medicine Residency Program

        Bahareh Binesh
        Ahvaz Jondishapour University of Medical Sciences

        Martin Binesh
        American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine

        Aaron De Witt
        American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine

        Justin Hogan
        American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine

        Rahul Kurapati
        Dr. B. R. Ambedkar Medical College

        Vijay Neelam
        Gandhi Medical College – Secunderabad

        Kishan Talagadadeevi
        Siddhartha Medical College

        Robert Territo
        Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine

         

         

         

         

         

         

        Baton Rouge General internal medicine physician residents (far left, L to R) Christopher Hodnette, MD, and Ramsy Abdelghani, MD, with faculty members (far right, L to R) Venkat Banda, MD,Associate Program Director, and Katherine May, MD.



        Baton Rouge General family medicine residency faculty member (L) Vincent Shaw, Jr., MD, with physician resident (R) Jovana Kakish, MD.


        *Source: The Economic Impact of Baton Rouge General’s Mid City Campus, Tripp Umbach, 2012

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Colorectal Cancer is More Preventable than Most Cancers, Screening is Key        

        Baton Rouge, La. – If you were able to get a screening that could possibly save your life, would you?

        Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States.* According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 1 in 20 people will develop colon cancer. And while over 90 percent of colorectal cancers are found in adults over the age of 50, it can occur at a much earlier age.

        Fortunately, colon cancer is preventable through regular screening and early detection. “I want everyone to know that colon cancer is a preventable disease,” says Dr. Oleana Lamendola, Gastroenterologist with Baton Rouge General Physicians. “Screening is key to prevention. I strongly recommend my patients who are 50 or older or have a family history of colorectal cancer get screened for the disease. It could save their life.”

        By finding and removing precancerous polyps that can develop into cancer, doctors can stop the cancer before it ever starts. Knowing the signs and symptoms and understanding your risks is important. While your age, personal and family histories are risks you cannot control, your lifestyle and diet are controllable. Smoking, obesity, low physical activity and heavy alcohol use are all linked to higher incidence of colorectal cancer.

        If any of these risks apply to you or someone you love, it’s time to talk to your doctor about the best screening option for you.

        For more information about screening and prevention of colorectal cancer, visit BRGeneral.org/Gastroenterology.

        *American Cancer Society

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Ribbon-Cutting Event for Radiation Oncology Center in Zachary Offers Community A Look Inside        

        Zachary, La. --- Baton Rouge General Medical Center and Lane Regional Medical Center hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house for their recently opened $4.5 million state-of-the-art Radiation Oncology Center in Zachary, Louisiana, on Thursday, March 13. Community and business leaders, government officials and members of the community attended the event which offered guests a unique opportunity to tour the Center and hear from physicians and cancer care experts.

        Conveniently located on Lane’s campus at 6180 Main Street, the Center is now open and accepting patients. Bringing together the strength of a nationally recognized comprehensive cancer program and cancer treatment experts, Baton Rouge General and Lane Regional have partnered to expand life-saving radiation treatment services to the region to offer patients convenient access to expert cancer care closer to home and their families.

        The American Cancer Society estimates about 24,300 new cancer diagnoses in Louisiana this year, and according to the CDC, about 50% of all cancer patients receive some type of radiation therapy during the course of their treatment. While each cancer treatment plan is unique, patients who undergo radiation therapy generally receive radiation treatment five days a week for approximately two to seven weeks.

        For more information, visit ROCZachary.com or call (225) 570-1212.


        Pictured L to R: William Russell, MD, Radiation Oncologist, Baton Rouge
        General; Mark F. Slyter, President & CEO, Baton Rouge General; Dionne
        Viator, Executive Vice President and Chief Business Development Officer,
        Baton Rouge General; Randy Olson, President & CEO, Lane Regional
        Medical Center; Senator Bodi White, Louisiana State Senate; Andrew Lauve,
        Radiation Oncologist, Baton Rouge General; Mayor David Amrhein, City
        of Zachary.

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is Baton Rouge’s first and only full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life. An accredited teaching hospital since 1991, Baton Rouge General serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine and offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology.

        Baton Rouge General's cancer center was approved by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer as a Community Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Program in 1989 and was the first cancer program in the region to attain approval. The program has maintained continuous approval subsequently. Baton Rouge General's Pennington Cancer Center was most recently re-approved in March 2011 and again achieved full three-year approval with all eight possible commendations. In addition, the Center's Radiation Oncology Department is accredited by the American College of Radiology and most recently received re-accreditation in 2012. In 2009, Baton Rouge General was the first accredited Breast Cancer Program in Louisiana by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers. This accreditation assures Baton Rouge General patients benefit from:

        • A multidisciplinary team approach to coordinate the best care treatment options
        • Access to breast cancer information, education and support services
        • Breast cancer data collection on quality indicators for all specialties involved in breast cancer care
        • Ongoing monitoring and follow-up care
        • Participation in clinical trials evaluating new breast cancer treatment options

        For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral

        About Lane Regional Medical Center 
        Lane Regional Medical Center has evolved from a community hospital to a state-of-the-art, regional healthcare system by continually expanding and adding new capabilities and technologies, as well as launching new programs and services such as Interventional Cardiology, Endoscopy & Infusion, Behavioral Health, Wound Care & Hyperbarics, Advanced Resonance Imaging Technology, and a new, comprehensive Radiation Oncology Center.

        Offering a full range of inpatient and outpatient diagnostic services, Lane also supports Orthopaedics, Labor & Delivery, Vascular & General Surgery, In-Patient Rehabilitation, Sleep Medicine, Home Health, Diabetes, Emergency Services and After-Hours programs. 

        With more than 850 dedicated team members, Lane Regional is the largest employer within the city of Zachary. The hospital continues to grow and invest in the community by recruiting new physicians and providing access to the very best healthcare services, technologies and programs available.

        Lane’s core values are Excellence, Integrity, Compassion, Respect and Commitment.

        For more details, please visit LaneRMC.org.


                  Baton Rouge General Hosts Free Vascular Screening        

        Baton Rouge, La. – Baton Rouge General is hosting a free vascular health screening,with clinical direction from Vascular Clinic, on Thursday, March 20, from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. at Baton Rouge General’s Bluebonnet hospital. The screening is designed to identify those who are at risk for cardiovascular disease and/or those who may need follow-up care for medical conditions relating to the body’s cardiovascular system. The event will also offer blood pressure checks, body mass indexing and additional screenings. Refreshments will be provided to registrants.

        Registration is required for this free event. For more information about screening eligibility requirements and to register, visit BRGeneral.org or call (225) 763-4280.

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Open House for New Radiation Oncology Center in Zachary        

        Baton Rouge General Medical Center and Lane Regional Medical Center Host Ribbon-Cutting Event To Offer Community A Look Inside State-of-the-Art Facility on Lane’s Campus

        Zachary, La. --- Baton Rouge General Medical Center and Lane Regional Medical Center are hosting a ribbon-cutting ceremony for their recently opened $4.5 million state-of-the-art Radiation Oncology Center in Zachary, Louisiana, on Thursday, March 13. Members of the community are invited to attend the open house which begins at 4 p.m. and will offer guests a unique opportunity to tour the Center and hear from physicians and cancer care experts. Light refreshments will also be provided.

        Conveniently located on Lane’s campus at 6180 Main Street, the Center is now open and accepting patients. Bringing together the strength of a nationally recognized comprehensive cancer program and cancer treatment experts, physicians and caregivers, Baton Rouge General and Lane Regional have partnered to expand life-saving radiation treatment services to the region.

        “A cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming and we are pleased to expand services to offer patients convenient access to expert cancer care closer to home and their families, which can help ease the challenges of treatment and recovery,” noted Dr. William Russell, MD, Medical Director of Radiation Oncology, Baton Rouge General Medical Center.

        Radiation oncology is the use of high energy radiation to control, shrink or kill cancerous cells, and is often used as a curative or controlling treatment, usually in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The American Cancer Society estimates about 24,300 new cancer diagnoses in Louisiana this year, and according to the CDC, about 50 percent of all cancer patients receive some type of radiation therapy during the course of their treatment. While each cancer treatment plan is unique, patients who undergo radiation therapy generally receive radiation treatment five days a week for approximately two to seven weeks.

        For more information, visit ROCZachary.com or call (225) 570-1212.

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is Baton Rouge’s first and only full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life. An accredited teaching hospital since 1991, Baton Rouge General serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine and offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology.

        Baton Rouge General's cancer center was approved by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer as a Community Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Program in 1989 and was the first cancer program in the region to attain approval. The program has maintained continuous approval subsequently. Baton Rouge General's Pennington Cancer Center was most recently re-approved in March 2011 and again achieved full three-year approval with all eight possible commendations. In addition, the Center's Radiation Oncology Department is accredited by the American College of Radiology and most recently received re-accreditation in 2012. In 2009, Baton Rouge General was the first accredited Breast Cancer Program in Louisiana by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers. This accreditation assures Baton Rouge General patients benefit from:

        • A multidisciplinary team approach to coordinate the best care treatment options
        • Access to breast cancer information, education and support services
        • Breast cancer data collection on quality indicators for all specialties involved in breast cancer care
        • Ongoing monitoring and follow-up care
        • Participation in clinical trials evaluating new breast cancer treatment options

        For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.

        About Lane Regional Medical Center
        Lane Regional Medical Center has evolved from a community hospital to a state-of-the-art, regional healthcare system by continually expanding and adding new capabilities and technologies, as well as launching new programs and services such as Interventional Cardiology, Endoscopy & Infusion, Behavioral Health, Wound Care & Hyperbarics, Advanced Resonance Imaging Technology, and a new, comprehensive Radiation Oncology Center.

        Offering a full range of inpatient and outpatient diagnostic services, Lane also supports Orthopaedics, Labor & Delivery, Vascular & General Surgery, In-Patient Rehabilitation, Sleep Medicine, Home Health, Diabetes, Emergency Services and After-Hours programs.

        With more than 850 dedicated team members, Lane Regional is the largest employer within the city of Zachary. The hospital continues to grow and invest in the community by recruiting new physicians and providing access to the very best healthcare services, technologies and programs available.

        Lane’s core values are Excellence, Integrity, Compassion, Respect and Commitment.

        For more details, please visit LaneRMC.org.


                  Baton Rouge General Makes It Easy to Love Your Heart        

        Free Heart Health Seminars and Vascular Screenings, Smoking Cessation Program

        Baton Rouge, La. – Heart Month may be coming to a close but that doesn’t mean you should put your heart health aside. Heart disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women, and Baton Rouge General Medical Center wants the community to continue to make their heart health a priority all year long – offering many ways to take charge of cardiovascular health in the coming months:

        • Free heart health seminars
          • March 6: Heart Failure Prevention and Treatment – Click here to learn more and register.
          • March 12: When to Call EMS: The Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack – Click here to learn more and register.
          • March 19: Know Your Numbers for Heart Health – Click here to learn more and register.
          • March 26: What is P.A.D. and How to Know if Leg Pain is More Than Just Arthritis – Click here to learn more and register.
          • April 3: High Cholesterol - Who Should See A Lipidologist – Click here to learn more and register.
        • Free vascular screenings
        • Smoking cessation program
          • Next series begins March 3. Click here to learn more and register.

        As the local major sponsor of the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign, Baton Rouge General is calling on our community to take steps to love their heart:

        • Be active: AHA recommends at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day.
        • Eat smart: Enjoy a diet low in sodium, trans-fat, hydrogenated oil and sugar, and rich in fiber-containing whole fruits and vegetables, monounsaturated fat and omega-3 fat.
        • Know your risk factors: Age, gender, race/ethnicity, family history and other medical conditions can all increase your risk of developing heart disease.
        • Listen to your heart: When warning signs pop up, pay attention to them and see your doctor.
        • See your doctor: Visit your physician every year and talk about your family’s health history
        • Kick the habit: One year after quitting smoking, heart disease risk is reduced by 50%.


        Baton Rouge General encourages our community to LOVE your heart all year long (Pictured L to R):
        Mark F. Slyter, President & CEO, Baton Rouge General; Susan McClay, RN, Cardiac Care Department,
        Baton Rouge General, Terri Johnson, Dietitian, Baton Rouge General; Patricia Williams, Smoking Cessation
        Program Coordinator, Baton Rouge General; Nakia Newsome, MD, Cardiologist, Baton Rouge Cardiology Center.


        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is Baton Rouge’s first and only full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  New Radiation Oncology Center Opens in Zachary on Lane’s Campus        

        Baton Rouge General Medical Center and Lane Regional Medical Center Partner to Bring High Quality Cancer Care Closer to Home
         
        Zachary, La. --- Baton Rouge General Medical Center and Lane Regional Medical Center announced today the opening of the $4.5 million state-of-the-art Radiation Oncology Center in Zachary, Louisiana. Bringing together the strength of a nationally recognized comprehensive cancer program and cancer treatment experts, physicians and caregivers, Baton Rouge General and Lane Regional have partnered to expand radiation services and technology to the region. Conveniently located on Lane’s campus at 6180 Main Street, the Center is officially open and accepting patients.
         
        “We are pleased to bring the life-saving services of radiation oncology therapy to the region and offer those battling cancer in our area access to a nationally recognized cancer program right here in Zachary,” commented Randy Olson, CEO of Lane Regional Medical Center.
         
        “With our shared commitment to serve the needs of our communities, Baton Rouge General is proud to partner with Lane to expand our programs and services to provide high quality, compassionate cancer care for the good patients and families in Zachary and surrounding communities,” said Mark F. Slyter, President and CEO, Baton Rouge General Medical Center.
         
        Radiation oncology is the use of high energy radiation to control, shrink or kill cancerous cells, and is often used as a curative or controlling treatment, usually in combination with surgery and/or chemotherapy. The American Cancer Society estimates about 24,300 new cancer diagnoses in Louisiana this year, and according to the CDC, about 50 percent of all cancer patients receive some type of radiation therapy during the course of their treatment. While each cancer treatment plan is unique, patients who undergo radiation therapy generally receive radiation treatment five days a week for approximately two to seven weeks.
         
        “A cancer diagnosis can be overwhelming and we are pleased to expand services to offer patients convenient access to expert cancer care closer to home and their families, which can help ease the challenges of treatment and recovery,” noted Dr. William Russell, MD, Medical Director of Radiation Oncology, Baton Rouge General Medical Center.

        For more information, visit ROCZachary.com or call (225) 570-1212.
         
        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is Baton Rouge’s first and only full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.  An accredited teaching hospital since 1991, Baton Rouge General serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine and offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology.
         
        Baton Rouge General's cancer center was approved by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer as a Community Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Program in 1989 and was the first cancer program in the region to attain approval. The program has maintained continuous approval subsequently. Baton Rouge General's Pennington Cancer Center was most recently re-approved in March 2011 and again achieved full three-year approval with all eight possible commendations. In addition, the Center's Radiation Oncology Department is accredited by the American College of Radiology and most recently received re-accreditation in 2012. In 2009, Baton Rouge General was the first accredited Breast Cancer Program in Louisiana by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers. This accreditation assures Baton Rouge General patients benefit from:

        • A multidisciplinary team approach to coordinate the best care treatment options
        • Access to breast cancer information, education and support services
        • Breast cancer data collection on quality indicators for all specialties involved in breast cancer care
        • Ongoing monitoring and follow-up care
        • Participation in clinical trials evaluating new breast cancer treatment options

        For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral
         
        About Lane Regional Medical Center
        Lane Regional Medical Center has evolved from a community hospital to a state-of-the-art, regional healthcare system by continually expanding and adding new capabilities and technologies, as well as launching new programs and services such as Interventional Cardiology, Endoscopy & Infusion, Behavioral Health, Wound Care & Hyperbarics, Advanced Resonance Imaging Technology, and a new, comprehensive Radiation Oncology Center.
         
        Offering a full range of inpatient and outpatient diagnostic services, Lane also supports Orthopaedics, Labor & Delivery, Vascular & General Surgery, In-Patient Rehabilitation, Sleep Medicine, Home Health, Diabetes, Emergency Services and After-Hours programs.
         
        With more than 850 dedicated team members, Lane Regional is the largest employer within the city of Zachary.  The hospital continues to grow and invest in the community by recruiting new physicians and providing access to the very best healthcare services, technologies and programs available.
         
        Lane’s core values are Excellence, Integrity, Compassion, Respect and Commitment.
         
        For more details, please visit LaneRMC.org


                  International Guitar Night Performs at Baton Rouge General        

        Baton Rouge, La. – Take a break from your work day and stop by Baton Rouge General for a musical treat this Friday, Feb. 21. International Guitar Night, a collaborative of the finest guitarists from around the world, will perform at 3:30 p.m. at the hospital’s Mid City campus in the lobby, located at 3600 Florida Boulevard. International Guitar Night will be performing at the Manship Theatre later that evening at 7:30 p.m. Tickets to the evening performance at the Shaw Center are available at manshiptheatre.org.

        International Guitar Night founder Brian Gore will be joined by Italy’s Pino Forastiere, Mike Dawes from England, and Quique Sinesi from Argentina. Pino is revered in contemporary steel string guitar circles for his unique mix of melody, improvisation and hand percussion using the strings, the fretboard and the body of the guitar. Quique is a master of many South American melodies and rhythms on both guitar and charango.

        In partnership with the Manship Theatre and the Janice H. Pellar Creative Arts Entrepreneurship Project in the LSU College of Music & Dramatic Arts, Baton Rouge General’s weekly Friday Lunch Live! concert series brings local musicians and performers to the hospital each Friday for performances. The concerts are free and open to the community and all are welcome to join Baton Rouge General for performances by pianists, guitarists, singers and other musicians. Recent performers include George Bell on trumpet, rhythm and blues singer Kalesha Brown Boudreaux, the LSU A Cappella Choir, nationally known Riders In the Sky and Grammy Award-winning Turtle Island Quartet.

        Launched in fall 2012, Baton Rouge General’s Arts in Medicine program brings the arts to patients and family members through a variety of creative activities, music and more. Learn more about the Arts in Medicine program and Friday Lunch Live! concert series, and see a list of upcoming concerts at BRGeneral.org.

        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is Baton Rouge’s first and only full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Baton Rouge General Goes Red for Our Littlest Sweethearts        

        Babies at Baton Rouge General Medical Center are dressed in red hats in support of women and the fight against heart disease throughout the month of February. By wearing red, the babies are sending a lifesaving message to their mothers and all of the women in their lives: Love Your Heart.

        Heart disease is still women’s number one killer, affecting more women than men and more deadly than all forms of cancer combined. That means many of the women in these babies’ lives, including mothers, grandmothers, aunts and sisters, or even the babies themselves, could be affected by heart disease at some point during their lifetime.

        Babies Go Red is an effort designed to bring awareness and is a part of Baton Rouge General’s partnership with the American Heart Association’s larger Go Red For Women campaign, celebrated in February each year. Heart disease can be prevented and the Go Red For Women movement is an effort that has the power to save lives. The campaign encourages women to improve their heart health while taking action to fight heart disease.

        “It’s important for women to take action to protect their heart health – know your risk factors, maintain healthy eating habits, exercise, don’t smoke, and see your physician every year,” said Dr. Taylar Childress, OB/GYN, Baton Rouge General Physicians Obstetrics & Gynecology.

        As a local major sponsor of Go Red For Women, Baton Rouge General is calling on our community to take steps today to love their heart by empowering themselves through conversations with their doctor about their heart health and talking with family about their health history. Visit Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral to share heart health tips and #StartAConversation today.


        Baby Avery wears her red cap at Baton Rouge General to support
        women’s heart health and share the lifesaving message with all
        women: “Love Your Heart.”



        Members of Baton Rouge General’s Birth Center team get together
        to encourage women to “Love Your Heart” by taking charge of their heart health.


        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is a full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.


                  Baton Rouge General Celebrates Women’s Heart Health at Go Red Luncheon        
        Baton Rouge General proudly supported community efforts to raise awareness about women’s heart health at the Capital Area American Heart Association's 2014 Go Red Luncheon on Friday, Feb. 7. As a local major sponsor of this year’s Go Red campaign, Baton Rouge General is calling on women and men in the community to take steps today to “Love Your Heart” by empowering themselves through conversations with their doctor and talking with family about their health history. Physicians were also on hand at the General’s photo booth to encourage heart health. The Go Red luncheon featured survivor stories, including Roxane Bingham, a recent Baton Rouge General heart patient who shared her story of surviving a heart attack. Check out all our Go Red event photos at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and be sure to share your heart health tips and #StartAConversation today.

        In celebration of National Wear Red Day, Baton Rouge General’s campuses also went red on Friday, Feb. 7, with heart healthy menus in the cafes as well as passing out apples and heart health information throughout the hospital.


        On Baton Rouge General’s red carpet at the Go Red luncheon (L to R):
        Stephanie Awad, MD, Baton Rouge General Physicians and Robert
        St. Amant, MD, Baton Rouge General Physicians


        Performing at Baton Rouge General’s booth at the Go Red luncheon –
        pictured (L to R): Alvarez Hertzog, Wess Anderson, Jazz saxophonist
        and recent Baton Rouge General stroke patient; George Bell, Senior
        Vice President, Community Relations, Baton Rouge General.


        Posing with Baton Rouge General’s “Love Your Heart” sculpture –
        (Standing L to R): Hollye Briggs; Roxane Bingham, recent Baton Rouge
        General heart attack survivor; Elaine Hillman; (Kneeling L to R): Denise
        Brister; Frances Bingham



        Baton Rouge General’s campuses go red encouraging our employees
        to “Love Your Heart” – pictured (L to R) with their heart healthy apples
        are employees Khelsea Conley, RN, MSN, FNP-BC, and Jessica Ashford, RN


        About Baton Rouge General Medical Center
        Baton Rouge General Medical Center is Baton Rouge’s first and only full-service community hospital, with 527 licensed beds between two campuses. As the first hospital in Baton Rouge, opening its doors in 1900, Baton Rouge General has a long history of groundbreaking milestones, as well as providing the Greater Baton Rouge community with high quality healthcare for generations. From our birth center to senior services, and state-of-the-art heart and cancer care, Baton Rouge General provides care for the whole family at every age and every stage of life.

        Baton Rouge General is affiliated with and also serves as a satellite campus of Tulane University School of Medicine. In addition to serving as a satellite campus for Tulane medical students in the LEAD (Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Discovery) Academy program, Baton Rouge General also offers a Family Medicine Residency Program, Internal Medicine Residency Program, Sports Medicine Fellowship Program, School of Nursing and School of Radiologic Technology. Baton Rouge General, an accredited teaching hospital since 1991, is committed to exceptional medical education and serves a diverse population that is representative of the types of patients, injuries, illnesses and healthcare needs most frequently seen by physicians in private practice. For more information, visit BRGeneral.org, find us on Facebook at Facebook.com/BatonRougeGeneral and follow us on Twitter at @BRGeneral.
                  Baton Rouge General/General Health System Announces New Board of Trustees        
        Baton Rouge, La. – Baton Rouge General/General Health System recently announced new appointments and members to the Board of Trustees.

        After concluding her post as Interim President and CEO of Baton Rouge General/General Health System, Evelyn K. Hayes, MD, has returned to her seat as Chair of the Board of Trustees. Serving on the board for 12 years, Dr. Hayes specializes in women’s health and has practiced medicine in our community for more than 35 years. Baton Rouge General/General Health System also welcomes three new members – Everett Bonner, MD, FACS, Debra Lockwood and Isabelina Nahmens, PhD – to its Board of Trustees.