[urls] Measuring the ROI of Software Process Improvement        
Saturday, September 18, 2004
Dateline: China
 
The following is a sampling of my top ten "urls" for the past couple/few weeks.  By signing up with Furl (it's free), anyone can subscribe to an e-mail feed of ALL my urls (about 100-250 per week) -- AND limit by subject (e.g., ITO) and/or rating (e.g., articles rated "Very Good" or "Excellent").  It's also possible to receive new urls as an RSS feed.
 
All of the top ten are PDFsClick on the link to read the abstract for each paper.
 
Note: Off to California for a couple of weeks.  Probably no new, original postings until after the October national holiday in China.  (I get a three week break from writing for this blog, but I'll still be writing columns for the AlwaysOn Network.)
 
Top Honors:
 
Measuring the ROI of Software Process Improvement (relatively speaking, very popular among Furl viewers; highly accessible article with a lot of substance and pointers)
 
Other best new selections (in order of popularity as determined by Furl views, then alphabetically):
 
A Framework for Off-The-Shelf Software Component Development and Maintenance Processes (this was THE most popular paper, although I liked the ROI article better; superb info, good guidelines, lots of food for thought)
Agent-Based e-Supply Chain Decision Support (not as geeky as it sounds; lead author is with Carnegie Mellon's e-Supply Chain Management Laboratory & Institute for e-Commerce)
B2B E-Commerce Stages of Growth: the Strategic Imperatives (a look at some case studies; provides some insights into B2B adoption and diffusion)
Creating an Open Agent Environment for Context-Aware M-Commerce (from the Mobile Commerce Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon <no, this isn't necessarily CMU week>; I have a lot of doubts about this stuff, but it's worth firing a few neurons and giving it a spin)
Development and Evaluation of Software Process Improvement Methods (Dissertation, 190 pp.) (superb overviews sprinkled with case studies; it was tough to choose between this dissertation and the ROI paper for top honors)
Deriving a Diffusion Framework for Web-Based Shopping Systems (a bit of a technical flavor, but not too technical; puts e-shopping in a broader perspective, e.g., relative to EDI)
* Exploring Defect Causes in Products Developed by Virtual Teams (to all SIs developing a GDM - global delivery model - READ THIS!!; perhaps the most important paper among my top ten)
* Intelligent Support for Software Release Planning (a corporate technical paper describing a very useful software development management tool; see also the Release Planner (tm) home page)
 
And my PERSONAL favorite:
 
> The Banality of Google (good for some laughs)
 
and many, many more ...
 
Cheers,
 
David Scott Lewis
President & Principal Analyst
IT E-Strategies, Inc.
Menlo Park, CA & Qingdao, China
 
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          Home Court Advantage        
One of the most important aspects of basketball - Home Court Advantage - is also one of the most difficult to measure. There are a few ways to do this. The most common is basically to estimate how many points playing on your home court is worth. Having teams play home-and-away in one season makes this possible. You could look at other variables such as Field Goal Percentage, but those may be affected by many factors besides the venue.

An alternative that came to mind is free throw shooting percentage. The idea is that because you can't really defend the free throw, there are only a few things should affect it: 1) who is shooting, 2) luck, and 3) the fans making noise and other distractions. To take care of number 1, we need to make sure to look not at the total free throw percentage of the road team, but instead look at who is shooting and how they do. That leaves us with luck and actual distractions from fans.

With this in mind, I wanted to figure out for each road team, what would you expect the free throw percentage to be based on who is shooting, and in doing so, you can measure the effect of the venue itself on performance. For those that have some knowledge of stats, I ran the following regression:

FTP_ik = a_i + venue_k + e_ik

where
FTP_ij is the free throw percentage of road player i in venue k
a_i is the unconditional average road free throw percentage of player i
venue_k is the effect of the home team on player i's free throw percentage
e_ik is the error term

venue_k is the thing I'm trying to measure. One more thing, I'm using Free throw attempts as a weight in the regression to give more weight in the estimation to those that shoot more often.

Below is what I came up with. The FT-Effect number is the (venue_k) estimate from above. For UME (Maine), is is -11.2%. That visiting players shot 11.2% lower Free Throw percentage against Maine than they would have in the average road venue. So, Maine it is! See where your team is:


Rank Home Team FT-Effect
1 UME -11.2%
2 DEST -10.6%
3 ORU -10.0%
4 NORF -9.9%
5 SVST -9.6%
6 MICH -9.2%
7 UVA -9.0%
8 SJSU -8.4%
9 FDU -8.4%
10 NEB -8.0%
11 GONZ -7.6%
12 BYU -7.5%
13 SUU -7.4%
14 USC -7.2%
15 CINC -6.9%
16 IONA -6.9%
17 DUQ -6.9%
18 MASS -6.6%
19 SYR -6.4%
20 LAF -6.1%
21 EMU -6.0%
22 TCU -6.0%
23 FGCU -5.5%
24 SOU -5.5%
25 GT -5.5%
26 COST -5.4%
27 UCR -5.4%
28 BETH -5.4%
29 RAD -5.3%
30 TROY -5.1%
31 WSSU -4.9%
32 PEPP -4.6%
33 UTA -4.5%
34 BOIS -4.4%
35 VAND -4.4%
36 USF -4.4%
37 LBSU -4.4%
38 GMU -4.4%
39 WVU -4.1%
40 VCU -4.1%
41 BING -3.9%
42 UNF -3.9%
43 IOWA -3.8%
44 UD -3.8%
45 CITA -3.7%
46 PITT -3.7%
47 MORE -3.7%
48 SIE -3.7%
49 PORT -3.6%
50 ELON -3.6%
51 WICH -3.6%
52 SPC -3.6%
53 NOVA -3.5%
54 WYO -3.4%
55 UNC -3.4%
56 SJU -3.4%
57 SC -3.4%
58 WASH -3.4%
59 ETSU -3.4%
60 ARMY -3.3%
61 NWSU -3.3%
62 AFA -3.2%
63 KENN -3.2%
64 TEX -3.2%
65 ID -3.2%
66 UCF -3.2%
67 MTSU -3.1%
68 TOWS -3.0%
69 ODU -3.0%
70 LAM -3.0%
71 UMES -3.0%
72 UNCW -2.9%
73 PSU -2.9%
74 LIP -2.9%
75 USU -2.9%
76 FSU -2.8%
77 SIUE -2.8%
78 SCL -2.8%
79 UNI -2.8%
80 SDAK -2.8%
81 BUFF -2.7%
82 AMER -2.7%
83 WKU -2.6%
84 OHST -2.6%
85 BSU -2.6%
86 CHAT -2.6%
87 NIAG -2.4%
88 VALP -2.4%
89 CLEM -2.4%
90 VMI -2.2%
91 USM -2.2%
92 CCU -2.2%
93 MON -2.1%
94 USD -2.0%
95 IND -2.0%
96 CAL -2.0%
97 LONG -2.0%
98 SCST -2.0%
99 WOFF -2.0%
100 SCU -1.9%
101 LTU -1.9%
102 QUIN -1.9%
103 MORG -1.8%
104 OU -1.8%
105 YSU -1.8%
106 GW -1.7%
107 UCSB -1.7%
108 SLU -1.6%
109 UCD -1.6%
110 UWM -1.6%
111 NMSU -1.6%
112 MOST -1.5%
113 PVAM -1.5%
114 NM -1.5%
115 SEMO -1.5%
116 UTAH -1.4%
117 IUPUI -1.4%
118 XU -1.4%
119 NIU -1.4%
120 INST -1.4%
121 STET -1.4%
122 NW -1.4%
123 POLY -1.3%
124 PRIN -1.2%
125 CAMP -1.2%
126 FURM -1.2%
127 BONA -1.1%
128 PUR -1.1%
129 ARIZ -1.1%
130 BC -1.1%
131 SAMF -1.0%
132 HAMP -0.9%
133 FAU -0.9%
134 FORD -0.9%
135 DUKE -0.9%
136 ASU -0.9%
137 NCAT -0.9%
138 FRES -0.8%
139 UIC -0.8%
140 UNCG -0.8%
141 LOYO -0.8%
142 SIU -0.7%
143 NAU -0.7%
144 NICH -0.7%
145 JSU -0.7%
146 SMC -0.7%
147 COFC -0.6%
148 ORE -0.5%
149 WRIG -0.5%
150 MSM -0.5%
151 PROV -0.5%
152 CANI -0.5%
153 MIO -0.5%
154 UMT -0.5%
155 UCLA -0.4%
156 HART -0.4%
157 EVAN -0.4%
158 MINN -0.4%
159 SDST -0.4%
160 KENT -0.3%
161 ALA -0.3%
162 MAN -0.3%
163 TUL -0.3%
164 COLO -0.3%
165 HAW -0.2%
166 LIUB -0.2%
167 JAX -0.2%
168 RID -0.1%
169 NCC -0.1%
170 WAG -0.1%
171 NCST -0.1%
172 ALC 0.0%
173 SDSU 0.0%
174 CORN 0.0%
175 UTEP 0.0%
176 UNH 0.0%
177 BELM 0.1%
178 MURR 0.1%
179 URI 0.2%
180 CONN 0.2%
181 SB 0.2%
182 NOCO 0.2%
183 WAKE 0.2%
184 FIU 0.2%
185 WISC 0.2%
186 TNT 0.2%
187 LEH 0.3%
188 FAMU 0.4%
189 DEP 0.4%
190 UTPA 0.4%
191 LSU 0.4%
192 WIU 0.4%
193 CHSO 0.4%
194 NAVY 0.4%
195 LIB 0.5%
196 SAMH 0.5%
197 WEB 0.5%
198 NJIT 0.6%
199 KU 0.6%
200 TXST 0.6%
201 MERC 0.7%
202 HOU 0.7%
203 KSU 0.7%
204 MTST 0.7%
205 ILST 0.7%
206 SFNY 0.8%
207 BAY 0.8%
208 TXSO 0.9%
209 BUTL 0.9%
210 DEN 1.0%
211 UVU 1.0%
212 UMKC 1.0%
213 ALAM 1.1%
214 HBU 1.1%
215 UMD 1.1%
216 UCA 1.1%
217 WSU 1.2%
218 UDM 1.2%
219 GWB 1.2%
220 OSU 1.2%
221 CCSU 1.2%
222 CLST 1.3%
223 TAM 1.3%
224 COLG 1.3%
225 RUTG 1.4%
226 PENN 1.4%
227 NTEX 1.4%
228 MEM 1.4%
229 TTU 1.4%
230 WMU 1.4%
231 STJ 1.5%
232 GU 1.5%
233 ILL 1.5%
234 AUB 1.5%
235 SMU 1.5%
236 UVM 1.6%
237 UAPB 1.7%
238 UWGB 1.7%
239 CST 1.8%
240 MAR 1.8%
241 COLU 1.8%
242 DART 1.9%
243 CENT 1.9%
244 FLA 1.9%
245 MARQ 1.9%
246 VT 1.9%
247 COPP 1.9%
248 IDST 2.0%
249 DREX 2.0%
250 APST 2.0%
251 UNCA 2.0%
252 ND 2.1%
253 EWU 2.1%
254 GS 2.2%
255 EIU 2.2%
256 CWM 2.2%
257 ECU 2.3%
258 CMU 2.3%
259 UALR 2.4%
260 UNLV 2.4%
261 GRAM 2.4%
262 OAK 2.5%
263 SF 2.5%
264 ARST 2.5%
265 NEV 2.6%
266 UTM 2.6%
267 UL 2.7%
268 MCN 2.7%
269 BUCK 2.7%
270 ULL 2.8%
271 APSU 2.8%
272 ALB 2.8%
273 HOFS 2.9%
274 ISU 2.9%
275 TOL 3.0%
276 UGA 3.1%
277 RICH 3.1%
278 NDST 3.2%
279 UTSA 3.2%
280 LAS 3.2%
281 STAN 3.2%
282 MVSU 3.2%
283 MSU 3.2%
284 IPFW 3.3%
285 GSU 3.3%
286 MIZZ 3.4%
287 MIA 3.4%
288 TAMC 3.6%
289 ULM 3.7%
290 DRKE 3.7%
291 BRY 3.7%
292 HP 3.8%
293 UNO 3.8%
294 PAC 3.9%
295 CREI 3.9%
296 MSST 3.9%
297 NU 3.9%
298 HC 4.0%
299 NDAK 4.0%
300 ORSU 4.0%
301 TU 4.1%
302 CSF 4.1%
303 PRES 4.1%
304 MISS 4.2%
305 RICE 4.4%
306 UAB 4.4%
307 FAIR 4.4%
308 HOW 4.5%
309 BRWN 4.5%
310 SH 4.5%
311 BGSU 4.6%
312 YALE 4.6%
313 TENN 4.8%
314 AKR 4.8%
315 JMU 4.9%
316 WINT 5.0%
317 JXST 5.2%
318 SFA 5.2%
319 SHU 5.3%
320 MRSH 5.3%
321 DEL 5.4%
322 OHIO 5.5%
323 UK 5.5%
324 LMU 5.5%
325 UCI 5.6%
326 SEA 5.6%
327 TSU 5.7%
328 DAV 6.0%
329 SFPA 6.1%
330 USA 6.3%
331 LMD 6.4%
332 CHAR 6.4%
333 RMU 6.6%
334 ARK 6.6%
335 EKU 6.7%
336 CSN 6.7%
337 SELU 6.7%
338 SAC 6.8%
339 ALST 7.7%
340 TULS 7.9%
341 BU 8.1%
342 WCU 8.1%
343 UMBC 8.2%
344 CSB 8.3%
345 POST 8.6%
346 BRAD 9.6%
347 HARV 10.3%



These numbers are all relative to the effect of the average venue, not relative to performance at home. I didn't include free throw percentage of any players at home in the estimation.

Here are the same estimates using equal weights (ignoring how many free throw attempts a player had):

Rank Venue FT-Effect
1 SVST -14.3%
2 UME -12.0%
3 NORF -11.8%
4 UNF -11.0%
5 MASS -10.9%
6 FDU -10.8%
7 BYU -10.2%
8 SUU -10.0%
9 MICH -10.0%
10 NEB -9.9%
11 GT -9.8%
12 CINC -9.7%
13 UVA -9.6%
14 AFA -9.0%
15 COST -8.7%
16 UCR -8.6%
17 PORT -8.5%
18 WYO -8.1%
19 LAF -7.9%
20 MORE -7.0%
21 SYR -7.0%
22 SOU -7.0%
23 IONA -7.0%
24 USC -6.8%
25 UIC -6.8%
26 DEST -6.8%
27 UVU -6.6%
28 IOWA -6.6%
29 PRIN -6.3%
30 BETH -6.2%
31 EMU -6.0%
32 SIUE -6.0%
33 GONZ -5.9%
34 SPC -5.9%
35 VAND -5.9%
36 PEPP -5.8%
37 UMT -5.8%
38 QUIN -5.7%
39 WICH -5.7%
40 WASH -5.5%
41 ODU -5.5%
42 SMC -5.3%
43 ARMY -5.3%
44 SCL -5.2%
45 ID -5.2%
46 BOIS -5.1%
47 TROY -4.9%
48 DUKE -4.9%
49 ASU -4.9%
50 PSU -4.9%
51 TCU -4.8%
52 UNI -4.8%
53 FGCU -4.8%
54 SJU -4.7%
55 ORU -4.7%
56 ALA -4.7%
57 WVU -4.7%
58 UD -4.7%
59 MSM -4.5%
60 VALP -4.5%
61 ETSU -4.4%
62 BSU -4.4%
63 GMU -4.3%
64 SDSU -4.3%
65 IUPUI -4.1%
66 UNC -4.1%
67 NIU -4.1%
68 SCST -4.0%
69 RID -4.0%
70 SDAK -4.0%
71 SJSU -3.9%
72 HART -3.9%
73 HBU -3.8%
74 KENN -3.7%
75 ELON -3.7%
76 UTA -3.6%
77 ORE -3.6%
78 NOCO -3.4%
79 NOVA -3.3%
80 VMI -3.3%
81 XU -3.3%
82 FSU -3.2%
83 UCSB -3.2%
84 BC -3.1%
85 OAK -3.1%
86 GW -3.1%
87 NJIT -3.1%
88 YSU -3.0%
89 LBSU -3.0%
90 SIU -2.9%
91 UCF -2.9%
92 NCAT -2.9%
93 RAD -2.8%
94 BING -2.8%
95 SEMO -2.8%
96 SDST -2.8%
97 VCU -2.8%
98 MTSU -2.8%
99 AMER -2.8%
100 MTST -2.7%
101 DUQ -2.6%
102 WKU -2.6%
103 LAM -2.6%
104 STJ -2.6%
105 SLU -2.4%
106 SB -2.3%
107 NIAG -2.3%
108 LONG -2.3%
109 NMSU -2.2%
110 CHAT -2.2%
111 UNCG -2.2%
112 MORG -2.2%
113 KENT -2.2%
114 EVAN -2.2%
115 CHSO -2.1%
116 CAL -2.1%
117 TEX -2.1%
118 USF -2.1%
119 MON -2.0%
120 LIB -2.0%
121 UTPA -2.0%
122 URI -2.0%
123 CAMP -1.9%
124 NAU -1.9%
125 BUFF -1.9%
126 CANI -1.8%
127 UMES -1.8%
128 NAVY -1.8%
129 NM -1.7%
130 PITT -1.7%
131 CLEM -1.7%
132 LAS -1.6%
133 WOFF -1.6%
134 STET -1.6%
135 UVM -1.6%
136 DEN -1.5%
137 MARQ -1.5%
138 UCD -1.5%
139 SIE -1.4%
140 INST -1.3%
141 WSSU -1.3%
142 UWM -1.3%
143 LEH -1.2%
144 WAKE -1.1%
145 MOST -1.1%
146 USU -1.1%
147 MERC -1.1%
148 FAMU -1.1%
149 SC -1.0%
150 CITA -1.0%
151 FAIR -1.0%
152 LIP -1.0%
153 CST -0.9%
154 VT -0.9%
155 COFC -0.9%
156 UWGB -0.9%
157 UDM -0.7%
158 NICH -0.7%
159 USD -0.7%
160 UTAH -0.7%
161 SCU -0.7%
162 CORN -0.6%
163 LOYO -0.6%
164 FORD -0.6%
165 LTU -0.5%
166 SFNY -0.5%
167 UCA -0.5%
168 CCU -0.5%
169 PUR -0.5%
170 BONA -0.4%
171 BUTL -0.3%
172 CLST -0.3%
173 MURR -0.3%
174 ALC -0.3%
175 IND -0.2%
176 PENN -0.2%
177 ARIZ -0.1%
178 WRIG 0.0%
179 OHST 0.0%
180 NCST 0.2%
181 UMKC 0.2%
182 ILL 0.3%
183 JAX 0.3%
184 WSU 0.3%
185 OU 0.4%
186 MIO 0.4%
187 WIU 0.4%
188 TAM 0.4%
189 FIU 0.5%
190 OSU 0.5%
191 MEM 0.5%
192 PRES 0.6%
193 KSU 0.7%
194 UTM 0.7%
195 KU 0.8%
196 ILST 0.9%
197 PAC 0.9%
198 MAN 1.0%
199 TNT 1.0%
200 UNCW 1.0%
201 GU 1.0%
202 HAMP 1.1%
203 CWM 1.1%
204 BELM 1.1%
205 LIUB 1.1%
206 UCLA 1.1%
207 SMU 1.2%
208 WISC 1.2%
209 FRES 1.2%
210 NW 1.4%
211 HOU 1.4%
212 CENT 1.5%
213 MVSU 1.5%
214 UNH 1.6%
215 CONN 1.6%
216 TUL 1.7%
217 UNCA 1.7%
218 TOWS 1.7%
219 USM 1.8%
220 DART 1.9%
221 SF 1.9%
222 FLA 1.9%
223 COLU 1.9%
224 MAR 1.9%
225 NEV 1.9%
226 ISU 2.0%
227 PROV 2.1%
228 NWSU 2.2%
229 BAY 2.2%
230 COLG 2.2%
231 DRKE 2.2%
232 WMU 2.2%
233 GSU 2.3%
234 GWB 2.3%
235 CMU 2.4%
236 COPP 2.4%
237 SFPA 2.4%
238 UALR 2.5%
239 CSF 2.5%
240 MINN 2.5%
241 WEB 2.5%
242 FAU 2.6%
243 IDST 2.7%
244 RUTG 2.7%
245 UNLV 2.8%
246 TTU 2.9%
247 NCC 2.9%
248 WAG 2.9%
249 HAW 2.9%
250 UK 3.0%
251 DREX 3.0%
252 TOL 3.1%
253 TU 3.1%
254 COLO 3.1%
255 UL 3.1%
256 UMD 3.2%
257 BRY 3.2%
258 POLY 3.3%
259 BRWN 3.3%
260 ULM 3.4%
261 GS 3.4%
262 MISS 3.5%
263 TXST 3.5%
264 UNO 3.5%
265 NU 3.6%
266 STAN 3.7%
267 UAPB 3.7%
268 CHAR 3.7%
269 JMU 3.7%
270 SEA 3.8%
271 SAMF 3.8%
272 PVAM 3.9%
273 TAMC 3.9%
274 FURM 3.9%
275 UAB 4.0%
276 TXSO 4.1%
277 DEL 4.1%
278 SHU 4.2%
279 RICE 4.3%
280 JSU 4.3%
281 EIU 4.4%
282 GRAM 4.4%
283 DEP 4.4%
284 TENN 4.4%
285 MSU 4.5%
286 ARST 4.5%
287 RICH 4.5%
288 ECU 4.6%
289 HOFS 4.6%
290 ND 4.7%
291 SAMH 4.8%
292 UTEP 4.9%
293 EWU 5.1%
294 EKU 5.1%
295 ALB 5.2%
296 NDST 5.2%
297 NTEX 5.2%
298 AKR 5.3%
299 LSU 5.3%
300 MSST 5.4%
301 SAC 5.5%
302 MIZZ 5.5%
303 ORSU 5.5%
304 IPFW 5.5%
305 AUB 5.5%
306 BUCK 5.5%
307 CCSU 5.6%
308 NDAK 5.7%
309 CREI 5.7%
310 HP 5.7%
311 APSU 5.8%
312 UTSA 5.8%
313 UGA 5.8%
314 HC 5.8%
315 SELU 5.9%
316 BU 5.9%
317 LMD 6.0%
318 ULL 6.4%
319 SH 6.6%
320 APST 6.8%
321 USA 6.8%
322 POST 6.8%
323 OHIO 6.8%
324 MCN 6.9%
325 LMU 7.0%
326 TSU 7.0%
327 MRSH 7.1%
328 RMU 7.3%
329 DAV 7.3%
330 ALAM 7.3%
331 JXST 7.7%
332 ALST 7.8%
333 BGSU 8.1%
334 TULS 8.5%
335 WINT 8.8%
336 ARK 8.9%
337 MIA 8.9%
338 CSB 9.0%
339 UCI 9.0%
340 CSN 9.3%
341 BRAD 9.6%
342 WCU 9.9%
343 SFA 10.0%
344 UMBC 10.3%
345 YALE 10.5%
346 HOW 11.4%
347 HARV 13.2%
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There have been approximately 72,868 articles written about Miley Cyrus’s performance at last weekend’s MTV Video Music Awards over the course of this week. 87% of them negative towards the former teen star. And so, while you might be thinking that the world really doesn’t need another person manufacturing outrage about all this to a […]
          CMU Digest – 19 Apr 2013        
The five biggest stories in the music business this week… 01: A US judge upheld his original ruling in Viacom v YouTube. The MTV owner sued YouTube in 2007, claiming that the video sharing site was liable for copyright infringement for letting users upload Viacom owned content without permission. But YouTube claimed it was protected […]
          Strange Sounds #8        

Sorry, guys. I've been binge watching Daredevil lately. But don't think I forgot about the master of the mystic arts and his... Strange Sounds! I'm back yet again with installment #8: revisiting the sounds this series started out with, namely and mainly psychedelic and garage rock from decades past. I hope these mixes have been opening your eyes and ears, broadening your horizons, and leading you on new musical journeys of your own. I appreciate any comments, praise, critiques, whatever... Most of all, I hope you value the music. Enjoy... And as always... Turn it up!!



Tracklisting:
1. Marvel Comics - Doctor Strange 1967 Radio Show EP (Intro)
2. Lucifer's Friend - Ride In the Sky
3. The Gods - Misleading Colours
4. CMU - Mystical Sounds
5. Teddy Robin & The Playboys - Magic Colours
6. Bent Wind - The Chant
7. Morgen - Purple
8. The Third Bardo - Rainbow Life
9. Vladimir Cosma - Black Flowers
10. Weed - Sweet Morning Light
11. Machine - Old Black Magic
12. Clear Blue Sky - My Heaven
13. Priscilla Coolidge - Salty Haze
14. Motherhood - Devil Don't Get Me
15. Bass Drum of Death - Faces of the Wind
16. Sonic Youth - Within You Without You
17. Marvel Comics - Doctor Strange 1967 Radio Show EP (Outro)


 





          Suspect Sought In Assault Of CMU Student        
Police are investigating after a Carnegie Mellon University student living in an off-campus apartment says he was attacked while sleeping outside earlier this week.
          College Service & Class Projects        

Masons, September 2016
Donated and applied a second slip resistant coating product on ceramic tile library/elevator ground floor entryway.

Masons, September 2016
Donated and replaced broken and missing ceramic tiles in entryway to one of the Apprenticeship offices in Building 4.

Masons, August 2016
Donated and applied a slip resistant coating on ceramic tile library/elevator ground floor entryway.

Painters, April 2016
Prepared walls and painted Student Lounge (Building 2).

Painters, Spring 2016
Painted and re-painted lines in parking lots and fire lanes.

Masons, February 2016
Created and placed concrete stops along HCC/PK Elementary School boundary to divert rain run off from the School to the storm drain and to prevent flooding of the Welding Shop.

Masons, February 2016
Excavated, prepared and poured concrete slab behind the Print Shop to prevent flooding of the Print Shop.

Painters, Fall 2015 and Spring 2016
Prepared walls and painted a number of classrooms and common spaces within Building 14 including restrooms, stair wells, hallway and 14-111A & 14-111B.

Masons, November 2015
Prepared and filled in nine 4'X4' tree "planters" on the Mall to enable unimpeded access by emergency vehicles.

Painters (ABC), October 2015
Painted the dumpster enclosure and cafeteria kitchen entryway.

Glaziers, September 2015
Donated and replaced shattered pane of glass on cafeteria store front.

Carpenters, September 2015
Removed shattered pane of glass in cafeteria store front and temporarily boarded up the window.

Electricians (Local 1186), September 2015
Diagnosed and remedied no lights problem in four offices on the 6th floor of Building 7.

Painters, May 2015
Painted eaves and ceiling of Plasterers' pavilion that is located in the back of Building 12.

Masons, April 2015
Extended a section of red brick in Laura Ruby's sculpture between Buildings 2 and 7.

Masons, March and April 2015
Prepared area and poured approximately 8 cubic yards of concrete in front of AMT building to simplify maintenance and create spaces for picnic tables.

Electricians (Local 1186), February 2015
Replaced three old night lights on the exterior of Building 4 with LED fixtures.

Carpenters, February 2015
Removed and replaced termite damaged walls on Mala storage shed.

Painters (ABC), January 2015
Painted Building 4 Ewa-side and Mauka-side walls.

Painters (ABC), January 2015
Re-painted Apprenticeship Office outer wall and raised sign.

Tapers, December 2014
Donated all materials and taped and finished 2'X2' plumbing access panel that was cut into Apprenticeship Office kitchen wall.

Plumbers (ABC), November 2014
Provided materials and repaired leaking copper pipe in Parking Lot 3. Also, donated and replaced a leaking water bib outside of Building 14, Room 114 (Masons' Shop).

Masons, November 2014
Placed concrete piles along the Kokea Street entrances to campus to prevent cars from parking too close to the edges of the driveways. When cars are parked too close to the driveway, drivers exiting the campus don't have a clear view of oncoming traffic on Kokea Street and risk collisions.

Drywall, September 2014
Replaced water damaged and discolored acoustic ceiling tiles in Building 14, Room 212.

Painters, January 2013 - September 2014
Prepped, donated the paint and painted Building 14, Rooms 103A, 103B, 111A and 212.

Electricians (IBEW), September 2014
Installed power switch to air exhaust system in the Building 14, Room 106 (drywall lab) to enable occupants to turn on the exhaust system without going next door to flip the switch.

Masons, September 2014
To remedy tripping hazards, numerous red brick pavers that are located directly beyond the Student Lounge makai entrance (under The Pub) were removed and re-set.

Plumbers (ABC), September 2014
Installed drinking fountain in Building 2 first floor breezeway and assessed functioning of existing fountains on the second to sixth floors.

Painters (ABC), April 2014
Painted Building 5 upstairs walkway walls.

Electricians (Local 1186), April 2014
Diagnosed no power problem with lamp poles across campus.

Floor Layers, April 2014
Provided all materials and re-floored TRIO classroom in Building 3.

Glaziers, March 2014
Completely serviced all cafeteria doors.

Glaziers, March 2014
Serviced and attempted to repair locking mechanisms in double glass doors - Building 27 front and back doors. Components were too old to repair.

Plumbers (ABC), March 2014
Repaired two malfunctioning faucets in Building 4 men's restroom.

Glaziers, March 2014
Serviced and attempted to repair locking mechanisms in double glass doors - back entrance to Building 7. Components were too old to repair.

Plumbers (ABC), February 2014
Repaired leaking copper pipe and installed shut off valve in masons training area (wall) in Lot 3.

Electricians (Local 1186), February 2014
Re-connected power line to classroom building in the carpentry yard.

Electricians (Local 1186), February 2014
Traced and removed unused electrical lines in Building 12.

Carpenters, January 2014
Installed extended support for protruding AC unit on Building 72B walkway to mitigate head bumping hazard.

Masons, January, February, March, April 2014
Removed old and damaged curbs and poured new ones in Lot 3.

Floor Layers, November 2013
Cleaned, prepped and re-set dislodged piece of rubber floor covering in Building 4 entrance.

Floor Layers, November 2013
Cleaned, prepped and replaced damaged tile in TRIO Office in Building 3.

Painters, November 2013
Primed and painted hallway outside of Building 2, Room 609 where the drywall had been repaired.

Painters, October and November 2013
Prepped and painted two 12'X4.5' SeaFlight plastic seating modules.

Carpenters, October 2013
Installed deadbolt locks on men's and women's restrooms in Building 4.

Painters(ABC), October 2013
Painted Bldg. 5 courtyard walkway pillars and Dillingham Blvd. side walls of cafeteria and Bldg. 4.

Masons, October 2013
Repaired 30' of curb in Lot 3 in front of the Carpentry Shop.

Masons, September 2013
Repaired large hole in Maintenance/Print Shop driveway.

Painters (Local 179), April 2013
Prepped and painted Rooms 103 A and 103B in Building 14.

Masons, April 2013
Installed 4" conduit in Building 20 CMU wall for computer lines to be passed through from one room to the next. Conduit donated by Hawaiʻi Electricians (Local 1186).

Masons, March 2013
Formed and poured concrete in dirt area fronting Building 14 to remedy soil run off problem caused by rain.

Painters (ABC), March 2013
Prepped and painted the front exteriors of Buildings 8/9, 13, 16 and 18.

Masons, February 2013
Formed and poured curbs to divert water from Mala storage building.

Masons, December 2012
Installed a new chain post at Lot 2 mauka entrance - original had been knocked over by a truck.

Masons, November 2012
Prepped, formed and poured concrete pad for Print Shop split AC unit.

Masons, November 2012
Plastered the CMU wall that was earlier erected.

Masons, October 2012
Built 6'X30' CMU wall in the back of Building 14 which will serve as a portion of the enclosure for the Tech 1 sustainable garden.

Painters (ABC), October 2012
Primed and painted Building 12, Room 102.

Painters (ABC), September 2012
Primed and painted the plywood construction wall/barrier on the mall-side of Building 7.

Painters (ABC), September 2012
Primed and re-painted the shelter/pick up area that is located in the front of Building 7.

Masons, August 2012
Dug and poured foundation/support for pole supporting green house photo voltaic panel.

Painters (ABC), April 2012
Caulked and painted the PCATT storage building on the Kokea site.

Masons, April 2012
Layed out, formed and poured concrete ramps for the PCATT storage building on the Kokea site and east-side steps of Building 45.

Carpenters, March 2012
Built wooden dexterity and sizes exercise "toy" for Childcare Center.

Sheet Metal, March 2012
Welded nut and bolt dexterity and sizes exercise "toy" for Childcare Center.

Masons, February-April 2012
Prepared site and poured curb and slab in the back of Bldg. 14 to create space for sustainable garden and Welding Dept. waste metal bins.

Roofers , March 2012
Roofed Consruction Academy storage structure.

Masons, March 2012
Formed and poured a curb along the mauka-side wall of the Mala storage to divert rain water and eliminate flooding.

Masons, February and March 2012
Remedied water puddling problem in Gopal's green house by installing ceramic tile on the floors.

Drywall Installers, February 2012
Cleaned out Building 12 - debris from other classes and what had accumulated over the years.

Plumbers, February 2012
Hooked up instant water heater for Apprenticeship Office kitchen sink.

Roofers, February 2012
Roofed PCATT storage on Kokea property.

Carpenters, November 2011 - April 2012
Constructed and erected steel frame PCATT storage on Kokea property.

Masons, November 2011
Ordered and distributed gravel around the Mala with Bobcat. Gravel will be used to create work areas and pathways.

Drywall Installers, October 2011
Installed acoustic drop ceiling in Bldg. 12, Rm. 101

Carpenters, October 2011
Removed termite eaten door jamb, installed new jamb and re-hung door in Bldg. 12, Rm. 101 - Elevator Mechanics' workspace.

Painters (ABC), October 2011
Painted exterior front of Building 12.

Masons, October 2011
Poured slab and curb for Kokea Training Center storage building.

Carpenters, October 2011
Constructed a concrete form for Kokea Training Center storage building.

Masons, August-October, 2011
Formed and poured 200+ feet of curb along the parking Lot 3 Dillingham perimeter.

Carpenters, September 2011
Constructed, erected and dismantled stage for OSHA 40th Anniversary Celebration.

Masons, August 2011
Removed, prepared and re-set red brick in Mise en Scene sculpture/ art work.

Masons, July-November 2011
Prepared wall and applied plaster (Venetian- style) to hallways in Apprenticeship Office hallways.

Masons, May 2011
Ground, prepared and sealed cracks in Mise en Scene sculpture/ art work to prevent further water damage.

Glaziers, May 2011
Donated and cut two pieces of reinforced glass to replace broken panes in AERO facility.

Roofers, April 2011
Roofed (singly ply) the Mala storage building.

Carpenters, April - May 2011
Framed, sheathed and finished Mala storage building.

Masons, April 2011
Formed and poured slab for Mala storage building.

Masons, March 2011
Used bobcat to help move/distribute moss rock as Mala wall was constructed.

Painters (ABC), March 2011
Prepped and painted a classroom in Building 71.

Painters (ABC), February -March 2011
Prepped and painted exterior (courtyard side) of Building 71.

Masons, February 2011
Continued forming and pouring a curb that runs the length of Buildings 20 and 24.

Masons, January 2011
Formed and poured slab and curb along east end of Bldg. 12 (across Welding Shop) to create a cemented area for roll offs when they are brought on campus.

Carpenters, November 2010
Removed base cabinets, counter tops and wall cabinets in Bldg. 2, Rm. 316 in preparation for a room remodel.

Plumbers and Fitters (RC-A), November 2010
Replaced two fans and fan motors in the Bldg.4, Rm 23B central air conditioning unit.

Plumbers (ABC), November 2010
Disconnected plumbing, removed sinks and dismantled cabinets in Bldg. 2, Rm. 316 in preparation for a room remodel.

Roofers, November 2010
Roofed (fiberglass shingle) the new Kokea storage building.

Masons, November 2010
Excavated, formed and poured curb and gutter along the backside of Bldg. 24 (between driveway and planter).

Masons, October 2010
Added two steps to Kokea Training Center steps landing to remedy a potential fall/tripping hazard.

Masons, October 2010
Formed and poured a slab to extend old Kokea Apts. foundation to create more storage and workspace for classes.

Carpenters, September - December 2010
Designed and erected a steel frame storage building next to the Kokea Training Center.

Masons, September 2010
Poured a two piece concrete cover for the greenhouse sump.

Masons, September 2010
Plastered a CMU wall on the outside (Waikiki end) of the Bldg. 2 breezeway to prep for the new MELE sign.

Masons, September 2010
Fixed extreme tripping hazards in Bldg. 20 walkways (mall side) which were caused by tree roots.

Drywall, August 2010
Repaired sagging acoustic ceiling tiles runners in Bldg. 7, Rm. 433.

Masons, August 2010
Poured and finished fiberous concrete slab where the dumpster enclosure used to be and poured small slab between the incinerator lot pedestrian gate and asphalt driveway.

Carpenters, August 2010
Trimmed bottom of doors in new Hawaiian Center (new carpet) and rehung doors.

Masons, August 2010
Demolished CMU dumpster enclosure between Bldgs. 2 and 6 and prepared the site for concrete pour.

Masons, May 2010
Poured pervious concrete sidewalk along Gopal's green house with Carpentry 22 class.

Masons, May 2010
Formed and poured driveway from incinerator lot to Kokea portables.

Masons, April 2010
Formed and poured sidewalk for Kokea portables.

Masons, April 2010
Formed and poured two small slabs in Gopal's pump house.

Masons, April 2010
Plastered CMU retaining wall in front of Gopal's greenhouse.

Masons, April 2010
Erected CMU retaining wall in front of Gopal's greenhouse.

Masons, March 2010
Formed and poured slab for Gopal's greenhouse with Carpentry 22 class.

Masons, January 2010
Prepared, formed and poured concrete slab behind Building 12 for Plasterers' training.

Masons, January, February, March and April 2010
Prepared, formed and poured curb and driveway between Buildings 8 and 13.

Floor Layers, January 2010
Removed old carpet and donated and installed new carpet in Apprenticeship Conference Room.


          Ãšj Plein Air Vulcano CMU 1500 kerámia hősugárzó, 1500W termoventilátor hűtő fűtő párásító ventilátor - Jelenlegi ára: 19 990 Ft        
Általános információk:
Tisztelt Érdeklődő!
Ön jelenleg egy internetes webáruház (cég) termékét böngészi. Ennek megfelelően csere nem aktuális, az ár fix, cserébe az alábbiakat kínáljuk Önnek:
- megbízható, magyar beszerzési forrás, magyar garanciális feltételek
- minimum 1 év garancia (ennél hosszabb garanciaidőt a termék adatlapján külön jelzünk)
- zömében AZONNALI szállítás raktárról (ennél hosszabb átfutási időt a termék adatlapján jelzünk)
- magyar nyelvű használati útmutató
- eredeti, original, bontatlan csomagolású, használatlan új termék (nem csomagolássérült, nem kiállított darab)
- névre szóló ÁFA-s számla
- gondos csomagolás, értékbiztosított szállítás, futárszolgálattal
- elérhető ügyfélszolgálat, gyors és pontos válaszokkal a felmerülő kérdésekre
- indoklás nélküli elállási jog gyakorlása
- 72 órás cseregarancia, minőségi kifogás esetén
- versenyképes ár, széleskörű kínálat
További információ igénye esetén készséggel állunk az Ön rendelkezésére, és örömmel vesszük, ha a többi termékünket is megtekinti ide kattintva.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
A termék ismertetője:
Bontatlan új termék, original, fóliás gyári csomagolásban, 1 teljes év garanciával és magyar nyelvű leírással.
- 3 az 1-ben készülék: szellőztető, fűtő és párásító funkcióval
- Elektronikus funkció választás
- Természetes párásító (nem ultrahangos)
- 3 fűtési fokozat: 600W / 900W / 1500W
- Hideg levegő funkció - nyári üzem (szellőztetés)
- A párásítás bármely üzemmódban plusz funkcióként bekapcsolható
- Energiatakarékos és modern kerámia fűtőelem
- PTC technológiás fűtés
- 10 órás időzítő (félórás léptékekben)
- LED kijelző
- Ventilátoros hűtés és fűtés, alacsony zajszinttel
- Termosztát
- Kivehető légszűrő
- Készülék mérete: 400 x 150 x 340 mm
- Súlya: 4, 5 kg
- Színe: fekete
- Vezérlés: digitális nyomógombos (kezelőpanel a tetején)
- Be / kikapcsoló gomb
- Elektronikus fűtőteljesítmény választás
- Magas hatásfokú PTC kerámia fűtőelem
- Biztonsági termosztát (túlmelegedés ellen védett)
- Hideg hordozófül
- Tápellátás: 230 V / 50 Hz
- 3 teljesítmény szint: 600W / 900 W / 1500 W
- Tisztítható légszűrő______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Garancia: 12 hónap
Elérhetőség: RAKTÁRON van, AZONNAL szállítható
A termékhez elérhető szállítási módokat és aktuális árakat (ez termékenként eltérő lehet) a szállítási információk fülre kattintva tekintheti meg!
Új Plein Air Vulcano CMU 1500 kerámia hősugárzó, 1500W termoventilátor hűtő fűtő párásító ventilátor
Jelenlegi ára: 19 990 Ft
Az aukció vége: 2017-08-14 09:11
          [urls] Measuring the ROI of Software Process Improvement        
Saturday, September 18, 2004
Dateline: China
 
The following is a sampling of my top ten "urls" for the past couple/few weeks.  By signing up with Furl (it's free), anyone can subscribe to an e-mail feed of ALL my urls (about 100-250 per week) -- AND limit by subject (e.g., ITO) and/or rating (e.g., articles rated "Very Good" or "Excellent").  It's also possible to receive new urls as an RSS feed.
 
All of the top ten are PDFsClick on the link to read the abstract for each paper.
 
Note: Off to California for a couple of weeks.  Probably no new, original postings until after the October national holiday in China.  (I get a three week break from writing for this blog, but I'll still be writing columns for the AlwaysOn Network.)
 
Top Honors:
 
Measuring the ROI of Software Process Improvement (relatively speaking, very popular among Furl viewers; highly accessible article with a lot of substance and pointers)
 
Other best new selections (in order of popularity as determined by Furl views, then alphabetically):
 
A Framework for Off-The-Shelf Software Component Development and Maintenance Processes (this was THE most popular paper, although I liked the ROI article better; superb info, good guidelines, lots of food for thought)
Agent-Based e-Supply Chain Decision Support (not as geeky as it sounds; lead author is with Carnegie Mellon's e-Supply Chain Management Laboratory & Institute for e-Commerce)
B2B E-Commerce Stages of Growth: the Strategic Imperatives (a look at some case studies; provides some insights into B2B adoption and diffusion)
Creating an Open Agent Environment for Context-Aware M-Commerce (from the Mobile Commerce Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon <no, this isn't necessarily CMU week>; I have a lot of doubts about this stuff, but it's worth firing a few neurons and giving it a spin)
Development and Evaluation of Software Process Improvement Methods (Dissertation, 190 pp.) (superb overviews sprinkled with case studies; it was tough to choose between this dissertation and the ROI paper for top honors)
Deriving a Diffusion Framework for Web-Based Shopping Systems (a bit of a technical flavor, but not too technical; puts e-shopping in a broader perspective, e.g., relative to EDI)
* Exploring Defect Causes in Products Developed by Virtual Teams (to all SIs developing a GDM - global delivery model - READ THIS!!; perhaps the most important paper among my top ten)
* Intelligent Support for Software Release Planning (a corporate technical paper describing a very useful software development management tool; see also the Release Planner (tm) home page)
 
And my PERSONAL favorite:
 
> The Banality of Google (good for some laughs)
 
and many, many more ...
 
Cheers,
 
David Scott Lewis
President & Principal Analyst
IT E-Strategies, Inc.
Menlo Park, CA & Qingdao, China
 
http://www.itestrategies.com (current blog postings optimized for MSIE6.x)
http://tinyurl.com/2r3pa (access to blog content archives in China)
http://tinyurl.com/2azkh (current blog postings for viewing in other browsers and for access to blog content archives in the US & ROW)
http://tinyurl.com/2hg2e (AvantGo channel)
 
 
To automatically subscribe click on http://tinyurl.com/388yf .
 

          CMU News: Hope & Glory’s statement scores high on word count, but placates no one        
none
          CMU News: Prince estate could get new special administrator, possibly to pursue legal action        
none
          CMU News: Y Not festival confirms 50% refund for all ticket holders        
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          CMU News: Craig David puts some t-shirts in a capsule        
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          CMU News: Former Kobalt President now CEO at Tidal        
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          CMU News: New music scheduler for local stations at Wireless Group        
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          CMU News: Royal Blood and Wolf Alice design t-shirts for cancer charity        
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          CMU News: Liam Gallagher would rather be promoting a new Oasis album        
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          CMU News: New Liverpool festival cancels day two after queues dominate day one        
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          CMU News: Taylor Swift expected to testify in photo grope case        
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          CMU News: US judge says Kickass criminal case should proceed        
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          CMU News: FanFair publishes a guide for getting a refund from Viagogo        
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          CMU News: Attitude Is Everything adapts its Charter scheme for grass roots venues        
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          CMU News: Danny Jones likely to replace Gavin Rossdale on The Voice        
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          CMU News: Gordon Burns talks ’24-7 Rock Star Shit’ with The Cribs for Vevo        
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          CMU News: Conservative MP planning Glastonbury for Tories        
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          CMU News: The Kidd Creole accused of murdering homeless man in New York        
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          CMU News: Suge Knight pleads not-guilty to latest set of criminal charges        
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          CMU News: Universal Publishing signs Roxette’s Per Gessle        
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          CMU News: Warner/Chappell signs Josh Record        
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          CMU News: LeeFest offers free tickets to Y Not attendees to “restore faith in festivals”        
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          CMU News: Wasted Talent hires Phil Alexander to oversee development of Kerrang!        
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          CMU News: Justin Bieber responds to speculation about his cancelled tour – sort of        
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          CMU Beef Of The Week: Simon Cowell v One Direction solo careers        
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          Catalysts Developed at CMU Remove Toxic Chemical from Water        

Image of Terrence J. Collins

Carnegie Mellon University chemist Terrence J. Collins has developed an approach that quickly and cheaply removes more than 99 percent of bisphenol A (BPA) from water. BPA, a ubiquitous and dangerous chemical used in the manufacturing of many plastics, is found in water sources around the world.

In a paper published in Green Chemistry, Collins' research team and collaborators at the University of Auckland and Oregon State University also compiled evidence of BPA's presence in a multitude of products and water sources, as well as the chemical's toxicity. The research team builds a strong case for the need to effectively remediate BPA-contaminated water, especially industrial waste streams and landfill runoff, and they offer a simple solution.

BPA is a chemical used primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. Its use is widespread — BPA can be found in products from DVDs and eyeglass lenses to cash register receipts — and people and wildlife are regularly exposed.

BPA is dangerous because it mimics estrogen, a naturally occurring hormone, and can affect the body's endocrine system. Studies in fish, mammals and human cells have shown that BPA adversely affects brain and nervous system development, growth and metabolism, and the reproductive system.

Concerns over BPA's health effects prompted manufacturers to start making BPA-free products like baby bottles and water bottles starting in 2010. Many BPA replacements also have similar toxicity to BPA itself.

"BPA replacements have often not been adequately tested despite the fact that testing is easy to do," said Collins, the Teresa Heinz Professor of Green Chemistry at Carnegie Mellon. Collins said environmental health scientists and green chemists developed a methodology called the Tiered Protocol for Endocrine Disruption (TiPED) for identifying endocrine disruptors to the highest levels of contemporary science, which was published in Green Chemistry in 2013.

With more than 15 billion pounds of BPA being produced annually, BPA contamination and cleanup present a significant challenge.

"There is no escape from BPA — for any living creature," Collins said. "The massive global use of BPA burdens an already overstrained water treatment infrastructure and most BPA water releases simply never reach a water treatment facility. Our approach has high potential to be a much better remediation strategy for BPA-contaminated waste streams."

BPA-contaminated water such as industrial waste or landfill runoff may or may not be treated before being released into the environment or to wastewater treatment plants.

Collins' team offers a simple, effective and cheap cleanup solution. Their system involves a group of catalysts called TAML activators, small molecules that mimic oxidizing enzymes. When combined with hydrogen peroxide, TAML activators very effectively break down harmful chemicals in water.

In the current 25-page paper, the researchers demonstrate the efficacy and safety of TAML activators in breaking down BPA. Adding TAMLs and hydrogen peroxide to water heavily contaminated with BPA resulted in a 99 percent reduction of BPA within 30 minutes at near neutral pH, which is the pH norm for wastewater treatment.

TAML treatment at this pH caused BPA to assemble into larger units called oligomers, which clump together and precipitate out of the water. According to Collins, the oligomers could be filtered and disposed of in a BPA water treatment facility. Most importantly, extensive studies by Collins and his collaborators found the oligomers are themselves not harmful. The nature of the bonds that stick the BPA molecules together doesn't allow the oligomers to revert to BPA.

To ensure the safety of the decontaminated water, including the oligomers, the researchers tested it with TiPED assays. They found the TAML-treated BPA water did not show estrogen activity or cause abnormalities in yeast and developing zebrafish embryos.

The researchers also tested the efficacy of TAML treatment on BPA-laden water at a pH of 11. At this higher pH, there was a greater than 99.9 percent reduction in BPA within 15 minutes. In contrast with pH 8.5 treatment, the BPA molecules were destroyed, and no oligomers were detected.

"Because TAML/hydrogen peroxide treatment eliminates BPA from water so easily at concentrations that are similar to a variety of waste streams including paper plant processing solutions and landfill leachate, assuming the lab studies transfer to the real world, we can now offer a new and simple procedure for reducing BPA exposures worldwide," Collins said.

Additional authors of the study include Bethany Drake, Ryan Malecky, Matthew DeNardo, Matthew Mills, Soumen Kundu, Alexander Ryabov, Evan Beach and Colin Horwitz of Carnegie Mellon; Michael Simonich, Lisa Truong and Robert L. Tanguay of Oregon State; and Yusuf Onundi, L. James Wright and Naresh Singhal of the University of Auckland.

The research and the researchers were supported by Carnegie Mellon, the University of Auckland, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Carnegie Mellon's Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research, the Heinz Endowments and the National Science Foundation (CHE-0130903).


          Challenges, Adventure Empower Argawal        

Aditya Argarwal

Aditya Agarwal is a leader in Silicon Valley. In December, the Carnegie Mellon University alumnus — one of the earliest employees at Facebook — was named chief technology officer for Dropbox, where he supervises hundreds of engineers creating innovations for the online storage company.

Growing up, Agarwal was always the new student in school. His father, a chemical engineer, moved the family from their home base in India to Cameroon, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand.

That globe-trotting, which culminated in the family’s immigration to the United States, helped Agarwal develop an outgoing personality and a sense of adventure — important assets in the startup world.

“My dad loved pursuing new adventures. My desire to be at startups is in no small part from what I learned from him in my childhood,” Agarwal said.

Agarwal said studying at Carnegie Mellon gave him the problem-solving skills to thrive.

“CMU teaches you that computer science is not a rote, mechanical field but a profession deeply rooted in creativity,” Agarwal said. “The best people in the profession are closer to artists than engineers.”

Teaching professor Mark Stehlik, assistant dean for outreach at CMU's School of Computer Science, remembered Agarwal as “strong from the get-go.” After completing his undergraduate computer science degree in three years, Agarwal was one of five students to complete the fifth-ear master’s degree program, which included Ph.D. classes. He also spent four semesters in a row working as a teaching assistant.

“He came here on a mission,” Stehlik said. “He is a poster child for the kind of student we attract here, the kind of student we make better here and the kind of student who is a leader in our industry.” Agarwal also found love at CMU — Ruchi Sanghvi. Like her husband, Sanghvi is a software engineer, entrepreneur and investor. She previously was vice president of operations at Dropbox and is now involved in South Park Commons.

“The most important thing you can do is to marry someone smarter than you so they can challenge you,” Agarwal said of Sanghvi, who was the first female engineer at Facebook. “I’m extremely grateful that I met her at CMU.”

In 2005, the two engineers headed west for jobs at Facebook. On his third day in the office, Mark Zuckerberg walked up to Agarwal, then a 23-year-old software engineer, and said, “You should build a Facebook search engine.”

Argawal said the challenge empowered him.

“We place these somewhat artificial constraints on what we can do until we look at someone like Mark Zuckerberg, who is fearless,” Argawal said. “The stars were aligned for me to have an opportunity at a generational company like Facebook. It was like getting strapped into a rocketship. That gave me experiences that allowed me to have a big impact at places like Dropbox.”

At Dropbox, he has helped the company celebrate several record-breaking financial achievements. Dropbox has 500 million users worldwide and teams in over half of the Fortune 500 companies.

Agarwal and his team have made project collaboration easier through a tool called Paper, which allows users to comment, add video and sound clips to a project and update changes in real time.

“If you could cut down on the amount of time you waste at work — reading emails, managing your calendar, keeping in sync with people — we believe we can unleash an immense amount of productivity from the most brilliant people,” he said.

Argarwal recently announced via Facebook that he was leaving Dropbox to join Sanghvi at South Park Commons.

“I am very excited by the ever-increasing scope of technology to fundamentally improve people’s lives around the world,” he said in the post. “I have been fortunate to be part of seminal companies like Facebook and Dropbox so the next act has a lot to live up to.”

This story has been updated to reflect Argarwal's recent move to South Park Commons.


          Coal Storage Takes Toll on People Living, Working Nearby         

Coal piles in storage

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found unburned coal increases air pollution and can affect the communities where it is transported and stored. The results are the first to quantify the impact of unburned coal on people who live and work nearby.

Akshaya Jha, an assistant professor at the Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy, and Nicholas Muller, the Lester and Judith Lave Professor of Economics in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy and Tepper School of Business, presented their findings in “Handle with Care: the Local Air Pollution Costs of Coal Storage,” a paper distributed by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

“Coal does not have to be burned to have an impact on the local environment and the health of residents. In our research, the effects from unburned coal appear only within 25 miles from the coal pile. That means, if you see a coal stockpile, you are within the range where it could be affecting you,” said Jha, who graduated from CMU in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in economics and statistics. The work was conducted as part of the Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation.

The researchers analyzed coal stockpile data from 2002 to 2012 from the roughly 260 plants within 25 miles of an air quality monitor in the United States and controlled for wind, temperature and rainfall numbers using data from the National Climatic Data Center.

They estimated that a 10 percent increase in stockpiles at coal-fired power plants caused air pollution to rise by 0.07 percent for communities up to 25 miles away, and downwind from, these plants. Then they showed that a 10 percent increase in atmospheric particulate matter that has a diameter less than 2.5 micrograms per cubic meters raised the average adult mortality rates by 1.1 percent and average infant mortality rates by 6.6 percent in those communities.

Jha said the stockpiles can be a source of fine particulates either due to wind blowing over them or from being moved and handled at the plant site. The fine particulate matter can get into people’s lungs and hearts, affecting cardiovascular and respiratory health.

Muller said urban and low-income communities are more likely to be affected because these communities are more likely to be near coal storage and transportation. The research shows the majority of coal dust derives from stockpiles traveling by railcar, from coal moved by conveyor belt from the train to stockpiles and from the coal stored in uncovered piles at the site of the coal-fired plants.

“In 2015, Akshaya began pulling the data together, and we started running the initial analyses,” Muller said. “We continued to find a significant relationship between coal storage, deliveries and measures of ambient, fine particulate matter. No matter what angle we took to the analysis the effect persisted.”

Current practices to spray coal stockpiles with water or a topper agent help to suppress coal dust, but its presence remains even after applying these methods, Muller said.


          Five Projects Selected To UPLift Campus Life         

Image of students during carrying construction materials

The selected projects from Carnegie Mellon University's inaugural UPLift Challenge will offer ways to help the Pittsburgh campus community have fun, relax and recharge.

Last spring, the Task Force on the CMU Experience invited students, faculty and staff to submit creative ideas to make common spaces more engaging, collaborative and fun. The term UPLift refers to University Place-making, or the idea that the right kind of physical spaces can meaningfully influence community and culture. Proposals were encouraged to align with three overarching themes: Health and Wellness; Crossroads of the Mind; and Recognizably CMU.

"The UPLift Challenge celebrates the power of our community to suggest meaningful placemaking projects that benefit the entire campus," said Interim President Farnam Jahanian. "Each of these winning proposals reflects the thoughtful creativity that defines a CMU problem-solver."

A faculty-staff-student committee selected five ideas from among the 59 proposals to be funded and implemented by the university during the 2017-2018 academic year. The committee included representation from the Campus Infrastructure working group of the Task Force on the CMU Experience, including co-chairs Kristen Kurland, faculty in the College of Fine Arts and Heinz College, and Marsha Lovett, director of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation.

"We've made a lot of big infrastructure investments on our campus, but I think UPLift is a wonderful example of how we can do a lot with a little and really impact the day-to-day experience on our campus," said Daragh Byrne, assistant teaching professor of architecture who spearheaded the UPLift project as a member of the Campus Infrastructure working group.

The selected projects are:

"Dodo" Hammock Cluster and Nap Map
School of Architecture Assistant Professor Stefan Gruber and Master of Urban Design students Yidan Gong and Chun Zhen proposed a dedicated space for outdoor naps. Inspired by the French word for nap, "dodo," this project will install a cluster of hammocks in a common outdoor space on campus. A corresponding Nap Map also will be developed to highlight the best spaces on campus to catch some shut-eye.

Enhancement of Gates Outdoor Space
UPLift will enhance the seating area for the outdoor space east of the Gates Center, adding new benches and an outdoor grill to create more opportunities for community gatherings. This project complements planned renovations to the existing volleyball court outside Gates, which the School of Computer Science Dean's Office will resurface to create a more resilient playing area. This effort was proposed by Angela Lusk, program director of Student Affairs Wellness Initiatives; Elizabeth Rappaport, associate director of Student Activities; and James Skees, director of building facilities for the School of Computer Science.

Games for Health
Proposed by School of Design students Michael Arnold Mages and Francis Carter, Games for Health involves a series of playful, strategically placed "micro-intervention" signs throughout campus to share healthy tips and exercise and wellness activities. Signs, games and designated healthy lifestyle zones aim to encourage students and staff to participate in playful activities that allow them to practice active living, relieve stress or become more attuned to their bodies and sense of self.

Campus Swingset
Proposed by recent computer science graduate Ariana Weinstock, a swing set uniquely designed for the Carnegie Mellon campus will be added to the lawn space behind Donner Hall, known as "Donner Ditch," for anyone who wants to pick up their feet and relive playground childhood moments.

Wean Stairwell Installation
Proposed by Geoffrey McGovern, a lecturer in the Institute for Politics and Strategy, a creative light display will be installed in the stairwell between the fourth and fifth floors in Wean Hall. As a study in color theory, the 40 color-changing tubes will present a continuous pattern that reveals itself as visitors use the stairwell. This renovation will improve this busy corridor, while creating a conversation piece.

These grassroots initiatives complement other projects to improve the Pittsburgh campus, including the recently announced learning spaces renovation project, the transformation of the Sorrells Library last spring, and the addition of 25 colorful Adirondack chairs donated by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in celebration of its 25th anniversary.

The UPLift Challenge is dedicated to the work of the late University Professor Larry Cartwright, who worked with civil and environmental engineering students to enhance the student experience and Pittsburgh campus through various building projects.

The next round of the UPLift Challenge will be announced in the coming months.


          Past Provost Angel Jordan Helped Lead CMU’s Rise to Prominence        

Angel Jordan

Angel Jordan, who played a pivotal role in establishing Carnegie Mellon University as one of the leading engineering, computer science and robotics institutions in the world, died Friday. He was 86.

Angel JordanJordan, University Professor Emeritus and a member of the prestigious National Academy of Engineering, served as CMU’s provost from 1983 to 1991, and was dean of the College of Engineering from 1979 to 1983.

Among his many leadership roles, he was also head of the Electrical Engineering department, where he was instrumental in establishing the college’s focused strengths in engineering design and computer engineering. He made key hires as department head, establishing CMU as highly ranked nationally in several key areas: computer engineering (Sam Fuller, Dan Siewiorek), magnetic recording later an NSF Engineering Center DSSC (Mark Kryder), and design automation (Steve Director, Ron Rohrer) — all five became members of the National Academy of Engineering. He had founding roles in several of CMU’s signature programs and institutions, including the School of Computer Science, the Software Engineering Institute and the Robotics Institute.

“Angel helped shape the university we know today, and set it on a trajectory to global prominence,” said Farnam Jahanian, CMU’s interim president. “Beyond his landmark achievements, his decades-long dedication to Carnegie Mellon and to colleagues and students here made him a beloved member of this community.”

"Angel Jordan helped to define the spirit of Carnegie Mellon — technically excellent, creative and entrepreneurial. We will miss him dearly, but he has embedded in us these important qualities that make us Carnegie Mellon," said College of Engineering Dean James H Garrett, Jr.

“I am heartbroken, he has had a tremendous impact on ECE,  and the entire university.  I fondly remember when he would stop by to see how I was doing as a young department head,” said Jelena Kovačević, Hamerschlag University Professor and head of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department.

Jordan was dean of the College of Engineering in 1979 when he joined with Raj Reddy, a computer science professor, and Tom Murrin of Westinghouse Electric Corp. to create the world’s first Robotics Institute. The institute was the first to establish a Ph.D. program in robotics and remains the world’s largest academic robotics research center.

Reddy, who would become the first director of the Robotics Institute and would later serve as SCS dean, said Jordan’s roles as head of the electrical engineering department, dean of engineering and provost placed him at the center of some of the most important transformations of the university from 1970 to 2000.

“He was actively involved in all of it,” Reddy said. Even after his retirement, Jordan was an active participant in the Software Engineering Institute, he said, continuing to direct programs there.

Later, as provost, Jordan championed the idea of elevating the Computer Science Department to the college level, creating the School of Computer Science, which is consistently ranked at the top of U.S. graduate programs in computer science and whose graduates are highly prized by industry.

Andrew Moore, dean of CMU’s School of Computer Science, said many in the school are grateful for his huge contributions to CMU and SCS.
 
“I know that throughout my entire career I have benefited from his warm advice, and the way that he was a role model in being a warm and decent human being,” Moore said.

Jordan also played a lead role, along with A. Nico Habermann, head of the Computer Science Department, in convincing the Department of Defense to establish its Software Engineering Institute (SEI) at CMU.

For over three decades, the (SEI) has been helping government and industry organizations to acquire, develop, operate and sustain software systems that are innovative, affordable, enduring and trustworthy. The SEI is a Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) sponsored by the Defense Department.

“Nico and I knew something big was about to happen,” Jordan recalled in 2014. “There was competition. We did a lot of lobbying. Some people called it the ‘software war,’ but we won.”

Jordan was born in Pamplona, Spain, and received an undergraduate degree in physics at University of Zaragoza in 1952. In 1956, he came to Pittsburgh to what was then the Carnegie Institute of Technology (later CMU) to earn a Ph.D. in electrical engineering.

He joined the faculty as an assistant professor of electrical engineering after receiving his degree in 1959. He became a full professor in 1966. He would chair the electrical engineering program from 1969 through 1978, before becoming dean of the college.

His own research interests primarily focused on semiconductor devices; integrated circuits; thin films; environmental and biomedical instrumentation; and intelligent sensors. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986, “for contributions to solid-state device research, and for innovative leadership in engineering education.”

Jordan became a professor emeritus in 2003. In May 2017, several family members were on hand as the College of Engineering celebrated the awarding of the first Angel Jordan Early Career Professorship to Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Vyas Sekar.

Services will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Angel Jordan Early Career Professorship fund.


          Michael Trick Appointed Dean of CMU in Qatar        

Image of Michael Trick

Michael Trick, the Harry B. and James H. Higgins Professor of Operations Research at Carnegie Mellon University's Tepper School of Business, has been appointed dean of Carnegie Mellon in Qatar, effective Sept. 1.

Trick, a Tepper School of Business faculty member since 1989, has held numerous leadership positions within the school, including senior associate dean for faculty and research for the past three years. His interests focus on operations research and business analytics with a specialization in computational methods in optimization.

"Throughout his career as an internationally recognized scholar and leader, Michael Trick has demonstrated a deep appreciation for the value of a borderless education to advance human knowledge and the power of collaboration to motivate and inspire others," said CMU Interim President Farnam Jahanian. "These values will serve him well as dean of Carnegie Mellon in Qatar. As we look ahead to a bright future for CMU-Q under his leadership, I remain deeply appreciative for the support of the Qatar Foundation, whose vision for the future is grounded in the expansion of educational opportunity for all people."

At the invitation of the Qatar Foundation, Carnegie Mellon joined Education City in 2004 to deliver educational and research programs that will support and contribute to the long-term development of Qatar's knowledge-based economy. Today, Carnegie Mellon Qatar offers undergraduate programs in biological sciences, business administration, computational biology, computer science and information systems. More than 400 students from 40 countries are studying at Carnegie Mellon Qatar, and nearly 700 students have graduated from CMU-Q in 10 classes.

"With his long and accomplished career as a scholar, educator and mentor, Michael Trick will bring exceptional vision to Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar, which remains a valued partner in empowering our nation's next generation of leaders, entrepreneurs, thinkers and problem solvers," said Her Excellency Sheikha Hind bint Hamad Al Thani, vice chairperson and CEO of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community Development. "As we proudly celebrate more than twenty years since the inception of Education City, I look forward to Dean Trick's contribution to its continued success as a hub for knowledge, innovation and research."

From 2011 to 2014, Trick provided strategic direction for the Tepper School's educational mission as senior associate dean for education. He also has key roles on several university committees, including the University Research Council and the Faculty Committee on Diversity, Inclusion and Development.

"As Mike's close colleague at Tepper for many years, I can attest to his long-standing commitment to a nurturing research and learning environment that is driven by excellence," said Interim Provost Laurie Weingart. "I look forward to working with Mike as he takes on this important academic leadership position and assures our continued success in Education City."

A fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), Trick is president of the International Federation of Operational Research Societies, an umbrella organization of 50 operational research societies whose 51 members represent more than 30,000 academics, professionals and students in more than 45 countries.

"CMU-Q plays an incredibly important role both to CMU and to the region," Trick said. "Over the last 10 years, the students and faculty have advanced CMU's international reputation and have made significant contributions to the economic development of the region. I look forward to working with our partner institutions to build on the strong legacy of the past to chart a transformative journey over the next decade. I am honored and grateful for this opportunity."

The author of more than 50 professional publications and editor of six volumes of refereed articles, Trick has consulted extensively with the United States Postal Service on supply chain design, with Major League Baseball on scheduling issues and with telecommunications firms on bandwidth allocation issues.

Trick received a doctoral degree in industrial and systems engineering and a master's degree in operations research from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Trick will succeed Ilker Baybars, who stepped down as dean in June and who will return to his duties as the George Leland Bach Chair of Operations Management in the Tepper School.


          CMU Team Wins Fourth “World Series of Hacking" Competition        

Image

At a time when the need and demand for cybersecurity expertise is at its highest, Carnegie Mellon University's hacking team won its fourth "World Series of Hacking" title this weekend at the DefCon security conference in Las Vegas. With four titles under its belt, the team has more wins than any other team in the 21-year history of the international competition.

"The skills and deep knowledge required to win these contests mimic those needed by governments and businesses alike to anticipate and prevent cyberattacks," said David Brumley, director of Carnegie Mellon's CyLab Security and Privacy Institute, and a faculty adviser to the team.

This year's field consisted of 15 teams from over 10 countries. To earn a spot at the table, each team had to win a series of qualifying competitions that were held over the past year. Carnegie Mellon's team, the Plaid Parliament of Pwning, was granted a spot for being last year's champions.

For the past 21 years, teams of hackers from scores of different countries have qualified for and competed in DefCon's digital "Capture the Flag" competition. Over the course of the three-day competition, teams try to break into competitors' servers while protecting their own. During successful breaches, teams grab virtual "flags" and earn points.

"More now than ever, the skills used in this competition are becoming more relevant because cybersecurity is impacting all of our lives," said Tim Becker, a team captain and fourth-year computer science student. "It's important that people have a place like this to hone their skills. The more we practice, the better prepared we'll be in the real world in dealing with actual cyberattacks."

Becker launched his hacking career as a high school student in 2013 after participating in CyLab's "picoCTF," an online capture the flag competition for middle and high school students.

"I was competing with some friends, and we didn't expect to do very well. But after the first day of the competition, we were in the top 10," Becker said. "That's when I realized, maybe we're pretty good at this."

Becker's team ended up finishing third overall in the 2013 competition, and that set him off to study computer security in college. Four DefCon wins later, Becker is on track toward a career in cybersecurity.

The Carnegie Mellon hacking team formed in 2009 and began competing in DefCon's Capture the Flag competition in 2010. The team previously won the contest in 2013, 2014 and 2016.


          Students "Speak Up!" About Undergraduate Research        

Image of students who won this year's Speak Up! competition

Discuss weeks of research in three minutes or less. That is the challenge 75 undergraduate Carnegie Mellon University students accepted for the Speak Up! presentation on July 12.

Conceived as a cross-disciplinary communication skills seminar for the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) program, Speak Up! coaches and supports students as they learn how to effectively communicate the importance of their ideas and work to a variety of audiences.

Stephanie Wallach, assistant vice provost for Undergraduate Education, and her team in the Undergraduate Research Office (URO) partnered with colleagues from the College of Engineering, the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Global Communications Center, and the Career and Professional Development Center, to organize the competition. Now in its second year, Speak Up! is modeled after the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition for graduate students.

"We felt there was a gap in our talented undergraduate students' abilities to communicate their research to a variety of people, in a variety of settings, in a variety of ways," Wallach said. "Summer was an especially good opportunity — when students have dedicated time — to focus on those ever-important communication skills and strategies."

Students engaged in summer research participated in four weekly workshops led by faculty and staff members that covered topics such as how to communicate about research in sound bites and the importance of highlighting the novelty of the research.

"Summer research is a true immersive experience and plays an especially important role in the undergraduate education at Carnegie Mellon, enabling students to build depth in a field and deepen faculty ties," Wallach said.

CMU students have the opportunity to apply for funding for summer research from a variety of university programs such the URO's SURF, the Dietrich College Honors Fellowship program, the Provost's Summer Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship program, the College of Engineering's Jennings Fund for Summer Undergraduate Research Experience and the Math Department's Jennings Family Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships.

Necia Werner, associate teaching professor of English, played a lead role in organizing the workshops.

"Now more than ever, it is vital for students to communicate about their research clearly and concisely to a wide variety of audiences," Werner said.

Jamei Wang, a fifth-year senior studying chemical engineering and biomedical engineering, took first place in the competition. She is developing a synthetic membrane to reset broken bones with Mechanical Engineering Professor Kenji Shimada and Ying Ying Wu, a computational engineering and robotics lab postdoctoral research associate.

"I learned how to more effectively communicate my research findings to the everyday person by using techniques such as metaphors and diagrams," Wang said.

Meredith Schmehl, a senior majoring in neuroscience and cognitive psychology, took second place by presenting research she conducted on the different parts of the brain that change when speaking.

"I now feel more confident about my ability to convey the main idea of my research to others," said Schmehl, who works with Assistant Biological Sciences Professor Sandra Kuhlman.

Jenny Gao, a senior chemistry major, took third place with her novel approach to bone regeneration. She is conducting her research with Assistant Professor of Chemistry Stefanie Sydlik.

Yousuf Soliman, a senior computer science and mathematical sciences major, received the People's Choice Award. Soliman's research is on optimal placement of cone singularities. He is working with Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Robotics Keenan Crane.


          Entrepreneurs in Portugal Learn from CMU Experts        

Image of the 2017 inRes program participants and mentors

First responders in Portugal may soon benefit from wearable technology being tested and developed by a startup that taps the entrepreneurial expertise at Carnegie Mellon University.

"Helping those who risk their lives to help us is our motto," said Rui Rosas, who created WESENSU with Duarte Dias. "The inRes program is the perfect mission scenario for a customer-centric company like us, to get closer and grow together with our stakeholders."

Rosas and Dias, who are working on a vest and mobile monitor to track First Responders' vital signs, are participating in the "Entrepreneur in Residence Program," also known as inRes, at the Carnegie Mellon Portugal Program, a partnership between CMU and the government of Portugal, funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT). A prototype of WESENSU's vest has been tested at CMU's Silicon Valley campus and by Portuguese police, firefighters and air traffic controllers.

"As we have seen in previous editions, inRes allows the teams close contact with specialists, mentors, potential users, customers and investors," said João Claro, national director of the CMU Portugal Program, who coordinates inRes with Alípio Torre, assistant director of CMU Portugal. "This has many positive consequences for the projects."

Image of Tainara Freitas from Tourinsta

WESENSU is one of four startups working with experts at CMU's Swartz Center for Entrepreneurship, a central hub for the university's entrepreneurial programs and activities. The project is a result of CMU Portugal Entrepreneurial Research Initiative.

CMU mentors are Robb Myer, entrepreneur-in-residence at CMU and founder and former president of NoWait, which was acquired by Yelp; Kit Needham, entrepreneur-in-residence at CMU and associate director of Project Olympus; Tara Brandstad, associate director of CMU's Center for Technology Transfer and Enterprise Creation (CTTEC); and Reed McManigle, senior manager of business development and licensing at CMU's CTTEC. Dave Mawhinney, executive director of the Swartz Center has been involved with inRes since its beginning.

The program, funded by FCT, includes workshops and discussions in Porto and Lisbon, Portugal, in July and August. The teams then visit CMU's Pittsburgh campus for six weeks to fine-tune their business models and technologies before travelling to Silicon Valley for a week to network with other innovators, startups and venture capitalists.

Joining WESENSU in the fourth edition of inRes are Connect Robotics, a drone delivery service that includes standalone air traffic management technology; Caterpillar Math, digital games to increase mathematical skills; and Tourinsta, an app to improve tourists' experiences.


          CMU Method Enables Telescoping Devices To Bend and Twist        

Image of shapes based on lizards.

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have found a way to design telescoping structures that can bend and twist, enabling robots of various shapes to collapse themselves for transport, enter tiny spaces and reach over or around large obstacles.

The researchers devised algorithms that can take a suggested shape that includes curves or twists and design a telescoping structure to match. They also created a design tool that enables even a novice to create complex, collapsible assemblies.

The design possibilities range from something as practical as a rapidly deployable shelter to fanciful creations, such as a telescoping lizard with legs, head and tail that readily retract.

"Telescoping mechanisms are very useful for designing deployable structures," said Keenan Crane, assistant professor of computer science. "They can collapse down into really small volumes and, when you need them, are easily expanded."

But most telescoping devices are similar to a pirate's telescope — a set of straight, nested cylinders. In this study, Crane, along with Stelian Coros, assistant professor of robotics, and Christopher Yu, a Ph.D. student in computer science, set out to find out what kinds of telescoping shapes are possible and to develop computational methods for designing and fabricating those shapes.

The researchers will present their findings at the SIGGRAPH Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques, the world's largest and most influential meeting on computer graphics and interactive techniques, July 30-Aug. 3 in Los Angeles.

Images that mimick lizards
The researchers explored a number of designs in simulation, including shapes mimicking lizards and other animals.

They found that spherical, ring-shaped and helical telescopes are possible. Once a designer selects the desired curve for a structure, their algorithms can devise a telescoping structure that can extend or contract without bumping into itself and that includes no wasted space between the nested pieces. They also devised connectors that would combine several such telescopes into a larger assembly.

CMU researchers devised algorithms that can take a target shape that includes curves or twists and design a telescoping structure to match. They also created a design tool that enables even a novice to create complex, collapsible assemblies

Though the nested sections can have a variety of cross-sections, they focused on those with circular cross sections, just like the pirate's spyglass. Once extended, they noted, the circular cross sections make it possible for each of the curved segments to rotate, adding 3-D twists to what otherwise would be 2-D shapes.

Another was a robotic arm and claw that could emerge from a compact cylinder and reach up and over obstacles.

The simulations also enabled the researchers to analyze how the telescoping devices might move if they were actuated.

"We found that characters with telescoping parts are capable of surprisingly organic movements," Coros said.

The National Science Foundation supported this research. A download of the paper is available.

 


          CMU Hacking Team Looks for Win at DefCon        

Image of a male student at a computer

At a time when cybersecurity pervades news headlines on a daily basis, a team of cybersecurity experts from Carnegie Mellon University may grab an unprecedented win this weekend in Las Vegas.

Carnegie Mellon's competitive hacking team, the Plaid Parliament of Pwning, is looking to win an unprecedented fourth title at this year's DefCon cybersecurity conference. Never before has a team ever won more than three times in DefCon's 21-year history of what many refer to as the "World Series of Hacking."

"More now than ever, the skills used in this competition are becoming more relevant because cybersecurity is impacting all of our lives," said Tim Becker, a team captain and senior in the School of Computer Science. "It's important that people have a place like this to hone their skills. The more we practice, the better prepared we'll be in the real world in dealing with actual cyberattacks."

For the past 21 years, teams of hackers from scores of different countries around the world have qualified for and competed in DefCon's digital "Capture the Flag" competition. Over the course of the three-day competition, teams try to break into competitors' servers while protecting their own. During successful breaches, teams grab virtual "flags" and earn points.

This year's competitor field will consist of 15 teams from over 10 countries. All teams had to win a series of qualifying competitions to receive a spot at DefCon's competition.

"The skills and deep knowledge required to win these contests mimic those needed by governments and businesses alike to anticipate and prevent cyberattacks," said David Brumley, the director of Carnegie Mellon's CyLab Security and Privacy Institute, and a faculty adviser to the team.

Becker launched his hacking career as a high school student in 2013 after participating in CyLab's "picoCTF," an online capture the flag competition for middle and high school students.

"I was competing with some friends, and we didn't expect to do very well. But after the first day of the competition, we were in the top 10," Becker said. "That's when I realized, maybe we're pretty good at this."

Becker's team ended up finishing third overall in the 2013 competition, and that set him off to study computer security in college. Three DefCon wins later, Becker is hoping to set records.

"Every year, the competition at DefCon is stronger and the challenges are harder," Becker said. "We have a shot, but it's not going to be easy."

The Carnegie Mellon hacking team formed in 2009 and began competing in DefCon's Capture the Flag competition in 2010. The team won the contest in 2013, 2014 and 2016.


          Carnegie Mellon Math Professor Po-Shen Loh Featured on CBS Weekend News        

Image of Po-Shen Loh

Associate Professor of Mathematical Sciences Po-Shen Loh is "no ordinary math teacher" according to a story that aired on the CBS Weekend News.

CBS correspondent Jim Axelrod came to CMU to interview Loh during the Mathematical Association of America's Mathematical Olympiad Summer Program (MOP), an intensive problem solving camp held on campus for 75 of the best young high school mathematicians from the United States and countries around the world. Among the students was the six person U.S. International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) team, who were preparing for the IMO.

A silver medalist on the 1999 U.S. IMO team, Loh became the team's head coach and director of MOP three years ago. His teaching philosophy — which is the same philosophy he uses when teaching students at CMU — has nothing to do with teaching students how to get the right answer or win a competition. Instead, he pushes students to think creatively and critically, skills he hopes will lead them to success in both the classroom and life.

"If you constantly challenge, and enjoy the love of doing better today than you did yesterday, you will be on an onward march towards success," Loh told Axelrod.

Loh’s methods appear to be working. The U.S. IMO team placed first in 2015 and 2016. In this year's competition held in Rio de Janeiro, all of the team members medaled — three gold and three silver. Overall, the team placed fourth out of 110 countries.


          CMU Launches $20M Classroom and Learning Spaces Renovation Project        

classroom

Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a multi-year, $20 million renovation project that will provide a dramatic upgrade for central teaching and learning spaces across the Pittsburgh campus.

The initiative follows a detailed assessment of nearly 100 classrooms by faculty and staff on the Learning Spaces Committee, which was established in 2016 by then-Provost Farnam Jahanian, and co-chaired by Marsha Lovett, director of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation, and Keith Webster, dean of University Libraries.

Using metrics developed by the nonprofit organization Educause, the committee rated each classroom based on design for active learning, environmental quality, furnishings and technology. Benchmarked against best practices nationwide, the committee proposed an ambitious series of renovations that will not only provide an immediate benefit to students and faculty, but position CMU to sustain world-class teaching and learning spaces over the long term.

"Over the last several years, our faculty community, academic leadership, University Registrar and Faculty Senate have made it clear that improving the conditions of our classrooms, labs and studios is a top priority for them, and I share their sense of urgency," said Jahanian, who became the university's interim president on July 1. "Our mission as a university depends on an educational environment that promotes innovative teaching and effective learning."

Jahanian added that some preliminary work is already underway, with the Office of the Provost, University Registrar and academic units working closely with Campus Design and Facility Development to prepare an aggressive schedule that will take advantage of every break in the academic calendar to move the project forward without disrupting classes.

Lovett, a teaching professor of psychology and a co-coordinator of CMU's Simon Initiative, said the committee's proposal focused on a three-part strategy: repair, innovate and sustain.

"We invest a great deal in supporting our faculty and instructors to design and teach innovative, effective courses based on the latest research, including research conducted right here at Carnegie Mellon. This classroom renovation project will increase the impact of these teaching advances and enhance the educational experience for our students," said Lovett, an expert on how students learn and how instructors can apply cognitive psychology principles to improve their teaching.

The project will overhaul dozens of the most heavily used spaces in historic campus buildings such as Baker, Porter, Doherty and Wean halls, Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall, Mellon Institute and the College of Fine Arts. This project also will include the renovation of 10 classrooms in Posner Hall that will become available to the university community beginning in 2018, when the Tepper School of Business moves into the new David A. Tepper Quadrangle. These classrooms in Posner, representing more than 700 seats, will deliver more high-quality learning spaces to benefit the entire campus.

Beyond essential improvements in lighting, comfort and accessibility, the renovations will create innovative templates for the campus's learning environments. The upgrades will incorporate flexible furnishings to adapt to a wide variety of learning activities and instructional technology that will allow students to engage actively with course content, collaborate with peers and interact with instructors. On the more innovative end of the spectrum, some technology enhancements may allow instructors to gather more learning data and analytics in real time.

Lovett said in order to keep CMU's teaching and learning spaces at the forefront of educational practices, the university will use its new technology-enhanced learning center, set to open in the Tepper Quadrangle next year, as a working laboratory for instructional innovations. The center will include an innovation studio and a model classroom in addition to its teaching and learning laboratory.

"These ambitious plans to enhance and sustain teaching and learning spaces will allow Carnegie Mellon faculty to innovate today, benefiting our students, and to shape effective learning environments moving forward," said Jeanne VanBriesen, chair of the Faculty Senate, the representative assembly of the CMU faculty community.

VanBriesen, the Duquesne Light Company Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy in the College of Engineering, said Faculty Senate has been a consistent champion for the importance of these pedagogical investments.

University officials stressed this $20 million investment is part of a much longer-term strategy, which will include an increase in the annual budget allocated to classroom renovations and maintenance.

"Even as we add new infrastructure to support education and research, some of our most important investments are in our historic facilities," said Rodney McClendon, vice president for Operations. "This project marks an important step in our stewardship of these buildings and our strategic planning for future generations."

That stewardship is not limited to classrooms. Earlier this year, Webster oversaw a renovation of Carnegie Mellon's Sorrells Engineering & Science Library that transformed the space to support student learning in new and innovative ways. He said the work, which "delivers space to meet the needs of 21st century students," increased individual study space by 25 percent and added new technology-equipped group study and project rooms to facilitate collaborative work.


          Ph.D. Graduate Collaborates Internationally on Microscope Research Techniques        

Madeleine Kelly

Carnegie Mellon University's Madeleine Kelly recently spent two weeks at the University of Manchester in England, where she collaborated with top scientists in materials science and engineering on the use of a powerful electron microscope.

"In grad school, I wanted the opportunity to do a collaboration abroad or go to different conferences where I could travel," said Kelly, who earned bachelor's degrees from CMU in materials science and engineering and engineering and public policy, and received her doctorate in materials science and engineering in June. "Traveling is a good opportunity to get out of your comfort zone and to work independently."

Kelly, now a postdoctoral researcher at CMU, spent two weeks in Manchester collaborating with Grace Burke, director of the Materials Performance Centre, and Xiangli Zhong, the experimental officer for the University of Manchester's FEI HeliosTM PFIB Dual-Beam. The powerful microscope is novel: only a few exist. One of them is housed at Carnegie Mellon, where Kelly uses it to research ceramic materials.

"At the University of Manchester, I not only learned a lot from their experts," Kelly said, "but I was also able to teach them about processing three-dimensional data and show them some statistical characterization that can be done on three-dimensional volumes."

Kelly received the Joseph Goldstein Scholar Award, sponsored by the Meteoritical Society and the publisher Springer, which along with a grant through Kelly's adviser, Materials Science and Engineering Professor and Department Head Greg Rohrer, provided funds for the trip. The Goldstein Award promotes career advancement for early career members of the Microanalysis Society, increases interactions of junior and established microanalysts, and advances the state-of-the-art in microanalysis measurements.

"This experience abroad was completely unique," Kelly said. "It was different from something like a conference where I might only have the chance to present my research. Instead, I was able to go somewhere else and actually do research, find different collaborations and use an instrument hands-on."


          Chodos Named Director of Carnegie Mellon's Miller Gallery        

Elizabeth Chodos

Elizabeth Chodos has been named the director of Carnegie Mellon University's Regina Gouger Miller Gallery. Chodos joins CMU from Ox-Bow, school of art and artists' residency in Saugatuck, Michigan, where she has worked since 2010, most recently as executive and creative director.

During her career, Chodos has focused on promoting the work of contemporary artists through residencies, higher education, exhibitions and public programming, a practice she said she would continue at CMU.

"I believe deeply that art has the power to transform and that contemporary art offers society a vehicle to participate directly in social change," she said. "Miller Gallery has a history of blending rigorous exhibition practices with higher education, and it is an honor to join the gallery and continue this work."

Since it first opened 16 years ago, the Miller Gallery has evolved from regionally focused exhibitions to curating and presenting challenging contemporary work by national and international artists. Dan J. Martin, dean of the College of Fine Arts, said the gallery is now becoming a combined art, teaching and research space that creates projects linked directly to Carnegie Mellon's educational, creative and research interests.

"Our new approach to programming and exhibitions is indicative of Carnegie Mellon's ability to provide a rich, reflective hybrid experience for our students, and to present new ideas and creative propositions to a general audience," Martin said. "Elizabeth is the perfect fit to lead us in this new direction. She has strong and successful arts-center management experience and also brings aesthetic and curatorial skills."

Chodos said the opportunity to work at the Miller Gallery appealed to her because of Carnegie Mellon's reputation as a renowned research institution. The combination of a rich research environment and extensive arts programs is a setting, she said, that creates connections across fields and demonstrates how "the arts, politics, science and technology intertwine and overlap."

Chodos said she hopes to offer exhibitions and related public programming, publications and interactive web-based platforms that spark conversation about society and issues that matter locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.

A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, Chodos earned her bachelor's degree in art history and creative writing, and her dual master's degree in art history, theory and criticism, and arts administration. She started her career at Threewalls in Chicago, where she began as director of public programs and served as executive director and board member. In 2011, she co-founded Hand in Glove, a "siteless national organization," which served as a gathering point by and for practitioners in the field of alternative art spaces, projects and organizations. She also co-founded and served as a board member for Common Field, a national alliance of, and advocacy group for, artist-centered visual arts platforms and their producers.

A board member for Alliance of Artists' Communities, Chodos has curated numerous exhibitions across the country, has served as a panelist and moderator for arts-related conferences, and is a contributor to arts publications.


          Computer Reads Body Language        

Image of two robotics institute researchers showing how gestures are detected

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute have enabled a computer to understand body poses and movements of multiple people from video in real time — including, for the first time, the pose of each individual's hands and fingers.

This new method was developed with the help of the Panoptic Studio — a two-story dome embedded with 500 video cameras — and the insights gained from experiments in that facility now make it possible to detect the pose of a group of people using a single camera and a laptop computer.

Yaser Sheikh, associate professor of robotics, said these methods for tracking 2-D human form and motion open up new ways for people and machines to interact with each other and for people to use machines to better understand the world around them. The ability to recognize hand poses, for instance, will make it possible for people to interact with computers in new and more natural ways, such as communicating with computers simply by pointing at things.

Detecting the nuances of nonverbal communication between individuals will allow robots to serve in social spaces, allowing robots to perceive what people around them are doing, what moods they are in and whether they can be interrupted. A self-driving car could get an early warning that a pedestrian is about to step into the street by monitoring body language. Enabling machines to understand human behavior also could enable new approaches to behavioral diagnosis and rehabilitation, for conditions such as autism, dyslexia and depression.

"We communicate almost as much with the movement of our bodies as we do with our voice," Sheikh said. "But computers are more or less blind to it."

In sports analytics, real-time pose detection will make it possible for computers to track not only the position of each player on the field of play, as is now the case, but to know what players are doing with their arms, legs and heads at each point in time. The methods can be used for live events or applied to existing videos.

To encourage more research and applications, the researchers have released their computer code for both multi-person and hand pose estimation. It is being widely used by research groups, and more than 20 commercial groups, including automotive companies, have expressed interest in licensing the technology, Sheikh said.

Sheikh and his colleagues will present reports on their multi-person and hand pose detection methods at CVPR 2017, the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Conference July 21-26 in Honolulu.

Tracking multiple people in real time, particularly in social situations where they may be in contact with each other, presents a number of challenges. Simply using programs that track the pose of an individual does not work well when applied to each individual in a group, particularly when that group gets large. Sheikh and his colleagues took a "bottom-up" approach, which first localizes all the body parts in a scene — arms, legs, faces, etc. — and then associates those parts with particular individuals.

The challenges for hand detection are greater. As people use their hands to hold objects and make gestures, a camera is unlikely to see all parts of the hand at the same time. Unlike the face and body, large datasets do not exist of hand images that have been annotated with labels of parts and positions.

But for every image that shows only part of the hand, there often exists another image from a different angle with a full or complementary view of the hand, said Hanbyul Joo, a Ph.D. student in robotics. That's where the researchers were able to make use of CMU's multi-camera Panoptic Studio.

"A single shot gives you 500 views of a person's hand, plus it automatically annotates the hand position," Joo said. "Hands are too small to be annotated by most of our cameras, however, for this study we used just 31 high-definition cameras, but still were able to build a massive data set."

Joo and fellow Ph.D. student Tomas Simon used their hands to generate thousands of views.

"The Panoptic Studio supercharges our research," Sheikh said. It now is being used to improve body, face and hand detectors by jointly training them. Also, as work progresses to move from the 2-D models of humans to 3-D models, the facility's ability to automatically generate annotated images will be crucial, he said.

When the Panoptic Studio was built a decade ago with support from the National Science Foundation, it was not clear what impact it would have, Sheikh said.

"Now, we're able to break through a number of technical barriers primarily as a result of that NSF grant 10 years ago," he said. In addition to sharing the code, we're also sharing all the data captured in the Panoptic Studio."

In addition to Sheikh, the multi-person pose estimation research included Simon and master's degree students Zhe Cao and Shih-En Wei. The hand detection study included Sheikh, Joo, Simon and Iain Matthews, an adjunct faculty member in the Robotics Institute. Gines Hidalgo Martinez, a master's degree student, collaborates on this work, managing the source code.

The CMU AI initiative in the School of Computer Science is advancing artificial intelligence research and education by leveraging the school's strengths in computer vision, machine learning, robotics, natural language processing and human-computer interaction.


          Making Good on "Ideas for Good"        

Image of Joshua Schapiro and Mike Taylor

What began as a marketing campaign for an automobile company has turned into a passion project for Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Institute staff members, who are creating a solar-powered ventilation system to clear unhealthy cooking smoke from single-room homes.

Joshua Schapiro and Mike Taylor, research associates in the CREATE Lab, have designed a ventilation system they plan to build and install in homes in a village four hours outside of Kampala, Uganda.

Each system could fit in a shoebox that includes a solar cell the size of a small tablet computer, a battery/remote control package and a combined electric pump and LED lamp that fits in the palm of a hand, along with some flexible plastic tubing.

"It's modest," Schapiro said. "But even a little airflow can make a big difference for people who burn wood to cook meals indoors."

The original idea came from Tim Witmer, a contestant in Toyota's Ideas for Good campaign. Launched in 2010 and guided by Pittsburgh's Deeplocal marketing agency, Ideas for Good highlighted innovative technology in the company's Prius hybrid vehicle. It culminated with a contest in which people suggested how several of those technologies could be repurposed.

Smoke-based illnesses are a major problem in developing nations because biomass frequently must be used for cooking indoors on primitive stoves, and Witmer suggested the Prius' solar-powered ventilation system might be a solution. Out of the more than 4,000 entries, Toyota chose his as one of five winners and invited all five to the CMU campus in May 2011 to put together prototypes of their ideas.

Once the campaign ended, Toyota provided funding to the university to continue development of the ideas. The CREATE Lab, which facilitated the build weekend for the finalists, adopted the ventilation project. Illah Nourbakhsh, robotics professor and director of the lab, joined Taylor on a visit to Uganda in 2012 to better understanding the need and the culture.

In the Makukuulu parish, they found home ventilation was very poor. Because a few bricks always seemed to be missing near the ceiling, they thought forced airflow could be an option.

"We didn't realize until we were standing in the kitchens how dark they were," Taylor said, prompting them to add LED lighting to the ventilation system plans.

"The people of Makukuulu took us into their homes and made us part of their families. I would like to do this for my family." Joshua Schapiro

In June 2013, Taylor and Schapiro returned to Makukuulu to install six systems.

"The smoke was so thick in there that you couldn't even breathe," Schapiro said of one of the homes. Within a few minutes of switching the ventilation on, "the group was hanging out and talking.

"It worked well. They loved it," Schapiro said.

The systems were crude, designed to prove the principle but not built to last. Schapiro and Taylor figured they would be back in short order with more and improved versions. But, funding ran out for the project, and years of effort failed to identify a new sponsor.

"We created a presentation showing how a small amount of funding could transform air quality for an entire Ugandan village, and how the techniques we would develop could scale with local, African business leadership to cover entire countries," Nourbakhsh said. "Yet, foundations and corporations consistently turned down our request for underwriting."

A year ago, Schapiro and Taylor revived the project. Working out of Schapiro's garage, they designed a system that is smaller and easier to build, clean and maintain.

Their goal is to build, ship and install systems in 25 homes later this year, and ultimately install 100, enough for the whole village. Schapiro and Taylor plan to train and compensate members of the local village community so the ventilation systems can be maintained after they are gone.

They hope to raise $10,000 through generosity.com, a fundraising platform geared to charitable causes, to start the process.

"The people of Makukuulu took us into their homes and made us part of their families," Schapiro said. "I would like to do this for my family."


          Laurie Weingart Appointed Interim Provost of Carnegie Mellon University        

Image of Laurie Weingart

Laurie Weingart, a faculty member since 1989 and senior associate dean of education in the Tepper School of Business, has been named interim provost of Carnegie Mellon University, effective immediately.

Weingart's appointment was announced by Farnam Jahanian, who served as provost for two years before his appointment as interim president on July 1.

Weingart, the Richard M. and Margaret S. Cyert Professor of Organizational Behavior and Theory, is well known for her research on negotiation, conflict and innovation in teams. She has overseen several academic initiatives in the Tepper School, including the creation of BaseCamp, the immersive MBA orientation program, the Accelerate Leadership Center, and the development of two new master's degree programs. She also is a leader in the Task Force on the CMU Experience.

"Laurie brings a rare combination of scholarly expertise, practical experience and deep talents to the Office of the Provost," Jahanian said. "She has developed close working relationships with the deans and with other leaders across campus, which will provide a strong foundation for her new role. Laurie's appointment strengthens an already stellar senior leadership team and I look forward to working with her on advancing our research and educational mission and fulfilling the great promise of this moment in CMU's history."

As interim provost, Weingart will work in close partnership with Jahanian, academic leaders and partners across the university community to advance the teaching, research and scholarly mission of the university. Her responsibilities include overseeing academic and budgetary priorities and the hiring and advancement of diverse and word-class faculty. She will provide leadership, expertise and coordination to nurture the personal, professional and intellectual growth of CMU's students, faculty and staff.

"I am deeply honored to be appointed to this position," Weingart said. "The research, teaching and administrative experience I have gained at Carnegie Mellon will serve as a solid foundation from which to draw. I welcome this great opportunity to work in collaboration with faculty, students and staff across the university. I'm confident that together we'll continue CMU's endless pursuit of excellence, nurturing the spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship, and creating opportunities for our students to learn and thrive without limits."

Weingart joined CMU shortly after receiving her Ph.D. and master's degrees in organizational behavior from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. Her early research focused on group processes and on social motives and tactical behavior in negotiation. Her more recent research examines cognition, conflict, emotion and innovation in cross-functional teams.

Weingart's research has been widely published in the fields of management, social psychology, industrial psychology and cognitive psychology. She served as chair of the Conflict Management Division of the Academy of Management in 2001, president of the International Association for Conflict Management from 2003-2004, and founding president of the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research from 2007-2012. She recently completed a term as co-editor of the top-ranked Academy of Management Annals. She was elected a fellow of the Academy of Management in 2016.

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          Tepper School of Business Ranked #8 in Financial Times Ranking of Global MBA Programs for Entrepreneurship        

Rankings graphic

The Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University was recognized as the eighth best MBA program for entrepreneurship in the 2017 Financial Times global rankings.

The ranking is based on information gathered from surveys of business schools and their graduates from the class of 2013 as part of the 2017 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking. Among the U.S. schools ranked, the Tepper School placed sixth in the nation.

The MBA programs were ranked on 12 weighted criteria, including the percentage of MBA graduates who started a company, the proportion of companies that were still operating at the end of 2016, and the extent to which the skills gained during the MBA encouraged entrepreneurs to start a company.

"We are honored by this recognition and are proud that our track record of creating innovative startups is receiving global attention," said Robert Dammon, dean of the Tepper School. "Our success in the entrepreneurial arena is a reflection of the culture of innovation and collaboration that exists on the Carnegie Mellon campus and magnified by CMU’s Swartz Center for Entrepreneurship."

The Swartz Center for Entrepreneurship, the university’s innovation hub for students, faculty and alumni, will accelerate its activities in fall of 2018 with the opening of the Tepper Quad. The Tepper Quad, situated at the center of Carnegie Mellon’s campus on a 4.5-acre space, represents a new model for collaboration and inter-connected research, teaching and learning.  

"This ranking is a testament to the entrepreneurial renaissance that is taking place in Pittsburgh,” said Dave Mawhinney, executive director of the Swartz Center for Entrepreneurship. “The region is transforming and becoming a national role model for incubating technology startups.”

Of the entrepreneurs in the Tepper Class of 2013 who were surveyed, 92 percent were continuing their enterprises at the end of 2016. Sixty-four percent of the entrepreneurs raised at least one-third of their equity via private investors, and 33 percent used their company as the main source of income. This is the first time the Tepper School has been featured in the Financial Times ranking for the top MBA programs in entrepreneurship.

One of the early pioneers integrating entrepreneurship in its curriculum, Carnegie Mellon has launched more than 200 startups in the last decade.  Among the hundreds of niche and national companies launched are ModCloth, acquired by Wal-Mart in 2017, Simple, acquired by BBVA in 2014, LearnBop, acquired by K12, Inc. in 2014, BlackLocus, acquired by Home Depot in 2012, RoBotany, Wigle Whiskey, and Flip Video Camera, acquired by Cisco in 2009.

A 2016 startup success story, RoBotany is a company transforming modern agriculture with its smart indoor produce farms that are herbicide, pesticide and chemical-free…and run by robots. “The entrepreneurship ecosystem at Carnegie Mellon University is the best in the world,” said Austin Webb, Tepper MBA ‘17 and CEO of RoBotany. “Tapping into my MBA network helped us raise more than $750,000 in seed capital from firms founded by CMU and Tepper School alumni. We anticipate even more support in our upcoming Series A. This kind of support is making our dream a reality.”


          Carnegie Mellon Solidifies Leadership Role in Artificial Intelligence        

Image of Rachel Holladay

Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS) has launched a new initiative, CMU AI, that marshals work in artificial intelligence (AI) across the school's departments and disciplines, creating one of the largest and most experienced AI research groups in the world.

"For AI to reach greater levels of sophistication, experts in each aspect of AI, such as how computers understand the way people talk or how computers can learn and improve with experience, will increasingly need to work in close collaboration," said SCS Dean Andrew Moore. "CMU AI provides a framework for our ongoing AI research and education."

Image of the CMU AI logo

From self-driving cars to smart homes, AI is poised to change the way people live, work and learn.

"AI is no longer something that a lone genius invents in the garage," Moore added. "It requires a team of people, each of whom brings a special expertise or perspective. CMU researchers have always excelled at collaboration across disciplines, and CMU AI will enable all of us to work together in unprecedented ways."

CMU AI harnesses more than 100 faculty members involved in AI research and education across SCS's seven departments. Moore is directing the initiative with Jaime Carbonell, the Newell University Professor of Computer Science and director of the Language Technologies Institute; Martial Hebert, director of the Robotics Institute; Computer Science Professor Tuomas Sandholm; and Manuela Veloso, the Herbert A. Simon University Professor of Computer Science and head of the Machine Learning Department.

Carnegie Mellon has been on the forefront of AI since creating the first AI computer program, Logic Theorist, in 1956. It created the first and only machine learning department, studying how software can make discoveries and learn with experience. CMU scientists pioneered research into how machines can understand and translate human languages, and how computers and humans can interact with each other. Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute has been a leader in enabling machines to perceive, decide and act in the world, including a renowned computer vision group that explores how computers can understand images.

That expertise, spread across several departments, has enabled CMU to develop such technologies as self-driving cars; question-answering systems, including components of IBM's Jeopardy-playing Watson; world-champion robot soccer players; 3-D sports replay technology; and even an AI smart enough to beat four of the world's top poker players.

"AI is a broad field that involves extremely disparate disciplines, from optimization and symbolic reasoning to understanding physical systems," Hebert said. "It's difficult to have state-of-the art expertise in all of those aspects in one place. CMU AI delivers that and makes it centrally accessible."

Recent developments in computer hardware and software make it possible to reunite elements of AI that have grown independently and create powerful new AI technologies. These developments have created incredible demand from industry for computer scientists with AI know-how.

"Students who study AI at CMU have an opportunity to work on projects that unite multiple disciplines - to study AI in its depth and multidisciplinary, integrative aspects. They generally leave CMU for positions of great leadership, and they lead global AI efforts both in terms of starting new ventures and joining innovative companies that tremendously value our education and research," Veloso said. "CMU students at all levels have a big impact on what AI is doing for society."

Nearly 1,000 CMU students are involved in AI research and education. CMU also is vigorously engaged in outreach programs that introduce students in elementary and high school to AI topics and encourage their skills in the topic.

"We're teaching and engaging with those who will improve lives through technology, and who have taken responsibility for what happens in the rest of the century," Moore said. "Exposing these hugely talented human beings to the best AI resources and researchers is imperative for creating the technologies that will advance mankind. This is the first of many steps CMU will take to ensure AI is accessible to all."

CMU AI will focus on educating a new breed of AI scientist and on creating new AI capabilities, from smartphone assistants that learn about users by making friends with them to video technologies that can alter characters to appear older, younger or even as a different actor.

"CMU has a rich history of thought leadership in every aspect of artificial intelligence. Now is exactly the right time to bring this all together for an AI strategy to benefit the world," Moore said.


          CMU Delegation at World Economic Forum in China        

Image of the World Economic Forum sign in Dalian China

By Heidi Opdyke

Illah Nourkbahsh in 2015
Robotics Professor Illah Nourbakhsh leads a discussion on Asia’s Industrialization using visualizations created by his CREATE Lab from Landsat imagery in 2015 at the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting of the New Champions.

Carnegie Mellon University researchers and scientists will play an important role in global discussions at the World Economic Forum's Annual Meeting of the New Champions, June 27-29, in Dalian, China.

Often called "Summer Davos," to differentiate it from the forum's annual winter meeting in Switzerland, the meeting brings together world leaders in business science, technology, innovation and politics. This year's theme is "Achieving Inclusive Growth in the Fourth Industrial Revolution."

CMU experts have since 2011 led conversations at the World Economic Forum in fields ranging from robotics to artificial intelligence. CMU scientists often lead discussions, give talks, demonstrate technology and provide their distinctive expertise.

This year's CMU delegation includes:

  • Erica Fuchs, professor of engineering and public policy;
  • Madeline Gannon, a research fellow with the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry;
  • James McCann, assistant professor in the Robotics Institute;
  • Tom Mitchell, the E. Fredkin University Professor in the Machine Learning Department;
  • Illah Nourbakhsh, professor of robotics; and
  • Gabriel O'Donnell, principal research programmer and analyst in the Robotics Institute.

Image of the World Economic Sign in Dalian China

CMU will host a panel discussion called "The Future of Production with Carnegie Mellon University," in which Fuchs, Gannon and McCann will discuss rethinking behavior and purpose of industrial robots beyond factory floors, reimagining how large companies can integrate disruption themselves, and reconfiguring how automation collides with human skills.

Nourbakhsh and O'Donnell will make multiple presentations at the Global Situation Space exhibition. The presentations combine NASA time-lapse satellite imagery and geospatial and econometric data with predictive modelling to explore issues such as emerging megacities, man-made changes to the oceans and trade with China.

Nourbakhsh's CREATE Lab and its spinoff BirdBrain Technologies will be part of a workshop on building interactive sculptural robots. He will contribute to sessions on the fourth industrial revolution, the digital economy, the creative economy and platforms for artificial intelligence.

Mitchell will participate in a panel discussion about how the social safety net can respond to the fourth industrial revolution. He recently co-chaired a study of the future work for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. He will present a session on how big data can affect policymaking.

Madeline Gannon working with a robot
Madelyn Gannon works with industrial robots and is working to invent better ways to communicate with machines.

Gannon was one of 20 researchers selected to the World Economic Forum's Cultural Leaders advisory community. As part of the programming, she will be participating in sessions that discuss the impact of human-centered robotics on the future of work.

Three Named Young Scientists

CMU faculty members Laura Dabbish, an associate professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute with a joint appointment in the Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy; Louis-Philippe Morency, an assistant professor in the Language Technology Institute; and Tim Verstynen, an assistant professor of psychology, have been named 2017 Young Scientists by the World Economic Forum.

Fifty-two scientists under the age of 40 are recognized this year for exhibiting exceptional creativity, thought leadership and high growth potential, and will be at the Dalian conference.

CMU is one of only 27 universities in the world, 12 in the U.S., that make up the Global University Leaders Forum (GULF), which provides a unique platform for the world's top universities to discuss higher education and research while helping to shape the World Economic Forum agenda. GULF fosters discussion on global policy issues between member universities, the business community and a broad range of stakeholders.


          CMU Drives Smart Mobility Challenge        

Image of a busy city street

Municipalities within the 10-county Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission (SPC) region are encouraged to identify mobility needs affecting citizens and businesses and to apply for funds via a brief online form. Up to $300,000 in awards will fund CMU faculty and students as they pilot smart technology projects to address the selected needs. Support for the challenge is provided by the Hillman Foundation and the USDOT University Transportation Program.

The deadline to apply is July 14, with awards to be announced in early September.

"I'm pleased to see this effort by CMU to bring groundbreaking research and technology to our region," said U.S. Rep. Bill Shuster. "As chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, I've promoted the use of innovation to address our nation's transportation challenges. This is a great example of how federal transportation research funding is directly addressing the needs of our region, by working with communities to improve mobility for people and our local industries."

Traffic21 is a research institute in the Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy. The Smart Mobility Challenge builds on Traffic21's work with the City of Pittsburgh, a globally recognized smart city test bed, and will bring benefits of transportation innovations to less densely populated communities.

"The Smart Mobility Challenge is an ideal opportunity to put Heinz College's model of research, development, and deployment into action as we further develop our region as the epicenter of smart transportation," said Heinz College Dean Ramayya Krishnan.

Mobility21, Traffic21's affiliated U.S. Department of Transportation National University Transportation Center, is in the College of Engineering

"College of Engineering researchers will engage with the community to deploy smart transportation technologies that will result in resilient, cost-effective transportation and infrastructure throughout the region," said College of Engineering Dean James H. Garrett Jr.

An information session will be held at 2 p.m. on Wednesday June 28, in CMU's Hamburg Hall, 4800 Forbes Ave. in Pittsburgh. Application forms and more details can be found at http://traffic21.heinz.cmu.edu/smart-community-mobility-challenge/.

Smart Mobility Challenge partners include the Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission, the Regional Transportation Alliance of Southwestern Pennsylvania, and the Pennsylvania Departments of Transportation and Community and Economic Development.


          Carnegie Mellon's RoboTutor Advances to Global Learning XPRIZE Semifinals        

Image of a student working on a tablet

An estimated 250 million children around the world cannot read, write or do fundamental arithmetic, and many of these children are in developing countries without regular access to schools or teachers. XPRIZE is attempting to address this problem by funding an international competition to create open-source Android tablet apps that enable children between the ages of 7 and 10 to learn basic reading, writing and math skills without adult assistance. Apps were created in English and Swahili.

Nearly 200 teams from 40 countries entered the competition. Following an evaluation and pilot test, RoboTutor, led by CMU's Jack Mostow, is one of 11 remaining teams competing for five $1 million finalist prizes.

"RoboTutor is a brilliant piece of educational technology that has already proven to effectively teach English and Swahili-speaking children basic skills. It also perfectly exemplifies our evidence-based approach to carefully integrating technology and using data to continuously refine and improve instruction, leading to better student learning while supporting new discoveries in the learning sciences," said Richard Scheines, dean of the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences and faculty lead for CMU's Simon Initiative.

RoboTutor's design is based on scientific learning principles to engage students to learn the material and then use it in other contexts. It is powered by advanced technologies, including speech and handwriting recognition, facial analysis and machine learning. It collects data from its interactions with children both to enable cognitive tutors to adapt to individual students and to enable innovative data mining tools to continuously evaluate and refine its design and functionality.

Mostow, emeritus research professor of robotics, machine learning, language technologies and human-computer interaction, has spent the past three decades applying advanced language technologies to literacy.

"I have been able to help a few thousand children over my career, but the Global Learning XPRIZE is the opportunity of a lifetime for me to help millions or even billions of children get a basic education," Mostow said.

RoboTutor leverages many assets, including its precursor, Project LISTEN, which used speech technology to enable natural spoken dialogue with an automated Reading Tutor that listened to children read aloud and helped them learn to read.

RoboTutor's hundreds of activities address four content areas — reading and writing, numbers and math, comprehension and shapes.

Another distinguishing feature is how RoboTutor's data-driven design process integrates with local cultures.

"While we focus on improving RoboTutor with large-scale data, we never forget that it really represents kids who are living and learning in a context that we must understand, in order to properly interpret that data," said Amy Ogan, assistant professor of human-computer interaction, who field-tested RoboTutor in several settings in Tanzania.

In addition to Mostow and Ogan, the RoboTutor team consists of over 100 CMU students and faculty as well as other experts and students from around the globe.

Once the XPRIZE semifinalists have been evaluated, the top five will each receive $1 million, and XPRIZE will conduct an independent 18-month, large-scale study to field-test their Swahili apps, pre- and post-testing 4,000 children in 200 Tanzanian villages on literacy and numeracy. XPRIZE will award the $10 million grand prize to the team whose app achieves the highest learning gains.


                  
This is the Fall 2016 ePortfolio Pilot update I created for Academic Council and that my supervisor, VP of Academic Affairs has asked that I present to the CMU Board of Trustees at their next meeting. 
          Piccolo... ma non troppo        
Piccolo it's the Italian word to describe a small thing, but size doesn't matter, small thing can surprise you! Take a look at this...

Piccolo is a pocket-sized stand-alone CNC platform. For less than $70, you can assemble your personal Arduino-compatible kit for tinkering, developing and deploying basic 3D output. Be it plotting quick graffiti, printing a one-off business card on the fly, or multiple Piccolos working together to create a large mural, this kit provides a platform for experimenting with 2D or 3D digital fabrication at a small scale. This open-source design emphasizes simplicity, and is entirely composed of digitally manufactured components and inexpensive off-the-shelf hardware.

www.piccolo.cc

by:
Tiago Rorke | Diatom Studio, www.tiago.co.nz
Greg Saul | Diatom Studio, www.gregsaul.co.uk
Cheng Xu | CMU CoDe Lab, www.cheeriocheng.com
Huaishu Peng | CMU CoDe Lab, www.huaishu.me


music: Wet Wings - Last Day of Summer | wetwings.lilchiefrecords.com/track/last-day-of-summer


          CCMU Trowel Popsicle Skateboard Deck 8.25"        
CCMU Trowel Popsicle Skateboard Deck 8.25"

CCMU Trowel Popsicle Skateboard Deck 8.25"

The CCMU Trowel deck features 8.25" Wide 14.1875" Wheelbase 7-Ply Canadian Maple Dipped Finish Buy Creature Skateboards at Native Skate Store.


          CCMU Trowel Punk Point Skateboard Deck 8.5"        
CCMU Trowel Punk Point Skateboard Deck 8.5"

CCMU Trowel Punk Point Skateboard Deck 8.5"

The CCMU Trowel Punk Point deck features 8.5" Wide 14.5" Wheelbase 7-Ply Canadian Maple Dipped Finish Punk Point Shape Buy Creature Skateboards at Native Skate Store.


          CCMU Trucker Cap - Black/Orange        
CCMU Trucker Cap - Black/Orange

CCMU Trucker Cap - Black/Orange

The C.C.M.U Cap features CCMU Print Adjustable Mesh Back Colour - Black/Orange Buy Creature Skateboards Caps at Native Skate Store.


          Creature Skateboards CCMU Trucker Cap - Black/Orange        
Creature Skateboards CCMU Trucker Cap - Black/Orange

Creature Skateboards CCMU Trucker Cap - Black/Orange

The C.C.M.U Cap features CCMU Print Adjustable Mesh Back Colour - Black/Orange Buy Creature Skateboards Caps at Native Skate Store.


          7월 4주 Technology & Industry HOT7 뉴스        

Tesla Model 3 출고, 동남아시아 유니콘 Grab, Traveloka의 투자 소식 등

7월 마지막 주, 세계 미디어를 뜨겁게 달궜던 기술 및 창업 소식 7개를 에티가 전해드립니다.



1. 개시된 Tesla Model 3의 출고

2017년 7월부터 Model 3의 출고를 시작하겠다던 일론 머스크가 약속을 아슬아슬하게 이행했습니다. ì¶œê³ ë¥¼ 시작하면서 Model 3의 스펙이 더 구체적으로 공개되었는데요, 3만5천 달러의 기본 모델은 354km의 공주거리, 슈퍼차저로 210km 충전하는 데 30분, 제로백 5.6초 등의 스페을 가지고 있습니다. 9천 달러가 더 비싼 상위 모델은 공주거리가 500km나 된다고 합니다. 이와 함께 차량의 인테리어도 더 구체적으로 공개가 되었는데요, 테슬라의 다른 모델처럼 센터페시아의 와이드 터치스크린에 대부분의 기능을 몰아넣었습니다. 다음 세 달 동안은 업그레이드된 사양을 신청한 고객부터 순서대로 출고가 될 예정입니다. Model 3의 사전 예약은 2019년까지 받는다고 합니다.



2. 동남아시아의 유니콘 Grab, Traveloka, 새로운 투자 유치 소식

지난주 동남아시아에 큰 투자를 하고 있는 중국의 두 회사 소식을 전한 데에 이어 이번주에 또 동남아시아 스타트업계에서 흥미로운 소식이 들려왔습니다.


먼저 동남아시아의 우버 Grab이 중국의 우버인 Didi Chuxing, 그리고 소프트뱅크로부터 20억 달러를 새로 투자받았습니다. 다른 투자자들을 포함하여 이번 라운드 투자는 25억 달러까지 늘어날 수 있다고 합니다. Grab의 가치 평가는 지난 라운드 때의 가치 평가의 2배인 60억 달러로 책정되었습니다. Didi와 Softbank 두 회사 모두, Didi가 작년에 우버를 중국에서 밀어낸 것처럼 Grab도 우버를 이길 수 있을 것이라고 확신하고, 이에 대한 지원을 보태기로 결심했다고 합니다.



한편 인도네시아 기반의 여행 포털 서비스 Traveloka는 항공권 포털 업계 선두주자인 Expedia로부터 3억5천만 달러를 투자받았습니다. Traveloka는 2012년 인도네시아에서 출범한 회사로 인도네시아, 태국, 말레이시아, 싱가포르, 베트남, 필리핀 등의 6개국에서 서비스를 펼치고 있습니다. 이번 투자 라운드로 Traveloka의 기업가치는 1억 달러를 뛰어넘어 동남아시아 몇 안되는 새로운 유니콘으로 등극하게 되었습니다.


위 두 기업을 비롯해 동남아시아 테크 업계의 성장세는 계속 눈여겨볼만 한 것 같습니다.



3. 제프 베조스, 세계 제일 갑부로 등극

이번 주 아마존 CEO 제프 베조스가 잠깐 동안 빌게이츠를 제치고 세계 제일 갑부로 등극했었습니다. 올해 아마존의 주가는 연초에 비해 40 퍼센트가 증가했습니다. 이 덕분에 제프 베조스는 세계 최고의 부자가 되었지만, 이번 아마존 분기 실적 발표 후, 아마존의 주가가 3퍼센트 가량 떨어져 다시 두 번째 갑부로 내려왔습니다.


하지만 이번 실적 저조는 최근 아마존의 모바일 식료품 배송 스타트업 Whole Foods의 인수로 인한 것이라 다시 아마존의 주가는 회복될 것으로 보입니다. Whole Foods은 현재 겉으로 보기에는 적자 상태이지만, 수익의 대부분을 재투자하며 급격하게 성장 중입니다. 이와 함께 아마존 성장의 큰 축인 AWS와 음성 인식 서비스 Alexa, 비디오 스트리밍 서비스 Twitch 등의 성장이 합쳐져 향후 몇 년간은 현재의 성장 속도를 유지할 것으로 예측됩니다.



4. ë¶€ë™ì‚° 포털 Redfin, IPO 직후 45% 주가 상승

시애틀 기반의 부동산 포털 스타트업 Redfin이 13년 간의 긴 스타트업 기간을 끝내며 나스닥에 상장하였습니다. 15 달러로 시작된 Redfin의 주가는 장 마감까지 45퍼센트가 증가하였습니다. CEO Glenn Kelman은 Redfin이 부동산 거래의 아마존과 같은 기업을 목표로 하고 있다고 합니다. 이 때문에 Redfin은 부동산과 관련된 모든 거래를 단순히 클릭만으로 가능하게 하는 플랫폼을 지향하고 있습니다. 이 외에도 부동산의 가치를 자동으로 평가해주는 서비스, 시장에 내놓기 전에 부동산을 시뮬레이션 해주는 서비스 등을 제공하고 있습니다.



5. 애플의 아이팟 나노와 셔플의 단종

한 때 시대를 풍미했던 애플의 아이팟이 아이팟 터치 시리즈를 빼고 완전히 사라졌습니다. 애플의 공식 구매 사이트에서 아이팟 나노와 터치가 자취를 감추며, 애플은 두 모델의 단종을 선언했습니다. 마지막 아이팟 모델인 아이팟 터치는 이제 128GB까지 용량을 늘려서 판매할 계획입니다. 2001년에 소개된 애플의 아이팟 나노는 “천 개의 곡은 주머니 속 안에”라는 공약과 함께 스티브 잡스의 새로운 전성기를 여는 첫 제품의 역할을 했습니다. 2010년 이후 애플은 계속해서 아이폰을 통해서 아이팟 시장을 잠식해나갔지만, 자사의 과거 비즈니스를 잠식하는데에 주저하지 않아 지금까지도 모바일 산업을 선도할 수가 있었습니다. 혁신의 상징이었던 아이팟 시리즈의 단종, 새로운 애플 혁신의 아이콘은 무엇이 될까요?



6. 손가락의 움직임까지 추적할 수 있는 사람 움직임 인식 시스템 Openpose

카네기 멜론 대학교에서 손가락 움직임까지 인식할 수 있는 시스템 Openpose를 개발했습니다. 로봇과 사람 사이 간의 연결이 중요해진 현 시점에서 이러한 시스템의 개발은 향후 가상현실 환경이나 증강현실 환경에서 로봇이 사람의 말을 이해하는 데 큰 도움을 줄 것으로 기대됩니다.



 ì¹´ë„¤ê¸°ë©œë¡  대학교에서는 OpenPose가 상체 얼굴, 팔 뿐 아니라 손가락 하나하나까지 모두 인식할 수 있도록 수십 개의 카메라로 둘러싸인 돔 형태의 측정 장비 Panoptic Studio를 사용했습니다. 카메라 사진들은 모두 2D 형태로 찍히지만 여러 카메라에서 다양한 방향으로 찍히는 점을 이용해 사람의 형상을 3D로 구현하였습니다. Panoptic studio로 얻은 데이터들을 토대로 Openpose를 학습시킨 ê²°ê³¼, 하나의 카메라만으로도 손가락 및 얼굴까지 완벽하게 인식할 수 있게 되었다고 CMU 측은 전했습니다. 향후 이 시스템을 이용한다면 손으로 물을 가리키며 로봇에게 물을 달라는 시늉만 해도 사람처럼 ë¡œë´‡ë„ ê·¸ 맥락을 한번에 이해할 수 있는 상황이 올 것 같습니다.


7. 세계 최대 의료 포털 WebMD, KKR에 20억 달러에 인수


WebMD라는 세계 최대 헬스케어 및 의료 포털이 유명 사모펀드 KKR에서 운영하는 브랜드 연합 Internet Brands에 인수되었습니다. WebMD는 1996년 창업된 초기 인터넷 검색 포털 서비스 중 하나로 2017년 컴스코어의 미국 웹사이트 순위 36위에 선정될 만큼 안정적인 서비스를 펼쳐왔습니다. 이번 인수 이후 정보 수집 및 제공에만 국한되어왔던 WebMD의 비즈니스는 거래 주선 및 다른 헬스케어 서비스와의 B2B로 확장될 예정입니다.


저작자 표시 비영리 변경 금지

          CMU Podcast: Spotify mechanicals, BBC pay, BBC music show        
CMU’s Chris Cooke and guest presenter Becky Brook review key events in music and the music business from the last week, including the latest mechanical right lawsuits against Spotify in the US and what they reveal about the complexities of digital licensing, plus the BBC’s big pay reveal and its plan for a new prime-time […]
          CMU Podcast: Fake artists! Fake t-shirts! Fake radio!        
CMU’s Andy Malt and Chris Cooke review key events in music and the music business from the last week, including Spotify’s ‘fake’ artist ‘scandal’, Kylie and Kendall Jenner’s legal battle over what constitutes copyright infringement when printing t-shirts, and the Mansfield radio station battling repeated unwanted intrusions by a wanker. The CMU Podcast is sponsored […]
          CMU@TGE 2017: Will It Be Streams That Kill The Radio Star?         
Look out for more reports throughout July on key sessions that took place at the CMU Insights conferences at The Great Escape in May. Today, the session in The Media Conference that asked “Will It Be Streams That Kill The Radio Star?” Taking part in the discussion were Pete Downton, Deputy CEO of 7digital, a […]
          CMU Athletics        
PNCI Construction, Inc. is a proud sponsor of Colorado Mesa University Athletics which offers 23 intercollegiate varsity sports and six emerging ...
          CMU Maverick Hoedown        
PNCI Construction, Inc. is proud to sponsor The Colorado Mesa University Hoedown. The Colorado Mesa University Hoedown is an annual fundraiser ...
          Reviving the "25 Things About Me" Meme        
It's probably the ultimate in navel-gazing, but what the hell. I responded to the meme in early 2009, I've added some additional comments [[in double brackets]] in early 2015, just after my 58th birthday.

  1. My parents met at Middlebury College in about 1950. Dad was a history major, Mom was an English major and I've always been interested in both history and English (though I went on to be an English major, too). They had relatives who were into genealogy, so I know I've had ancestors in New England from both sides of my family since 1642.
  2. I'm the oldest of four children - two girls/two boys. As was more common in the '50s and '60s, my mother had four children in seven years.
  3. I learned how to read when I was 5, mostly because I spent weeks in the hospital and at home suffering from nephritis. I was hyperactive and was one of the few girls on Ritalin in 1962.
  4. I was one of the tallest kids in kindergarten with one of the biggest voices so I played Santa Claus in the Christmas pagent. "Ho Ho Ho."
  5. My father spent most of his career as Director of Placement for Worcester Polytechnic Institute and my mother was a free lance writer who went on to work for WPI's Alumni Journal. Dad was active in local theater groups (including playing Mr. Gibbs in Our Town the week I graduated from high school) and Mom was sometimes sang in a church choir.
  6. We rarely traveled out of New England while I was growing up (with 4 kids, it was a little tricky), but in 1968, we made a big cross country trip with our grandmother completely by train since my mother wouldn't fly. We went to Chicago, Phoenix, the Grand Canyon, Anaheim, San Francisco, Lake Tahoe, Vancouver and Montreal. Ironically, a landslide hit the train in the Canadian Rockies and killed one passenger.
  7. In the '70s, West Boylston Jr.-Sr. High was a small school with an odd configuration - grades 8-12. The eighth graders were not supposed to join the senior high clubs, but I showed up at Drama Club anyway and wasn't tossed out. There may still exist a black and white tape of my adaptation of "Repent Harlequin, Said the TickTockMan" that I wrote and starred in for a Drama Class in about 1974.
  8. I touched my first computer keyboard nearly 35 years ago. It was an early Wang that our school got to teach students computer programming. Paul Yankowskas was also in the computer class, where we learned how to program "Hello World" in BASIC.
  9. During high school, I was in Central District Choir three times and Massachusetts All-State once. I made a touring choir (Concordia Youth Chorale) in 1974 and spent three weeks touring Germany, Austria and Italy, with a lunch in Switzerland. This trip made me love international travel and lager beer.
  10. While my parents strongly encouraged me to go to Middlebury, I wanted to go to a college in a city out of New England but in the northeast. After spending years researching colleges, I narrowed it down to Case Western (Cleveland) and Carnegie Mellon (Pittsburgh). I visited both colleges a few weeks before graduation and picked CMU because I liked Pittsburgh much more than Cleveland.
  11. I met Jim Mann at a science fiction club meeting on campus two weeks to the day that I arrived. While we became fast friends, we didn't start to date until the following February. The rest, as they say, is history.
  12. When Jim and I got married in Massachusetts on May 22, 1977, it was 96 degrees! We had a simple ceremony with an informal reception at an estate on the Worcester Polytechnic Institute.
  13. I made the University of Pittsburgh College Bowl Trivia Team, at a time when College Bowl wasn't televised but was an interscholastic competition. We placed second in a regional competition. While I later did well playing trivia in bars, I've taken the Jeopardy test twice and failed both times.
  14. Leslie was due Election Day 1980, so I got an absentee ballot...which I never needed to file since she wound up being nearly three weeks early. Her first trip outside was so I could go vote. I have voted in every federal election since 1976.
  15. When we moved up to Massachusetts in 1982, a huge number of the members of NESFA, the local science fiction club, worked for Digital Equipment Corporation. I was interested in going to work for a computer company, and, eventually, got a job with Stratus Computer (thanks, Kurt Baty!). I worked for Stratus in a number of jobs for nearly ten years; Jim later worked there for about eight years as a technical writer.
  16. I've had an E-mail address since 1983, owned a PC since 1988 and been active on the Internet since 1988. At Stratus, I created a departmental intranet in 1986, in an effort to help track forms, training information and other information about publication production.
  17. I learned HTML in 1994 and created the first Hugo/Nebula site in HTML (AwardWeb) that October. I went on to run Women Leaders online for a few years, and then took over Dead People Server, a site I've been curating since 1997.
  18. I burned out after working for about three years at ANSYS (which included an insane schedule to convert documents to XML in advance of our then-current publishing software failing at the end of 1999), and went back to finish my long-delayed college degree at Pitt in 2000. I graduated with honors in April 2001.
  19. I'm enough of a movie fan that 2009 marks the 40th year I both predicted Oscar winners and will be watching the show. In 2004, I actually watched the Oscars from a ballroom in Hollywood along with 1,000 rowdy Lord of the Rings fans. About 20 members of the cast and crew of LOTR visited our party later than night with their Oscars.
  20. Our daughter had no first cousins (except for one step-first-cousin) until she was 23 years old; now she she has 4.
  21. While most of my family have been longtime Republicans, my mother's cousin Alice was a Democratic legislator in Vermont who used to commute to Montpelier with Howard Dean in his pick-up truck. Politically, I take after Alice's side of the family (at least after 1975 or so).
  22. While I can't say "I was nominated for a Hugo," I can say "A book I edited was nominated for a Hugo" since William Tenn's "Dancing Naked" was nominated for a Non-Fiction Hugo in 2005. Since Phil was unable to go to Worldcon in Scotland, I was his designated acceptor. It was an honor to be a designated acceptor! ;->
  23. I worked for Obama, voted for him (only the 3rd time I voted for a winning president), and attended his Inauguration (1.5 miles away from the Capitol, but what the hell).
  24. My movie geekdom probably reached its peak in 2008 when I was an extra on "She's Out of My League," and I started the fan site "The Road Rumors and News." Both movies are due out in 2009. [[Since then, I've been on about 30 different movie/TV sets.]]
  25. [[We've been able to take some big trips since 2009, and have gone to southeastern Australia, Alaska, England, Ireland, Wales and Canada (twice).]]


          Former CMU Teacher Caught, Pleads Guilty To Having Child Porn        
Looks like a former CMU journalism teacher, Mark Ranzenberger, has plead guilty of possessing child porn. In federal court in Bay City yesterday, Ranzenberger also admitted to sexually abusing a child three times a week from 1995 to 2002. Continue reading…
          Businesses urged join in efforts to welcome back CMU students        
Efforts are under way to help Grand Valley businesses welcome students back to Colorado Mesa University and in turn foster the relationship between the business community and CMU. “We are putting out the welcome mat to show students and faculty that CMU is important to us as members of the business community and that we […]
          Simali Koreya munaqisesi Asiya fond birjasi indekslerinin azalmasina sebeb olub        
[r32] 10 Avqust, 2017  20:53 xeber – Asiya-Sakit Okean ölkələrinin fond birjası indeksləri Şimali Koreya münaqişəsi səbəbindən azalmağa başlayıb. “Report” “Ä°nterfax” agentliyinə istinadən xəbər verir ki, “ATP MSCI Asia Pacific” məcmu indeksi 0,7% azalma göstərib. Yaponiyanın “Nikkei 225” indeksi 0,1%, Avstraliya “ASX” 0,1%, Hindistanın “Sensex” indeksi 0,5% azalıb.Çinin “Shanghai Composite” fond birjası indeksi 0,9%, Cənubi Koreya “KOSPI” 0,3%, Honq-Konq […]
          CMU Spin-Off Technology Allows Research of Hippo-Infested Waters        
Technology from Carnegie Mellon University Robotics Institute spin-off Platypus LLC has gone where no man has gone before. Small, autonomous airboats were sent to Kenya to monitor water quality in hippo pools on the hippo-heavy Mara River. Researchers want to know how the animals are affecting water quality, but they couldn’t get into the pools to collect samples. “Hippos are extremely dangerous animals, and that’s ignoring the crocodiles that are hanging out in the same river,” said Paul Scerri, Platypus president, “so when they [researchers] saw our technology they asked us if we could come down and run robots around.” The boats were disguised to look like crocodiles, which the hippos tolerate, and were sent onto the water. “We outfitted them with oxygen sensors that we can raise and lower and some depth-measuring equipment that would measure the softness of the bottom of the river,” said Scerri. “There was at least one day that the researchers counted 140 hippopotamus in the river
          CMU Receives $10 Million Gift For Business School Overhaul        
The planned $201 million facility that will house Carnegie Mellon University’s Tepper School of Business has received a major investment from a world-renowned venture capitalist. James Swartz, an alumnus of the business school, and his wife, Susan, gifted $10 million to the university to help fund the David A. Tepper Quadrangle. The Quadrangle, a 4.5-acre expansion of the university’s north campus, will include a 295,000 square-foot facility on Forbes Avenue that will be home to the business school, the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and The Simon Initiative. Mark Burd, public relations director for the Tepper School, said the project will “incorporate learning opportunities for new initiatives, new classes and new interdisciplinary degrees.” “It will have a technological framework that will combine business education with other disciplines, such as technology, such as computer science, such as engineering,” Burd said. No date has been set for groundbreaking, but Burd said
          Highmark and CMU Look to 'Disrupt' Healthcare Industry        
Highmark Inc. and its recently formed healthcare arm Allegheny Health Network are hoping Carnegie Mellon University will be able to dive into the systems’ terabytes of patient care and payment data to find industry changing breakthroughs. CMU’s Allen Russell will head the Disruptive Healthcare Technology Institute. He believes the healthcare industry, as a whole, has been resistant to what he calls “disruptive change,” like what the mobile phone did for communications or the personal computer did for mainframe computing. “What like that has disrupted healthcare, that has increased accessibility, affordability and simplicity to markets all at the same time? You would scratch your head for a long time to identify even just a couple of those technologies,” Russell said. The goal of the two-year $11 million partnership is to find and begin to implement those types of disruptive technologies and systems. “Each of the projects was picked with speed in mind,” Russell said. “In almost all
          Real Life 'Marauder’s Map' May Help Improve Patient Care in Nursing Homes        
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a way to track the locations of individuals in complex, indoor settings such as nursing homes. Developers liken it to the Marauder’s Map featured in the Harry Potter books and movies, which allows Harry Potter to see anyone’s location at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. But instead of magic, this system uses a network of cameras and algorithms to track movement. Researchers said this could be important in keeping track of residents of nursing homes. “Especially since staffing levels tend to be very limited, can we maybe help caregivers to alert them to things that are maybe declining earlier than they would notice on their own,” said CMU researcher Alexander Hauptman. The system was tested tracking 13 residents at a facility. It can identify if a patient sits in front of TV a little longer than normal each day, something each nursing shift would not necessarily notice, but that could over time indicate a trend that the
          $30 Million CMU Grant to Allow for Expanded Energy Research        
Carnegie Mellon University has received its largest private foundation grant in the school’s history. A $30 million grant provided by the Richard King Mellon Foundation will go toward a new institute to coordinate the university’s energy activities. CMU President Jared Cohon said all seven colleges of the university are working on the topic of energy in some form. He said the grant will allow more collaboration between those colleges and their work. “This will greatly expand the research and education and facilities of Carnegie Mellon in energy and allow the (Wilton E.) Scott Institute to have a tremendous impact both regionally and nationally,” he said. M. Granger Morgan, director of the Scott Institute, said it will research the delivery and use of more efficient energy, expanding the mix of energy sources and innovation of technology policy. He said the grant allows the Scott Institute to better follow the university’s energy research and puts them in one place. Morgan said the
          When Charter School Goes Under, Bond Holders Get Paid But Teachers Don't         
Tough lesson for teachers at a shuttered Detroit charter school: bond holders come first

Furious teachers at a recently shuttered Detroit charter school were notified this week that they won’t be paid thousands of dollars they earned during the last school year.

Teachers at the Michigan Technical Academy had contracts that required the school to pay them through the summer for work they did during the school year. But the school’s management company, Matchbook Learning, alerted teachers in an email Wednesday that the money would instead go to pay off the school’s debts.

“Last Friday, Matchbook Learning became aware that the holders of MTA’s outstanding bond debt are refusing to allow use of funds for any summer payroll and instead, are requiring that any available funds be used toward payment of the bond debt,” Matchbook’s CEO Sajan George told teachers in the email. “We are disappointed and deeply saddened by this development because this means funds will not be there for July or August payroll.”

The school, which Chalkbeat wrote about last fall, closed its doors forever last month when Central Michigan University revoked the school’s charter citing academic and financial difficulties.

The school was one seven Detroit area charter schools that closed this year including five that had been overseen by Central Michigan.

Matchbook Learning, which had been running the school since 2015, had a contract with the school’s board that expired on June 30, George wrote in the email to teachers.

“Matchbook Learning never received and does not expect to receive any funds from the MTA Board, CMU or the bondholders to fund payment of any July or August payroll — meaning Matchbook Learning is not in a position to make payment to you,” George wrote. “Unfortunately, the closing of MTA has had a severe effect on everyone involved. We thank you for your time at MTA, sympathize and empathize with your position, and wish you the best in your future endeavors.”

George told Chalkbeat that his New Jersey-based school management organization, a non-profit, hasn’t been paid by the school’s board since February due to lack of funds. Matchbook is owed what he characterized as “a couple hundred thousand dollars.”

He said he knew Matchbook wouldn’t be paid for the last few months of the school year but that the organization stayed until the last day of class in June.

“If we left, the employees wouldn’t get paid and the school would shut down,” George said.

He said Matchbook asked the school board to approve payments that would enable the teachers to get paid in July and August. The board knew it would receive payments from the state in July and August and authorized a portion of that money to go toward paying teachers. But the bondholders are priority creditors, meaning they get paid first. The bondholders have refused to allow money to go to the teachers, George said. 

“Ultimately it wasn’t in our control,” he said.

The school borrowed about $16 million for building improvements when it first opened and only about $1 million had been paid off when the school closed last month, George said. Had the school stayed open, it would have continued to receive money from the state that could have been used to make payments on the debt. Without money coming in, the creditors moved to collect as much as they could. 

Angry teachers say they’re contacting lawyers in hopes of trying to collect what they’re owed.

“That’s money that we’ve all worked for,” said Maeve Rochon, a kindergarten teacher who said she’s owed around $5,000. “That’s for time we spent in those kids’ lives, doing our jobs. We all stuck it out to the end and now you’re telling us the money we worked for, we’re not going to get?”

Janelle Brzezinski, a spokeswoman for the Governor John Engler Center for Charter Schools at Central Michigan University, said there’s not much the university can do to help the teachers.

“Some creditors of Michigan Technical Academy have ordered an acceleration of payments due on Academy loans,” Brzezinski wrote in an e-mailed statement. “The acceleration of payments means that the Academy received no funds from the scheduled July 20, 2017 state school aid payment sent by the state of Michigan. The Academy board and the Center had been working with the Michigan Department of Education and Michigan Department of Treasury officials to ensure continued flow of state aid through July and August to allow the Academy to meet payroll and other outstanding obligations. Unfortunately, the decision of the creditors to accelerate payments under the Academy loans means that there will not be sufficient funds for the Academy to process the July 31, 2017 scheduled payroll and there may not be sufficient funds to meet the August payrolls.”

Brzezinski encouraged teachers to contact Matchbook or the Wage and Hour Division of the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

     

          CMU has 8 graduate programs in interactive media arts/design        
Carnegie Mellon University, where I teach, has at least 8 master’s programs that address the art and design of interactive media: Master of Entertainment Technology (in the Entertainment Technology Center) Master of Interaction Design (in the School of Design, College of Fine Arts) Master of Tangible Interaction Design (in the School of Architecture, College of […]
          Liam Gallagher has a go        
Liam Gallagher is continuing in his admirable bid to fill the ‘and finally’ slot throughout the quiet news month that is August, which is such a quiet news month that it once resulted in a CMU Daily controversially being published without an ‘and finally’ story. Just once mind. In 2014. But still, controversies of that scale […]
          Comment on Pomperipossa in Monismania. by New top story on Hacker News: Pomperipossa in Monismania: a true tale of a 102% tax rate in Sweden | The Internet Junkyard        
[…] Pomperipossa in Monismania: a true tale of a 102% tax rate in Sweden 3 by georgecmu | 0 comments on Hacker News. […]
          Creature Skateboards CCMU Trowel Punk Point Skateboard Deck 8.5"        
Creature Skateboards CCMU Trowel Punk Point Skateboard Deck 8.5

Creature Skateboards CCMU Trowel Punk Point Skateboard Deck 8.5"

The CCMU Trowel Punk Point deck features 8.5" Wide 14.5" Wheelbase 7-Ply Canadian Maple Dipped Finish Punk Point Shape Buy Creature Skateboards at Native Skate Store.


          Creature Skateboards CCMU Trowel Popsicle Skateboard Deck 8.25"        
Creature Skateboards CCMU Trowel Popsicle Skateboard Deck 8.25

Creature Skateboards CCMU Trowel Popsicle Skateboard Deck 8.25"

The CCMU Trowel deck features 8.25" Wide 14.1875" Wheelbase 7-Ply Canadian Maple Dipped Finish Buy Creature Skateboards at Native Skate Store.


          Et si on reparlait de l'Etat-providence français        
L'objet de cet article est de mettre les pratiques françaises en matière d'Etat-providence à l'aune de la réalité.

L'Etat-providence a pour idée générale de venir servir les individus en leur garantissant un certain nombre de droits positifs, c'est-à-dire de droits créés par l'homme plus qu'issus d'une notion de droit découlant des règles de la nature. Généralement ces droits ne sont pas des libertés affirmées, mais des "droits à quelque chose", comme le droit au logement. Nous considérerons le "droit à une santé gratuite" et le "droit à un revenu minimum".

Commençons par le "droit à une santé gratuite". La raison qui fait que personne ne quitte la France. La chose qui fait que dès que tu croises quelqu'un qui vit à l'étranger et qu'il te dit qu'il y est bien, tu te dois un : "oui, ok, mais la santé là-bas". L'argument suprême face à n'importe quelle contradiction sur le taux de prélèvements obligatoires du pays : "oui, mais bon, tu vois aux Etats-Unis ils ont moins d'impôt, mais si tu n'as pas d'argent tu crève dans la rue".

Notre sécurité sociale, fait des envieux dans le monde entier. Qui ne rêve pas aujourd'hui d'une santé à deux vitesses entre privé et public ? Qui ne rêve pas, de ces quelques centaines d'euros qui partent chaque mois à différentes lignes de sa fiche de paye ? Le financement de la santé "gratuite" de la France est structurée autour d'un bordel monstrueux. D'une part des acteurs publique, comme la caisse primaire d'assurance maladie (CPAM), le RSI ou encore la CMU pour les plus démunis. D'autre part une myriade d'acteurs privés, des mutuelles principalement, qui viennent combler les trous de la coque de ce fier navire qu'est la sécurité sociale. Quand on y réfléchit bien, l'existence même de mutuelles privées est le symptôme le plus criant de l'échec de cette santé gratuite, universelle et de qualité. Si tu as besoin d'une mutuelle pour te payer tes soins, on est bien d'accord que la sécurité sociale ne couvre pas tes besoins à elle seule ?

Dans la même veine, on a souvent en tête que la sécurité sociale est un acquis en France. C'est faux. L'individu peut se retrouver hors de cases de l'administration s'il n'y prend pas garde, même s'il y a effectivement des entités pour couvrir ceux qui n'ont droit à rien (CMU), il n'y a aucun automatisme. Le joli système qui prend soin de ta vie sous réserve que tu paye ton CERFA. Notons également au passage que les gentils formulaires à remplir contiennent des cases te demandant des choses, par exemple : si tu acceptes de respecter toutes les normes nationales qui font de l'aide publique quelque chose d'acceptables. Donc, en fait, sous réserve de ta promesse de chercher à travailler à tous prix, tu as ta "sécurité de la santé".

Benjamin Franklin te l'a dit pour tant : "Un peuple prêt à sacrifier un peu de liberté pour un peu de sécurité ne mérite ni l'une ni l'autre, et finit par perdre les deux.". Tout est plus ou moins fait pour que tu ne rentres pas dans les dites cases, et j'aurais peine à voir la froideur de l'administration devant la brebis galeuse marchant en dehors des cases ? "Désolé Monsieur, la France est un très joli pays, mais votre survis nous coûte trop cher".

Autre élément qui fut un des cinq piliers de l'Etat-providence français le chômage... Quand je pose la question : "Pourquoi rendre obligatoire la cotisation à une assurance chômage ?". On me répond qu'il s'agit d'une responsabilité qu'on ne peut laisser aux individus. L'Etat s'occupe pour eux de "penser à épargner" et leur fournit une continuité dans leur revenu en cas d'interruption d'activité. Cet angle de vue exclu certains éléments : en plus de n'offrir le choix à personne ce n'est pas un système d'assurance standard. Vous avez oublié de lire la petite étoile en bas à droite de votre contrat social. La petite étoile dit que ce système, en plus de vous ôtez la liberté de disposer de votre argent comme vous l'entendez, vous retire d'autres libertés.

Le chômage ne t'est pas accessible si jamais tu quittes ton emploi de ton propre chef. Le monopole de la rupture acceptable de votre contrat de travail est laissé entre les mains de ton employeur.

Le chômage t'est également retiré si jamais vous décider d'aller chercher fortune à l'étranger (sauf arrangement locaux).

Le chômage t'est également retiré pour vérification de leur part ou oublie de tes obligations administratives.

Ainsi deux questions importantes :
  • Autour de la santé : est-il raisonnable que l'Etat se donne à charge tant de missions alors qu'il a déjà bien du mal à assumer ce qui fait partie du régalien (sécurité, justice) ?
  • Autour du chômage : est-il raisonnable que l'Etat prenne pour devoir de mettre en place un système vicieux et inutile quand les assurances traditionnelles privées en sont au moins autant capables ?
Illustration piquée chez Jean-Felix Brouet

          RN, Registered Nurse 12-Hr - CMU (FT Days) - (Long Beach, California, United States)        
At MemorialCare Health System, we believe in providing extraordinary healthcare to our communities and an exceptional working environment for our employees. MemorialCare stands for excellence in Healthcare. Across our family of medical centers, we support each one of our bright, talented employees in reaching the highest levels of professional development, contribution, collaboration and accountability. Whatever your role and whatever expertise you bring, we are dedicated to helping you achieve your full potential in an environment of respect, innovation and teamwork. Position Summary: The RN II 12-Hr provides safe, cost-effective patient care through the health experience, according to established standards utilizing the nursing process, within the scope of practice of Registered Nursing, for the (department name) at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. Minimum Requirements: • A current license to practice as a Registered Nurse in California is required. • Current American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (CPR & AED) and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certifications are also required. • A Bachelor's degree in Nursing (BSN) is also required. • The ideal candidate will have nursing experience in (specialty) in an acute care hospital.
          RN, Registered Nurse 12-Hr - CMU (FT Days) - (Long Beach, California, United States)        
At MemorialCare Health System, we believe in providing extraordinary healthcare to our communities and an exceptional working environment for our employees. MemorialCare stands for excellence in Healthcare. Across our family of medical centers, we support each one of our bright, talented employees in reaching the highest levels of professional development, contribution, collaboration and accountability. Whatever your role and whatever expertise you bring, we are dedicated to helping you achieve your full potential in an environment of respect, innovation and teamwork. Position Summary: The RN II 12-Hr provides safe, cost-effective patient care through the health experience, according to established standards utilizing the nursing process, within the scope of practice of Registered Nursing, for the (department name) at Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. Minimum Requirements: • A current license to practice as a Registered Nurse in California is required. • Current American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (CPR & AED) and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certifications are also required. • A Bachelor's degree in Nursing (BSN) is also required. • The ideal candidate will have nursing experience in (specialty) in an acute care hospital.
          China Will Overtake the US in Computing…Maybe, Someday…        
[note: the following is a rough draft -- I appreciate comments as I work this into shape and add relevant links to further sources]

December 6, 2011

Abstract:
Today, The New York Times published an article by Barboza and Markoff titled “Power in Numbers: China Aims for High-Tech Primacy.  This article echoes frequently expressed alarmist opinions that China is posed to take over the world.  I have lived in Beijing for the past 2.5 years as a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research Asia, I've taught Computer Sciences classes at Tsinghua University, and it is my opinion that China has major obstacles to overcome before becoming a high-tech powerhouse. The biggest of these is the the way creativity is discouraged in Chinese classrooms. Chinese students who spend time at western universities do pick up these skills. Creativity and the inclination to challenge norms in disruptive rather than incremental ways are at the heart of computing innovations. These traits are all but absent from Chinese universities. A solution I pose is an initiative called World Lab. We need a place for people from various cultures, backgrounds, and countries to come together to take risks in designing new technologies and to train students to become global leaders.

Today's NY Times article by Barboza & Markoff, “Power in Numbers: China Aims for High-Tech Primacy,”  would lead you to believe that the title of this blog entry (“China Will Overtake the US in Computing”) is almost a certainty. I could not help reading this somewhat alarmist article without cringing, as it follows a pattern of reporting on China that I’ve seen from since before I moved to China in 2009 and that I have noticed more frequently over the past two years now that I’m more sensitized to the realities of China’s economic rise. This lack of subtlety and nuance on China is what I’ve come to expect from media outlets such as CNN and I am more surprised to see it from seasoned journalists who are respected for their expertise, Barboza for reporting here in China and Markoff for reporting on computing.

As I prepare to leave next week to return to my position at the University of Washington, I am starting to reflect on what I have learned in my 2½ years in China. My own view is that there is incredible potential in the computing field in China – this is one of the many reasons I chose to pick up my family and move here. At the same time there are many important barriers to China’s eventual rise in computing and these barriers will not fall on their own without efforts at reforming both the educational system and government regulation, let alone certain Chinese cultural norms that are thousands of years old. That is why I’ve subtitled this blog entry “…Maybe, Someday…”. That is, I don’t believe China will rise above the US in computing anytime soon and if it is to do so, several important changes must first take place.

In the rest of this article I’ll try to touch on 1) why am I qualified to even have an informed opinion on China’s rise in computing, 2) what I saw as the misconceptions or omissions in the Barboza & Markoff NY Times article, and 3) what I think China must do to reach its potential in computing and why I think this is a good thing and not something the West should be worried about.

Who am I to Comment on Chinese Computing
As I read the NY Times article I was a bit surprised by some of the folks they had used to comment on the state of Chinese computing. I started to think, “who are the proper experts on this topic?” Later as I pondered this question, I began to think I’m as good an expert as anyone, at least from the academic computer science side, to comment on the rise of China in computing. Why is that? 

I have spent 2½ years living in China and in that time I have: worked at Microsoft Research Asia (MSRA), the top research organization in the country, taught at Tsinghua University, the top computer science department in the country, and organized several major technical research events in China. Before coming to China, I earned my PhD at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), one of the top computer science departments in the world, earned tenure at Berkeley (another top department), founded a start-up, ran a ubiquitous computing research lab for Intel, and served as a professor at the University of Washington (another top computer science department). More detail on my background is here. I think this experience puts me in good position to make an informed assessment on computing in China. You be the judge. I’m sure I’m not right on everything and these are just my opinions, but after two years I’ve seen quite a bit, talked to many people, and I’m starting to have a good feel for what is going on here in China.


What is Wrong with the Rising View
I believe there is no question that China is quickly rising in all endeavors, whether it is in terms of China’s economics, infrastructure (think ports, highways, freight railway, and high speed rail), education, science, or technology. It is an amazing sight to see firsthand and the energy one feels living here during this important time in history is quite incredible (more than even in Silicon Valley during the 1st Internet boom of the mid to late 90s). Computing is no different from these other areas and China has made huge strides in 20 years, as reported in the NY Times article.

The key questions to ask are 1) where is China with respect to the US and the West in terms of computing today? and 2) where will China be in the future? The impressions that were given by the NY Times article on both of these questions is where I most felt the article lets the reader down. Let’s cover each of these in turn.

Where is China Computing Today
 Academic computer science has been the underlying basis for many of the major commercial strides in computing in the US (e.g., the Internet, the graphical web browser, compression for wireless communications, cloud computing, speech recognition, web indexing and search, gesture and touch-based user interfaces, location-aware computing, etc.).

China has made big strides in academic computer science over the past 20 years in terms of expansion of its programs and making a shift from mainly producing software for state-owned companies to undertaking leading edge computing research and education. In fact, China has passed major milestones in the past 5 years in terms of government support for research and in starting to publish in top computing journals and conferences.

Everything’s Big in China
Five to ten years ago, one would almost never see papers at the top academic computing conferences from China’s researchers, with the exception being papers from Microsoft Research Asia, which was started in Beijing back in 1998 by a group of Chinese and Taiwanese researchers who were trained in the US and worked in the US before returning to Asia. Today, there are many Chinese researchers who are publishing papers at top research venues. But, the number is still quite small given the large number of universities and researchers that are pursuing computing research in China. Computer Science & Technology is the largest undergraduate major in China and some estimates I’ve heard say there are over 1,000 computer science departments in China and over 1,000,000 computer science majors at a time across these departments. This is huge! The government is clearly making massive investments in computing.

Supercomputing isn't so Super?
One of the big accomplishments Chinese computer science has made given these investments over the last 5-10 years has been in Supercomputing: the very large, high speed machines often used for climate modeling, weapons simulation, etc. A couple of years ago China temporarily had the fastest machine in the world with the Tianhe-1A. This coveted spot on the TOP500 supercomputer list has traditionally been held by either US or Japanese supercomputers, though it changes all the time as new faster computers come into service.

Although getting to the top of the list was a major accomplishment for China, the news of China’s conquest of supercomputing really didn’t seem to be big news for almost anyone I know in leading computer science departments. Why is that? I think most leading computer scientists believe that although supercomputers are useful for certain problems, this is a technology of the past that will simply improve incrementally with underlying processor improvements (in fact, most supercomputers today use conventional processors used in desktop computers rather than the special purpose processors used in the past).

The big innovations in supercomputing have been in the programming models, network interconnects, and most recently in cooling/power usage. But, people seem to see much more important innovation going on in the cloud computing clusters that literally combine thousands of commercial processors together in standard racks connected with traditional networks in huge data centers around the world. This is the technology that powers Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, and the many other web computing giants of the world and is then resold inexpensively to every little web site or mobile phone application that needs to do computing in the cloud. This type of architecture supports a far wider range of applications than supercomputing. Cloud computing is a hot topic in both industrial and academic computer science research and American computer scientists are clearly far in the lead in this area of work.

Academic Publications
In my own subfield of Ubiquitous Computing (ubicomp) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI), China is still in its early stages. Ubicomp has been around since 1991 and in those 20 years China has had almost no presence in the field (for example there were no papers from China at the 2010 UbiComp conference). This year I co-organized the conference with my colleagues at Tsinghua University and we held UbiComp 2011 here in Beijing (link). There were over 300 papers submitted and only 50 were accepted for presentation at the conference (a highly competitive 17% acceptance rate). Although this year we saw 38 papers submitted from China (last year there were only 10), only 3 of these papers with primary Chinese authors were accepted (and all of those were from Microsoft Research Asia). There were many US universities that alone had as many or more papers than all of China (e.g., Carnegie Mellon had seven and UW had four!).

This trend is very similar at other top computing conferences: China had almost no representation 5 or 10 years ago and now there is a smattering of papers (e.g., 1-3 papers/year – out of a 30 paper program – the last couple of years at each of the top systems and networking conferences: SIGCOMM, NSDI, and SOSP). Again, the majority of these papers are coming out of Microsoft Research Asia, not the top Chinese universities.

So we see China starting to be represented at major computing conferences, but Chinese researchers are at this stage no more impactful than many other smaller countries (e.g., France). Given the large number of universities and researchers pursuing computing in China, the interesting question is whether this a straight line that is going to continue its meteoric rise of the last few years (similar to China’s economic growth of ~10% for ten years) or is China’s impact in computing research going to start to grow at a much more modest rate (similar to many predictions of its economy growing at still fast yet more modest rates).

Research Creativity: Students, Faculty, & Academic Structure
Creativity, innovation, and “design thinking” have been some of the most overused buzzwords bandied about in the US business press over the last 3-5 years and this has especially accelerated in the few months since the passing of Steve Jobs. In computing research as well as in industry, creativity and innovation are also important topics. These hard to measure attributes are what we all believe lead to “impact”, which is also hard to measure, but is that which we are all after! Counting papers at top conferences or patents does not measure impact, but people (including me above) tend to sometimes fall back on this counting exercise, as it is easy to measure.

Having interacted with many top Chinese students while here in China, at both MSRA (the top place to have an internship for a computer scientist in China) and at Tsinghua (the top CS department), I’ve gotten a chance to observe the level of creativity and innovation in these top students. We’ve also attracted some of the top design students in China to our lab (in addition to hiring top designers from the US and Europe). I’ve also been lucky to interact with the top Chinese research computer scientists (i.e., folks who already have their PhDs) at MSRA and at the universities.

The simple fact is, the level of innovation and creativity in this cohort is much lower than in similar cohorts in the US. And in fact, the ones that are the best on the “creativity” scale almost invariably are folks who received their PhDs in the US/Europe or worked in the US/Europe. This is not to say those who haven’t left China for their education aren’t doing good work – as I mentioned above MSRA is one of the top places in the world for CS research and the researchers there are publishing at the top venues, but many of the most successful of these researchers have spent years under the tutelage of computer scientists who were trained in the West – almost going through a 2nd PhD while working at MSRA.

The simple fact is if you are educated in the Chinese system, from primary school through university, you have a much harder chance of practicing being “creative” than if you were educated elsewhere. This is not a genetic trait (as many Chinese educated in the West have clearly shown), but a trait of the Chinese educational system, which is based on over a thousand years of Chinese culture.

There are many articles (link) on how cultural underpinning of the Chinese educational system does a good job with the basics (e.g., the students in Shanghai beat the entire world on the PISA Test a year ago), but many here in China question whether the pervasive emphasis on memorization, test taking, and a cultural imperative that almost requires copying the teacher (link art article) and the past “masters” leads to a population that cannot think “outside of the box” (link).

Again, this lack of creativity is cultural and obviously there are folks who don’t fit the system and are creative and innovative (the art scene in China is growing by leaps and bounds). For many years, the top students in China have left the Chinese system for graduate school in the US. Although some of these students start out in America as brilliant and hard working students, many do not show much creativity when they start. They have learned not to question the professor, or others in positions of authority, and they are used to being told what to do rather than coming up with ideas on their own. But, many soon rise above this after a few years of practice and have turned into some of the top stars in the field (e.g., my own classmates at Carnegie Mellon, Harry Shum and Qi Lu, are now two of the top executives at Microsoft (links)).

I have personally advised students like this that have gone onto great computing careers, relying on their innovation and creative skills everyday. But this was only after 5-6 years in the “American” higher education system. My colleagues have often told me of similar examples. Now many Chinese are also aware of this key difference in our educational systems. The latest trend among middle class and wealthy Chinese is to send their kids to the US for their undergraduate degrees or even their high school education (some 200,000? were studying in the US this year alone link).

Now this trend by itself would cause one to believe that China will overtake the US in computing as this massive cohort of students return to China after earning their degrees. Although the “sea turtle” trend of returning to China after several years of working in the US continues, it doesn’t appear as common as some would believe. Many Chinese students become very accustomed to what is still an easier life in US cities and often choose to remain in America. In fact, a more important “glue” for these students might be the far more streamlined US corporate life (many Chinese companies are still fairly byzantine in their politics and structure and corruption is still a major problem). In fact, recent reports show that most wealthy Chinese are starting to secure homes and passports in the West, often for the educational opportunities outlined above, but also to avoid environmental degradation, corruption, and find access to healthcare (link report).

Last Spring I attended a major National Science Foundation workshop on computer science research collaboration with China (http://current.cs.ucsb.edu/nsf-uschina11/). Of the 80 attendees, over half were Chinese who were now professors at American universities. In computing research, many Chinese with US PhDs might be staying in the US for the prospect of working at a better university and with better graduate students than they can in China. Will this change soon?

One of the major differences I’ve noted between Chinese universities (and in fact Chinese organizations in general) and American universities is the power structure exposed in the academic hierarchy. American universities are hierarchical in that Full Professors make decisions about Associate and Assistant Professors, and Associate Professors in turn also make decisions (e.g., tenure) about Assistant Professors. But, I’ve also noticed that in the top departments I’ve been in that the more “senior” faculty understand that a lot of the innovation and best work occurs in the groups led by the “young” Assistant Professors and we in fact “protect” them so as to allow them to better develop and get this great work accomplished (e.g., we do not give them a lot of tedious committee work to do and we encourage them to teach advanced courses in their specialized areas rather than large, general undergraduate courses).

In Chinese universities, there is far more power and money concentrated in the hands of the senior faculty. In many universities the Assistant Professors are just that – they assist a senior faculty member and have no true independent agenda of their own. In a fast moving field like computer science, I believe this structure is bound to fail and cannot keep up with the changes in technology that occur so rapidly. Certainly more rapidly than the 10 years or more it will take a hotshot young faculty member to rise to the top of that hierarchy.

Today’s computing technology is nothing like it was 10 years ago! I believe this structural impediment makes it hard for anyone to name a computer science researcher in a Chinese university that they would say is one of the top in the world in their subfield (other than the few famous names, e.g., Andy Yao – a Turing Award winner, who have been “imported” to Chinese universities).

This means that unless the Chinese universities change this system, it will take many years (15-20) before their CS departments could even have a chance of being stocked from top to bottom with world-class computer scientists. And that would assume they start producing the top scientists here in China (which hasn’t happened yet) or start importing them from abroad (only a few have come so far). Again, this is not to say there aren’t good people here already. There are plenty of good people working in Chinese universities. For example, Prof. Yuanchun Shi, my co-chair for UbiComp 2011 from Tsinghua, is doing lots of great research in her group at Tsinghua. These folks are just spread thin and not a single Chinese computer science department has the strength of even a top 25 or maybe even a top 50 computer science department in the United States. This will be hard to change anytime soon without a massive change in hiring practices as well as in how those people are treated when they come on board.

Startups
Although academic computer science research in China isn’t yet all it can be and has some major impediments to its continued improvement, I believe the start-up scene is a bit healthier. Although I am not an expert on this, I try to keep up by following the top China tech blogs and writers on twitter (cite niubi, wolfegroupasia, tricia, kaiserkuo, affinitiy china, china law) and pay attention to what is going on at the key start-up events (e.g., TechCrunch Beijing was the most recent such activity).

I’ve also spent time chatting with and reading the works of folks who do study the start-up scene closely, such as Vivek Wadhwa (@wadhwa), professor at Duke and Stanford, who studies high-tech entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley and around the world. Professor Vwada has commented recently on the healthy start-up scene he has encountered while traveling in China (link). Noticing that this culture is starting to come to terms with the need to try and fail and start over again, as has fueled the amazing rise of Silicon Valley’s companies.

The conclusion I’ve come to from watching the Chinese start-up scene is that 1) it is vibrant, 2) some major early movers, especially on the Internet, e.g., Baidu, Alibaba, Sina, have already amassed fairly dominant positions in their niches as happened in the US (though we know as Yahoo has shown most recently that these positions can be lost easily), and 3) the amount of venture funding and number of startups are both increasing rapidly. 

In addition to these traditional spaces for innovation, there are other cool things that happen in China that are an outgrowth of its manufacturing innovation. In particular, the entire Shanzhai market (link), which started with fake name-brand goods, including phones and purses, has quickly moved into making novel new products. Again, they tend to be useful tweaks (e.g., multiple SIM card phones, new shapes, etc.) rather than major innovation. This might be where lots of the creative engineers end up in China as these types of folks may not have conformed with the rigid educational system to get into the elite schools.

There is innovation in the China computing startup world, but the type of innovation that happens in start-ups and in industry tends not to be the innovation that will pay off for the entire computing field in 10 years (e.g., the invention of the internet and many of the other computing advances I noted in the introduction to this article). Start-ups tend to take ideas that have already been floating around for a while and repurpose them to a new problem or incrementally improve on them. China’s start-ups are especially known for this incremental improvement strategy. As noted tech environmental crusader Peggy Liu (@shanghaipeggy) wrote today on Twitter, “China is not good at radical innovation, but it's great at tweakovation.” This quote exactly captures the type of activity happening most often in China’s startup scene.

This criticism for copying and tweaking rather than innovating is probably overblown, but continues to be said in and about the Chinese computing industry. One of the biggest names in China Tech funding, Kai Fu Li, founder of Innovation Ventures and former Google China Head, Microsoft Research Asia head, and all around Chinese high tech success story (from Taiwan), now has the nickname in China of “Start-Copy Li” (check for proper translation) for the propensity of companies in his venture portfolio to simple copy a popular western web site and give it some minor Chinese characteristics. For instance, there were hundreds of Groupon clones in China just a few months ago.

So although start-ups in China might be healthy, if a little less innovative than in the West, I do not think this is a fundamental problem for Chinese computing. The bigger question is can they really make the type of fundamental advances in the future that in the past led the US computing industry to its dominance. And can the Chinese make those advances if they are not first taking place in academic research. I do not believe they can and therefore encourage the Chinese to keep upgrading the educational system and infrastructure – but with more than just increased funding. I believe the structure needs to change (see below).

Patents
One argument for China’s future dominance in the fundamental underlying technologies of computing is the large Chinese patent portfolio. The NY Times article pointed out how China has overtaken Europe in number of patents filed and is catching up to the US and Japan. What the article fails to mention is that many, many people believe that many of these Chinese patents are bogus (link Vivek, China La blog) and come out of 1) a quota system that requires organizations to produce a certain number of patent filings per year regardless if they are actually any good and 2) a tendency to copy foreign patents, make minor changes to them, and then use these as trade barriers to western companies trying to do business in China (link China law blog). Leaving this type of information out of the NYTimes article really distorts the patent story. When paired with the lack of strong intellectual property rights protection in China, the patent story leads one to believe that China will not be able to innovate in the future.

How China Can Reach its Computing Potential
My analysis above might leave you with the opinion that I think China’s computing field is going nowhere fast. That is far from the truth. I think China will continue to improve in computing for two major reasons. First, computing in China will improve simply due to China's massive size: (1) in 1.3B people there are going to be a lot of great ones, no matter what barriers you put in their way and (2) the domestic market by itself will be huge and thus a great opportunity! Second, the large investment in technology research funding coming from the government (growth on the order of 10%/year for 10 years) will allow a lot of researchers to carry out many ambitious projects. But, I believe that instead of fearing China, we should see that China reaching its potential in computing could change the world in a very positive way and it is something we should try to help with.

China is Part of the Solution
Why do we want Chinese computing to succeed? I believe that the major problems that the US faces, the rest of the world faces, and China especially faces. China is key to helping solve these problems and by helping China’s research and education system in computing, we have a better chance of creatively solving these problems together. These are problems in:
  •  Sustainability: maintaining the environment, and stopping global warming in particular
  • Education: Improving education for all in both the basics as well as in creativity and innovation
  • Healthcare: Creating a healthcare system that will care for an aging population (North America, Europe, and China all suffer from this) as well as all one that will service all citizens at a reasonable price
All three of these problem areas will have solutions that involve government, policy, and pricing. Yet they also are problems where major technology innovations, especially computing technology innovations, can make a major positive impact. By working together with China on these problems we can help improve the world.

World Lab
In light of this view, I’ve been working the last few months on trying to create a new, multidisciplinary research institute that is jointly housed between a major Chinese university and an American university. This World Lab will become known as the place for risk taking, breaking the mold, inventing the future, and tackling the major problems facing the world. We will apply a new methodology I term “Global Design” to find a balance between design and technology, between human-centered & technology centered approaches, between academia & industry, and between Eastern and Western culture. The World Lab will push the boundaries of what is possible and invent the future today. This institute will help train the students and leaders of tomorrow’s universities and companies to be free thinkers who can create the solutions that society will need to solve these challenging problems.

I believe China’s rise in computing is remarkable, but the future is not assured. As a computer scientist I support helping China improve in computing because I believe it will help the world as well as the population of China. The problems are complex and success is not assured, but together I think we can create a better world.


Disclaimer: The opinions set out in this article are those of James Landay and do not represent the opinions of the University of Washington, Microsoft Corp., Intel Corp, or anyone else (unless they decide to say so – which I’d appreciate).

Acknowledgements: Thanks to Ben Zhao from UCSB (@ravenben) for some of the data on top networking and systems conferences. Thanks to Frank Chen (@frankc), Lydia Chilton, Aaron Quigley (@aquigley), Robert Walker, and Sarita Yardi (@yardi) for helpful comments on this essay.


My Background


Unlike other computing academics who have commented on Chinese computing, I’ve not just dropped into China for a week or two here or there and developed an impression. I’ve actually been living here full time for 2½ years. In that time I’ve helped build a new research group at Microsoft Research Asia(link), taught a course at Tsinghua University(link), co-organized a major international computing conference(link), started a major computing lecture series/symposium on new uses of computing(link), traveled to many different universities to speak, visit, and meet the students and faculty, and attended several meetings of the top computing faculty in China (a few of which also were attended by their US counterparts link: http://www.nsfc.gov.cn/Portal0/InfoModule_479/30695.htm).

I’ve also thrown myself into reading much of the press and blogs on innovation and start-ups in China and I’ve tried to go to events here in Beijing on these topics when I could. I also chat with others about these topics whenever I get a chance. As an expat you can easily meet some of the movers and shakers in this circle even when living in a city of 20M+.

In addition to my time in China, I think I’ve also been lucky to have been at the center of some of the top places in computing over the last 20 years. I obtained my PhD in Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University (link). CMU is ranked by most as one of the top departments in the world. I was a faculty member and received tenure in CS at UC Berkeley (link), another one of the world’s top departments. Until coming to China, I was a faculty member in Computer Science at the University of Washington (link), another top department. At UW we’ve built one of the top programs in the world in Human-Computer Interaction and Design (link), which is a field that is at the forefront of envisioning and building the future of computing technology.

I also have industrial experience. In addition to the last 2½ years at Microsoft Research Asia, unquestionably the best computing research organization in all of Asia, I was the co-founder and CTO of a silicon valley-based start-up (NetRaker) while on the faculty at Berkeley and I ran a ubiquitous computing research lab for Intel in Seattle for 3 years (link). The researchers at the Intel lab invented many leading edge technologies in that time, including the city-scale, beacon-based location capabilities that were originally found on the iPhone and every single smart phone since (link), activity inference technology that uses sensors to tell what physical activities you are doing in the real world (e.g., running, walking, biking, taking stairs, etc.), which is just starting to show up in products in its most basic form (e.g., the FitBit (link)), and other very cool technologies that hopefully you will hopefully see in products some day in the future.

So, I think I’ve got a pretty significant amount of experience in computing research at the top academic institutions, industrial experience through my time at Intel and Microsoft, and start-up experience through NetRaker, that when combined with my time and study in China puts me in a fairly strong position to comment on where China is in computing and where it might be going.


          Commentaires sur Ousmane Sonko: « Macky Sall va déployer des moyens pour acheter des députés » par Deugue rek - (via l'Appli Iphone SeneNews)        
Mr le député du plus fort , vous savez en politique c'est connu les calculs se font à convenance . Exp vous faites 5 + 5 = au lieu de dire j'écris 0 je retiens 1 vous faites : j'écris 1 je retiens 0 et vous obtenez le résultat que vous souhaitez mais il est faux . En 2012 Macky n'a pas obtenu 65% mais 25 % c'est au deuxième tour que 40% s'y sont rajoutés et depuis parmi ces gens certains n'ont pas attendu aujourd'hui pour se démarquer peut être pour dés raison opportunistes ( Idrissa Seck ,Khalifa Sall et d'autres j'en passe ) Je vous prouverai même que Macky a renforcé son aura , mais déjà comparer une élection présidentielle à une législative , c'est comme comparer un foulard de chez Hermès a une serpillères . Macky n'a rien perdu , quand il s'est adressé au peuple par référendum , le peuple lui a dit oui à plus de 65% malgré les défections soulignées plus haut . Mais dites moi à quelle niveau sont ses adversaires de l'époque qui sont toujours les mêmes plus les traîtres ?mais j'aime bien votre : malgré son << pse ,pudc , cmu , et les bourses familiales ) Macky est en perte de vitesse , que faudrait - il alors proposer à ce pays pour être aimé ? Voulez - vous Mr le député du plus fort nous rappeler ce que proposaient tous les autres président d'avant pour la prospérité du pays , et surtout ce que vous proposez pour demain ? Si vous en été à souligner l'ingratitude du peuple , il saura vous attendre . À bon entendeur .
          Show Your Mama Some Love (or Facebook Like)         

Epic Change has launched a clever social media infused fundraiser for Mother's Day, called To Mama With Love.  Leveraging the emotional connection we feel with our own mothers or our own pride of being a mom, Epic Change is inviting donors to participate in an online collaborative art project to honor moms around the Globe.

The fundraiser's goal to is to raise money for one amazing Mama who dreams of building a home for children in her village in Africa.  The money you donate to this effort will support Mama Lucy Kamptoni, a changemaker in Tanzania who once sold chickens and used her income to build a primary school that now provides a high-quality education to over 400 children in Tanzania. The money raised from this fundraiser will help build a boarding facility on campus so that every child who attends her school has a place to call home. To Mama With Love is a project of US 501c3 nonprofit Epic Change.

Here's how it works: You have to make a donation first. Then once you've donated, you can create a special "heartspace" in honor of your mother or a mother you admire. You are given the option to customize your "heartspace" with photos, video, poems and artwork. The program creates a mini-web page with a unique URL that declares your love.   

Here's the one I created to honor my mother, Ruth. Ironically, she isn't on Facebook or Twitter, nor does she have an email address. So, will have print it out and send via US postal mail. The heartspace also lets you create an e-card and I sent it to my Dad to share with my mom. (And, if anyone in my house is reading this blog, this would make a terrific mother's day gift - hint - hint.)

According to Epic Change's founder, Stacey Monk, the web site was created by volunteers that included developers who are students from CMU (where Stacey attended school) and a designer in London whose parents come from a village one hour from Mama Lucy in Tanzania. I love the design.

To help spread the word, the site has integrated "sharing" your love for your mother and Mama Lucy both on Twitter as well as on Facebook (or should I say sharing your "like"). For Facebook, they're using one of the Facebook social plugins.  

What are you doing to honor your mother on Mother's Day and help change the world? If you are a mother, how are you celebrating your special day and making the world a better place?

Beth Kanter is the author of Beth's Blog, Nonprofits and Social Media and the co-author of The Networked Nonprofit.


          An Affair To Remember        
On December 11, 2008, Carnegie Mellon's Heinz College Australia had it's biggest graduating ceremony yet with 50 scholars representing nearly 20 different countries picking up their diplomas.









This year's graduation was moderated by Carnegie Mellon's Provost, Dr. Mark
Kamlet (a former Dean of the Heinz College), and featured Alan Noble, the Engineering Director for Google Australia and a Heinz College Australia Advisory Board member, as the keynote speaker.












In my role as Executive Director of Carnegie Mellon Australia, I get to give the "Charge to the Graduates" at the end of the ceremony, which is kind of a gentle shove out the door, a verbal line of
demarcation between life as a graduate student and the challenges of the "real world".

Here are my remarks from a remarkable day:

First of all, I’d like to add my congratulations to all of our graduates and, in particular, the trailblazers that make up our first graduating class of part-time students. As someone who got two graduate degrees while trying to hold down a job, have a life, and keep my wife from forgetting what I looked like, I know how challenging this journey has been for all of you. Make sure that you take at least a few minutes to take great pride in your accomplishments.

And that brings me to my Charge to the Graduates.

I was pretty proud to get accepted into Carnegie Mellon as an undergraduate in the early 1980’s, although I probably didn’t understand how significant it was at the time. I was a pretty good student but I have to admit that my primary focus in high school was sports and girls, not always in that order.

My life changed forever about halfway through my first day of orientation as a freshman. I was sitting between two guys in a packed lecture hall. On my left was a guy who had worked at an IBM research lab over the summer. On my right was a guy proudly talking about the computer he had just built from scratch, from soldering the circuit boards to writing the operating system. As I glanced down a couple of rows, I noticed another incoming student, obviously from somewhere outside the US, working on page-wide equations located on the back cover of our new calculus book.

As a computer science major that had taken one programming class in high school and got a ‘B’, I was clearly in a new land. Unfortunately, it was a land where I had the wrong kind of passport, didn’t speak the language, and the natives seemed hostile.

I learned something pretty important in that moment—my success or failure would be directly connected to how much I was willing to change and how hard I was willing to work. It was also reminded me that having a good dose of humility is a pretty desirable character trait.

I’ve had lots of challenges in my academic and professional life since then but getting through Carnegie Mellon is still the toughest thing I’ve ever done. Ever though I eventually graduated from CMU as a University Scholar, I was so happy that my time at Carnegie Mellon was over, and so intent to put that difficult period in my life behind me, that I chose not to stay in touch with the university for nearly a decade.

So I hope that our graduates, this year and every year, enter the world with what I’ll call a “confident humility”. That while they take great pride in the accomplishments that we recognize today, they balance that confidence with a recognition that they have stood on the shoulders of giants—friends, family, classmates, and colleagues—to get this far and that they’ll need other shoulders—to stand on, depend on, and occasionally cry on—to make their difference in the world.

Congratulations again to our graduates. All of us at the Heinz College hope that you won’t be as foolish as I was and let ten years go by before you let us know what you’re up to. You’re now officially part of the Carnegie Mellon family and, like the family and friends that are with you here today, we’ll be cheering you on every step of the way.

Thank You.

Photos courtesy of Roy VanDerVegt www.royvphotography.com.au
          The CMU effect: A lot of economic blessings to count        
here are those who regard economic impact studies with suspicion — sometimes justifiably so — the benefits of this industry sector or that event are inflated. But the analysis conducted every two years of the economic effects of Colorado Mesa University in Western Colorado is, if anything, conservative in quantifying the role of CMU. And […]
          CMU chemical promises to rid 99 percent of BPA from wastewater.        
Terry Collins will tell you BPA is a scary compound. It's a chemical that's used to manufacture plastics, and more than 6 billion pounds of it are produced every year.
          Episode 40: Review of Iron Fist and the Justice League Trailer        
Danny Rand, along with the Justice League, take center stage of Episode 40 as we review Season One of the Netflix original series, Iron Fist, and discuss the Justice League trailer. We look back at Iron Fist history and debate whether or not critics were justified in their series reviews. And, can Justice League right the DCMU universe, or will Wonder Woman carry the weight? Hosted by Clarence Brown, Kyle Jones, and guest co-host, Andy Sims.
           Men's CMU T Shirt         
Men's CMU T ShirtCMU Words Design

Buy Now
          What drives India? - Part II        
Part I: http://kishoresp.blogspot.com/2011/03/what-drives-india-part-i.html

What drives India? I had put this question to a couple of colleagues travelling with me in Japan. Some of the immediate answers were -- food (people in India and abroad like Indian food), hospitality (well..., after seeing Japan I tend to disagree) . Nothing was a satisfying answer.

To understand what drives India, I had to connect my trips to Varanasi in 2002 & 2008. In 2002, I had a bitter experience by seeing carcasses (human and animal) floating in Ganga. It was hard to swallow, and live with, given that I had gone to Varanasi to take a holy dip in Ganga (I didn't and haven't yet. I am due to take one, but may be in upstreams near Himalayas).

In 2008, I was a part of digital library team. We were with colleagues from CMU and other universities. We did see fire puja to Ganga, where hundreds of people (both Indian and foreigners) gather to see the evening puja on the Ganga ghat.

In these two visits, I had always asked -- how there can be carcasses left floating in a holy river? How there can be hundreds and thousands doing/watching puja to the river dumped with carcasses?. Why Varanasi attracts (and attracted) people from India and abroad?

Given these unforgettable experiences, I was now asking whether religion drives India. Whatever drives a nation or people, it should be towards upliftment or development. It was clear to me that religion is not a driver. Then what else?

Is it spirituality? - Indians are believers in God, humanity and in Karma. Self-realization and attainment of peace are goals of every Indian. Is it spirituality that foreigners see when they see India or Indians? Is it for which folks from all over the world fly here and find themselves in short & narrow streets of Varanasi and next to Ghats?

Is it the goals of self-realization and peace are so hardwired in our minds it drives our lives subconsciously and so the entire nation? Is it spiritualism -- which makes us tolerant of such unpredictable life in India at different levels (political, social, family-wise, career-wise)? Is it spiritual bent of our minds, which eventually lead us to say -- whatever happens is for our good.

          Discussing Who Episode 40 – Review of Iron Fist and the Justice League Trailer        
Danny Rand, along with the Justice League, take center stage of Episode 40 as we review Season One of the Netflix original series, Iron Fist, and discuss the Justice League trailer. We look back at Iron Fist history and debate whether or not critics were justified in their series reviews. And, can Justice League right the DCMU universe, or will Wonder Woman carry the weight? Hosted by Clarence Brown, Kyle Jones, and guest co-host, Andy Sims.
          New Cartoon: "Stick Around"        
I encountered this one at the CMU English Language Institute's Annual Poetry Contest: If someone says this and they are not handing you a bottle of glue, then they probably just want you to stay wherever you are and not leave.-Bill [...]
          Zimske "King Size" Deverike        
Vjerujem da je vecina ribolovaca uzivala loveci krupne deverike u svojoj mladosti, a ja i danas s vremena na vrijeme volim otici ciljano loviti takozvane lopatare iliti "King Size" Deverike.
Ljeti i u Jesen se daju uloviti bas kapitalni primjerci, ali Zimi to ima svoju posebnu draz u nadmudrivanju sa ovom prelijepom ribom.
Ja ih obozavam loviti i zimi kad je ribolov nesto zahtjevniji, a samim tim i zanimljiviji.
Iako mi je glavni saranski ribolov, uzivam u ribolovu i drugim tehnikama poput feeder-a.
Moj cilj su samo oni krupniji primjerci i sve mi je podredjeno njima od sistema, taktike, mamaca itd.

Ovaj moze se reci srednje teski fider na deverike mi je jedan medju omiljenim pristupima jer sam upravo iz saranskog ribolova prenio neke cake koje odlicno rade pri lovu krupnih deverika.
Upravo iz tog razloga vam i pisem jer steceno iskustvo zelim podijeliti sa vama.

- Prije nego i pocnem, a znam da vas vecina ovo zna, ipak moram napomenuti par stavki vezano uz ovu ribu.
Deverike su jako probirljive ribe, a pogotovo one velike nije tako lako prevariti i uloviti ih.
Iako se za njih zna da su jatne ribe odnosno da zive u jatima, cesto krupni primjerci zive usamljenicki i ponekad se bas treba potruditi kako bi ih ulovili.
Ova riba voli duboku vodu i nemojte se iznenaditi ako ih lovite na dubinama preko 8 i vise metara.
U hladnijem dijelu godine cesto znaju biti u nekom medjusloju ako se radi o izrazito dubokoj vodi bez nekih vecih prepreka.
Ako pak u vodi postoji nekih prepreka i zaklona, rado ce se privuci tim objektima i tu boraviti.
Upravo u ovom danasnjem zimskom ribolovu sam ih pronasao na dubini od 7,5 metara pored jednog potopljenog stabla.
Naime, drvo u vodi apsorbuje bolje toplotu te tako stvara ambijent ugodan za boravak i zimovanje pa makar to bio i 1C° u plusu za razliku od otvorene vode.
Pored toplote ribe ovdje imaju i zaklon, ali i izvor hrane tokom toplijih mjeseci.
Sve ovo su na prvi pogled nijanse, ali kad ih se sve sklopi u jedno onda to cini veoma bitnu razliku i tok vaseg ribolova.

Sistemi i prezentacija
Kada znamo za lokaciju gdje deverike obitavaju ili smo ih pronasli tad je potrebno odabrati odgovarajuci sistem.
Kao sto sam i naveo ja koristim skoro sve iz saranskog ribolova i to mi se pokazalo odlicnim.
Tokom hladnijih mjeseci je dno prepuno lisca koje je za vrijeme Jeseni opalo u vodu pa stoga koristim plivajuce montaze koje su izdignute nekih 1cm i vise od dna.
Jos jedan razlog za to je sto deverike u vecini slucajeva uzimaju mamac izdizuci ga na gore, a ovim sistemom su kacenja veoma ucinkovita.
Udica igra veoma vaznu ulogu, a ja sam ovaj puta koristio nove visokokvalitetne udice od Masterbih koje su strasno ostre i nepogresivo kace ribu.
Ova udica pod nazivom Curve Shank je fenomenalna, a broj 8. odlican za univerzalnu montazu na kojoj mogu koristiti jednu malu plivajucu boilu ili jedno ili dva zrna umjetnog plivajuceg kukuruza o cemu cu vise govoriti u nastavku kod mamaca.
Predvez mi je kratak jer zelim sistem blizu hranilice sa hranom, a mamac sa udicom mi je udaljen najvise 10cm od hranilice.
Materijal za predvez koristim saranaski - neutralni, a ovaj put je to bio Korda Super Natural.
Na kraj strune navezem malu omcu - u saraniji to nazivamo dlaka.
Navucem mamac i stavim stoper te onda kroz mali buzir provucem nit i navlacim buzir na udicu.
Polozaj buzira namjestam na sami luk udice kako bi dobio jos agresivniju samokacivu montazu jer kad riba pokusa da izdigne mamac, udica joj se sama automatski zabija u usta.
Udicu vezujem standardno cvor bez cvora, a zatim iznad udice na strunu stavljam malu olovo - sacmu koje je udaljeno nekih 1cm.
Ovakav sistem je veoma efikasan tokom citave godine, a zimi je jedan od mojih omiljenih.
Sad sve spajam na osnovni najlon izmedju kojeg je obicna virbla-vrtilica na koju nalijeze hranilica.
Izbor hranilice je takodje vazan, a ja ih pravim sam za sebe koristeci gotove kalupe za izljevanje olova koje mozete i sami kupiti ovdje na blogu:
www.ribolovacki.blogspot.com/p/shop.html
U ovom shopu imate veoma povoljno ogroman izbor aluminijskih kalupa za izradu svih vrsta olova, ali i hranilica kako obicnih tako i onih za method feeder.
Ja imam kalup za method hranilice sa tri odljevka u gramazama od 30/50/90 grama sto pokriva skoro sve situacije u kojima se nadjem na vodi.
Kalup za olovo mi se u jednoj godini ribolova peterostruko isplatio zbog ustede, a vjerujem da ce i vama.
Sve sto je potrebno za izradu sistema - predveza
Mamci i primama
Odabir hrane je od velikog znacaja, a moj prvi izbor je Masterbih Feeder Carp.
To je hrana na koju lovim zadnjih 5. godina i ne planiram da je promjenim jer mi se pokazala fantasticnom tokom citave godine na svim tipovima voda.
Ima unikatni specificni miris, a njena struktura je veoma bogata za razliku od mnogo jeftinijih hrana na trzistu u kojima bukvalno nema nista.
Obogacena je strasnim aditivima i skupim sastojcima te nije primama za svaki dan vec striktno za vazne ribolove, a meni je moram biti iskren svaki izlazak vazan jer zelim da na vodi uzivam i lovim, a ne kopam nos gledajuci u nebo.
Ovu primamu mozete samu koristiti bez ikakvih dodataka, a ja sam otisao korak dalje i pronasao varijantu koja nepogresivo lovi one "King Size"!
Mjera se odnosi na pola kesice kilogramskog pakiranja fider hrane, a tajna je u jednom tekucem dodatku pod nazivom Masterbih Fruit Amino kojeg malo dodam u svoju primamu koju kasnije dovlazim obicnom vodom na poziciji gdje lovim.Velike ribe traze hranu, a ovaj aminokiselinski dodatak im daje jasan znak da krenu u akciju i kad mozda nisu zainteresirane za jelo.
Odokativno je to oko 10-15ml za pola kilograma primame, a ako stavite i vise nece skoditi vec samo moze biti jos atraktivnije.
U primamu ubacim jos saku secerca iz konzerve i saku kuhane konoplje sto je sasvim dovoljno u ove zimske hladne dane.
Takvu hranu energicno izmjesam i ostavim stojati nekih 15-ak minuta a zatim opet promjesam i dovlazim po potrebi.
Sad je hrana spremna za lijepljenje na hranilicu.
Sto se tice mamaca tu nema dileme i nezaobilazni adut je Masterbih Fake Corn u aromi Sweet Corn koji tako realno i snazno mirise da bih ga i sam pojeo.
Veoma jeftin mamac, a jedno pakiranje vam moze biti citavu sezonu.
Prednost ovog plutajuceg gumenjaka je sto je on izradjen brizganjem i sto je u samoj masi umijesana tekucina odosno aminokiseline, ulje i sladilo.
U samom pakiranju se nalazi i buster tekucina te nakon sto zavrsite ribolov, samo svoj mamac ponovno ubacite u bocu da upije tekucine i mozete ga koristiti vise puta.
Ja jedno pakiranje koristim citavu godinu bez ikakvih problema.
Ovaj umjetni kukuruz je odlican na dlaci koja je odmjerena za jednu popupicu od 10mm sa kojom smo napravili predvez.
Mozete staviti jedno, a ja pretezno koristim dva zrna jer zelim izdvoji i upecati samo vece ribe.
Jos jedan favorit mi je pop-up boila pink boje u velicini 10mm.
Strawberry Cream od firme Masterbih su strasno lovne.
Predobro mirisu na kombinaciju obicne i sumske jagode, imaju odlican vizuelni efekat, plovnost i postojanost dok njihova struktura omogucuje snazno otpustanje atraktora u vodi.
Ja volim ove popupice u pocetku ribolova zaliti Fruit Aminom kojeg koristim u primami kako bi dobile jos jaci nutritivni signal, a kasnije pred kraj ribolova prelazim na dipanje mamca u Masterbih Amino Liquid Dip Fruit kojeg ribe veoma brzo lociraju pod vodom.
Razlog tomu je sto od samog pocetka krecem sa laganom atrakcijom, a onda kako vrijeme odmice ja ju povecavam jer ako nam se jato mota oko zone pecanja, tu je vec oblak hrane od konstantnog zabacivanja malo poremetio osjetila kod riba i pozeljno je mamac malo istaci da bi ga one prije pronasle.
Da se razumijemo, ovo govorim sa tacke gledista u ovom robolovu, tj. u ledeno hladnoj vodi kad je atrakcija jedna od najvaznijih stavki dok ja uz nju volim prezentirati i nutritivni signal kako bi se ribe jos vise opustile i intenzivno trazile hranu.
Jos jedna prednost ovakvih mamaca je da su vam ruke uvijek na toplom jer nema potrebe stalno nesto cackati oko mamaca.
Zamislite da stavljate glistu ili snop crvica svakih 4-5 min na udicu, a vani je ledara brrrr..?

Taktika
Pozeljno je da hranilicu zabacujete na isto mjesto, a ako je voda kao u mom slucaju dublja, onda primamu napravite ljepljivijom tako sto cete je nesto vise namociti i jako stegnuti na hranilicu.
Ako vam se primam jako raspada u gornjim slojevima, to moze ribi ostaviti dovoljno cestica da ona nema potrebe spustiti se na dno po zalogaj.
Ovo je veoma vazno tokom citave godine, a tokom zime jos bitnije kad ribu svega par zalogaja zasiti zbog usporenog metabolizma u hladnoj vodi.
Fruit Amino se brzo rasprsuje u vodi iz hranilice i ostavlja signal koji je znak da krenu u potragu, upravo iz tog razloga ga i koristim jer sve sto se vise spustaju ili jednostavno priblizavaju kamarici hrane to je signal jaci gdje ih ceka moj mamac sa udicom.
Druga prednost je da puno hrane ne ostaje u drugim slojevima osim nesto malo cestica primame uz ono glavno "Amino signal" koji nepogrjesivo privlaci krupnu ribu koja zeli pravi zalogaj.
Ako pak imate probleme na jacoj tekucoj vodi gdje vam se hrana rasipa mnogo ili je to prouzrokovano velikom dubinom, firma Masterbih ima rjesenje i za ove situacije kad mozete dodati Special Groundbait Glue hrani, odnosno specijalno ljepilo za primamu da vam hrana bude postojanija prilikom zabacaja i pada u vodu.
Ovaj dodatak je neko krace vrijeme odrzava kompaktnom i pod vodom, a onda pocinje da se otvara kao i bez njega sto je odlicno.
Deverika ima nesto slabiji vid, a na velikim dubinama je to po mom misljenju ionako svejedno pa je potrebno obratiti paznju da ne podizete stap u kontru ako riba samo zapne za najlon jer se to cesto desava kad vam legne jato na hraniliste.
Ja ponekad volim stap staviti na bankstick na kojem je saranski indikator gdje mu osjetljivost pojacam pa nepogresivo znam kad je to griz, a kad zapinjanje o najlon.
Nakon svega par zabaca i grizeva te zapinjanja vjerujem da cete i vi lako nauciti razlikovati pravi griz od onog laznog.
Moram vam napomenuti jos jednu vaznu stvar, a to je da su deverike jako osjetljive na promjenu vremena.
Pogotovo je to po vjetrovitom danu kad mi se u vecini slucajeva pokazalo da nisu zainteresovane za hranjenje.Pred nevrijeme i neke padavine je pretezno na samom dnu i tad nije puno zainteresovana da pretrazuje teren vec joj mamac mora biti serviran pred nos da bi ga uzela.
Najbolje je stabilno i jednolicno vrijeme koliko je to moguce potrefiti i pouzdati se u prognozu.
Temperatura u ovom ribolovu je bila u zoru oko -5C°, a oko podneva je bila oko 2C°.
U samo jutro je bilo i nesto vjetra sto nije bas obecavalo dobar ribolov, ali sam ipak odlucio okusati srecu.
Svi cete pomisliti kako su mi najbolje grizle oko podneva kad je bila najvislja temperatura sto bi po nekom pravilu i trebalo biti zimi, ali nazalost ovaj put je bilo drugcije.
Ne da nisu grizle - ulovi se pokoja na svakih 15-20 minuta, ali to nije kako bi trebalo da bude.
Najbolje su mi grizle oko jedan sat prije mraka kad sam na svakih 2-3 minuta imao griz.
Upravo je to ono sto se trazi.
Sve ovo vam pisem s razlogom da ne odustajete prerano vec budete istrajni i uporni, a trud ce se garantirano isplatiti.
Vjerujte u sebe i vidimo se na vodi.
Bistro!

Za: ribolovacki.blogspot.com
Autor: Boban
          Found Senryu (#224) [Summary]        

The quiz this week has solutions from Martin DeMello and wkm.

wkm’s solution uses the Lingua::EN package to count syllables. Installing Lingua::EN was somewhat of a challenge. I was only able to install it without the dictionary and run using the guessing library, hopefully others may have better luck.

When the program runs the first step is to read in the documents, extracting the words and syllable counts. Whenever a word’s syllables are looked up the results are cached to save time on looking up common words. Next, this list of words with their syllable counts is iterated over with all possible word offsets to find runs of 17 syllables. When such a run is found the words that comprise it are printed out.

There is, however, one issue with wkm’s solution. It does not check to see if the 17 syllables split on word boundaries into 5-7-5 syllable chunks. This causes the program to greatly over-estimate how many 17 syllable runs there are in the text.

Martin’s solution uses uses the cmu pronouncing dictionary directly. The entire dictionary is loaded so that words can be looked up easily. The text is then iterated through, counting up the number of syllables. When a run of words totals 17 syllables it is checked to see that the fifth and twelfth syllable boundaries are also on word boundaries.

If the number of syllables for a section is greater than 17 the first word in the section is removed and its syllables removed from the count. This allows checking of all possible runs of 17 syllables without having to iterate through the text multiple times. When running Martin’s solution against Wodehouse’s “Right Ho, Jeeves” it produces many good excerpts, but when run solely against those excerpts does not print them out. I haven’t been able to find the cause of this issue, but as they say, let’s leave that as an exercise to the reader.

Thank you Martin and wkm for your solutions to this week’s quiz!

Found Senryu (#224) - Solutions


          Promotion de la CMU : La Cicodev continue la sensibilisation        
Stratégie de sensibilisation sur la Couverture Maladie Universelle au Fouladou. A Kolda une large campagne de sensibilisation de la Cicodev est mise en branle pour orienter les populations dans les mutuelles santés. L’institut panafricain de recherche, de formation et d’action pour la Citoyenneté, la Consommation et le Développement entend élargir et participer à sa manière […]
          TRATAMIENTO DE DESORDENES TEMPOROMANDIBULARES. PHYSCIAL TECHNIQUES FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS.        

As a nice reflection on the past, Mercedes drove the 100km route done by Bertha Benz in the first automotive road trip 125 years ago. You will also find that this alternate video is much better at talking about the technical details of the vehicle.

The Vislab team from Parma also released video of their drive around town. As the name suggests, Vislab’s research has a focus on computer vision, though this test vehicle also has 3 small LIDARs.

The Mercedes video has a lot of statements from MB engineer Ralf Herrtwich about their goals in doing this using existing sensors (cameras and radar primarily) and not (though he does not name it) LIDAR which he says is years or decades away. While I don’t want to criticise the accomplishments of his team, nor in any way deny that everybody would love to be able to make a safe driving system using the most cost-effective sensors, his philosophy seems backwards to me.

First, those of us used to Moore’s law think that planning to use hardware that is expensive today but which will come down greatly in price by the time things are commercialized is the obviously right strategy. It seems backwards to limit yourself to the technologies of today in planning a product for the future just because they are cheaper today. To use the metaphor of a great Canadian athlete, you skate to where the puck is going to be.

This is magnified by the fact that the problems of robocars are safety problems, not problems of cost or ones of appearance. With safety as the dominant goal, it seems very odd to me to imagine that one would, in the first vehicles to be made, avoid using a sensor that could improve safety and performance markedly just because of cost or appearance. If the cost difference were forecast to be ridiculous, one could consider it, but it makes no sense if the cost is within the noise to early adopters. That’s why Tesla is able to succeed with such an expensive car — the early adopters are more interested in a cool, high-performance electric car than they are in the cost. The other argument that is made — that the established sensors are more tested and robust — has some merit but is surely a short term optimization.

It could be argued that attempting to build a vehicle without LIDAR is skating to where the puck is going to be in the next game. After all, there is optimism that vision and radar will be enough for safe driving some day. As we all know, humans can drive with simple vision — even with one eye closed — and no radar or other sensors aside from hearing. So some day, cameras and a lot of processing probably can safely drive a car, and do it with low cost hardware. But the first production robocar? Deliberately not having lasers when it’s such a challenge to meet the safety goals? It seems very unlikely.

The notes on appearance are also odd to me. (It is commonly noted that research sensors like the Velodyne are big and make the car look unusual and not like a car.) We even see the IEEE Spectrum keen on how the new CMU car does not look like a robot) unlike BOSS from the urban challenge. While the research vehicles like BOSS were over-the-top on top, I think the reaction of early adopters is going to be quite the opposite. They will want their shiny new robocar to look distinctive and clearly different from regular cars. Prius owners reacted the same way, and there was not even much need for the Prius to have such a distinctive shape, though being more like a raindrop never hurts.

I suspect this approach is in part inspired by a marketing goal. The auto companies, not wanting to appear to be trailing Google on robocar research, are making extra effort to appear to be on a different course, and in fact ahead of Google and the rest on that path. “We’re doing what the competition is doing, but we’re not as far along” is not a very good press release. That’s OK if it were just for appearances — and I’m in favour of there being many competing approaches because any paradigm, including mine, can turn out to be wrong — but I hope that these teams really expect their approach is the best and fastest path to a safe and capable vehicle.

Here, by the way, are more details of the 33 mile trip by the GM/CMU collaboration. This vehicle has an “automotive grade” LIDAR — meaning one of the smaller ones that is one to four planes, not the giant 64 plane Velodyne used by CMU’s BOSS, Google and many others.


          How to design and build your own robot        
Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Robotics Institute researchers have developed a simplified interactive design tool that lets you design and make your own customized legged or wheeled robot, using a mix of 3D-printed parts and off-the-shelf components. The current process of creating new robotic systems is challenging, time-consuming, and resource-intensive. So the CMU researchers have created [...]
          Workplace Microkernel and OS: A Case Study        
The Ars Technica article on OS/2 mentions, in passing, Workplace OS, the pie-in-the-sky successor to OS/2 IBM was working on. I found this fantastic journal article written by Brett D. Fleisch and Mark Allan A. Co, which goes into this failed project in great detail. IBM's Microkernel, named Workplace OS microkernel, was the core components of Workplace OS, a portable successor of OS/2. The basic premise of Workplace OS work was: 1) IBM would adopt and improve the CMU Mach 3.0 microkernel for use on PDAs, the desktop, workstations, and massively parallel machines, and 2) that several operating system personalities would execute on the microkernel platform concurrently. This architecture would allow users to switch between applications written for different operating systems while IBM would also benefit by having one common platform for all product lines. The goals of the microkernel and the technical features of design are described in this paper. We also present lessons that may benefit future projects with similar goals. Also, I get to use the IBM icon!
          Four short links: 29 October 2014        
TweetNLP — CMU open source natural language parsing tools for making sense of Tweets. Interview with Google X Life Science’s Head (Medium) — I will have been here two years this March. In nineteen months we have been able to …
          Intel/Micron Detail Their 3D-NAND at IEDM        

On the Monday afternoon at IEDMthe key paper for me was the Intel/Micron talk on their 3D-NAND flash part (paper 3.3), which is currently sampling to customers. Samsung put their V-NAND flash on the market last year, but that uses charge-trap technology, whereas the Intel/Micron device has adapted conventional floating gate technology to the vertical direction.
This is the first-generation product, with 32 active tiers plus additional layers for dummy wordlines and source and drain select gates. A vertical channel surround-gate structure is used for the flash cells. The CMOS decoders and sense-amps are situated under the NAND flash array, which saves significantly on die area. It appears that this product will be a 256-Gb memory, or 384 Gb when the TLC version is introduced. Die size is 168.5 mm2, giving a bit density of 1.52 and 2.28 Gb/mm2 for the MLC and TLC devices.

  Intel/Micron 3D-NAND flash die (Source: Intel/Micron/IEDM)

The wordlines/control gates are horizontal polysilicon layers with an ONO inter-poly dielectric, and the floating gates are also polySi. The vertical channel and tunnel dielectric are formed in holes etched through a horizontal polySi/oxide stack. 

SEM cross-section of vertical-channel 3D-NAND structure  (Source: Intel/Micron/IEDM)

The process is shown below; the cell hole is first etched through the wordline tiers, and then the control gate is recessed back and the inter-poly dielectric is formed. The floating gate is then deposited, and etched back to form an isolated floating gate in each cell; the tunnel-oxide is formed, and the polySi channel is deposited to line the hole in the stack.
Process flow of vertical-channel 3D-NAND stack formation  (Source: Intel/Micron/IEDM)

An image of the full stack is shown below; I see 38 wordline layers, plus a thick polySi layer at top and bottom of the stack, presumably for the drain and source select transistors. There are two tungsten metal layers below the stack for the decoders and sense-amps, and also the wordline drivers; and it looks like the M3 bitline is also tungsten. There is another metal level above used for power busses and global interconnects, but we don’t know if that is copper or aluminum.


Putting the wordline drivers under the array is claimed to keep the wordlines short, but it raises some questions – how are the wordlines contacted from below? Do we have the sort of staircase at the ends of the wordlines that we saw in the Samsung V-NAND, and could it be inverted? (Can’t imagine that!)
SEM cross-section of 3D-NAND stack  (Source: Intel/Micron/IEDM)


          Measure And Mark The Drywall For The Parts To Cover The Sides And Top Face Of The Beam Using A Tape Measure And T-square.        

If a chalky residue comes off on your hand, you will need to easy to clean, and a simple wash or spray should do the trick. 3 Spread rolled foam plastic at the base of the concrete wall to set up a dumpster near the building that you are working in. Line the perimeter of these panels with 2-by-4 pieces in the ceiling and leaving bald spots that mar the appearance. How to Level a Wood Frame House on Blocks How to Level a Wood Frame House of the splattered drywall compound without applying too much pressure.

Tips & Warnings If you are doing several rooms, you might have of cleaner and start at the top of the siding. Use only enough pressure to flatten the highest point Wood By John Smith, eHow Contributor jual rumah panggung bogor Share Mold has the potential to damage wood. 3 Connect one end of the air-compressor hose to the air compressor, and the other cardboard so the filler will not stick to it later when removed. 4 Plug in the compressor and turn the dial on the primer using a half-inch roller cover and 3-inch brush.

11 Apply a line of wood glue to the front and back edges of the roof hinges, so that you have a lid that lifts and locks. If you are installing wood windows, add 2 inches to the nails Cut a piece of plywood to create a floor measuring 12 inches by 24 inches. "House Beautiful Take Charge of Your Home Renovation"; Susan Boyle Instructions 1 Place a 2- by 8-foot pressure-treated sill plate on the top of the CMU block wall. Rain, sun and wind all play a part in destroying the wood; but if halfway down the wall, if you are applying the texture to a wall.


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Videces prizore potresne
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Njihova dusa je prokleta
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Podigni mac svoj, andjele
Seti se krstaskih ratova
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Nek' ti u dusi vlada mir

Uslisi molitve, andjele
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I skini paucinu s ociju
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          ###RIBLJA CHORBA###        
Pogledaj dom svoj andjele

Pogledaj dom svoj, andjele
I skini paucinu s ociju
Videces prizore potresne
Videces nesrecne i bolesne
Videces cemer, smrt i jad

Pogledaj stado, andjele
Sve sami bogalji i prosjaci
Slepi tumaraju u gomili
Svima su kicmu polomili
Od tebe ocekuju spas

Pogledaj bagru, andjele
Njihova dusa je prokleta
Svima su stavili amove
Sebi sagradili hramove
Ruke im ogrezle u krv

Andjele, andjele, andjele
Ruke im ogrezle u krv

Podigni mac svoj, andjele
Seti se krstaskih ratova
Seti se preklanih vratova
Kad dodjes bogu na istinu
Nek' ti u dusi vlada mir

Uslisi molitve, andjele
Dabogda pocrkali dusmani
Pa budi andjeo osvete
Neka na svojoj kozi osete
Sta znaci beda, strah, i bol

Andjele, andjele, andjele
Sta znaci beda, strah, i bol

Pogledaj dom svoj, andjele
I skini paucinu s ociju
Videces prizore potresne
Videces nesrecne i bolesne
Videces cemer, smrt i jad

Andjele, andjele, andjele
Videces cemer, smrt i jad
          Shader Components for Modular and High Performance Shader Development        
Researchers at CMU and NVIDIA have developed an open source shading language and compiler framework named Spire enhanced to support shader components for high-performance rendering.  The Spire compiler can generate either GLSL or SPIR-V output for use with OpenGL and Vulkan based engines.  The work interfaces with a modernmini 3D engine that supports equivalent back-ends for both OpenGL and Vulkan.  The researchers will present this year’s work at SIGGRAPH next week which builds on a paper from last year’s SIGGRAPH.
          EU DA ILI NE        
Dragi nasi,

Ne mozemo jos da konfirmamo nas dolazak ovog leta, ali, kako sada stvari stoje, izgleda da cemo morati da kancelujemo tikete koje smo bukirali, jer nas ubi morgidz za taun haus sto smo skoro kupili. Doduse, za tikete imamo, ali ne mozemo da skupimo za prezente svima vama i ostaloj familiji, a bez toga ne ide da dolazimo jer necemo da nas smatraju za neke bamove, kao sto su pricali za Djoleta i njegove kad su svojima doneli po 100 maraka, kako su cip i kako nista nisu uradili u Kanadi. Mi tako necemo. Ili dolazimo kao gospoda, ili nikako. Zato smo se i dogovorili da sejvujemo sto mozemo vise i da sve odlozimo za sledeci vekejsn.

Inace, mi zivimo dosta dobro. Ja radim ful tajm i jos dva par tajma, a Zorica je nasla i treci par tajm (preko vikenda), ali smo dobro uskladili sifte pa mozemo da se vidjamo svakog drugog vika. Mozda je to malo nezgodno za Rebeku, ali njoj placamo dej ker posle skole, a odatle je uzima bejbi siterka i dovodi kuci na spavanje. Ona, iako je mala, razume da mi ovoliko radimo za njeno dobro i da ovako mora da bude sve dok ne otplatimo morgidz. Svaki fri tajm koristimo da budemo sa njom, pa smo je tako last samer (ili to bese pretproslog) vodili ceo dan na lejk. Kupili smo joj i hot dog i ajs krim i od tada stalno svima prica kako joj je bilo bjutiful.

Ja imam dosta posla oko taun hausa, (katujem travu, cistim atik) i nekako ugrabim par sati dnevno da sredjujem bejsment jer hocemo da ga rentamo i tako povecamo inkam. Kao sto vidite, da je lako - nije, ali kad je covek hard vorker i ako dobro isplanira skedzual moze sve da uradi. Ja sam lepo doterao liniju na 130 paunda, pa mi se neki nasi dusmani odavde podsmevaju da sam se osusio zato sto mnogo radim i spavam samo cetri sata, ali to je samo zato sto oni mnogo dzelos na mene, a i ne znaju da ja uvek ugrabim bar 45 minuta da dremnem u sabveju. Coveku vise i ne treba, a i to je samo privremeno (25-30 godina, dok ne otplatimo morgidz) a posle cemo da uzivamo. Sve je lako kad imas svoj target.

Cuo sam da Djole i ove godine ide za stari kraj. Moze se njemu kad vec deset godina cuci na velferu i jos vozi picu za kes, a zena mu otvorila bjuti salon u stanu pa ove nase guske navalile ko nezdrave da rade her kat. Ali, sta im vredi kad ne znaju da invest nego sve spiskaju na putovanja i neke druge stjupid stvari. Zato ce ceo zivot da budu golje i rentaju apartman, a mi imamo properti i sejving akaunt u banki. On stalno mejk fan od mene i prica okolo kako sam ful i ne znam da zivim, ali polako, zaigrace mecka i pred njegovom kucom. Ja sam vec obavestio revenju Kanada o njegovim biznisima, pa cu da ga pitam kako se zivi kad bude poceo da placa taksu za sve ove godine.

A to sto on misli kako mi ne znamo da zivimo, malo se prevario. Skoro svaki satrdej uvece ja i Zorica popijemo kejs piva (onaj mali od siks). Doduse, ona popije samo jedno zato sto mora na posao od devet, ali se zato ja rileks i smazem sve ostalo jer u sandej radim tek od osam. Zato, kad ga vidite nemojte nista da mu verujete sta prica jer on nije covek za rispekt. To je rizon sto vam nisam poslao pare po njemu, jer znam kako ce da kaze da sam cip i da grabim samo za sebe. Vi znate da to nije zbog toga, nego zato sto sam temporari sort, ali i to je samo dok ne otplatimo morgidz. Posle cemo svi da uzivamo. Sa nasim ljudima se ne druzimo puno jer oni uglavnom vole da juzaju one koji su nesto uradili u zivotu, a nece da rade i ostvare svoj sukces kad im ova zemlja vec daje cens.

Dobar sam samo sa jednim kolegom koji radi sa mnom u fabrici i vrlo je polajt jer mi uvek donosi novine od juce (srpske na cirilici) pa mogu da se upoznam sa svakim iventom. Ja sam se nudio da mu dam kvoder, ali on nece ni da cuje. Mnogo fini dzentlmen. Iz tih novina i vidim kako se zivi kod vas, pa sam konkluzn da i nemate bas mnogo cime da se praud. Pritisla nemastina i svi kukaju da im stigne help od nas koji krvavo pravimo svaki cent. Zato sam i mislio da vam sadzest da prodate to tamo sto imate i dodjete ovde, jer bi svima bilo bolje. Pare bismo ulozili u morgidz, a dosta bismo sejvovali i na dej keru i bejbi siterki jer biste onda vi ker o Rebeki. Vama bi ovde bilo mnogo najs jer je u nasem nejberhudu jedan veliki i lep park gde mozete da sedite po ceo dan, a kad je vinter mi obavezno zagrejemo living rum na 18 stepena i milina jedna. Bedrums ne grejemo jer je to cist vejsting, a i zdravije je ovako.

Sto se zdravlja tice, mi smo dosta dobro. Zorica se malo zali na kicmu jer na jednom dzobu u verhausu vuce pakete od 90 paunda, a posle kad ode na drugi u mit plent ubije je ladnoca iz frizera, pa kaze da ujutru ne moze da se ispravi. Ali to je samo temporari - do podne, posle toga ide ko nova. Ja se pomalo brinem i rekao sam joj prosle godine da ide kod doktora, ali ona nikako da nadje tajm. Kaze, treba mnogo da se ceka u vejting rum, pa kad to pomnozis sa njenom satnicom od sedam dolara ispadne stvarno mnogo, a mi nemamo mani za bacanje. Ja se ponekad osecam dizi, narocito kad zavrsim onu siftu od midnajt, ali to nije nista sirijus. Svako jutro uzmem jedan mafin za brekfast i posle mogu da radim jos toliko. Najbolja stvar koju sam uradio je sto sam bacio cigaretes jer su na televizn rekli da su mnogo bed za zdravlje, a i dosta nam je islo iz kucnog badzeta. Jedino, jos pomalo suspekt u Zoricu jer sam fju tajms osetio smok u batrum pa mislim da jos uvek sikretli pusi. Ali, neka je dok je ne uhvatim na delu, a onda ce da joj zvone usi tri dana.

Razmisljamo i da uzmemo novi kar, ali kad smo videli cene ostavili smo to za fjucur, jer je toliko ekspenziv da je to strasno. Jos mozemo da juzamo ovaj nas stari, samo moram malo da zagitujem ruf jer se Zorica stalno zali kako joj curi voda za vrat kad je rejn. I Rebeka kuka da uzmemo nesto novo na liz jer je sejm od drugarica kada je vide u cemu se vozi, ali ne zna dete koliko treba da se sejv za ne daj Boze i da mora da se pazi na svaki cent. Normalno, onaj Djole kupio novu Tojotu i pre neki dan se dere ko seljak da ga svi cuju: "Zemljace, dodji da te malo provozam da vidis sta je masina". Vozaj se ti, vozaj, mislim se ja, a kad ti dodje mantli fi i insurens nemoj da dolazis kod mene da ti borou pare. Uopste ne razumem te ljude sto ne znaju nista da sejvuju i koji ne znaju da ovde vredis onoliko koliko imas na akauntu. Samo se plasim da ce da im bude tu lejt kad saznaju.

Mada, da budem onest, nekad mi padne na pamet pa se zapitam ko je rajt - ja ili Djole? Kad ga vidim kako je smajli svaki dan iako nema nista, zapitam se da li vredi sto mi toliko vorking hard i sta ce da bude za koju godinu. Ali onda se setim koliki mi je morgidz i da nema rest dok se on ne isplati pa vise o tome i ne mislim. A posle, kad to finis, onda cemo svi da uzivamo.

Rebeka je veri gud i smart kid, samo ponekad ne mozes da joj objasnis kakav je ovde zivot i koliko covek mora da bude kerful, jer za cas moze da ode u bankropt, a onda ode i taun haus i sve sto si steko. Trazi recimo, ponekad picu za lanc ili mek donalds, videla od druge dece, i place sto joj Zorica svaki dan salje u skolu hleb i dzem. A dzem bas onaj lep, hom mejd, sami smo ga pravili od bresaka sto smo last samer nabrali na jednoj farmi. Ali ne vredi. Ne mozes to da eksplejn detetu, pa to ti je. Zorica se ponekad sazali pa joj kazem da ce tako samo da je pokvari pa cemo muku da imamo kad bude grou ap. Sta ce posle da trazi? Biciklu!!??

Sad je uhvatile neke musice pa kaze kako sve njene drugarice idu na pijano, pa hoce i ona. Idi bre dete, mislim se, samo mi jos pijano treba. To je ovde ekspensiv da se smrznes. Pa gde su pare za ticera, za gas, za notne buks... Kostalo bi me tu mac. A opet, ne mozes bas detetu nista da ne pruzis. Ne moze ni ono mimo sveta. Zato smo stavili na kalkulator i odlucili da je damo u srpsku skolu. To je mnogo jusful, jer ona ne prica naski i to je za nas mnogo pejnful. Jer sta je covek bez svog lengvidza? Zero! Srpski mora da se cuva jer smo bez njega komplitli lost. Zato ce Rebeka od jeseni u srpsku skolu, a ja sam se vec dogovorio sa ticerom da mu opentam bejsment, tako da cemo da platimo samo manji part. Mada mi ne bi bilo zao ni da platim sve kad je to u pitanju. Srpski je za mene svetinja!

Na kraju, sa old best, pozdravljaju vas vasi iz Toronta.
          CMU Student Arrested For String Of Oakland Fires        
Police arrested a man after a string of fire in Oakland back in April.
          BIOGRAFI KURT COBAIN        
Kurt Donald Cobain lahir pada 20 Februari 1967 di rumah sakit umum Grays Harbor-Aberdeen Washington Amerika Serikat dan dikota inilah Kurt menghabiskan masa kecilnya.Kurt merupakan putra dari pasangan Donald Cobain seorang Amerika yang berprofesi sebagai montir dan Wendy O’Connor seorang wanita keturunan Irlandia.
Sejak kecil Kurt sudah menunjukkan bakatnya di bidang seni dan pada awalnya ia suka menggambar sehingga berkembang ke arah music dan disaat usianya enam tahun Kurt bahkan dengan mudah memainkan nada yang baru saja ia dengarkan dari radio dengan menggunakan piano.

 http://www.hdwallpapersinn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Kurt-kurt-cobain-1285543-1024-768.jpg
Ketegangan dan perselisihan orang tua Kurt yang kemudian berakhir dengan perceraian pada tahun 1976 saat Kurt masih berusia sembilan tahun Sejak perceraian itu Kurt menjadi anak yang pendiam dari sebelumnya ia juga lebih suka menyendiri yang di kemudian hari perceraian orangtuanya ini diungkapkan dalam salah satu lagu Nirvana yang berjudul Serve The Servants yang termuat di album In Utero yang dirilis tahun 1993
Memasuki tahun 1981 ketika berusia 14 tahun Kurt tertarik dengan film ia mulai membuat sendiri film-film karyanya dengan menggunakan kamera video milik orangtuanya karya-karyanya kebanyakan bernuansa gelap dan kematian Kurt bahkan membuat sebuah film yang diperankan sendiri olehnya dimana ia melakukan akting bunuh diri dengan menyayat nadinya kecenderungan Kurt akan kematian juga nampak pada sebuah percakapan dengan seorang temannya John Fields dimana Kurt mengatakan bahwa ia ingin menjadi musisi terkenal dan kemudian mati bunuh diri di tengah ketenarannya
Pada masa-masa ini juga Kurt mulai mengenal narkotika meski belum sampai taraf yang mengkhawatirkan Kurt menggunakan obat-obatan itu untuk sedikit membantunya melupakan dampak psikologis yang dirasakannya akibat perceraian orangtuanya ketika SMA Kurt mulai berpindah-pindah tempat tinggal hingga akhirnya ia memutuskan untuk tinggal dirumah pamannya Chuck yang juga memiliki band Kurt kemudian diajari bermain gitar oleh Warren Mason gitaris band pamannya ketika itu Kurt minta diajari memainkan lagu Stairway To Heaven milik Led Zeppelin
Konser The Melvins merupakan sebuah band punk lokal asal Montesano yang kemudian mengubah haluan musik Kurt The Melvins sendiri ketika itu begitu disegani di Montesano Aberdeen dan Olympia vokalisnya Buzz Osborne mengenal Kurt sebagai pribadi yang unik saat mengomentari sukses Nirvana Buzz mengatakan bahwa Kurt tadinya seperti anak yang tak punya masa depan tapi musik kemudian mengubahnya menjadi jutawan
Penampilan perdana Kurt dan Krist terjadi pada bulan Maret 1987 yang sekaligus menasbihkan formasi awal Nirvana yang terdiri atas Kurt Krist dan seorang penabuh drum bernama Aaron Burkhard Waktu itu mereka belum memakai nama Nirvana ada banyak nama yang mereka pakai pada awal karir mereka dan mereka memakainya bergantian di setiap konser
Nama Nirvana baru muncul pada tahun 1988 ketika Kurt menemukan nama itu dari sebuah tayangan televisi tengah malam yang menyiarkan tentang program agama Budha yang berarti pencapaian kesempurnaan pada November 1988 single pertama Nirvana Love Buzz pun diedarkan pada kalangan terbatas Kurt sendiri yang kemudian menyerahkan salah satu kopinya kepada radio KCMU untuk diputar setelah itu Kurt segera mendengarkan radio dan setelah berjam-jam gelisah karena lagunya tak segera diputar hingga Kurt harus menelpon dari sebuah telpon umum dan merequest lagunya sendiri barulah kemudian lagu tersebut mengudara salah satu ironi terbesar seorang bintang Rock besar pada awal karirnya sempat merequest sendiri lagunya di sebuah radio
Pada awal 1991 Nirvana pindah label dari Sub Pop ke DGC (David Geffen Company) sebuah label mayor dengan distribusi lebih luas dan dana lebih besar salah satu orbitan tersukses DGC adalah Guns N Roses Nirvana juga bergabung dengan Gold Mountain sebuah perusahaan manajemen artis dimana Sonic Youth band punk kontemporer yang dikagumi Kurt bernaung Nirvana pun melanjutkan perjalanannya dengan mengeluarkan album kedua yang berjudul Nevermind yang direkam pada mei 1991 dan selesai sebulan kemudian
Inilah album legendaris dan fenomenal yang kemudian melambungkan nama Nirvana ke jagad musik internasional lagu-lagu yang terdapat di album ini bercerita tentang Tobi Vail vokalis band punk cewek Bikini Kill perempuan yang sangat disukai Kurt bahkan sepanjang tahun 1990-1991 hampir semua lagu yang dibuatnya selalu bercerita tentang Tobi meski demikian Tobi ternyata tak bisa sepenuhnya menerima Kurt Kurt akhirnya dekat dengan seorang wanita bernama Courtney Love vokalis band post punk Hole dan dalam rentang tahun ini juga heroin terus mengiringi hidup Kurt
Nevermind dirilis pada 24 September 1991 diluar dugaan album bercover gambar seorang bayi yang sedang menyelam ini telah terjual hingga mencapai 500.000 keping pada hari Helloween 31 Oktober 1991 Nirvana pun mendapat penghargaan piringan emas saat inilah seluruh radio Amerika Eropa Australia Jepang Brazil dan di negara-negara lain dengan serentak memutar terus-menerus single Smells Like Teen Spirit Kurt kini sudah tak perlu lagi menelepon radio memohon agar lagunya diputar video klip Smeels Like Teen Spirit pun memasuki masa mengudara dengan frekuensi terbanyak pada awal tahun 1992
Di Indonesia sendiri popularitas Nirvana berhasil menyaingi popularitas Guns N Roses Metallica dan Sepultura yang pada masa-masa itu memang sangat terkenal di Indonesia namun pada Januari itu juga kecanduan Kurt terhadap heroin makin parah dalam sebuah sesi pemotretan Kurt bahkan sampai tak sanggup berdiri tegak dan hanya tertunduk terus-menerus momen semacam inilah yang akan terus berulang dan mewarnai lembaran karir Nirvana berikutnya
Kurt dan Courtney menikah pada 24 Februari 1992 di Pantai Waikiki Hawaii Ketika itu Courtney sudah mengandung Sementara itu pada April 1992 Nirvana untuk pertama kalinya tampil di cover majalah Rolling Stones Akhirnya pada 18 Agustus 1992 pukul 7 pagi Frances Bean Cobain putri Kurt satu – satunya lahir di rumah sakit Cedars Sinai Los Angeles Sebuah kelahiran yang ironis karena pada saat yang sama Kurt juga tengah dirawat di rumah sakit yang sama di bagian rehabilitasi obat karena kecanduannya terhadap heroin sudah semakin parah
Sementara itu pada bulan Juli Nevermind akhirnya terlempar keluar dari tangga lagu Billboard setelah bercokol di sana selama hampir dua tahun Ketika keluar dari Billboard Nevermind telah mencapai angka penjualan sebanyak 8 juta keping di seluruh dunia
Pada 3 Maret di Roma Italia di Exelcior hotel berbintang lima Kurt kembali mengalami overdosis parah ini merupakan usaha bunuh diri Kurt yang pertama terlihat dari secarik kertas dalam genggaman Kurt dalam surat itu Kurt menulis seperti Hamlet aku harus memilih antara kehidupan dan kematian dan aku memilih kematian peristiwa ini pun menyebar di kalangan media musik dan penggemar diseluruh dunia CNN bahkan sempat memberitakan bahwa Kurt Cobain sudah tewas
Meski demikian Kurt masih menuruti saran orang – orang terdekatnya untuk mengambil program rehabilitasi Pada 30 Maret 1994 Kurt terbang ke Los Angeles untuk mengikuti program pemulihan di Exodus Recovery Center sebuah tempat rehabilitasi bagi para pecandu obat – obatan namun ini pun hanya bertahan dua hari Kurt melarikan diri dan pergi membeli tiket pesawat untuk pulang kembali ke Seattle
Sementara itu Courtney panik begitu mendengar kabar kaburnya Kurt ia takut sesuatu yang buruk akan terjadi pada Kurt karena beberapa hari sebelum terbang ke Los Angeles untuk masuk rehabilitasi Kurt dikabarkan sempat membeli sebuah senapan di sebuah toko senjata di Seattle
Kurt tiba di rumahnya Sabtu dini hari 2 April 1994 Dia sempat menemui Michael Cali dan Jessica Hopper dua orang yang bertuga menjaga rumahnya sementara Frances bersama Courtneyberada di Los Angeles yang tengah melakukan promo untuk album terbaru bandnya serta melacak keberadaan Kurt

          Miroslav Antic        
PESMA ZA NAS DVOJE




Znam,
mora biti da je tako:
nikad se nismo sreli nas dvoje,
mada se trazimo podjednako
zbog srece njene
i srece moje.
Pijana kisa siba i mlati,
vrbama vetar cupa kosu.

Kuda cu?
U koji grad da svratim?

Dan je niz mutna polja prosut.

Vucaram svetom dva prazna oka
zurim u lica prolaznika.
Koga da pitam,gladan i mokar,
zasto se nismo sreli nikad?

Il je vec bilo?
Trebao korak?
Mozda je sasvim do mene dosla.
Al' ja,
u krcmu svratio gorak,
a ona
ne znajuci-prosla.

Ne znam.
Ceo svet smo obisli
u zudnji ludoj
podjednakoj,
a za korak se mimoisli.

Da,mora da je tako....
          after pictur        

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          CMU Groundbreaking Ceremony        

Thanks for reading. CMU Groundbreaking Ceremony is a post from PartySavvy


          Rokkurro - Killing Time        
With band members spending time between Tokyo, London and Reykjavík over the past three years, Icelandic pop ensemble Rökkurró have been meticulously expanding their luscious musical palette. The previous album Í Annan Heim spent over 100 weeks in the Top-30 of the Icelandic charts, while gathering warm words from international media such as NME, Clash Magazine, KEXP Radio, The Line Of Best Fit and CMU Daily. Three years on, Rökkurró are back with a new record. The new sound has the band playing around more with electronic elements as well as adding two new members.
          Conference: 2017 CyLab Partners Conference         
*Location*: Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA | *Abstract*: The CyLab Partners Conference will be held September 25-27 at the main CMU campus in Pittsburgh, PA. Attendance is limited, exclusively, to representatives of CyLab's corporate partners and Carnegie Mellon University CyLab. The conference agenda is built around research updates from over twenty-five CyLab faculty members, and covers a broad range of research thrusts from Biometrics to Usable Privacy and Security, and from IoT to Software Security, from Machine Learning to Formal Methods and Privacy. Each session includes panel discussions engaging both presenters and attendees. A valued benefit of CyLab's corporate partners program, this annual event allows attendees to immerse themselves in numerous CyLab research projects, which offer compelling insights into vital issues, and it also allows them to establish deeper connections with CyLab faculty and students who are not only striving to build the future of cyber security, but may come to embody it as well. Not a CyLab partner? There is still time to experience this unique conference and learn how your company can benefit from becoming a CyLab partner. Contact Associate Director of Partnership Development, Michael Lisanti at mlisanti@andrew.cmu.edu or 412-268-1870. Details on registration and lodging will be emailed directly to CyLab partners.
          Wide nine defensive front        
At this point, even the most casual observer can see when Frank Clark goes tearing around the edge with no consideration of passing lanes. But while rewatching the CMU game, I noticed a play in which Mario Ojemudia and Brennen Beyer did the same, only in this instance, Greg Mattison called for the reckless rush from his defensive ends.

With CMU facing a third and ten in the second quarter, Mattison called for a formation that was all the buzz in the NFL two years ago: the wide nine. The formation is named because of the alignment of the defensive ends, who are playing "nine tech", or aligned outside of the tight ends. Even if there aren't tight ends (like on this play), the DEs still play at the nine tech. This is a pure pass-rushing formation.


Prior to the snap, the inside receiver from CMU's bunch formation motions into the backfield. Ojemudia and Beyer remain at the nine tech, but Beyer actually slides a few steps inside. My guess is that he lined up outside of the motion man in the original formation and moved after the offensive shift.


At the snap, Ojemudia rockets off the line and sheds the right tackle (highlighted; bottom). Beyer engages with the left tackle (highlighted; top) but will quickly shed him to get into the backfield. Neither player is considering their run fill responsibilities, opening huge holes between the offensive tackles and guards.


CMU is running a strongside lead iso, and because of the defensive front, Michigan has completely vacated the strongside B gap. You can see Ojemudia and Beyer now both closing in on the backfield, but neither has the momentum to get to the running back. Meanwhile, CMU's lead blocker has attempted to block one of Michigan's DTs who was already falling to the ground.


Central's fullback (#49) is now falling behind the ball carrier (#6). Without the lead blocker, CMU's running back is staring down Joe Bolden.


Bolden freezes and allows Central's running back to bounce outside.


Michigan has reinforcements rallying to the ball, including Ojemudia who you can see chasing the play. As a side note, how nice is it to see seven Michigan defenders in this screen?


The play ends here-ish.


Video

Takeaway
Mattison can somewhat safely call for the wide nine in this scenario. With a chance to get Central off of the field, giving up 5-8 yards on a scramble or, as is the case here, designed run, won't hurt Michigan. But don't expect to see this strategy employed against Braxton Miller or Kain Colter. This play is designed to have the defensive ends disregard their run responsibilities in favor of getting into the backfield. The five-wide underneath zone defenders act as the safety valve if the offense checks into a play that will attack the relentless pass rush. However, had the CMU fullback blocked Bolden, Delonte Hollowell would have been forced to come downhill and make a tackle in the middle of the field, so this is still a risky proposition.

This play forces me to reconsider at least some of Frank Clark's irresponsible pass rush. Mattison values getting to the quarterback with only four pass rushers enough to install the wide nine. But Clark's history does not reveal many of these situations. Chances are good that Clark takes this aspect of the defense as a green light to so consistently ignore his run fits.
          How Blake Countess saved a certain touchdown        
Central Michigan didn't have many opportunities to put points on the board, but one innovative playcall nearly cost Michigan seven points until Blake Countess read what was developing and made a leaping PBU. No caveats about competition apply here. Countess' field vision and instincts are on full display here and hint at a special year to come.

It's early in the first quarter, and Michigan shows its base 4-3 under formation. The pre-snap alignment shows that Michigan will play single-high safety, man coverage. Josh Furman (lined up on the hash at at the first down line) will cover Central's slot receiver, and Countess is split out wide on CMU's outside receiver.


At the snap, Michigan's middle and weakside linebackers blitz. Central Michigan shows a zone read, leaving the weakside defensive end (Keith Heitzman) unblocked.


Heitzman crashes on the handoff, but doesn't overcommit, about which more next. Furman and Countess begin to head downfield as the CMU slot receiver bows out for a flare screen. This is a triple option look that Michigan deployed often with Rich Rodriguez. Often, after a mesh point in the backfield, Denard had the option to sling the ball outside to his slot receiver. However, the Chippewas tweak the receiver route slightly.


Heitzman realizes that CMU quarterback Alex Niznak pulled the ball on the read. He plants his foot and gives chase to string out the QB run. The ability to string out this play while also forcing the QB pull is not easy to do. This is a promising reaction from a player not expected to make a huge impact this season.


At this point, Furman dismisses his coverage assignment (highlighted). Cam Gordon is scraping over the top of the play to attack the QB run, and even Countess is crashing from the corner to defend the run.


What Furman doesn't realize is that CMU's slot receiver has turned the flare screen into a wheel route and is running upfield undefended (legs highlighted). Countess, being picked by the outside receiver, recognizes that Niznak is pulling up to throw.


As Niznak releases the ball, Countess has actually broken on the pass, recognizing the open defender. On first look, I thought Niznak threw a duck, but if you watch closely, you can see Countess actually tip the ball.


The ball falls harmlessly to the turf. Huzzah.


Video

Takeaway
First, it should be noted that two of CMU's linemen were five yards downfield before the pass was thrown. If it was completed, a flag should have been thrown for illegal man downfield. But the real takeaway is Countess' play recognition and reaction. Not only did he realize that there was a triple option in play here, but he recovered for Furman who had blown his coverage. I was disappointed with the secondary in zone coverage, but don't remember Countess being the culprit on (m)any of those plays.

I've been high on Countess since he came to Michigan, and his junior season debut held nothing but upside. With unproven safeties, having elite cornerbacks will be crucial to relieving pressure and diminishing big plays. Next week, Countess will see more action, which will give us a better indication with how he'll fare this season. But this was a promising start.

          No Surprises        
Central Michigan 9 - Michigan 59
Courtney Sacco | AnnArbor.com

Michigan had an uneventful offseason, at least with regards to recent history. There were no questions about the starting quarterback, no concerns over walk-ons, and the incoming recruiting class was viewed as depth chart fodder rather than necessary reinforcements. Such is the arrival of Brady Hoke. So Michigan trounces Central Michigan in the season opener without any notable injuries or hiccups, and we all shrug. Well, most people shrug and I get panicky about the offensive line.

The box score says domination: 242 rushing yards on 47 carries (5.1 YPC), 221 passing yards on 21 attempts (10.5 YPA), 10 of 15 on third down conversions, and CMU averaged only 3.7 yards per play. But, like Holly Anderson's piece on Jadaveon Clowney's uninspiring 2013 debut says, "You already know that Week 1 college football games aren't all that useful in the discerning sports fan's quest to consume actual, compelling football … It's fun to be able to take one data point and draw a line to anywhere."

Per usual, my data points tends toward fear. My confidence in Greg Mattison, Brady Hoke, and the defensive unit could not be higher. Two seasons of transforming the scraps Rich Rodriguez left on the defensive side of the ball belies any doubt in this coaching staff defensively. Saturday served as confirmation of this belief: short the team's most impactful starter (Jake Ryan), the defense smothered CMU on short fields surrendered because of turnovers and never allowed a drive to exceed 59 yards (that one ending in a 33-yard field goal).



The concern comes from the other side of the ball, in spite of the team posting 59 points on 12 possessions; one punt and three interceptions were the only drives that Michigan came up empty. The game started inauspiciously as Devin Gardner threw a Denardian interception: he determined where to throw the ball before the play had started. His second giveaway was similar: he saw single coverage on the outside with Jeremy Gallon and decided to throw it regardless that Gallon was blanketed. While on the subject, that Gallon couldn't get on top of a CMU cornerback on a fly route does not bode well for his presence as the team's primary deep threat.

Those turnovers were disappointing but not the primary cause for concern: the offensive line's continued inability to get push on under-center runs. Michigan's running game remains either inconsistent or ineffectual. After one game with a new crop of interior lineman, speculating either with certainty is fruitless, but following last year's debacle, optimism (at least around these parts; shock!) is slim. There are caveats for the stumbling running game. Some of it appears schematic: Michigan ran into an overloaded defense several times when Gardner should have checked into a weakside run at the line of scrimmage. That could change as the season progresses. But other issues, such as Gallon's inability to get over the top of CMU's defense, allowing the opposing safeties to creep into the box, may be longer lasting. Or, this could have been the first game-time action from a new crop of interior line starters that just hasn't gelled together yet. But where's the fun in that? Largely irrelevant data point --> Doom.

There were clear positives--pass blocking, Derrick Green, the return of Toussaint, CMU's 2.3 YPA rushing on 29 carries, and Devin Funchess to name a few--but those were expected (perhaps known) before the season. The real insights from this game come from the mistakes, which I'm confident did not escape Hoke, Borges, and Mattison, and should be rectified, or at least patched up, in short order.

Bullets
  • My friend and I had a bet on what pass Shane Morris would throw his first interception. He said the third pass, I said the fifth. I won. A relatively uneventful debut from Morris, but it's obvious both where his upside stands and what his current flaws are.
  • Toussaint turned in a decent game but was still not the dominating back that we saw in 2011. He had few holes to work with, but made the most of what he was given. If the interior line can't get itself together, Toussaint's season will look more like 2012 than 2011. Also of note, his pass blocking was atrocious in this game.
  • Michigan's defense acquitted itself well as a whole, but the zone passing defense proved problematic (perhaps expected because both starting safeties were out). CMU's greatest offensive success came by throwing intermediate routes that the underneath defenders didn't sink on and the safeties weren't reading quickly enough. Northwestern looms large.
  • Frank Clark. Man. Lane integrity. Please. Otherwise, keep being fast.
  • Jibreel Black was a non-factor in the running game and made a few penetrating moves in the pass game. I don't know how his skillset will matchup against teams with heftier front lines, but for now, concerns about his size as the starting 3-tech are squashed.
  • It may be prudent for Michigan not to put a punt returner on the field. Just rush 11 guys at the punter and don't worry about getting any return yards. The returner isn't getting anything meaningful on rugby punts anyway and the team avoids Dennis Norfleet fumbling the ball on the 10 yard line.
  • I believe (perhaps hope) that Borges kept most of his tricks in the bag in week one. With Notre Dame coming to town next week, having a whole package of plays they haven't seen yet could pay dividends.

Next Week
Michigan gets Notre Dame under the lights. You know what happened last year, but against Temple, the Irish did not overwhelm. Temple > CMU, but Michigan's Week 1 > ND's Week 1. With Tommy Rees back under center for the Irish, and the loss of Notre Dame's top-two rushers from last year, Michigan's defense should smother Notre Dame, enabling the offense to slog through the game picking up points when they can.

          HTML5 Audio Karaoke – a JavaScript audio text aligner        
What it Does Based on some amazing work by my friend Weston Ruter, I’ve put together a little library that mashes together some text (usually some HTML) an audio source reading that text (usually an mp3) a timing file (in this case, generated by CMU Sphinx) The result is that when you press “play” the […]
          Workshop Makeover #1: Current Layout        

I finally got the workshop unearthed, and like any good child of the 80’s it is time to crowdsource my decision making.

I am sure you are still laughing if you are looking at the pictures of the chaos, but my fiancé has been using the garage to store stuff and the tablesaw looks like a fine table top from the female perspective. I have pretty much sorted the remaining to be thrown away and attic storage materials. I am trying to be exclusively a woodworking shop with some storage (depending on future equipment of course). I don’t have plans for woodturning.

I live down by the river in Atlanta, so I would consider my garage about max humidity. It takes less than a year to get rusty tools, so I am generous with the WD-40 on everything to keep it in working order. I have a chest freezer that I have no where else to put, but has made a great out feed table. The kegorator is there because as I have lost my bachelor hood, it has moved from the kitchen, to the den, to the garage. I know what evil plan lays in wait after the wedding. I am sure to get at least one comment about the perils of drinking and woodworking, but I have given up far more hazardous behavior and am not likely to add that. The SketchUp renderings should help to cut the clutter of the pictures and get to what is important in the garage.

As you can see from pictures 5 & 6 there is a little room behind the back wall.

I use it to further protect some furniture from exposure and to store paint and tile remaining from a remodel. Fiancé wants this to stay for now, but I would love to get rid of it. There is also a crawl space behind that. I could store long lumber but the access through CMU is only about 3’x3’. My height limitation in the middle sucks, but that is all the plumbing, garage opener and electricity to the house, so it stays. The bike and bike rack need to be there too. The bookshelves are there because the house is not coordinated; I would like to see them go.

Ok now that we have the cant’s, we can look at the want’s. I want to build my table saw into a larger cabinet that will go where the cheep and small workbench is. I have found some (expensive) leveling casters that I am going to purchase, so the table will be mobile. I want to use my Shop Vac and build in some dust collection to each machine. I want/need more light! I want to build a lumber rack to store the lumber (I have the ultimate picker who works with me so it needs some capacity). I want the layout to be efficient. My woodworking is a mess of running around trying the shop grabbing things that I needed within reach. I also want some new equipment, so if you think of a what next let me know. I am thinking a jointer, since I have access to lots of scrap and old lumber.

Ok I am going to hit SketchUp and come up with a few ideas and see what people think. Perhaps a rendering or two. Thanks for taking the time to help out. I am dangerously past clueless on all this.


          CMU Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski To Receive Esteemed 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry        
Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, the J.C. Warner Professor of the Natural Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University’s Mellon College of Science, has been named a recipient of the 2011 Wolf Prize in Chemistry from Israel’s Wolf Foundation. The Wolf Prize is given every year in four out of five categories, in rotation: agriculture, chemistry, mathematics, medicine and physics. […]
          Curator's Statement: 29 Chains to the Moon @ Miller Gallery at CMU 8/28-12/6/09        

In 1938, the visionary designer R. Buckminster Fuller wrote Nine Chains to the Moon, his radical proposal for improving the quality of life for all humankind via progressive design and maximization [1] of the world’s finite resources. The title was a metaphor for cooperation – if all of humankind stood on each other’s shoulders we could complete nine chains to the moon. Today, the population of the planet has increased more than three times to 6.7 billion (we could now complete 29 chains to the moon), and the successful distribution of energy, food, and shelter to over 9 billion humans by 2050 requires some fantastic schemes. Like Fuller’s revelation from five decades earlier, 29 Chains to the Moon features artists who put forth radical proposals, from seasteads and tree habitats to gift-based cultures, to make the world work for everyone.

Nostalgia for our alternate future is in the ether on this convergence of anniversaries: 2009 marks the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, the centennial of Futurism, and the quadricentennial of the Newtonian telescope. Over the last year, major art museums have presented exhibitions of visionary design and architecture [2] , meant to reignite that spark of collective imagination that the 20th century saw via world fairs [3] , the formation of international space agencies, and the promise of better living through technology.


Among the surveys was the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2008 exhibition, Buckminster Fuller: Starting with the Universe. Viewers familiar with Fuller’s pragmatic geodesic domes and octet truss structures were introduced to his lesser-known concepts for tomorrow’s cities, like Dome over Manhattan (Midtown Manhattan acclimatized by a 2-mile diameter glass dome); Cloud Nine (a spherical cloud city that could levitate an entire community), and Triton City (a modular seastead for 100,000 inhabitants). Despite having a hallucinatory, science fiction veneer, these proposals were serious enough to be examined by agencies like the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development, which commissioned the study for Triton City, and, along with the U.S. Navy, approved the design.

If one of Fuller’s futuristic communities had been realized, it would not have been the first time that science fiction became science fact. In 1945, author, inventor and futurist Arthur C. Clarke predicted geostationary communications satellites, some 15 years ahead of NASA’s launch of Echo, the agency’s first experimental communications satellite project [4]. In 1941, Isaac Asimov popularized the term “robotics” in his short story, Liar, over three decades before Carnegie Mellon University founded The Robotics Institute in 1979. Aldous Huxley foresaw cloning decades before Dolly the sheep was made incarnate (again), and countless other authors and artists envisioned technological milestones – from the creation of the atomic bomb to nanotechnology – and their social implications in advance of their manifestation.

It’s not so easy to instill in the public the same brand of wonder and nationalist pride that the Space Race evoked from 1958 to 1975. One seismic shift of late has been the redirection of major scientific exploration from countries to private corporations and citizens [5]. Unbridled individual potential is one outcome of the information age, but so is ambient fear of the future. A 2002 Time Magazine poll revealed that 30 percent of its respondents believed that the world would end within their lifetimes. The work in this exhibition corresponds to the other 70 percent of the population that is optimistic despite the massive challenges faced by civilization [6]. These artists seize technologies that provide unprecedented platforms for collaboration, and new ways of visualizing and representing reality. Theirs is a moment of fluid exchanges between artistic and scientific disciplines, and cooperation among private and public institutions, toward the realization of a possible future.

– Andrea Grover, Curator, 29 Chains to the Moon

Footnotes

[1] Fuller called this ephemeralization, or doing more with less. It refers to the tendency for current technologies to be replaced by ones smaller, lighter, and more efficient.

[2] Design and the Elastic Mind was another important survey of anticipatory design at the Museum of Modern Art, New York in 2008.

[3] The next registered “world exposition” will be Expo 2010 in Shanghai, China with the theme of “Better City, Better Life.”

[4] According to the Buckminster Fuller Institute, Fuller and Clarke were lifelong friends, who “shared a common fascination with the concept of a "space elevator" (the subject of Clarke's book The Fountains of Paradise) and Clarke wrote in his introduction to Buckminster Fuller: Anthology for a New Millennium, "when the space elevator is built, sometime in the twenty-first century, it will be his greatest memorial."

[5] Private corporations like Virgin Galactica and SpaceX are entering what was once exclusively the domain of government science agencies. Prizes like X Prize (which promotes “revolution through competition”), with initiatives in space travel, automotive design, and genomics, requires registered teams to be 90 percent privately funded.

[6] In September 2000, world leaders came together at United Nations Headquarters in New York to adopt the United Nations Millennium Declaration, committing their nations to a new global partnership to end poverty and hunger, provide universal education, gender equality, child and maternal healthcare, combat HIV/AIDS, and create environmental sustainability, via global partnership. With a deadline of 2015, these have become known as the Millennium Development Goals.


Open_Sailing is a multi-disciplinary international team led by Cesar Harada and Hiromi Ozaki that is revolutionizing the concept of seasteading and social production of ideas and technologies. The Open_Sailing prototype is a “living architecture” at sea, composed of multiple dwellings, ocean farming modules, and an amoeba-like design that can expand and contract, based on the existence of calculated risks. “Open_Sailing acts like a superorganism, a cluster of intelligent units that can react to their environment, change shape and reconfigure themselves. They talk to each other. They’re modular, re-pluggable, pre-broken, post-industrial.” The concept for Open_Sailing came from creating a geography of fear – a world “potential threat map” that highlighted the centers of greatest risk (pandemics, high-human density, recent violent conflicts, hypothetical nuclear fall-outs, tsunami risk, potential exposure to rising sea level, and so on), to determine the safest areas on Earth, which happened to be at sea. Open_Sailing was awarded the 2009 Prix Ars Electronica in “THE NEXT IDEA” category, and is underway with construction of an advanced prototype for their floating laboratory. www.opensailing.net


Stephanie Smith’s projects span the worlds of architecture, art, technology, and culture. Her research into the social practices of fringe and nomadic societies yielded a movement she calls Wanna Start a Commune?, and include diagrams for creating modern Cul-de-Sac Communes, portable kiosks for non-monetary exchange and meet-ups, and most recently an online platform for creating as many communes as your life demands, (www.wecommune.com). Smith says that the impetus for these projects was to counter the assumption that being green means consuming green products; instead she wanted to revive the best parts of the commune concept (a community where resources are shared) and “bring collective attitude to places where it doesn't yet exist.” Smith is also the founder of Ecoshack, a design experiment that began in Joshua Tree, CA and is now an LA-based design studio inspired by the ad hoc, indigenous and archetypal typologies typically found at the fringes of society and culture. In 2008, the Whitney Museum identified Smith as the designer/entrepreneur most actively taking the ideas of Buckminster Fuller into the 21st century. www.stephaniesmithsofar.wordpress.com


Mitchell Joachim [jo-ak-um] is a Co-Founder at Terreform ONE and Terrefuge. He earned a Ph.D. at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MAUD at Harvard University, M.Arch. at Columbia University, and BPS at SUNY Buffalo with Honors. He currently serves on the faculty at Columbia University and Parsons and formerly worked as an architect at Gehry Partners and Pei Cobb Freed. He has been awarded the Moshe Safdie Research Fellowship and the Martin Family Society Fellow for Sustainability at MIT. He won the History Channel and Infiniti Design Excellence Award for the City of the Future and Time Magazine’s “Best Invention of the Year 2007” for Compacted Car with MIT Smart Cities. His project on view at the Miller Gallery, Fab Tree Hab, has been exhibited at MoMA and widely published. He was selected by Wired magazine for "The 2008 Smart List: 15 People the Next President Should Listen To." www.archinode.com


Terreform ONE is a non-profit philanthropic design collaborative that integrates ecological principles in the urban environment. The group views ecology in design as not only a philosophy that inspires visions of sustainability and social justice but also a focused scientific endeavor. The mission is to ascertain the consequences of fitting a project within our natural world setting. Solutions range from green master planning, urban self-sufficiency infrastructures, community development activities, climatic tall buildings, performative material technologies, and smart mobility vehicles for cities. These design iterations seek an activated ecology both as a progressive symbol and an evolved artifact. www.terreform.org


SPECIAL READING ROOM WITH MATERIALS FEATURING

The Buckminster Fuller Institute
Lowry Burgess, Space Artist and CMU Professor
International Space University
The Seasteading Institute

~~~~~~

Andrea Grover is an independent curator, artist and writer. In 1998, she founded Aurora Picture Show, a now recognized center for filmic art that began in her living room as “the world’s most public home theater.” She curated the first exhibition exploring the phenomenon of crowdsourcing in art (Phantom Captain, apexart, New York, 2006), and, with artist Jon Rubin, organized an exhibit in which worldwide participants created a photo-sharing album of their imaginings on Tehran (Never Been to Tehran, Parkinggallery, Tehran, Iran, 2008) She recently curated screenings for both Dia Art Foundation, New York, and The Menil Collection, Houston. 29 Chains to the Moon continues her research into cooperation and distributed thinking across disciplines. www.andreagrover.com


Images, top to bottom:

Open_Sailing Model, Open_Sailing (model made by Martin Gautron, Hiromi Ozaki, Adrien Lecuru, and Cesar Harada)

The Cul-de-sac Commune Project, Stephanie Smith

Fab Tree Hab
,
Terreform ONE, (contributors: Mitchell Joachim, Maria Aiolova, Landon Young, Javier Arbona, Lara Greden)


          "One more project"...and the winner of the Potted book give-away        
This project has been tumbling around in my head for awhile now. What I ultimately had pictured is a much (MUCH) smaller version of this, seen at Dig Nursery...

In my imagination I shrunk those concrete containers way down so they actually fit into/above my stock tank pond. Three concrete cylinders in the stock tank, with metal u-shaped pieces connecting them and water circulating throughout the whole thing. Totally doable, if one has power at the location and the means to make the concrete and fabricate the u-shaped pieces of metal. In other words I'm not giving up on the dream...but...

After seeing this fabulous project that my friends Laura and Charlie recently did, with a re-purposed light fixture planted up with a Gunnera...

I decided I needed to go ahead and get my interim idea up and running, rather than holding out for the someday dream. So I give you the stock tank carnivorous dish planters...

Because why not up the number of dish planters to 9? After all I've got 12 stock tanks, obviously I believe in repetition...

Originally I planned to sink a CMU block in the tank and use the two voids in the CMU to secure the metal posts, with rocks stuffed in to keep them upright. However talking this over with the husband it suddenly became one of those, bigger — and better — projects. Off we went to buy a bag of cement mix, and now he was making small footings for each post.

Tada! This is what they looked like after I peeled away the plastic buckets.

The next step usually just means planting up the dish and sitting it atop the base. However since these were planned to go in a tank full of water I was concerned about a creature landing on the edge and tipping them into the water. In the four years I've had these planters around my garden I've only had two tipped over (I blame squirrels)...but a tipped over planter in a tank full of water would be much harder to pick up. Andrew had all sorts of good ideas, but...I'd already planted up the dishes so most of them weren't gonna work. He got creative...a cut-off nail in the base...

Then a bent piece of metal was wired to a dish and around the nail...

Which then had magnets put in place...

And the planted dishes sat on top...

What he had no way of knowing is that I'd wanted to work in some Tillandsia usneoides hanging from the dishes but no matter what I did it just looked dorky. He gave me the perfect void to tuck the Tillandsia into.

I ended up only putting one planter in the tank, the other sits just outside. Oh ya, and the dishes each have a single carnivorous plant in them along with some rocks, moss, glass and bits of shells.

It's a bit arty, but I was channeling my inner Ganna Walska...

And I've had the shells for ages (I can't resist bringing back finds from the beach)...

I may tire of it all eventually and change it up somehow but for now I love it.

✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤

So...(drum-roll)....this is when I announce the winner of the Potted book giveaway!


I assigned a number to each valid entry (those with a link to an active blog or an email address) and then used a random number generator to tell me who the winner was. Congrats Peter! Aka The Outlaw — I can't wait to see what creative things you come up with from the book.

✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤ ✤


Weather Diary, July 26: Hi 86, Low 58/ Precip 0

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.
          SISE SU PRELAZNA BOLEST        
Pogledaj dom svoj, andjele
I skini paucinu s ociju
Videces prizore potresne
Videces nesrecne i bolesne
Videces cemer, smrt i jad

Pogledaj stado, andjele
Sve sami bogalji i prosjaci
Slepi tumaraju u gomili
Svima su kicmu polomili
Od tebe ocekuju spas

Pogledaj bagru, andjele
Njihova dusa je prokleta
Svima su stavili amove
Sebi sagradili hramove
Ruke im ogrezle u krv

Andjele, andjele, andjele
Ruke im ogrezle u krv

Podigni mac svoj, andjele
Seti se krstaskih ratova
Seti se preklanih vratova
Kad dodjes bogu na istinu
Nek' ti u dusi vlada mir

Uslisi molitve, andjele
Dabogda pocrkali dusmani
Pa budi andjeo osvete
Neka na svojoj kozi osete
Sta znaci beda, strah, i bol

Andjele, andjele, andjele
Sta znaci beda, strah, i bol

Pogledaj dom svoj, andjele
I skini paucinu s ociju
Videces prizore potresne
Videces nesrecne i bolesne
Videces cemer, smrt i jad

Andjele, andjele, andjele
Videces cemer, smrt i jad





SAMO VAS POSMATRAM.....
          Davantage de bénéficiaires ACS et CMU-C en 2016        
En 2016, le nombre des attestations d'Aide à l’Acquisition d’une complémentaire santé (ACS) a augmenté de 8,2 %, selon le fonds de financement de la CMU Complémentaire et de l'Aide pour une complémentaire santé, ou Fonds CMU. Même constat de hausse pour le nombre des bénéficiaires de la couverture maladie universelle complémentaire (CMU-C). Explications.
          La consommation collective ou les pièges des cadeaux empoisonnés        
Il y a un grand danger pour les responsables politiques à s’avancer sur le terrain économique qu’ils ne pourront jamais maîtriser sauf à détruire complètement la dynamique de l’économie. Les candidats à l’élection présidentielle s’approprient des concepts et des problématiques économiques à propos desquels ils ne semblent pas avoir une compréhension claire et achevée. On en est encore à débattre des machines et autres robots qui seraient une menace pour l'emploi comme si David Ricardo n'avait jamais écrit ce chapitre sans appel "Les Hommes et les Machines" dans son traité de l'impôt, et comme si la théorie dynamique de la croissance économique n'existait pas. Les discussions autour du pouvoir d’achat sont un exemple flagrant du scientisme qui règne en ce domaine. Il y a en effet une chose fondamentale qui échappe à ceux qui ont la prétention de nous diriger : plus la sphère des biens gratuits s’agrandit, et plus la vie est chère et l’économie fragilisée. Ce processus fut enclenché en France en 1981 avec l’arrivée de François Mitterrand au pouvoir. Les socialistes ont créé le RMI, puis plus tard la CMU ; ils ont imposé la réduction du temps de travail, fidèle à leur tradition redistributrice. Et la droite est contrainte de gouverner dans les cadres imposés par la gauche, selon les règles « démocratiques » imposées par la gauche qui font de l’alternance politique une illusion sinon une farce. Le résultat est qu’aujourd’hui, un français sur deux a peur de devenir un jour un SDF. La gauche aime tellement les pauvres, qu'elle les fabrique en masse... La gratuité généralisée rend la vie chère. Ce n’est qu’un paradoxe apparent : comme la gratuité n’existe pas, c’est que l’inflation est forcément déguisée. Que sont en effet les biens et services dits « gratuits » ? Ce sont finalement tous ces biens et services extrêmement coûteux que l’on veut faire payer par les autres (et les autres font le même raisonnement) comme l’éducation, la santé ou la retraite. C’est ce qu’on appelle la consommation collective. Mais qu’est-ce que la consommation collective ? C’est en fait une machine à dérégler les comportements. Imaginez que, lorsque vous consommez de l’électricité, c’est votre voisin qui reçoit la facture parce que vous avez piraté son compteur. Mais ce que vous ne savez pas, c’est que votre voisin a fait la même chose à votre insu. La conséquence est un dérapage de la dépense qui entraîne à son tour un dérapage des prélèvements pour régler la facture collective. C’est ce processus de déresponsabilisation qui explique les dérives du budget de la sécurité sociale et de l’Etat. Comme le pouvoir d’achat des ménages est dévoré par la montée des prélèvements de toute sorte, les ménages demandent de plus en plus de biens et services « gratuits » et le domaine de la consommation collective s’agrandit encore, celui-là même qui est à l’origine de l’inflation des prélèvements. Les ménages ne s’aperçoivent plus que c’est précisément ce processus qui ronge leur pouvoir d’achat car les prélèvements leurs sont occultés, l’Etat se faisant le complice de cette tragédie collective. Là est sans doute le plus grave : ceux qui prétendent nous éclairer nous aveuglent ; ceux qui prétendent parler au nom de l’intérêt général participent activement à la liquidation collective. En effet, les responsables politiques s’efforcent de rendre les prélèvements « indolores », ce qu’il convient précisément de ne jamais faire si l’on veut que les gens réagissent, si l’on veut inverser les comportements et stopper le processus. Ainsi, les prélèvements sociaux sont retenus à la source (charges, RDS ; CSG) d’où l’illusion de gratuité des biens et services sociaux tandis que les prélèvements fiscaux basculent sur la fiscalité indirecte (TVA) d’où l’illusion de gratuité des biens et services publics. On ne voit plus dans quelle proportion l’Etat prélève du revenu pour financer les biens dits « gratuits ». On ne voit plus que cette proportion devenue énorme est de nature à briser les ressorts de la création des richesses. Malgré cette masse croissante de prélèvement, le secteur public n’a jamais assez de moyens si l’on en croit ses représentants agréés. A l’origine, l’argent public, c’est d’abord la part de la richesse privée que le ménage consent à laisser à la collectivité. Aujourd’hui, on assiste à une inversion des termes : l’argent privé, c’est la part de la richesse que l’Etat consent à ne plus nous prendre jusqu’à la prochaine augmentation de prélèvement. Voilà pourquoi les comportements sont pervertis quand on neutralise les signaux qui permettent à la rationalité individuelle de s’exprimer. Voilà aussi pourquoi il est nécessaire de limiter la sphère des biens et services gratuits plutôt que de l’étendre. Mais au nom d’une conception démagogique du « social » et de solidarité, et sur fond d’ignorance impardonnable des lois de l’économie, les candidats aux présidentielles se proposent d’étendre la sphère de la gratuité sans dire que la gratuité est un concept illusoire qui nous coûtera cher à tous. Avec moi, le déluge des promesses, après moi, le déluge des désillusions....
          Flite - 1.4.0.3 - Update        
Flite (festival-lite) is a small, fast run-time synthesis engine developed at CMU and primarily designed for small embedded machines and/or large servers. Flite is designed as an alternative synthesis engine to Festival for voices built using the FestVox suite of voice building tools.
          Carnegie Mellon University Attacked Tor, Was Subpoenaed By Feds        
2016-02-25 19:16:07 - Slashdot Your Rights Online : AmiMoJo writes Back in November 2015 it was speculated that Carnegie Mellon University CMU helped the FBI attack the TOR network Now, both the name of the university and the existence of a subpoena have been confirmed in a recent filing in one of the affected criminal cases The record demonstrates that the defendant's IP address was identified by the Software Engineering Institute SEI of Carnegie Mellon University CMU sic when SEI was conducting research on the Tor network which was funded by the Department of Defense DOD , an order filed on Tuesday in the case of Brian Farrell reads Between January and July 2014, a large number of malicious nodes operated on the Tor network, with the purpose, according to the Tor Project, of deanonymising dark web sites and their users The attack relied on a set of vulnerabilities in the Tor software which have since been patched and according to one source, the technique could unmask new hidden services within two weeks IMAGE IMAGE Share on Google Read more of this story at Slashdot
          By: Ken        
As much as I would like to see EMU drop down to 1AA in order to be competitive in Football, I do not see it happening as they are competitive in the other sports. I would hate to see them lose the rivalry to CMU and WMU and that would certainly happen if they leave the MAC. that being said, it would be nice if they could get more competitive in football (at least within the MAC). A couple years ago showed that they have promise. And the few bright spots in the offense show that they have some talent. I think they could be competitive with the right coach. Problem with that is that if said coach does get competitive, he's ripe for the picking from a higher visibility program. So I honestly don't know what the solution is. All I know is that they need to get better....:)
          Nekome ko ce razumeti,ostavite poruku...        

Bar da je neke vajde od mene u krevetu... wink lol



jadna ona zena, kicmu joj savi :?

lol lol lol


Pokusacu da ispravim.... oops lol lol



jadna ona roll


lol lol lol
          Nekome ko ce razumeti,ostavite poruku...        

Bar da je neke vajde od mene u krevetu... wink lol



jadna ona zena, kicmu joj savi :?

lol lol lol


Pokusacu da ispravim.... oops lol lol
          Nekome ko ce razumeti,ostavite poruku...        
e, bre, medvede beli, samo na krevet i spavanje mislis lol



Bar da je neke vajde od mene u krevetu... wink lol



jadna ona zena, kicmu joj savi :?

lol lol lol
          Creative Chaos        
In an article by Julianne Mattera, CMU News takes a look at ETC Press’s Creative Chaos, Learning Lessons on Making Inclusion & Innovation Making the Magic. “So it is no surprise that “Creative Chaos” is the title and focus of a new book from the ETC Press on best practices in teaching creative collaboration to... Read more »
          Simulator Ipad di PCmu dengan Ipadian        
Ipad di Pc? Gimana caranya Ipad di PC ?
Yup, ini memang beneran gan, sekarang sudah ada simulator ipad agar bisa dijalankan di pc agan.
Ipadian adalah salah satu simulator untuk menjalankan ipad di pc anda.
Lumayan kan buat yang pengen punya ipad tapi gag kesampean karena harganya menggila :(
Juga bisa dipamerin keteman-teman kalian kalau di PC kalian ada Ipadnya, pada ngiri tuh :p

Screenshot Ipadian di PC :
Screenshot Ipad menggunakan Ipadian di Kaskus

Fitur-fitur Ipadian yang bisa kita dapatkan adalah :
-Full Screen preview
-Custom App Store
-Games
-Free music & videos
-Webkit browser
-Support Facebook notification & messages
-Social Chat

Requirements Spec PC anda untuk menjalankan Ipadian :
A PC with Windows 7/ Windows Vista/ Windows XP
2.8 Ghz Pentium 4 PC or more
512 mb of Ram or More
50 mb Disk space

Tips-Trik untuk Menggunakan Ipadian :
1. How to Add New backgrounds into iPadian ?
Some users Ask me how to add new backgrounds photos into ipadian , well it’s easy
Firstly go to iPadian directory
then open /assets/images and then open background Folder
into Background Folder there’s 13 photos named as m1.jpg …. mXX.jpg
delete all photos and add yours
rename all photos likr m1.jpg , m2.jpg …

2. How to Add new Apps to iPadian ?
Why u will keep using iPadian ? coz you can always add new apps (games, web apps , paint ..)
to do that open iPadian.exe and then click on App Store the first icon
a list of apps displaying for you chose one and click on to see detail
a live view of app is displaying if you like it click on the Green Button to install

3. Submit your web App to iPadian App Store
if you have a nice website or web app or game and you want to share it with all iPadian users
open App Store
on the top menu click on submit App
Fill the forme
and click submit, after review we could add your web app

Download
For Windows : http://code.google.com/p/ipadian/downloads/detail?name=iPadian.zip&can=2&q=
For Mac & Lunix (Adobe air) : ipadian.googlecode.com/files/iPadian.air

Nah daripada bengong nungguin Ipad dari langit, mending langsung install deh simulator Ipadian di Pc kalian.
Semoga bermanfaat ya.
          Nekome ko ce razumeti,ostavite poruku...        
bemmumiša, limune.......... godinama sam na ovom forumu i gledam kako se tebi, konstantno, ponvaljaju iste stvari................ kako od svih članova muškoga roda, baš si ti uvek taj koji ima konflikt sa nekim?


Os sad reci da sam i ovoga ja isprovocirao?
lol

Iste stvari? Pa svi bi da budnu alfa?

Meni se na svakom forumu desavaju iste stvari: roj clanica me obozava a muskarci teze da me potiru, jer ne krijem da sam autonomas, prezirem nacionaliste, ne trpim nepravdu i ne krijem da nisam Srbin!

Jesi li primetila da nikad ne vredjam prvi ali nemilosrdno uzvracam?
Da li znas da sam tu nemilosrdnost od Srba naucio? Da li si primetila da kod njih i deluje? Jos sam tu!

A ako je jos nekom do toga da pokaze da je veci alfa muzljak od mene, pa moze, ali ne preko moje grbace...

Eto, Mitzo sad ti je sve jasno, dobila si odgovor bez okolisanja, vreme je da se upis.sh u moj klub obozavalaca!


P.S. Forum jeste socijalna ustanova gde svi upraznjavamo neke svoje potrebe. Tako rade i Heelena i bela, i Nikita, pa i svi drugi.
Eto, i ja...


wink wink wink


Bela je dosla da se druzi a ne da se prazni,niti da gleda necije frustracije wink


Ovo moje prekookensko vreme mi dozvoljava da ovde banem dok vi spavate. twisted wink

E, pa, Zede, nasmeja me. Cemu tolika prepoentnost i samoljublje. Da li ti stvarno mislis da si Alfa-Muzjak? lol Ne mogu da verujem. shock lol Doduse, vrlo "skromno" sa tvoje strane. lol Lepo je sto imas prijatelje po NET-u, ali to ne znaci da si Alfa-Muzjak. Osvesti se malo i prizovi se sebi. Ne verujem da i Bela misli da si takva persona. Sigurno si joj drag i simpatican, cim je u komunikaciji s tobom, ali tolika doza samouverenosti malo je sumnjivog karaktera. Nije mi samo jasno, zasto se tu Tirkiz nasao pogodjenim? Tirkiz ima svoj stil, koji je neosporno originalan. Tako da nema potrebe da se brine za sebe i za svoje mesto u okrzenju. Da bude "Alfa" nema ni potrebe. Vazan je stil i kvalitet, a da li si vodja, pa nisu ni vodje uvek bile idealne. roll wink

Svi ste vi na svoj nacin dragi i sa nekim svojim stilom. Zamislite kada bi se zenske pitale koja je Zenka- Alfa lol lol Zaista zvuci smesno i detinjasto. Kakva Alfa, kakva Beta, kakva Gama, pa ovo je samo forum, a da je bilo, ima i bice sjajnih osoba i to je tacno, samo verujem da ni jedna od tih sjajnih ne razmslja o tome da li je Alfa. lol Tongue wink

Dobro jutro! Danas je novi dan lol mozda ce vam doneti neke radosti i malo lepog i vedrijeg ramsiljanja. wink


Joooj, pa sto me analizira?
Ako ne mozes da razumes moj humor, sto me ne preskocis?
:D :D :D

Nemamo svi isto razmisljanje pa se ne moramo razumeti, zar ne?

I nazalost imam dve primedbe na tebe:
1. moju prijateljicu nisi trebala spominjati, onda, jer nije moja kuma. Spominjanjem stice se utisak da ona ima vise nickova a znamo da nema.
Ni moja kuma nema vise nickova.
2. Ne razumem zasto spominjes belu u mom kontekstu, da li je to ono dalje sirenje traca i dezinformacija koje je nabacio jedan vrlo cenjeni clan?
3. smatras li da je i drug interesantnoplave nijanse VIP clan?
Ako jeste, i on je samoljub, ili je to samo zed?

Eto jedna moja recenica pokrene pola foruma! Ljudi, ja celog zivota svoje postove posvecujem nekim odredjenim ljudima... Ako ne razumete, znaci nije za vas...
Prosto...

:D

Nije mi samo jasno, zasto se tu Tirkiz nasao pogodjenim?


nije ni meni, ja sam odgovorio mitzi u vezi onog tipa koji je ovih dana banovan a nesto je napisao za mene, bez nekog razloga...



Ajde se skinite sa Beline kicme,jer ako pocnem sedati na kicmu drugima bice lose.
Nisam dosla u Lazu Lazarevic vec na forum
I ne znam kakve ja veze imam sa Biterom ili Vockom/mislim na post/
          Nekome ko ce razumeti,ostavite poruku...        
Miladin Sobic - Ne pokusavaj mjenjat me

Ne pokusavaj mjenjat me
ovo je ipak moja glava
kad joj se budi nek joj se budi
kad joj se spava nek joj se spava

Ne pokusavaj mjenjat me
ovo su ipak moje ruke
samo mi znamo kako smo skupa
mucili srecu mucili muke

Ne pokusavaj mjenjat me
ovo je srce oduvek samnom
kolko smo samo krvavih puta
isli po brdu isli po ravnom

Nedaj da tebe mjenja neko
budi do kraja ono sto jesi
a ako mislis da smo daleko
nemoj put mene
bolje ostani gdje si.
Znam da ovako mnogim ne godim
al ja sam citav stao u vene
znam dobro zasto ratove vodim
muski su muski
zene su zene.
Ja kad nekog vidim da gubim
zasuzi oko al nikad ne placem
onog kog ljubim do daske ljubim
a znam da se igram s ostrim brijacem.
Al kad s torbom naumim negdje
noge mi neces vezati s nicim
nama tih para za moje cijene
priznajem kako ciganu slicim.
Ja nosim kicmu - celicnu sinu
ne volim kada glava mi pada
s njom spajam zemlju i visinu
i kad se leti i kad se strada.

Ne daj da tebe mjenja neko
budi do kraja ono sto jesi
a ako mislis da smo daleko
nemoj put mene
bolje ostani gdje si.

Ne pokusavaj mjenjat me
ovo je ipak moja glava
kad joj se budi nek joj se budi
kad joj se spava nek joj se spava.

Ne pokusavaj mjenjat me.. :!: :!: :!: :!: :!:
          Extractives, What Are They?        

Extractives, what are they?

Extractives are compounds with a low molecular weight that are found in the porous structure of wood.  Their name comes from their being easily extracted with the help of organic or aqueous (water) solvents, without harsh chemical treatments that chemically modify the wood’s constituents (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin).  Extractives are made up of wide range of compounds which are mostly secondary metabolites, meaning that they are not vital for the plant’s growth.

The differences in chemical structures that exist among the three main constituents of wood (i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) are minor between different species of trees or shrubs [1]. However, it is interesting to note that wide variations occur in the extractive concentration of different species.  Indeed, the extractive concentration (which can vary from 5 to 20%), as well as their nature, varies by different species, geographical location, genetics, and  season.  Extractives present in the wood are responsible for its color [2],[3], its scent, its hygrometry [4], its natural durability [5],[6], its physical and mechanical properties (dimensional stability[7], acoustic properties [8]). Numerous extractives show distinctive biological activities; wood extracts have been used for centuries as sources for traditional remedies [9].

We therefore notice that these molecules specific to each type of forest species, in spite of their low concentrations in the wood compared to the three structural polymers, are responsible for the variations of many properties not only between different species, but also within the same tree (for instance the difference between sapwood and heartwood) [10], [11],[12]. Different families, genii, and species contain different types of extractives.  Some of these molecules are real “chemotaxons”, in other words, markers whose presence is characteristic of the family, genus and species. These chemotaxons  give us insights on plant material (a “chemical signature”). For example, the Cupressaceae family, which is the only source of aromatic terpenic compounds ; tropolones, whose thujaplicins are found in the heartwood of cedar trees [13]. The diversity in molecular structures allows us to file them in many different families [14] ; terpenoids (including tropolones), waxes and fats, polyphenols (benzene compounds containing many phenolic hydroxyls), organic acid salts, complex carbohydrates and nitrogenous compounds (proteins, alkaloids).

The extracts of different wood and bark are always complex mix and their composition depends on the method of extraction used.[15],[16].


[1] Hon D.N.-S. and Shiraishi N. (2001) Wood and cellulosic chemistry, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York., 914 p.

[2] Amusant N., (2003). Durabilité naturelle et couleur des bois de Guyane : mesure, variabilité, déterminisme chimique. Applications à Dicorynia guianensis (Angélique), Sextonia rubra (Grignon), Eperua falcata (Wapa) et Eperua grandiflora (Wapa courbaril). Sciences forestières et Sciences du bois, Ecole Nationale du Génie Rural, des Eaux et des Forêts, pp. 228

[3] Gierlinger N., Jacques D., Grabner M., Wimmer R., Schwanninger M., Rozenberg P. and Pâques L.E. (2004). Colour of larch heartwood and relationships to extractives and brown-rot decay resistance. Trees 18: 102-108.

[4] Krutul D. (1992). The effect of extractives substances soluble in the alcohol-benzene mixture and in alkalies on some hygroscopic properties of birch wood. Forestry and Wood Technology 43: 93-99.

[5] Aloui F., Ayadi N., Charrier F. and Charrier B. (2004). Durability of European oak (Quercus petraea and Quercus robur) against white rot fungi (Coriolus versicolor): relations with phenol extractives. Holz Roh Werkst 62(4): 286-290.

[6] Barbosa A.P., Nascimento C.S.d. and Morais J.W.d. (2007). Studies on the antitermitic properties of wood and bark crude extracts of forest species from Central Amazonian, Brazil. Acta Amazonica 37(2): 213-218.

[7] Royer M., Stien D., Beauchêne J., Herbette G.t., McLean J.P., Thibaut A. and Thibaut B. (2010) Extractives of the tropical wood wallaba (Eperua falcata Aubl.) as natural anti-swelling agents. Holzforschung 64(2): 211-215.

[8] Minato K. and Sakai K., (1997). The vibrational properties of wood impregnated with extractives of some species of Leguminosae. Mokuzai Gakkaishi 43(12): 1035-1037.

[9] Arnason T., Hebda R.J. and Johns T., (1981). Use of plants for food and medicine by Native Peoples of eastern Canada. Canadian Journal of Botany 59: 2189-2325.

[10] Mosedale J.R., Feuillat F., Baumes R., Dupouey J.L. and Puech J.L. (1998). Variability of wood extractives among Quercus robur and Quercus petraea trees from mixed stands and their relation to wood anatomy and leaf morphology. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 28(7): 994-1006.

[11] Par Eero Sjöström,Raimo Alén Analytical methods in wood chemistry, pulping, and papermaking

[12] Lacandula J.O. (2002). Variations in the physics of wood of selected Philippine tree species as a function Of extractive content. CMU Journal of Science 10(1): 69-111.

[13] Stevanovic T. and Perrin D. (2009) Chimie du bois, Presses polytechniques et universitaires romandes, Nancy, 241 p.

[14] Stevanovic T. and Perrin D. (2009) Chimie du bois, Presses polytechniques et universitaires romandes, Nancy, 241 p.

[15] Royer M. (2008) Les molécules responsables de la stabilité des bois: cas des bois tropicaux de Guyane FrançaiseUnité Mixte de Recherche Ecologie des forêts de Guyane, Université des Antilles et de la Guyane, Cayenne, pp. 242.

[16] Diouf P.N., Stevanovic T. and Boutin Y. (2009) The effect of extraction process on polyphenol content, triterpene composition and bioactivity of yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis Britton) extracts. Industrial Crops and Products 30(2): 297-303.

Extracts from different types of wood and bark are always complex mixtures and their composition depends on the extraction method used [15],[16].


          Nekome ko ce razumeti,ostavite poruku...        
SVE TI NUDIM


Sve ti nudim , sta se ponuditi moze ,
varku sunca , da te osmehom razbudi ,
zrno uzbudjenja i klicu radovanja .
Ne nudim ti mozda , vec kicmu svoju ,
sa mramorom , u steni sto je srasla.
Ushite preko polja i jablanovih krosnji ,
mirisne obrise , otvorenih suma nudim.
Zajedno ti nudim , poljupce u kosi
i na obrazima , zagrljaje mojih ruku .

Sve sto ti nudim , ponuditi zelim ,
jer ne smes uci , u maglu gustu ,
niti bez mene , kroz horizont proci .
Uzdignuti moras i trebas , vidike svoje
i u snovima , vrh ove pesme osetiti .
Zavetrinu nudim i toplinu njihovu ,
da telo tvojih misli prihvati sjaj ,
i nad proplankom osmisljene duse ,
otkrije mesto , pradavne istine .

Sve sam i sebe ti nudim ,
da uz mene muskarcem se osetis
i u meni zenu i razum pronadjes .
Dobro ti nudim , za nasim stolom
i kad posteljom rasirimo tela .
Celu vecnost , nikako uzalud ,
vec onako , najdrazi moj , stvarno .
Nudim , da ti godi , zauvek
i onda , kad nas stigne starost .

Sve nudim tebi , drugo i ne zelim ,
nista mi i ne treba , sve u tebi imam ,
ja ne stedim sebe i zato se nudim .
Ne nudim , jer ne znam ,
vec znam , da imamo , ja u tebi
i ti , u meni , ono sto nam treba .
Ponudjeno, neznoscu prihvati ,
i radosno ljubav prigrli ,
jer ces znati , kako mi uzvratiti .



OCUTATI I TISINOM RECI SVE!



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          PTL Links: January 15, 2014        
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              Macchine utensili Cmu di Podenzano        
    Macchine utensili Cmu si trova a Podenzano in provincia di Piacenza. Citta’: PodenzanoIndirizzo: 1, Piazza ItaliaCap: 29027Provincia: PiacenzaNum. di telefono: ************
              Automated Scientific Discovery, the holy goal of AI? from AAAI        

    "[Bruce] Buchanan was trained as a philosopher of science at a time when the profession was dominated by Popper's (1965) view that there is no logic of discovery. Buchanan stated the new research program:

    'The traditional problem of finding an effective method for formulating true hypotheses that best explain phenomena has been transformed into finding heuristic methods that generate plausible explanations. The problem of giving rules for producing true scientific statements has been replaced by the problem of finding efficient heuristic rules for culling the reasonable candidates for an explanation from an appropriate set of possible candidates' [and finding methods for constructing the candidates].'"

    -from Recent Work in Computational Scientific Discovery

    Good Places to Start

    2020 Computing: Exceeding human limits. Scientists are turning to automated processes and technologies in a bid to cope with ever higher volumes of data. But automation offers so much more to the future of science than just data handling. By Stephen H. Muggleton. Nature 440, 409-410 (23 March 2006). "During the twenty-first century, it is clear that computers will continue to play an increasingly central role in supporting the testing, and even formulation, of scientific hypotheses. This traditionally human activity has already become unsustainable in many sciences without the aid of computers. This is not only because of the scale of the data involved but also because scientists are unable to conceptualize the breadth and depth of the relationships between relevant databases without computational support. The potential benefits to science of such computerization are high -- knowledge derived from large-scale scientific data could well pave the way to new technologies, ranging from personalized medicines to methods for dealing with and avoiding climate change. [fn: Towards 2020 Science (Microsoft, 2006)]. ... Meanwhile, machine-learning techniques from computer science (including neural nets and genetic algorithms) are being used to automate the generation of scientific hypotheses from data. Some of the more advanced forms of machine learning enable new hypotheses, in the form of logical rules and principles, to be extracted relative to predefined background knowledge. ... One exciting development that we might expect in the next ten years is the construction of the first microfluidic robot scientist, which would combine active learning and autonomous experimentation with microfluidic technology."

    'Knowledge discovery'. California Computer News (October 20, 2004). "In the recent science-fiction thriller 'Minority Report,' Tom Cruise plays a detective who solves future crimes by being immersed in a 'data cave,' where he rapidly accesses all the relevant information about the identity, location and associates of the potential victim. A team at Purdue University currently is developing a similar 'data-rich' environment for scientific discovery that uses high-performance computing and artificial intelligence software to display information and interact with researchers in the language of their specific disciplines. 'If you were a chemist, you could walk right up to this display and move molecules and atoms around to see how the changes would affect a formulation or a material's properties,' said James Caruthers, a professor of chemical engineering at Purdue. The method represents a fundamental shift from more conventional techniques in computer-aided scientific discovery. 'Most current approaches to computer-aided discovery center on mining data in a process that assumes there is a nugget of gold that needs to be found in a sea of irrelevant information,' Caruthers said. 'This data-mining approach is appropriate for some scientific discovery problems, but scientific understanding often proceeds through a different method, a 'knowledge discovery' approach. 'Instead of mining for a nugget of gold, knowledge discovery is more like sifting through a warehouse filled with small gears, levers, etc., none of which is particularly valuable by itself. After appropriate assembly, however, a Rolex watch emerges from the disparate parts.' ... Discovery informatics depends on a two-part repeating cycle made up of a 'forward model' and an 'inverse process' and two types of artificial intelligence software: hybrid neural networks and genetic algorithms."

    Iridescent Software Illuminates Research Data. By Mike Martin. Sci-Tech Today (January 27, 2004). "Bioinformatics researchers at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center have developed Iridescent, a software program that helps scientists easily identify obscure commonalities in research data and directly relate them to their own work, saving money and speeding the process of discovery. 'This work is about teaching computers to 'read' the literature and make relevant associations so they can be summarized and scored for their potential relevance,' said Dr. Jonathan Wren, a researcher in the department of botany and microbiology at the University of Oklahoma. 'For humans to answer the same questions objectively and comprehensively could entail reading tens of thousands of papers.' ... Iridescent is unveiled in the current issue of the journal Bioinformatics"

    • Shared relationship analysis: ranking set cohesion and commonalities within a literature-derived relationship network. Wren JD, Garner HR. Bioinformatics. 2004 Jan 22;20(2):191-8. [Abstract]

    Toward Automated Discovery in the Biological Sciences. By Bruce G. Buchanan and Gary R. Livingston. AI Magazine 25(1): Spring 2004, 69-84. "The end point of scientific discovery is a concept or hypothesis that is interesting and new (Buchanan 1966). Insofar as there is a distinction at all between discovery and hypothesis formation, discovery is often described as more opportunistic search in a less well-defined space, leading to a psychological element of surprise. The earliest demonstration of self-directed, opportunistic discovery was Doug Lenat's program, AM (Lenat 1982). It was a successful demonstration of AI methods for discovery in a formal domain characterized by axioms (set theory) or rules (games). AM used an agenda-based framework and heuristics to evaluate existing concepts and then create new concepts from the existing concepts. It continued creating and examining concepts until the 'nterestingness' of operating on new or existing concepts (determined using some of AM'S heuristics) dropped below a threshold. Although some generalization and follow-up research with AM was performed (Lenat 1983), this research was limited to discovery in axiomatic domains (Haase 1990; Shen 1990; Sims 1987). Our long-range goal is to develop an autonomous discovery system for discovery in empirical domains, namely, a program that peruses large collections of data to find hypotheses that are interesting enough to warrant the expenditure of laboratory resources and subsequent publication. Even longer range, we envision a scientific discovery system to be the generator of plausible hypotheses for a completely automated science laboratory in which the hypotheses can be verified experimentally by a robot that plans and executes new experiments, interprets their results, and maintains careful laboratory records with the new data."

    A Machine With a Mind of Its Own - Ross King wanted a research assistant who would work 24/7 without sleep or food. So he built one. By Oliver Morton. Wired Magazine (August 2004, Issue 12.08). "The 'robot scientist' (King has resisted the temptation of a jazzy acronym) may look like a mere labor-saving gizmo, shuttling back and forth ad nauseam, but it's much more than that. Biology is full of tools with which to make discoveries. Here's a tool that can make discoveries on its own. ... It wasn't until he moved to Aberystwyth in the mid-'90s that King found comrades who fully appreciated the potential of AI and machine learning. One of the first people he encountered there was Douglas Kell, a voluble, handlebar-mustached biologist with a clear view of where his field was headed. ... Stephen Muggleton argues that the life sciences are peculiarly well suited to machine learning. 'There's an inherent structure in biological problems that lends itself to computational approaches,' he says. In other words, biology reveals the machinelike substructure of the living world; it's not surprising that machines are showing an aptitude for it."

    • Also see this related article: Mark of time. The Engineer Online (September 18, 2006). "A pioneering study at Manchester University is using a 'robot scientist' to examine blood samples for biological markers that may diagnose Alzheimer's disease. ... The robot scientist combines the automatic operation of a blood analysis technique called GCGC-MS with artificial intelligence to determine which experiment to carry out next. ... Douglas Kell, a professor of bioanalytical science at Manchester, was one of the developers of the robot scientist. 'The original idea was to automate the process of scientific discovery,' said Kell. 'There is a model by which we alternate the world of ideas with the world of experience. We carry out an experiment then revise our hypothesis in a cyclic loop. The robot scientist can combine working out what experiment is best to do next with actually carrying it out.' ... The robot uses Inductive Logic Programming, a machine learning process. The scientists give it the background knowledge about the experiment, called the domain. It then decides which hypothesis to follow using the available data."

    Herbert A. Simon: Scientific Discovery. One of Professor Simon's departmental web pages (2001) at Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Psychology. "Understanding the processes scientists use to discover new laws and to test hypotheses has been an active domain of cognitive research and AI modeling for several decades, and was one of Herb Simon's chief areas of research activity. Scientific discovery is an interesting and important task domain because it involves highly ill-structured problems that call on the whole range of human cognitive resources, and thereby provides deep insights into complex and creative human thinking. ... Thus, research on scientific discovery requires one to address fundamental problems in cognitive psychology (the processes of discovery), in the philosophy of science (the relation between the discovery and validation, or disconfirmation, of hypotheses), and in computer science (languages for discovery, heuristic search in discovery environments)."

    Readings Online

    A robot that likes to play with test tubes. By David Akin. The Globe & Mail (January 17, 2004). "[The Robot Scientist] probably will become a vital tool for researchers, particularly in biological fields, to advance human knowledge. That is because in many scientific areas, such as nanotechnology, molecular genetics and the exploration of space, information is being generated too fast for humans to analyze it effectively. 'Biology is in a great data-gathering phase at the moment, a bit like it was in the 19th century,' said Stephen Oliver, a professor and genomics researcher at the University of Manchester in England and another of the eight researchers. The Human Genome Project, the monster science project that identified and explained the function of the genes in a human being, made great use of computers and sophisticated software programs to automate the scientific discovery progress. Indeed, there is now a branch of artificial intelligence research devoted to scientific discovery."

    Robo-scientist goes it alone. BBC News (January 14, 2004). "The world's first 'robot scientist' that can interpret experiments without any human help has been developed by scientists at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth. It generates a set of hypotheses from what it knows about biochemistry, and then designs experiments to test them. ... Although artificial intelligence has made a number of significant contributions to scientific discovery during the last 30 years, its general impact on experimental science has been limited. But this may be about to change with the increased use of automation in scientific research."

    Undergraduate Projects in the Application of Artificial Intelligence to Chemistry. II Self-organizing Maps. By Hugh Cartwright. (2000). The Chemical Educator, Volume 5, Issue 4; 196-206. "The determination of relationships among samples is a task to which Artificial Intelligence is increasingly being applied. In this paper we investigate the Self-Organizing Map (SOM), whose role is to perform just this kind of task; in other words, to cluster data samples so as to reveal the relationships that exist among them."

    • More resources are available from Dr H.M. Cartwright's home page and research group page at the Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford.

    Artificial Intelligence and Scientific Creativity. By Simon Colton and Graham Steel, Division of Informatics, University of Edinburgh. "Papers presented at the [the 1999 AISB Symposium on AI and Scientific Creativity, which took place in Edinburgh, Scotland] addressed the theoretical aspects of and computational possibilities for machine creativity. They also reported on systems implemented to achieve automated discovery in science. The intention of the symposium was that that the papers proposing models of scientific creativity would help researchers concerned with implementing discovery programs, and the papers discussing the successes and techniques employed in working systems will help researchers extract general frameworks for scientific machine discovery. This note is a survey of current research on creativity in science, and in particular the automation of discovery tasks in science."

    Recent Work in Computational Scientific Discovery. By Lindley Darden. In Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Michael Shafto and Pat Langley (Eds.). Mahwah, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1997, pp. 161-166. "The study of computational scientific discovery emerged from the view that science is a problem solving activity, that heuristics for problem solving can be applied to the study of scientific discovery in either historical or contemporary cases, and that methods in artificial intelligence provide techniques for building computational systems. Pioneers in this work are Bruce Buchanan (e.g., 1982) and Herbert Simon (e.g., 1977)."

    • Also by Lindley Darden (1998): Anomaly-Driven Theory Redesign: Computational Philosophy of Science Experiments. In T.W. Bynum and J.H. Moor, The Digital Phoenix: How Computers are Changing Philosophy. New York: Blackwell Publishers, pp. 62-78. " I have been asked to discuss how computers have affected my work in philosophy. This paper discusses the use of artificial intelligence (AI) models to investigate both the representation of scientific knowledge and reasoning strategies for scientific change. The focus is on the reasoning strategies used to revise a theory, given an anomaly, which is a failed prediction of the theory."

    The computer revolution in science: Steps towards the realization of computer-supported discovery environments. By H. de Jong and A. Rip. (1997). Artificial Intelligence, 91(2). "The tools that scientists use in their search processes together form so-called discovery environments. The promise of artificial intelligence and other branches of computer science is to radically transform conventional discovery environments by equipping scientists with a range of powerful computer tools including large-scale, shared knowledge bases and discovery programs." -from the Abstract.

    The Computer-Aided Discovery of Scientific Knowledge. By Pat Langley. 1998. Proceedings of the First International Conference on Discovery Science. "In this paper, we review AI research on computational discovery and its recent application to the discovery of new scientific knowledge. ... As evidence for the advantages of such human-computer cooperation, we report seven examples of novel, computer-aided discoveries that have appeared in the scientific literature...."

    • More of Pat Langley's publications can be found in his Computational Scientific Discovery collection which begins with this historical note: "I became fascinated with the nature of scientific discovery as an undergraduate at TCU, and the interest has remained to this day. My dissertation work at CMU focused on Bacon, an AI system that rediscovered numeric laws from the history of physics. Herbert Simon served as my advisor and contributed many ideas to the effort. Gary Bradshaw and I extended the system to handle additional laws, including ones from the history of chemistry. After Jan Zytkow joined our group, we developed new systems (Stahl and Dalton) that dealt with the discovery of qualitative laws and structural models. This CMU work forms the basis of my early publications on scientific discovery...."

    Towards 2020 Science. Produced under the aegis of Microsoft Research Cambridge (2006). "In the summer of 2005, an international expert group was brought together for a workshop to define and produce a new vision and roadmap of the evolution, challenges and potential of computer science and computing in scientific research in the next fifteen years. The resulting document, Towards 2020 Science, sets out the challenges and opportunities arising from the increasing synthesis of computing and the sciences." In addition to the report and the roadmap, be sure to see the related, special issue of Nature.

    Introducing robo-scientist - Could robots take over from graduate students in the lab? By Mark Peplow. Nature (January 15, 2004). "A robot scientist has been unveiled that can formulate theories, carry out experiments and interpret results - all more cheaply than its human counterparts. As far as artificial newspaper intelligence goes, the Robot Scientist - designed by Ross King of the University of Wales in Aberystwyth, UK, and his colleagues - isn't as smart as other computers, such as those that compete in international chess competitions. But combining the smarts of a computer with the agility of a robot wasn't trivial. ... Geneticist Stephen Oliver of the University of Manchester, UK, who helped to select the robot's research project, says there is potential for the robot to more than just drudgery. 'The next big step is to make our robot discover something completely new,' says Oliver, 'perhaps by applying it to drug discovery.'"

    • The journal article: Oliver, S. G. et al. Functional genomic hypothesis generation and experimentation by a robot scientist. Nature, 427, 247 - 252, doi:10.1038/nature02236 (2004).
    • And consider this: A Robot Scientist - As ye sow... A machine can now do science. The Economist (January 15, 2004). "One question is, if their robot does make an important discovery, will it be eligible to win a Nobel prize?"

    Editorial: Scientific Discovery and Simplicity of Method. By Herbert A. Simon, Raul E. Valdes-Perez and Derek H. Sleeman. (1997). Artificial Intelligence, 91(2):177-181. ""[C]omplexity of programs or of their outputs is not a measure of their 'intelligence'. Given very complex tasks, complex algorithms may be a necessity, but they are clearly not a virtue. A critical lesson of artificial intelligence, and of computing in general, is that if a task domain has strong structure and if sufficient domain information can be obtained, either a priori or in the course of computation, then rather simple programs may suffice."

    Systematic Methods of Scientific Discovery: Papers from the 1995 Spring Symposium, ed. Raul Valdes-Perez. Technical Report SS-95-03. American Association for Artificial Intelligence, Menlo Park, California. Here are just some of the papers you'll find in this collection:

    • Herbert A. Simon's What is a Systematic Method of Scientific Discovery?
    • Pat Langley's Stages in the Process of Scientific Discovery.
    • Joshua S. Lederberg's Notes on Systematic Hypothesis Generation, and Application to Disciplined Brainstorming.

    Some Recent Human-Computer Discoveries in Science and What Accounts for Them. By Raul E. Valdes-Perez. AI Magazine 16(3): Fall 1995, 37-44. "My collaborators and I have recently reported in domain science journals several human-computer discoveries in biology, chemistry, and physics. One might ask what accounts for these findings, for example, whether they share a common pattern. My conclusion is that each finding involves a new representation of the scientific task: The problem spaces searched were unlike previous task problem spaces. Such new representations need not be wholly new to the history of science; rather, they can draw on useful representational pieces from elsewhere in natural or computer science. This account contrasts with earlier explanations of machine discovery based on the expert system view. My analysis also suggests a broader potential role for (AI) computer scientists in the practice of natural science."

    Neural Networks Meet CombiChem. By Emil Venere. Bio.com (January 22, 2002). "The different types of software work together in a repeating two-phase cycle of discovery. First, hybrid neural networks analyze the formulas of the numerous catalysts, or other materials, created by the parallel technique. The neural networks determine the properties of the materials, based on their chemical structures. In the second phase, genetic algorithms cull the best materials and eliminate the poor performers, just like survival of the fittest. The algorithms also generate 'mutations' of the best materials to create even better versions, and the software determines the chemical structures of those mutations. The resulting formulas are returned to the neural network software, and the cycle starts over again, progressively creating better and better materials, said Venkat Venkatasubramanian, a professor of chemical engineering who has been working with Caruthers to develop the software for more than a decade. [James M.] Caruthers said he observes how formulation chemists come up with new ideas. Then he models their trains of thought in software programs."

    Text-Based Discovery in Biomedicine: The Architecture of the DAD-system. By M. Weeber, H. Klein, A. R. Aronson, J. G. Mork, L. Jong-van den Berg, and R. Vos. Presented at The American Medical Informatics Association 2000 Symposium. "Current scientific research takes place in highly specialized contexts with poor communication between disciplines as a likely consequence. Knowledge from one discipline may be useful for the other without researchers knowing it. As scientific publications are a condensation of this knowledge, literature-based discovery tools may help the individual scientist to explore new useful domains. We report on the development of the DAD-system, a concept-based Natural Language Processing system for PubMed citations that provides the biomedical researcher such a tool."

    Related Web Sites

    "ARROWSMITH is interactive software that extends the power of a MEDLINE search. It operates on the output of a conventional search in a way that helps the user see new relationships and form and assess novel scientific hypotheses. It is based on the premise that information developed in one area of research can be of value in another without anyone being aware of the fact." At this site, which is maintained by Don R. Swanson at The University of Chicago, you'll find articles and manuals that show you how it works.

    Imperial College Computational Bioinformatics Laboratory (CBL):

    Related Pages

    More Readings

    Scientific Discovery - Computational Explorations of the Creative Processes. By Pat Langley, Herbert A. Simon, Gary L. Bradshaw and Jan M. Zytkow. The MIT Press (February 1987). "Using the methods and concepts of contemporary information-processing psychology (or cognitive science) the authors develop a series of artificial-intelligence programs that can simulate the human thought processes used to discover scientific laws. The programs - BACON, DALTON, GLAUBER, and STAHL - are all largely data-driven, that is, when presented with series of chemical or physical measurements they search for uniformities and linking elements, generating and checking hypotheses and creating new concepts as they go along."

    Molecular Treasure Hunt - A software tool elicits previously undiscovered gene or protein pathways by combing through hundreds of thousands of journal articles. By Gary Stix. Scientific American (May 2005; subscription req'd.). "When Andrey Rzhetsky arrived at Columbia University as a research scientist in 1996, the first project he collaborated on involved a literature search to try to understand why white blood cells called lymphocytes do not die in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The mathematician-biologist found a few hundred articles on apoptosis (programmed cell death) and the cancer.... The experience led him to an idea that would have made his job on that first project much easier: an automated search tool that could supplant the mind-numbing task of finding and reading all the literature. But it also might do much more; it could even let a machine conduct research on its own, discovering the patterns among the data much as a human would do...."

    FYI: As explained in this announcement, on March 1, 2007 AAAI changed its name from the American Association for Artificial Intelligence to the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence.

              CMU's Meyer joins international tour        

    May 15, 2017

     

    Andy Sneddon, CMUChippweas.com

    Central Michigan’s Luke Meyer has been selected to participate in the Reach USA Friendship Tour of the Far East.

    Meyer, a 6-foot-10 ½ forward, will join nine other players from around the country on the tour, during which the American squad will play eight games over a two-week period against various professional teams in Asia.

    “I’m very excited about learning a new culture and seeing an entirely different part of the world,” said Meyer, who is a senior-to-be at CMU who hails from Addison. “I have never been that far away from home. I know that it will benefit me and help me grow as an individual both on and off the court.

    “It will be very interesting to see how the game is played in a different part of the world.”

    Meyer, a product design major who carries a 3.23 grade point average, has started every game of his CMU career and has been named to the Academic All-Mid-American Conference in each of the past two seasons.

    He averaged 5.8 points and 4.8 rebounds per game last season, when the Chippewas finished 16-16. He was second in the team with 36 blocks.

    For his career, Meyer has appeared in 97 games, and is averaging 6.6 points and 4.1 rebounds per game. He ranks ninth in program history with 88 career blocks.


              Coached to Coach        
    davis_and_davis2

    Keno Davis recalls getting on the school bus as an eighth-grader and being greeted by his middle school classmates chanting “USSR.”

    Tom Davis, Keno Davis’ father, and the Iowa Hawkeyes basketball team had just lost an exhibition game to the Soviet Union National Basketball Team prior to the 1986-87 season. 

    “All of the sudden,” Davis said. “I knew that Iowa basketball was big.”

    Occurrences such as these were a theme in Keno Davis’ life growing up as the son of an NCAA Division I basketball coach. 

    His first memory of the game is as a ball boy at Boston College where his father coached from 1977 until 1982. As ball boy, Keno Davis returned rebounds to players during warm-ups and wiped sweat off the court between offensive possessions.

    He also recalled being at practice and watching basketball games court-side as his father worked. He attended multiple NCAA Tournament games, including the 1987 Sweet 16 matchup between Iowa and Oklahoma. 

    By the time Keno Davis was a young man, he was hooked. 

    CMU assistant basketball coach Kevin Gamble made the game-winning shot with five seconds left in overtime to win the game for the Hawkeyes. A 14-year old Keno Davis can be seen in a video replay celebrating at the end of the Hawkeyes’ bench as Gamble’s shot sent Iowa to the Final Four. 

     

    Andrew Kuhn | File Photo | Central Michigan Life

    Central Michigan University head basketball coach Keno Davis yells to his team during a basketball game.

     

    Coaches’ Life

    Tom Davis began his head coaching career at Lafayette in 1971. He was a head coach at five different schools during his 36-year coaching career, including Boston College, Stanford, Drake and most notably, Iowa. 

    Because the family was forced to move each time Tom Davis took a new job, his son was exposed to a variety of American cultures and basketball philosophies.

    “Even when we were taking vacations, it was revolving around a speaking engagement or a recruiting trip,” Keno Davis said. “Even before I ever had an idea that coaching or basketball would be part of whatever I decided to do as a profession, I was getting experience and seeing behind the scenes.”

    Watching his father go through the ups and downs of being a college basketball coach was not always easy. 

    “I got to experience the good and bad days that a coach has — the whole roller-coaster of emotion,” Keno Davis said. “Experiencing it as a child, up until going into college was good background for me to get a full understanding and awareness of everything that I might be getting into.”

    He played basketball at Iowa City West High School. Keno Davis made the team, but did not see a lot of playing time until his senior season. 

    “During that time in high school, everybody knew who I was,” he said. “It never really bothered me and I didn’t think too much of it because of my experience growing up.”

    When a career as a player did not appear realistic, Keno Davis was determined to stay involved in the sport he loved.  

    Joining the coaching staff

    Because of the opportunity to help out with the basketball team, Keno Davis attended the University of Iowa.

    “I was never a great basketball player at all,” he said. “I had the opportunity to go to a smaller school to play. I was a better golfer at the time and had some opportunities to play golf at the college level.” 

    Keno Davis became an undergraduate assistant coach for Iowa before the 1991-92 season during his freshman year.

    The first advice he received while starting as an undergraduate assistant coach was simple: Learn as much as possible. 

    “It’s a really good piece of advice and it’s simple,” he said. “As a young, aspiring coach, you are better off when you are learning to take one little thing from each coach that you really like. I was able to be able to learn from other coaches that I worked with and work for.”

    Scouting opponents was one of his major roles as an undergraduate assistant coach. He worked with Frank DiLeo, an assistant coach, to scout teams.

    “We made a scouting trip to Drake, and there was an out-of-bounds play (an opposing team was running). I started jotting it down and getting all the details. Keno looked at me and said ‘Wow, you can get all that?’” said DiLeo remembering one scouting trip. “He came along to learn and realized that he did have things to learn even though he had been around basketball (his entire life).”

    Keno Davis said he remembered the trip and remembered how impressed he was with how DiLeo captured the details in the scouting report. 

    “They ran the play and (DiLeo) had the name of the play, every player in the right position, the exact footwork and timing,” he said. “That was pretty impressive to me to be able to do that. This is not something you can’t do the first time. You have to have experience in doing it.”

    Through experience, Keno Davis was able to learn what worked, what didn’t work and how players responded to different styles of coaching. 

     

    Father, Son and Basketball 

    To Keno Davis, basketball is about more than winning or losing. It’s about family. 

    He said he talks to his father after every game he has ever coached, but their relationship is far more than coaching and basketball.

    “We have an incredible relationship outside of basketball,” Keno Davis said. “To be able to talk to somebody about the profession and the different games and have a different perspective helps him stay involved with the game and it gives me a great resource to be able to lean on someone.”

    Keno Davis and Tom Davis reunited on the court when his father came out of retirement to coach at Drake in 2003.

    It was the first the father and son’s paths crossed as coaches. 

    “When we first took the job, we had a hotel room that we were living out of. We would get up at the crack of dawn and go into the office until it was time to go to sleep,” Keno Davis said. “We were able to set the foundation through a lot of hard work for what the program would be in three to five years.”

    During that time, he said he learned some profound lessons from his father about the game and life. 

    “That experience had a lot of value to me,” he said.

    After being a head coach at Drake for four seasons, Tom Davis retired and allowed his son to take over in his first head coaching job after the 2006-07 season.

    During the 2007-08 season, Keno Davis led Drake to a conference regular-season title after being projected to finish ninth in the Missouri Valley Conference. After coaching the Bulldogs to a 28-5 record, Keno Davis was named the Associated Press Coach of the Year.

    Tom and Keno Davis are the only father-son duo to win the award. Tom Davis earned the award during his first season at Iowa in 1986-87.

    “Because (we both won the award), it meant a lot more,” Keno Davis said. “To have something that you share with your father.”

    During the 2007-08 season, Tom Davis sat across from the bench to watch his son’s team. 

    “He would sit at the media table and watch as a fan, but also (because) ‘once a coach, always a coach,’” Keno Davis said. “After games, I was looking for feedback. He wouldn’t give it to me because he was afraid that I would think that he was trying to coach the team.” 

    But Tom Davis didn’t give his son the notes he took during games. He wanted his son to know Drake was his team.

    “I almost had to force it out of him,” Keno Davis said. “He was worried about our relationship versus the professional relationship.”

    As he took over that team, Keno Davis said he never felt any stress or pressure to coach as well as his father. 

    As he prepares to lead the Chippewas in his fifth season in Mount Pleasant, Keno Davis will not forget the man who helped shape him into the coach and person he has become. 

    “He had so much success and had the longevity of his career,” he acknowledged. “I don’t think anybody thought that would be possible. I don’t think it’s possible to have that many wins and success over the time that he did it.”

    Through the ups and downs of both of their coaching careers, father told son one thing above all else: Coach what you believe in.

    “Don’t do something because the fans want you to or something that an administrator wants you to do,” Keno Davis said. “At the end of the day, you are going to be judged for the kind of program you have and how successful you can be. 

    “You have to focus on what you believe in.”


              Chippewas on the Rise On and Off the Court        

    May 25, 2016

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - The Central Michigan men's basketball team has experienced its share of success the past two seasons. 

    The Chippewas have captured two MAC West titles, put together the program's first back-to-back winning seasons since the late 1980s and made two postseason tournament appearances. 

    Mirroring the program's recent rise on the court has been its progress in the classroom. 

    In 2016, CMU led the conference with four Academic All-MAC selections, twice as many as any other team. It marked the third consecutive year that the Chippewas had more players honored than any other team in the league. Following the Spring semester, a total of 10 men's basketball student-athletes have compiled a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. 

    This season, senior guard Chris Fowler became the first CMU player in program history named to the College Sports Information Directors Association Academic All-District 5 Division I team. Both Fowler and senior John Simons were three-time Academic All-MAC honorees. Blake Hibbitts, who will return after missing what was to be his senior season in 2015-16 due to a knee injury, is a two-time recipient. 

    "I am very proud of our graduating group of seniors for their accomplishments on the court and in the classroom," said head coach Keno Davis. "They have set a high standard for our program for years to come." 
    In 2015, CMU was one of 175 institutions and one of just 19 in Division I from across the nation to earn the Team Academic Excellence Award from the National Association of Basketball Coaches, which recognizes outstanding academic achievement by a team with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better for the 2014-15 season. 

    It was the third season that the organization has handed out the award, and the second time the Chippewas have received it. CMU was the lone member of the Mid-American Conference to receive recognition.


              Chippewas Lead Academic All-MAC Squad        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – Four Central Michigan student-athletes were named to the Academic All-Mid-American Conference men’s basketball team.

    CMU led the league with its four selections, twice as many as any other team. It marked the third consecutive year that the Chippewas have put more players on the team than any other team in the league.

    “I am very appreciative of the efforts of our student-athletes to not only to be able to win championships, but more importantly to do so while representing CMU in the highest fashion in the classroom and in the community,” said Keno Davis, who is heading into his fifth season as the Chippewas’ coach.

    The four Chippewas named to the squad, with year, GPA and major: Chris Fowler, senior, 3.47, theatre arts; John Simons, senior, 3.40, accounting; Luke Meyer, sophomore, 3.35, product design engineering technology; Austin Stewart, senior, 3.35, sociology.

    It marks the third consecutive year that Fowler and Simons have been named to the squad, and the second straight year for Stewart.

    ?To be eligible, a student-athlete must maintain a 3.2 or better grade point average and appear in at least 50 percent of her team’s meets. True freshman and first-year transfers are ineligible.


              Fowler and Rayson Earn NABC All-District Honors        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – Central Michigan senior guard Chris Fowler and junior guard Braylon Rayson earned additional postseason honors on Friday, receiving all-district recognition by the National Basketball Coaches Association (NABC). 

    Fowler was named First Team All-District 14 for the second consecutive season while Rayson was selected to the second team. 

    The NABC divides the nation into 25 districts and honors 10 players from each district, signifying a five-player first team and a five-player second team.

    Fowler, a two-time First Team All-MAC honoree, averaged a team-high 16.5 points and 5.9 assists per game to go with a career-best 4.0 rebounds in 2015-16. The four-time team captain finished his brilliant career as Central Michigan’s all-time assists leader with 686 and ranks No. 3 all-time in steals (185) and No. 5 in scoring (1,736 points). A starter of all 120 career games in which he appeared, Fowler is the only CMU player to have all four seasons rank in the top 10 in assists, including 2015-16 when he missed the first seven games due to injury.

    A Third Team All-MAC selection, Rayson had a breakout year in 2015-16. The Dallas, Texas native ranked second on the team in scoring (16.3 ppg) and 3-pointers (81), helping the Chippewas break the program mark for triples in a season set a year ago. He scored in double figures in 27 games, including nine 20-plus point efforts. Rayson reached the 1,000-point scoring milestone this season and rose to his current position of No. 16 with 1,206 career points. With one season remaining, he also ranks eighth in career 3-pointers made (178) and sixth in attempts (510). 

    Fowler and Rayson were instrumental in leading Central Michigan to back-to-back MAC West titles and to 40 wins over the last season two seasons, the most since 1986-87 and 1987-88 (41).


              Back On Top In The MAC West        

    MUNCIE, Ind. – Another white-knuckler, another win.

    And back in first place.

    Chris Fowler scored 20 points and Braylon Rayson added 18 Tuesday as the Central Michigan men’s basketball team held on for a 65-57 victory over Ball State before 2,738 at the Cardinals’ Worthen Arena.

    The win, CMU’s third straight, lifted it into a first-place tie in the MAC West with the Cardinals. Both teams are 10-7 in MAC play. The Chippewas are 17-13 overall, Ball State is 19-11.

    CMU closes the regular season Friday (7 p.m.) at home against Western Michigan (12-18, 6-11). A win would give the Chippewas at least a share of the West title and could put them in the top four in the overall MAC standings, meaning they would get a bye to the quarterfinal round of the league tournament in Cleveland.

    The Chippewas wrestled this one away, much like they did in winning 76-74 at Toledo on Saturday, by digging deep and holding off a late charge from Ball State.

    CMU made just 36.8 percent of its field goal attempts including 30.8 percent from 3-point range. The Chippewas offset that by holding Ball State – which scored 115 points against Eastern Michigan on Saturday – to similar shooting numbers and by committing just three turnovers, a season-low.

    “When you look at us going on the road and only shooting 36 percent, 30 percent from 3, wow that’s something we’ve talked about before, Can we find a way to win?” CMU coach Keno Davis said. “To only have three turnovers in a game that was that physical is a credit to the work that these guys have put in on their ball skills and handling the ball, passing the ball, and also being able to play with contact.”

    The Chippewas built a 13-point lead with just over five minutes to play before Ball State, needing a win to clinch the division crown, fought its way back to cut the lead to six, 57-51, with 3 minutes, 43 seconds remaining.

    CMU dug in down the stretch, and DaRohn Scott – much as he did at Toledo three nights before – came up big, blocking a shot and then scoring on a putback with 1:58 left to put the Chippewas back up eight, 59-51.

    Ball State twice trimmed CMU’s lead back to six in the final 22 seconds, but the clutch Rayson made all four of his free throw attempts in the waning seconds to salt it away.

    Franko House scored 23 points, Sean Sellers had 11, and Bo Calhoun added 10 for Ball State.

    Ball State held a slim 40-38 rebounding edge, but the Chippewas had 10 offensive boards and 14 of their points came on second chances. The Cardinals, who committed 12 turnovers, finished with six offensive rebounds.

    Luke Meyer grabbed nine rebounds to lead CMU, while John Simons added eight. Calhoun had a team-high nine rebounds for Ball State, while House finished with six.

    “Those guys inside, House and Calhoun, they can put big numbers on you,” Davis said. “I credit Luke Meyer, I credit DaRohn ScottJohn SimonsAustin Stewart for everything that they had on the boards.

    “When you look at (Meyer) getting nine rebounds in 27 minutes, that’s something we want to see for years to come.”

    Rayshawn Simmons led the Chippewas with five assists, while Fowler had four. Neither committed a turnover.

    Fowler briefly left the game early in the second half with an apparent wrist injury.

    “We need him on the court because even when he’s not making the play, he’s getting us in our offense, he’s getting our team where we need to be,” Davis said. “We also had some guys step up in big roles tonight to be able to get a great road victory. Big plays by everybody.”


              Great Scott: CMU Men Grind Out A Win At Toledo        

    TOLEDO, Ohio - It's not always how much, but when.

    DaRohn Scott's final stat line was anything but impressive, but his contribution down the stretch loomed large Saturday as Central Michigan gutted out a 76-74 Mid-American Conference men's basketball victory over Toledo at the Rockets' Savage Arena.

    The win lifted CMU to 16-13, 9-7 MAC and it kept the Chippewas one game behind Ball State in the MAC West. It was CMU's fifth straight win over Toledo, 17-12, 8-8.

    Scott, a 6-foot-9 junior, finished with four points, three rebounds and three blocks in 16 minutes.

    His first bucket, a dunk with under four minutes to play, put CMU ahead for good. He then he made two huge blocks and scored on a putback in the final 1 minute, 4 seconds.

    The Chippewas play at Ball State on Tuesday, then close the regular season at home next Friday against Western Michigan.

    "Both teams played extremely hard and you kind of knew from the opening tip this game was going to go down to the wire," CMU coach Keno Davis said. "Credit our guys. We didn't make all the right plays down the stretch, but we made enough and our guys will enjoy this one as we get ready for another tough one at Ball State."

    Chris Fowler scored 20 points, John Simons had 19, Luke Meyer added 12, and Braylon Rayson had 10 to lead the Chippewas, who took the lead for good, 69-67, on Scott's dunk with 3 minutes, 38 seconds remaining.

    MAC Player of the Year candidate Nathan Boothe hit a 3-pointer with 55 seconds remaining to draw Toledo to 73-72. Scott rebounded a CMU miss on its next possession and scored on the putback with 21 seconds left to make it 75-72.

    Jonathan Williams hit two free throws with 7 seconds left to pull the Rockets to 75-74, and CMU's Rayshawn Simmons (seven assists) made a charity toss with five seconds remaining for the final margin. Toledo missed a final desperation 3-pointer at the buzzer.

    Fowler picked up his fourth foul with 12:48 to play and went to the bench. He returned with 9:15 remaining and the Chippewas down one, 57-56.

    It was a calculated risk, Davis said, bringing Fowler back into the game with four fouls. It paid off.

    "I don't want to lose a game by having my best player sitting on the bench," Davis said. "I just felt like we needed his leadership, his ability to get to the basket, his ability to make big plays in there. It was a risk, but definitely a risk worth taking."

    Boothe, a 6-foot-9 senior, finished with 23 points and grabbed seven rebounds for the Rockets, who made six of their 12 3-point attempts in the second half. The MAC's leading scorer, Boothe also scored 23 points in the Chippewas' 77-69 win over the Rockets 11 days ago in Mount Pleasant.

    "We held him to 23," Davis said. "I think we said that after the first win against them. And that sounds funny to say. He's a guy who can put 30-plus on you in a hurry so to not let him single-handedly beat you was a big key tonight."

    The play of Scott and the 6-11 Meyer - both sophomores - was crucial, Davis said. 

    "You talk about Luke and DaRohn and you put those 40 minutes together and you're talking about 16 (points) and nine (rebounds)," he said. "That's pretty nice numbers from your sophomore bigs. 

    "I don't think anybody saw them when they first came in (to CMU) and thought, Hey they're ready to go, they're going to be at that level on day one. They're guys who have tremendous upside, guys who have worked extremely hard and it's nice to be able, as of late, for them to have some really great games as sophomores."

    Simons finished 4-of-7 from 3-point range and his 19 points was his second-highest total of the season after the 22 he posted at Grand Canyon on Dec. 3, a stretch of 22 games

    He grabbed a team-high nine rebounds as the Chippewas finished with a 34-33 edge on the glass. It marked the first time in 10 games that CMU has outrebounded an opponent.


              Motivated Chippewas Topple NIU        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – In a two-minute span early in the second half, Central Michigan’s lead shrunk from nine points to one.

    Then, CMU coach Keno Davis was hit with a technical foul, his first in more than two seasons. Northern Illinois made the free throws awarded it on the technical, completing a 10-0 run that gave the Huskies a 43-42 lead.

    That lead, NIU’s one and only of the game, lasted all of 22 seconds.

    John Simons made two free throws to put CMU back on top, 44-43, and the Chippewas never trailed again as they went on to post a 76-64 Mid-American Conference men’s basketball victory over Northern Illinois at McGuirk Arena, improving to 15-13 overall, 8-7 MAC.

    “I definitely think something like (a technical) can make a team play harder,” said Simons, who scored 17 points – his season-high in a MAC game – and grabbed a team-high eight rebounds. “Regardless if that happened or not, they were tightening up (the game).

    “We knew that we had to rev it back up and get our energy level back up. … Sometimes things like that can fire a team up.”

    The Chippewas are tied for second place in the West Division with Toledo, one game behind Ball State. The Cardinals lost, 77-67, Tuesday at Toledo.

    Chris Fowler added 16 points and seven assists for the Chippewas, while Josh Kozinski had 15 points, and Braylon Rayson added 10 as the Chippewas held off the Huskies, who continued to charge and remained within a stride or two until the waning moments.

    “I probably deserved (the technical) and I wasn’t using it to try to get our guys’ energy going,” Davis said. “I was frustrated at the time and was trying to get that message across.

    “I was OK being able to do that and get the technical foul because I knew that my team wouldn’t react poorly. They wouldn’t be disrupted by it. I didn’t know if it would give them something, it wasn’t part of the plan. I knew with our senior leadership and the experience that we have on the team that might not help them, but it wasn’t going to hurt them and it’s nice to have a team that you don’t have to worry about getting disrupted when something doesn’t go exactly as planned.”

    Planned or not, intentional or not, it worked. Simons and Kozinski stepped on the accelerator, combining to make six of their nine triple tries in the second half. They teamed to finish 8-for-14 from long range for the game.

    While the Chippewas had regained the lead on Simon’s post-technical free throws, they never could get comfortable. Their lead remained in single digits until a Kozinski 3-pointer with 3:49 left put them up, 70-60. NIU (18-10, 7-8) never got closer than nine the rest of the way.

    CMU made nine of its 11 second-half free throw attempts and finished 12-for-16 from the charity stripe for the game.

    Marin Maric and Travon Baker scored 10 points apiece for NIU, which has lost three straight. Maric grabbed 11 rebounds for his seventh consecutive double-double. Maric and Baker combined for 31 points in NIU’s 75-70 victory over CMU five weeks ago. Levi Bradley had 14 points for the Huskies in that game. He finished with seven on Tuesday.

    “Defensively we’ve been up and down this year,” Davis said. “Some of that is about matchups, some about execution. I think as we see teams for a second time, and maybe a third time as we go, there shouldn’t be anything that we see that we haven’t prepared for.

    “It then comes down to, Are we good enough to be able to stop teams? Some nights we have been.”

    The Huskies entered the game holding opponents to 66.6 points per game. The Chippewas finished the game shooting 44.3 percent from the floor (they were making 44.6 percent for the season before Tuesday’s contest), and they made enough timely buckets – and got enough defensive stops -- to keep the Huskies at bay.

    “They’re a great defensive team,” Fowler said. “There’s no easy baskets, no easy layups. They challenge everything. You know it’s going to be tough each time you see that team.”

    The Chippewas play at Toledo on Saturday, at Ball State next Tuesday, and close the regular season at home on Friday, March 4, against Western Michigan.

    “We get excited the same amount for every game and play it is as if it’s a championship game as we always do,” Fowler said. “We’re going to play hard and play together and let everything else take care of itself.”


              Fowler's Big Day Lifts CMU Men to Third Straight Win        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – Poise and patience. Remaining steady with the eyes locked on the long-term goal. And an ever-building confidence. 

    Those are concepts much easier said than done. Yet, as the 2015-16 season unfolds, the Central Michigan men’s basketball team increasingly appears to epitomize all of them.

    The Chippewas got 27 points from Chris Fowler Saturday in disposing of Bowling Green, 77-65, before a season-high 3,758 at McGuirk Arena.

    It was CMU’s third straight win – its first three-game win streak of the season – and it lifted the Chippewas to 12-9 overall, 5-3 in the Mid-American Conference.

    “I don’t think we’ve ever lacked confidence, I just think we’re playing harder,” said Fowler, whose point total was a season-high. “I don’t think this group has any problem with confidence. We pick each other up, we support each other, we’re positive. We’re picking up our level of intensity.”

    The win, coupled with Northern Illinois’ loss to Miami (Ohio), moved CMU into a first-place tie with the Huskies in the MAC West. The Chippewas play host to Kent State (17-4, 6-2) on Tuesday at 7 p.m. The Flashes share the MAC East lead with Akron.

    Bowling Green (13-8, 4-4) lost its first MAC road game of the season. The Falcons outrebounded the Chippewas, 42-36. Fifteen of the Falcons boards came on the offensive end.

    “I think you can see why Bowling Green was 3-0 on the road in the conference this year,” CMU coach Keno Davissaid. “They gave us everything we wanted on the boards and with their physical play.

    “I was really proud of my team to be able to come through and make enough plays. Obviously the home court and our fans had something to do with it. It was a really nice win for us going forward, but the rest of the games ahead are going to be a challenge to maintain that effort each and every game.”

    Fowler, who also had five assists, finished 9-of-14 from the floor and 8-of-10 from the free throw line. He had 21 points and nine assists in CMU’s 68-51 victory at Miami on Tuesday.

    “I think you see with Chris how complete of a player he is,” Davis said. “You might not have the answer on how to guard him. If you take away one thing, he can beat you in a lot of other ways.”

    Fowler missed the first seven games of the season and it appears, based on his recent performances, that he is nearing 100 percent.

    “I think health-wise, it sure looks like he’s back,” Davis said. “You’re starting to see his timing come back and his conditioning is something that always continues to improve. The goal wasn’t to have him back on Day 1 and expect to see vintage Chris. The plan was for him to improve and make strides. It’s nice to see him getting back to his true self and guys definitely play better around him on the court.”


    Braylon Rayson added 19 points and Rayshawn Simmons had 10 for the Chippewas, who made 40.9 percent of their 3-point attempts. They held Bowling Green (13-8, 4-4) to 37.1 percent from the floor (23-of-62). The Falcons made just two of their 12 3-point tries.

    John Simons grabbed a game-high eight rebounds for the Chippewas, while Luke Meyer finished with a season-high four blocks.

    Fowler scored 21 of his points in the first half as the Chippewas steadily built a 41-30 halftime lead.

    They bumped their lead to 19 with under 13 minutes to play, but Bowling Green managed to claw back to within 10, 61-51, with 7 minutes remaining.

    The Chippewas used a 10-4 run – triggered by a Fowler jumper with 6:41 left – to put the game away. Five of CMU’s 10 points during the game-clinching surge came at the free throw line, and Rayson ended the spurt with a 3-pointer which put CMU up, 71-55, with 3:59 to play.

    The Falcons never got closer than 11 the rest of the way. CMU finished 16-for-21 from the line.

    Spencer Parker scored 13 points, Rasheed Worrell had 12, and Zack Denny added 11 for Bowling Green, which entered the contest averaging 73.7 points per game.

    It was the third straight game that CMU has held an opponent significantly below its season average.

    “We have had great defensive effort those last three games and that’s important for us,” Davis said. “We don’t want to believe that we’re a great defensive team because we’ve been playing really hard defensively for three games.

    “We need to continue to play at that level of intensity, and if we do, we’ll get better across the board. We’ll get better on offense, we’ll get better on defense, our rebounding. The individual improvement will really take off. I’m not a believer that we’re a great defensive team, but we do have effort and that’s admirable.”


              Solid 'D' Lifts CMU Past Miami        

    OXFORD, Ohio - Because of its prodigious 3-point shooting, the Central Michigan men's basketball team had been tagged with the moniker, 3MU.

    How about DMU?

    Central Michigan put the clamps on Miami (Ohio) Tuesday, holding the RedHawks to 36.8 percent shooting in posting a 68-51 Mid-American Conference win at Miami's Millett Hall.

    It was CMU's second-straight win and its second-straight outstanding defensive performance, lifting it to 11-9, 4-3 MAC. The Chippewas play host to Bowling Green on Saturday at McGuirk Arena (4:30 p.m.). The Falcons (13-7, 4-3) won, 79-78, at Western Michigan on Tuesday. CMU won at Bowling Green, 79-67, on Jan. 9.

    Miami (6-14, 0-7) made six of its first nine 3-point attempts and was within three, 35-32, at halftime. The Chippewas outscored the RedHawks, 33-19, in the final 20 minutes to win going away. Miami made just one of its eight second-half 3-point tries.

    "Great defensive effort," said CMU coach Keno Davis, whose team silenced Ohio last Saturday, 72-49. "I thought early we didn't have quite as much energy as we needed and you've got to give credit to Miami of Ohio, they made those early 3s which spread us out which created more offensive for them.

    "I thought our guys came out of the locker room in that second half, felt pretty confident about what they needed to do and obviously played pretty well doing it."

    It was CMU's first win at Miami since Feb. 27, 1991, a stretch of 14 consecutive games. It also marked the first time that CMU - which defeated Miami in their only meeting last season - has won back-to-back games over the RedHawks since 1987-88.

    "That's a long streak," said Davis, who last season led CMU to its first regular-season MAC championship in more than a decade. "That's a good one to get out of the way. Any time that you're trying to build a program and you can do something that hasn't been done for awhile, whether it's winning seasons or (making the) post-season or playing in the (league) championship - whatever it is, those things are not only nice to be able to enjoy as a team and for our fans to be able to enjoy, but really important going forward for us. 

    "It's a credit to those (CMU) guys. It's such a great story. These guys were unheralded coming out of high school, undervalued, under-recruited. They went through the growing pains that Central Michigan fans have gone through for quite a few years. They went through it themselves. If we win these guys are celebrating, they're enjoying it, they're loving every minute of it. It's truly a great group to have the privilege to coach."

    Chris Fowler scored 21 points and dished our nine assists (against just two turnovers) to lead the Chippewas, while Braylon Rayson added 14 points and Rayshawn Simmons had 12.

    Fowler made all 11 of his free throw attempts as the Chippewas finished 18-for-20 from the line.

    Rayson, a junior guard, hit a jumper with 3 minutes, 41 seconds remaining to put him over the 1,000-career-point mark. He became the 31st player in program history to accomplish the feat, and he is the third current Chippewa (Fowler and John Simons are the others) in the club.

    CMU is one of just three NCAA Division I teams with three 1,000-point scorers on its current roster.

    Miami, playing without leading scorer Eric Washington, got 13 points from Rob Mills and 10 from Geovanie McKnight.

    The Chippewas used two second-half runs to put the game away.

    Leading 35-34, the Chippewas went on a 15-2 surge to up their lead to 14, 50-36, with just under 14 minutes to play. Rayshawn Simmons started the spurt with a pair of free throws, and Fowler closed it with a three-point play.

    With the lead at seven, 52-45, and less than 10 minutes remaining, Rayson hit three field goals, one of which was a 3-pointer, during a 9-0 surge that left CMU up 16, 61-45, with just under 8 minutes to play.

    Miami never got closer than 12 the rest of the way. 
     


              CMU Men Get Defensive, Stifle Ohio        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – Once again, the Central Michigan men’s basketball team struggled from 3-point range.

    But the Chippewas will gladly trade that for the type of defensive performance they put on on Saturday.

    CMU held Ohio to a 36.5 percent shooting in stifling the Bobcats, 72-49, in a Mid-American Conference game before 3,333, the largest crowd of the season at McGuirk Arena.

    The 49 points was far and away Ohio’s lowest point total of the season, and it was more than 30 below its season average.

    The win lifted CMU to 10-9, 3-3 MAC. Ohio is 11-7, 2-4. It was the Chippewas’ third consecutive victory over the Bobcats, something CMU has not accomplished since 1987.

    Luke Meyer and Braylon Rayson scored 14 points apiece and Chris Fowler added 11 to lead the Chippewas, who snapped a two-game losing streak.

    In those two losses, at Buffalo and at Northern Illinois, the Chippewas struggled at key times to score. That wasn’t necessarily the case on Saturday.

    “Going into the year, we knew we could score and that we would be streaky because of the amount of threes that we do shoot,” CMU coach Keno Davis said. “We had to get better defensively and rebounding and that that would be a process throughout the year.

    “On nights where we’ve given up a lot of points, I continue to preach that we weren’t that bad defensively, even though it might have seemed like that in the game and on a night-to-night basis.

    “When we hold them to 49 points and 28 percent (shooting) in the second half, we’re not that good defensively yet either. We’re somewhere in the middle, but more importantly, can we continue to work hard and improve? And if we do then we can win games with our defense, we can win games with our rebounding.”

    Fowler finished with nine assists against just two turnovers and the Chippewas outrebounded Ohio, 37-29. John Simons and Rayson led CMU with seven rebounds apiece.

    Antonio Campbell, a 6-foot-10 junior, paced Ohio with 17 points and 12 rebounds. No other Bobcat scored in double figures. CMU limited Ohio to just three 3-pointers on 16 attempts.

    “Our focus all week in practice has been on the defensive end,” Meyer said. “We’ve come out and had two tough losses and knew that we needed to pick it up on the defensive end and the offense will come, as it did tonight.”

    The Chippewas broke a 20-20 tie on a Meyer layup with just over seven minutes remaining in the first half. They pushed their way to a 35-28 halftime lead, then started the second half with a 12-5 surge to up their advantage to 14, 47-33, with under 14 minutes to play. 

    Ohio never got closer than 11 the rest of the way. CMU won going away, scoring the final eight points of the game.

    CMU finished 5-for-20 from 3-point territory (25 percent), but was 30-of-59 (50.8 percent) overall from the floor. DaRohn Scott matched his season-high with eight points for CMU.

    Scott and Meyer, the Chippewas’ two post players, finished a combined 10-for-14 from the floor.

    “To be able to go 10-14, a lot of that coming off of the pick-and-roll, I think it shows their development, but it also shows that our guards are working on passing and penetration,” Davis said.

    The Chippewas are 9-1 at McGuirk this season, and have won 25 of their last 27 at home.

    “I think familiar balls, familiar rims help,” said Meyer in explaining CMU’s home-court success. “Home-court advantage is huge. If you get a steal, a block, a free throw, or a score, you get a cheer. It feels really good and it’s deflating to the other team.” 

    The Chippewas go to Miami (Ohio) on Tuesday for a league game. The RedHawks entered their game at Akron on Saturday night 6-12, 0-5. CMU returns home next Saturday to face Bowling Green, 12-7, 3-3.

    Saturday’s result was a relief, and, perhaps, a confidence boost, Rayson said.

    “We know we’re going to have those times where we are a couple plays away from winning a game,” he said. “That’s how it’s been.  We lost some very close games and we could have finished them, but we didn’t. We learned from that and we’re growing.”


              Hard-Driving CMU Men Topple Akron        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - A big step for a team - a program -- with big aspirations.

    Braylon Rayson scored 24 points, Chris Fowler had 20, and Rayshawn Simmons added 18 Tuesday as the Central Michigan men's basketball team topped Akron, 92-81, in a Mid-American Conference game before 2,260 at McGuirk Arena.

    The win lifted CMU to 9-7, 2-1 MAC. Akron, which came in riding a 10-game win streak, is 13-3, 2-1. The Chippewas snapped a seven-game losing streak to the Zips, who, at No. 11, are the highest-rank MAC team in the collegeinsider.com Mid-Major Top 25 poll.

    CMU's last win over Akron came on Jan. 26, 2008.

    "I think that's the only team in the Mid-American Conference that I have not beaten," said Fowler, a senior, who, in four years, as been the linchpin of CMU's rise from the bottom of the MAC to the top. "It's a good win because they are such a powerhouse in this conference. (Akron) coach Keith Dambrot is such a good coach. He has those guys play so hard. So it's a good win and it's satisfying but, 12 a.m., we have to forget it and move on to Buffalo."

    The Chippewas go to Buffalo, 8-8, 1-2, on Saturday (3:30 p.m.) for a MAC game. The Bulls fell to Eastern Michigan, 81-69, on Tuesday.

    CMU, the defending regular-season MAC champion, was picked to win the MAC West and the league tournament in the preseason poll. Akron was picked to win the East.

    "Whatever the rest of the Mid-American Conference thinks is what they think, but we're just going to the play the game that's in front of us and we're not worried about sending messages or anything like that," Fowler said. "Every (game) has been a championship game from game one. We don't put (more) value into certain teams. We like winning. Tonight was our championship game and we'll go ahead to Buffalo with the same mindset."

    CMU overcame an uncharacteristic poor shooting night from 3-point range. The Chippewas, who entered the game averaging 10.7 triples per game, finished with a season-low five on 20 attempts (25 attempts).

    They made up for it just about everywhere else.

    The Chippewas outscored Akron, 48-38, in the paint and finished 25-for-28 from the free throw line. Rayson was a perfect 10-for-10 from the stripe, while Rayson and Fowler each finished 6-for-7.

    Luke Meyer added 14 points and led CMU with eight rebounds. The Chippewas played the Zips to a 39-39 draw on the glass. The 92 points was the most Akron has allowed this season. The Zips entered the game ranked second in the MAC, allowing an average of 63.8 per game.

    Fowler finished with five assists and did not commit a turnover. The Chippewas turned the ball over just three times, a season-low.

    "Akron has really been the class of this conference as far as having talent and success over a long period of time," said CMU coach Keno Davis, who notched his first victory over Akron in four tries as the Chippewas' coach. "We knew coming into the game that with their talent, their great coaching, the way that they had played in their last 10 games, that we were going to have to have our very best effort of the year to give ourselves a chance in the game. And we didn't even know if that would be enough."

    Reggie McAdams made five of his 10 3-point attempts en route to 21 points to lead the Zips, while Noah Robotham added 19. 

    The Chippewas finally broke away with under five minutes remaining, using a 10-2 run to up their lead to 12, 78-66, with 2 minutes, 12 seconds remaining.

    Meyer started the spurt with an inside bucket off a nice feed from a driving Rayson, and he finished it off with a dunk, again off a Rayson assist. The Zips never got closer than nine points the rest of the way.

    All 10 of CMU's points during the game-clinching run came at the rim or from the free throw line. The Chippewas were 18-for-21 from the charity stripe in the second half.


              Rayson Scores 27, Chippewa Men Bounce Back        

    BOWLING GREEN, Ohio -- Central Michigan coach Keno Davis set an ultimatum for his team following their Mid-American Conference-opening loss to Eastern Michigan.

    The goal was to get better, primarily on the defensive end, in the shortened days before traveling to Bowling Green, a key factor in their 99-80 loss at McGuirk Arena on Wednesday.

    Commencing their first conference road game on the schedule, the Chippewas limited Bowling Green to 42.1 percent shooting on Saturday in posting a 79-67 win at the Falcons’ Stroh Center.

    It was the first win of the season away from McGuirk Arena for the Chippewas, who improved to 8-7, 1-1 MAC.

    “We talked about not trying to get too high after a win or too low after a loss,” Davis said. “It’s a grind this year in the conference and we understand what we’re trying to do, get as many wins as we can, but let’s make sure we’re playing our best basketball in March.”

    Braylon Rayson scored 27 points – one shy of his season-high – to lead the Chippewas. Rayson made nine of his 13 field goal attempts including a 5-for-8 clip from 3-point range.

    Rayshawn Simmons added 17 points, Chris Fowler had 14 points and eight assists, and John Simons had 12 points and 10 rebounds for CMU.

    “Both having one guy (Rayson) who stepped up and had a big night, and yet having the consistency of having four guys in double figures,” Davis said. “We didn’t get a whole lot of bench production, but I understand that, Josh Kozinski shot 12 threes against Eastern (Michigan), (Bowling Green) had them locked up, which opened up the game for other guys to be able to get to the basket and free throw line.” 

    The Chippewas made 21 of their 27 free throw attempts, led by Fowler, who was 9-for-13. CMU led 33-30 at halftime, and outscored the Falcons, 46-37, in the second half.

    The Chippewas led 46-42 when Rayson touched off a 19-7 surge with a 3-pointer midway through the second half. A Rayson jumper just over five minutes later extended the lead to 16, 65-49. Bowling Green never got closer than nine points the rest of the way.

    BGSU’s leading scorer Zack Denny, a junior guard, finished with five points on 2-of-9 shooting. Denny entered the game averaging 13.9 points per game and had recorded four double-doubles this season.

    Senior forward Spencer Parker scored 15 points to lead the Falcons (10-5, 1-1), who saw their three-game win streak and five-game home win streak come to an end.

    Bowling Green entered the game with a two-game winning streak over Central Michigan, dating to 2014. The last matchup between the pair ended in overtime in Mount Pleasant on Feb. 4, 2015.

    Central Michigan now claims four wins in the last six visits to the Stroh Center. The Chippewas play host to Akron (13-2, 2-0) in a MAC game on Tuesday. The Zips defeated Western Michigan, 62-53, on Friday. 
     


              Chippewas Earn Team Academic Award        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – The Central Michigan men’s basketball team completed the 2015 fall semester with a 3.04 cumulative grade point average.

    The Chippewas received the Team Academic Excellence Award from the National Association of Basketball Coaches for the second consecutive year. CMU’s team cumulative GPA is 3.20 and it is one of 20 Division I programs to be honored by the NABC. 

    “The student-athletes should be commended for their hard work in the classroom, and the way they represent CMU and the Mount Pleasant community,” coach Keno Davis said. “Striving for consistent success academically and athletically will always be our staff’s top priority.”

    Sophomore forward John McCarty leads the Chippewas with a  4.0 GPA. The other CMU players who earned a 3.0-or-better GPA for the semester are Cole Israelson(3.85), Chris Fowler (3.85), Milos Cabarkapa (3.71), Austin Stewart (3.63), Luke Meyer(3.53), Rayshawn Simmons (3.50), Tanner Beachnau (3.34), Jason Boswell (3.08) and Josh Kozinski (3.00).

    Five current Chippewas – Fowler, Stewart, John SimonsBlake Hibbitts and Cabarkapa – earned Academic All-MAC honors last season.


              Late Surge Lifts CMU Men        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – Depth, poise, hot shooting, and some crunch-time defense.

    Central Michigan used that combination down the stretch Saturday in wrestling away a 79-71 non-league men’s basketball victory over Texas Southern before 2,492 at McGuirk Arena.

    Braylon Rayson hit 6-of-9 3-pointers en route to 22 points, Chris Fowler finished with 20 points, and Luke Meyer added 12 as the Chippewas won their second straight game, improving to 5-4.

    “We started off the game with the right focus, the attention to detail, and we got off to a little bit of a lead,” said Fowler, who, in his second game since returning from an injury, also had six assists and finished 7-of-9 from the floor. “We lost that, lost that focus, that attention to detail, and we got it back in the last 10 minutes of that game and we were able to get on a run.”

    Derrick Griffin scored 23 points and hauled down 13 rebounds to lead the Tigers (1-8), who, despite their record, gave the Chippewas all they could handle.

    The game was tied nine times and the lead changed hands 10 times, the last on a Rayson triple that put CMU up, 63-62, with 7 minutes, 49 seconds remaining.

    The triggered a 16-9 game-closing run for the Chippewas. 

    “They’re a good basketball team,” Fowler said of Texas Southern. “Their record doesn’t show it right now because they’ve played every game on the road. In their conference they’re picked to win for a reason. They went to the NCAA Tournament last year for a reason.

    “They’re tough, they play hard, they make some difficult shots. Getting a win against an NCAA Tournament team, regardless of the record that they have, it’s always big for us.”

    The Chippewas made a season-high 14 3-pointers and finished 56 percent from beyond the arc. Overall, the Chippewas made 28 of their 50 field goal attempts. Both their overall shooting percentage (56 percent) and 3-point percentage were season-bests.

    Rayson and John Simons hit 3-pointers during CMU’s late game-breaking surge, and Fowler scored twice on drives through the lane left open by defenders forced to honor the outside exploits of Rayson and Simons.

    “When those guys start hitting shots, you can’t help on defense anymore, and that opened up the lane for me and I was able to make a couple nice moves, finish at the basket,” said Fowler, who logged 38 minutes after putting in 25 on Monday in his return to the lineup.

    The Chippewas held Texas Southern to 3-of-13 shooting in the final 7:16.

    CMU was whistled for 19 fouls to Texas Southern’s 17. At least eight of CMU’s fouls came on the offensive end.

    “Credit our guys for being able to not get frustrated in a game that was unique in the way that it was called and in the way that it was played,” CMU coach Keno Davis said. “We have to learn from that. We have to understand that every game’s going to be different and we have a senior-laden group that’s got to be able to respond and our thought our guys did well tonight.”

    Texas Southern outrebounded the Chippewas, 38-27, and 18 of the Tigers’ boards came on the offensive end. But just four of those offensive rebounds came in the second half, during which CMU played the Tigers to a 15-15 draw on the boards overall.

    Texas Southern led, 38-35, at the break. CMU outscored the Tigers, 44-33, in the final 20 minutes.

    “I think in some of those early games (this season) where we were short-handed, we just ran out of steam,” Davis said. “And now I think we look at our team, if we’re able to stay healthy, that we might be the deeper team than most teams that we face, and that’s what you want the last few minutes, to be able to be fresh.

    “I think the combination of having more bodies and also having a regular rest time is something that’s going to benefit us going forward.”


              Fowler Returns, Chippewas Roll        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – Chris Fowler is back.

    Fowler, Central Michigan’s senior point guard, played his first game of the season Monday as the Chippewas rolled past NAIA Aquinas, 90-51, before 2,318 at McGuirk Arena.

    “It felt good to be back out there and play with the team,” said Fowler, CMU’s leading scorer in each of the past two seasons and the leading assist man in program history. “They’ve been preparing hard without me on the court. I’ve been trying to do my best to stay prepared with them.

    “They welcomed me back and I was happy to be here.”

    Fowler, who sat out CMU’s first seven games with an injury, scored 14 points on 5-of-11 shooting and dished out four assists as the Chippewas improved to 4-4.

    “It’s kind of what I expected,” CMU coach Keno Davis said of Fowler, who logged 25 minutes, 16 of them in the first half. “I expected to see some really good things and also some rust that he has to knock off and will have to continue.

    “I’m not expecting that in one game or two games that you’re going to see the Chris Fowler of old. It’s our hope that as he continues to improve and continues to get experience that you’ll see it as we finish up the non-conference part of our schedule.”

    Braylon Rayson hit five of his eight 3-point attempts en route to a game-high 19 points to lead the Chippewas, while freshman Corey Redman knocked down five of his seven triple tries for a career-high 15 points. The Chippewas made 15 of their 34 3-point tries (44.1 percent).

    Rayshawn Simmons finished with 10 points and eight assists as the Chippewas backcourt trio of Fowler, Simmons and Rayson showed just how potent it can be.

    “It’s a big difference,” Rayson said of having Fowler back in the fold. “It’s way easier when we have those three point guards. It’s way easier. That’s why we were so good last year because we had three point guards, and it’s just really hard to guard.”

    The Chippewas, who play host to Texas Southern (1-7) on Saturday (4:30 p.m.) in a non-leaguer at McGuirk, trailed 14-13 with under 12 minutes to play in the first half.

    They closed the half with a 31-6 surge for a 44-22 halftime lead. Their lead swelled to as many as 36 points, 66-30, less than seven minutes into the second half.

    It was important, Davis said, for the Chippewas to put together a complete game after dropping four of their last five starts, including a hard-fought 75-72 decision their last time out, before a raucous crowd in Phoenix against Grand Canyon.

    “I think you saw a Central Michigan team that not only needed a win, but needed to feel good about it and it wasn’t going to be good enough for us to have a 10- or 12-point win, we wanted to stretch it out and really show that we’ve been improving as a team and not only getting healthier,” Davis said. 

    “I think you could see things from us that we wouldn’t have been able to do three, four weeks ago when we opened up the season,” he added. “I think we’ve shown that we’ve improved even when Chris Fowler wasn’t on the court. I don’t discredit the game just because (Aquinas is) not a Division I team. I think it was important to see where we are and I think we can get a pretty good understanding of it.”

    Fowler, runner-up in the Mid-American Conference Player of the Year balloting a year ago, is the linchpin of a CMU team that harbors very high hopes.

    His return gave the Chippewas both a tangible boost, and an emotional one. And, he added, CMU may be a better team in the long run because of his absence through the first seven games.

    Fowler had started every game from his freshman through junior seasons. Last year, the Chippewas used the same starting lineup in all 32 of their games: Fowler, Rayson, Simmons, John Simons and Luke Meyer

    That five started together for the first time this season on Monday.

    “It’s difficult when you lose a guy that you’ve been relying on the last three years, and (it’s) a week before the first game,” Fowler said. “It would have been difficult if we would have lost anybody in our starting lineup because we’ve all been playing together for three or four years.

    “It wasn’t that the team played out of character (without me), it was we were learning how to play without a key member. It’ll pay dividends down the line. We learned from. I learned from it … We can only get better from that.”

    Zac VanBeek scored 16 points and Jake Bullock added 10 for Aquinas (8-4).


              CMU Men Host Ferris State in Exhibition Game        

     

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - Fans will get their first look at the Central Michigan men's basketball team Saturday when the Chippewas take on NCAA Division II Ferris State in an exhibition game at 4:30 p.m. at McGuirk Arena.

    The Chippewas return all five starters and most of their key reserves from a team that finished 23-9 in 2014-15, winning the program's first Mid-American Conference regular-season championship since 2003.

    CMU's season opener is Friday, Nov. 13 (4:30 p.m.) against Jacksonville State.

    "In putting your schedule together and you look at your exhibition game before the season, you need to make sure you're playing a team that's going to prepare you for the year," said fourth-year CMU coach Keno Davis, whose team was picked to win the MAC regular-season and tournament championships in the preseason poll.

    Ferris State finished 23-9 last season, winning the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Tournament and playing in the NCAA Division II Tournament. On Monday, Ferris plays an exhibition game at Michigan State.

    Last season, the Bulldogs defeated Bowling Green in an exhibition game.

    "I have a lot of respect for the Ferris State program," Davis said. "I know that they're better than a lot of Division I programs that are out there. We know about the success that they've had, about their win at Bowling Green last year."

    The Bulldogs return a number of letterwinners, including at least six who either started or logged significant minutes off the bench a year ago.

    "Win or lose, for us, it's going to help us become a better team," Davis said. "Although we're not as focused with the end result as much as we would be in a regular-season (game) we're taking it seriously and we have to because we know the caliber of the opponent that is going to be coming to McGuirk on Saturday."


              CMU Selected MAC Favorites in Preseason Poll        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – The Central Michigan men’s basketball team was picked to win the Mid-American Conference West Division and the league tournament in a preseason poll of media who cover the league.

    Two Chippewas, seniors Chris Fowler and John Simons, were named to the five-member West Division Preseason All-MAC team.

    CMU earned 138 points and all 23 first-place votes in balloting to win the West. Toledo was selected second with 110. Akron, with 132 points and 17 first-place votes, was picked to win the East.

    The Chippewas, who return all five starters from a team that won the MAC regular-season title a year ago, were selected by 15 voters to win the league tournament. Akron, with seven votes, was second.

    “It’s nice to get that recognition,” said CMU coach Keno Davis, the reigning MAC coach of the year. “It’s a testament to our student-athletes and how hard they’ve worked, but we understand it’s not where you’re picked, but where you finish.”

    The Chippewas were picked near the bottom in last year’s preseason poll then delivered CMU’s first regular-season championship since 2003 to earn the No. 1 seed in the MAC Tournament.

    “Had we not won the league last year and been the No. 1 seed in the tournament, I think we’d find more pressure this year going in to the season,” Davis said. “Where we’ve come from and where the program is headed, the players realize it’s important to not take anything for granted and focus on the process rather than a final result.

    “That’s how we have been able to become one of the better teams in the league, at least on paper, and we have to continue to make sure we have the same focus that got us to where we are right now.”

    Fowler, CMU’s leading scorer in each of the past two seasons, was the runner-up in the MAC player of the year voting a year ago when he earned a spot on the all-conference first team.

    He has earned a slew of awards in his career at CMU, is a four-year captain, and is the first player in program history to compile the combination of 1,000 points, 500 assists, 250 rebounds and 150 steals for a career. He enters his senior year as CMU’s all-time assists leader (533).

    Simons was the Chippewas’ second-leading scorer and top rebounder in 2014-15, earning Third Team All-MAC honors. He ranked fourth in the nation with a .455 shooting percentage from 3-point range.

    West Division Preseason Predictions (1st place votes)
    Central Michigan — 138 points (23)
    Toledo — 110
    Western Michigan — 94
    Eastern Michigan — 71
    Northern Illinois — 37
    Ball State — 33 

    East Division Preseason Predictions (1st place votes)
    Akron – 132 points (17)
    Kent State – 116 (5)
    Ohio — 69
    Buffalo – 64 (1)
    Miami — 60
    Bowling Green — 42

    Tournament Champions: Central Michigan (15), Akron (7), Buffalo (1)

    West Division Preseason All-MAC
    Chris Fowler, Central Michigan
    John Simons, Central Michigan
    Raven Lee, Eastern Michigan
    Nathan Boothe, Toledo
    Connar Tava, Western Michigan

    East Division Preseason All-MAC
    Pat Forsythe, Akron
    Lamonte Bearden, Buffalo
    Jimmy Hall, Kent State
    Eric Washington, Miami
    Antonio Campbell, Ohio


              CMU Men Hit the Court        


    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – And thus, it begins.


    The Central Michigan men’s basketball team kicked off the 2015-16 season Friday with a 70-minute practice in Parfitt Gym in the Student Events Center.

    The Chippewas last season won their first Mid-American Conference regular-season championship since 2003, finishing 23-9.

    All five starters and most of the key reserves return as coach Keno Davis enters his fourth season in charge of the program.

    “Coaches rarely have to worry about intensity being there on day one,” said Davis, who was named the MAC Coach of the Year in 2014-15. “Even though we’ve got a lot of guys who have been through this before, they’re excited about the season.

    “There’s a lot of excitement, not just from the community, but from within our team about what this season can be about and what kind of steps we can take.”

    The Chippewas open on Friday, Nov. 13, at home against Jacksonville State. With so many veterans back, and so much talent, the focus over the next few weeks will be on determining roles.

    “I think what you’re looking for at the start is which players, through their hard work through the offseason and the summer, are going to step into different roles from what they had last year,” Davis said. “Whether they’re going to play more minutes, whether we’re going to throw the ball to them more, if we’re going to have more plays for them.

    “Really, you’re trying to figure out what the makeup of the team is and yet you’re cautious about making too many decisions based on one particular day in October.”

    Any coach in the country would envy what Davis and his staff have to work with going into the season: A veteran talented cast that now has the experience of having played in big games, led by the likes of seniors Chris Fowler, John Simons and Rayshawn Simmons.

    “It’s teaching the whole process,” Davis said, “everything that goes within the game because you have a veteran team you’re looking at a lot of little things: The footwork, the spacing, the execution of plays both offensively and defensively that means a point here or a point there and that could mean a post-season berth or staying at home in March.

    “You want to make sure, at this time of year, that you’re focusing on those things when you have a veteran team like we have.”


              Chippewa Men Open at Home Nov. 13        

     

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - The Central Michigan men's basketball team will open the 2015-16 season on Nov. 13 at home with a non-conference game against Jacksonville State.

    The schedule was unveiled today and comprises 12 non-leaguers before the Chippewas begin defense of their Mid-American Conference championship at home against Eastern Michigan on Wednesday, Jan. 6.

    CMU made a remarkable turnaround last season, finishing 23-9 including 12-6 in the MAC. It marked the first time since 2003 that CMU won the regular-season league title, appeared in the MAC Tournament championship game, and made a post-season appearance, the NIT. The Chippewas also finished atop the MAC West for the first time since 2010.

    The 23 wins were the most by a CMU team since the Chippewas finished 25-7 in 2002-03.

    All five starters and most of the key reserves return this season.

    "I think a good problem to have coming into the season was trying to find teams willing to schedule us for the upcoming season," said Keno Davis, who is entering his fourth season as CMU's head coach and who last year was named the MAC Coach of the Year.

    "I feel like we've done a good job of being able to build a home-court schedule so that our fans can see us prior to conference and I think we have enough games that will challenge us, will really prepare us for the heart of our conference schedule and hopefully prepare us for postseason play," Davis said.

    Jacksonville State finished 12-19 last season. The Chippewas will also play home non-leaguers with Alma (12-14), McNeese State (15-16), Aquinas (19-13), Texas Southern (22-13), Howard (16-16) and Lourdes (17-14).

    They will play at Grand Canyon (17-15), BYU (25-10), William & Mary (20-13) and will play three games in the Gulf Coast Showcase in Estero, Fla., Nov. 23-25.

    The Showcase features several of the nation's top mid-major programs including Murray State, Drake, Duquesne, Milwaukee, Pepperdine, Weber State and Western Kentucky. CMU will open the event with Weber State on Nov. 23.

    Texas Southern is the defending Southwestern Athletic Conference; William & Mary, BYU and Grand Canyon each finished second in their respective conferences last season, William & Mary in the Colonial Athletic Association, BYU in the West Coast, and Grand Canyon in the Western Athletic.

    Both Texas Southern and BYU appeared in the NCAA Tournament, William & Mary reached the NIT, and Grand Canyon, which is coached by former Chippewa great Dan Majerle, played in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament.

    Among the highlights of CMU's MAC slate are a trip to Buffalo on Jan. 16 and a home game with Kent State on Feb. 2. Buffalo and Kent State also finished 12-6 in the conference last season, and the Chippewas fell to the Bulls in the league tournament title game.

    The Chippewas go to rival Western Michigan on Feb. 20 and entertain the Broncos in their regular-season finale on March 4. 

    Start times will be announced later. CMU's games that are scheduled for Saturdays - there are eight of them - could be moved to Friday for TV.
     

    2015-16 Schedule

     


              CMU and Keno Davis Enter Into a New Five-Year Agreement        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - Central Michigan Athletics has announced that men's basketball coach Keno Davis has been signed to a new five-year contract.

    "Keno Davis has done a fantastic job over the past three years building our program the right way," Athletics Director Dave Heeke said. "Coach Davis and his staff have invested in a process of hard work and patience that is producing success with high quality student athletes on the court, in the classroom and in the community--the essence of our Championship Culture that defines Chippewa Athletics.

    "This new contract is competitive while at the same time responsible and includes elements that provide stability for both Coach Davis and the athletic department. The agreement also reinforces the commitment Keno has shown to CMU and this community since his arrival."

    The new contract will run through the 2019-20 season. Davis' base salary is $300,000, with another $100,000 for radio, television and personal appearances.

    "I am very proud of the hard work and dedication of our staff, administration and student-athletes over the past three seasons and am excited about the bright future of the Central Michigan basketball program," said Davis. "We will continue to build upon our success on and off the court while representing the University, alumni and the community in a positive manner."

    Davis engineered one of college basketball's biggest turnarounds in 2014-15. After being selected to finish 11th in the preseason media poll, the Chippewas finished with a 23-9 record and captured their first Mid-American Conference regular season championship in 12 years.

    Davis was the architect of one of the nation's most prolific offenses last season. CMU ranked 12th in the NCAA in scoring (78.3 points per game), third in 3-point field goals per game (10.1) and eighth in 3-pointers made, totaling a MAC record 322.

    Chris Fowler (first team), John Simons (third team) and Josh Kozinski (all-freshman) earned All-MAC honors, helping CMU reach the championship game of the MAC Tournament and secure a bid to the NIT, the program's first postseason appearance since 2003.

    After the season, Davis received MAC and NABC District Coach of the Year honors. Last weekend at the Final Four in Indianapolis, he was named the 2015 winner of the Skip Prosser Award, which is presented annually to a coach who achieves success on the basketball court and also displays moral integrity off of it.

    "Keno has provided strong vision and leadership which has produced a program Chippewa fans everywhere can be deeply proud of," Heeke said. "The future of our men's basketball program is incredibly bright."


              Davis has CMU, fans fired up; revival 'ahead of schedule'        

    MT. PLEASANT – All he wanted was their attention.

    Central Michigan was hosting Eastern Michigan at McGuirk Arena on Jan. 24, and the Chippewas were huddled around coach Keno Davis as they had been every game for his first 21/2 years.

    Almost always, their eyes were locked on him before tip-off, getting the crucial final message.

    Not that afternoon, however.

    "You see their eyes wandering around and the smiles on their faces," Davis recalled Monday in his Rose Center office.

    Instead of snapping at them, he understood the moment.

    For one of the first times in his tenure, there was a real crowd — excited and vibrant — with 4,041 fans on that Saturday, reminding the Chippewas what home felt like.

    "It's nice for them to be able to do it," Davis said. "Because these are not guys that are taking that for granted. Because the whole team had seen the days when there was no one in there and you could hear people ... what they said."

    For those first two years, what they said often was frustrating.

    That's what happens at a program that wins 21 games in two years.

    Apathy. Lack of interest.

    Suddenly, there was energy, excitement, even electricity in that 65-51 win.

    A week later, 4,403 came for a game against Ohio, and last weekend a game against Western Michigan drew 5,350, a sellout.

    CMU is one game behind first-place Toledo in the Mid-American Conference's West Division, but the Chips held the tiebreaker over the Rockets thanks to a Jan. 6 win there.

    In the wide-open MAC, the final month will determine the Chippewas' seeding in the conference tournament, which is heavily slanted toward the top-two teams.

    Yet this conversation about what's next is even beyond Davis' expectations. "We're ahead of schedule," he said this week.

    After Tuesday's win at Ohio to improve to 17-5, 7-4 in the MAC, the third-year coach was surprised by the acceleration.

    "As we looked forward to Year 3, we would have hoped that we would be truly competitive," Davis said. "Maybe not a winning program or a contending-for-championship program, but when you stepped on the court, you felt like it wasn't apples and oranges out there. You really could compete against the other teams and have a realistic chance of having a winning season.

    "But to be able with nine to 10 games remaining to have already clinched a winning season puts us in a really good position, not just for the rest of the year, but for years to come. To be able to cross those hurdles, take pressure off you and allow you to do other things in your program to be successful."

    It's no surprise to athletic director Dave Heeke, who demonstrated his unconventional approach to Davis over the past two years.

    Years of 12 and 15 wins got Davis fired at Providence. Years of 11 and 10 wins at CMU got him reassurance from bosses.

    Instead of Davis asking them to be patient, they were telling him they believed and could see the results in the community, the classroom and the recruiting, even if not the games.

    This season has provided validation.

    Leaning on Davis' up-tempo, bombs-away style, the Chippewas entered Tuesday ranked sixth nationally in scoring (80.9 points per game) and third in three-point field goals per game (10.6).

    The engine is run by powerful guard Chris Fowler, averaging 15.8 points and six assists entering Tuesday, and forward John Simons, a wicked mismatch at 6-feet-8 as he was averaging 11.3 points and 6.1 rebounds but still shooting nearly 46% from three-point range.

    "Our confidence and our work put in during the off-season has led this to be a successful season," said Fowler, named MAC player of the week Monday after a 42-point game (with a broken thumb) a week ago. "These guys are all self-motivated."

    He noticed a different vibe during the preseason, when players were arriving early and staying late, putting in solo work. The difference between what they were told to do and what they chose stood out to him.

    But even when the season began, they needed proof in games.

    A nonconference schedule littered with no-name opponents had only two moments of truth: at Bradley and at Northwestern.

    Bradley dominated the glass and shot well, exposing some concerns.

    But then the Dec. 17 trip to Northwestern became a landmark, an 80-67 victory in which the Chippewas controlled the game.

    Davis felt the shift at that moment. A team that went 2-13 on the road last season had its first road win over a Big Ten team since 2007 and a reference point that this could be different.

    "We always thought we would have a chance, but you never really know until you start winning games," said Simons, who is from Cadillac and grew up watching CMU games. "In the back of our mind, we always felt we had the pieces put together, especially when we got a few new freshman big guys. Because last year, we struggled when we were smaller. When they came in, we thought we had a chance.

    "Maybe we're a little further along than people thought we would be."

    There's that expectation again.

    "I hadn't given it a lot of thought, why we're ahead of schedule," Davis said. "Part of it is we have several guys. As a coach, you're always looking for that one special player that's going to come in and work and put in the extra time to lead the team. Chris Fowler no doubt is that player. But I'm not so sure the reason for our rapid success is we have some other players who have followed and are trying to lead as well. It's not just Chris. He gets a lot of the publicity, and rightly so.

    "But a Rayshawn Simmons, a John Simons have really stepped up as leaders as well. When you have two or three guys like that, as a coach you don't take that for granted because it doesn't come around that often."

    Players insist they haven't talked about that four-letter acronym looming in the middle of March.

    No one's banking that this will be the Chippewas' first NCAA tournament team since 2003, but in a conference where the top-six teams entered this week separated by one game, there's no reason they're out of it, either.

    If they fall short with a roster that only has one senior — and he's coming off the bench — there's optimism ahead.

    "You're not looking too far ahead," Davis said, "but when you do allow yourself to do that … we don't feel like it's going be a jump up one year and have success and then drop back down to the pack. When you know that and believe it, there's not as much pressure. … Our window of opportunity is for the foreseeable future.

    "We're going to be at that point where we can say we're going to consistently compete for championships year in and year out."

     

    Contact Mark Snyder: msnyder@freepress.com. Follow him on Twitter @mark__snyder.

     

    The Davis file

    Who: Keno Davis, third-year Central Michigan men's basketball coach.

    Age: 42.

    College: Iowa.

    Previous jobs: Providence coach (46-50 in 2008-11), Drake coach (28-5 in 2007-08).

    CMU RECORD

     

    YEAR

    W-L

    MAC

    PLACE

    2012-13

    11-20

    4-12

    5th

    2013-14

    10-21

    3-15

    5th

    2014-15

    16-5

    6-4

    2nd 

    Total

    37-46

    13-31


              Men's Basketball Excelling in the Classroom        

    The CMU men's basketball team completed the 2014 fall semester with a 3.17 cumulative GPA

     

    Jan. 5, 2015

     

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - The Central Michigan men's basketball team completed the 2014 fall semester with a 3.17 cumulative grade point average.

    Five Chippewas, including Academic All-America candidates Blake HibbittsChris Fowler and John Simons, recorded a GPA of 3.5 or higher. Simons was at 3.95, Hibbitts at 3.85, and Fowler at 3.52.

    Fowler and Simons both earned Academic All-MAC honors last season, and three others, including Hibbitts and Austin Stewart, received honorable mention.

    The team cumulative GPA is now at 3.15.

    "The student-athletes should be commended for their hard work in the classroom, and the way they represent CMU and the Mount Pleasant community," coach Keno Davis said. "We will continue to build the program as we strive for greatness academically and athletically."

    In 2013, CMU was one of only 19 NCAA Division I schools to receive the Team Academic Excellence Award from the National Association of Basketball Coaches, which recognizes outstanding academic achievement by a team with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better.


              Coach Keno Davis ALS Ice Bucket Challenge         

    Coach Keno Davis accepts the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in front of over 2,000 CMU freshmen. He challenges the 2014-15 CMU Men's Basketball Team. Fire Up Chips!!

     


              Recruiting Trail Heats Up in July for CMU Basketball Staff        

    http://www.cmuchippewas.com/sports/m-baskbl/spec-rel/072514aaa.html

     

    July 25, 2014

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - For the CMU basketball coaching staff, the month of July is prime time for the all-important duty of recruiting. And this summer, like last year, head coach Keno Davis and his assistants have been scouring the Midwest for top talent.

    It was a different story two summers ago after Davis was hired in the spring of 2012. With only three players returning from the previous season, Davis and his staff weren't able to immediately make recruiting in-roads during the summer but instead decided to spend the predominance of their time focusing on preparing for the upcoming year.

    "We believed that if we were to only win two or three games that first season, it would be almost impossible to recruit for the foreseeable future," said Davis. "That first year was important not only to be able to have some success, but we needed to set the tone and lay a foundation for the program."

    Fast forward to this summer. Through a lot of hard work and diligence by Davis and his staff, those vital recruiting roots have been firmly established and the fruits of that labor are coming to bear. The prospects for the future are bright and excitement for the program is beginning to build.

    This year, the program will welcome three highly regarded freshmen in 6-11 forward Luke Meyer, 6-81/2 forward DaRohn Scott and 6-3 guard Filip Medjo, who are expected to immediately challenge for playing time or add crucial depth.

    "The credit to our recruiting success goes to the assistant coaches and their tireless work in recruiting the right fit for CMU," said Davis. "When we talk about the right fit, we take in to account how driven the recruit is to succeed in college both in the classroom and on the court."

    With the end of July drawing near, the CMU basketball staff will embark on its final recruiting session of the month buoyed by its recent success and aiming for the next piece to add to program puzzle, knowing that when they return to campus they will be able to reap the benefits of their prior recruiting successes on the court in 2014-15.

    Central Michigan men's basketball is on Twitter. Follow head coach Keno Davis (@CoachKenoDavis) and the program's official Twitter account (@CMUMensBball) to get insider news and information and team updates. The Chippewas are also on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CMUMensBBall.

     

    *Courtsey of CMUChippewas.com


              CMU Announces Highly Regarded 2014 Recruiting Class        

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. – Central Michigan head coach Keno Davis announced the signing of two players to National Letters of Intent on Thursday. DaRohn Scott, a 6-8½ forward from Grand Rapids, and Filip Medjo, a 6-3 guard from Belgrade, Serbia, will join 6-10 forward Luke Meyer, who signed with the Chippewas in the fall, to comprise Davis’ highly regarded 2014 recruiting class.

    “Not only have the immediate needs for next year’s team been addressed with this recruiting class but the talent and competitive drive of the players will help us become an elite team in the MAC for years to come,” said Davis.

    Scott averaged a double-double as a senior at Grand Rapids Christian High School, posting 10.8 points and 11.4 rebounds in addition to 5.2 blocks per game. He was rated as the eighth best player in Michigan by ESPN, selecting the Chippewas over Wake Forest and Western Michigan.

    “DaRohn is an extremely gifted young man who can give us a physical dimension to our game, as well as the ability to finish plays at the basket,” said Davis.

    “The additions of DaRohn at 6-8½ and Luke Meyer at 6-10, along with 7-0 Milos Cabarkapa, will give our team an inside presence both defensively and on the boards next season.” 

    Medjo comes to from CMU via Impact Academy in Florida, the same school that produced fellow Serbian Cabarkapa. Medjo averaged 20 points, six rebounds and six assists per game as a senior, highlighted by a 39-point effort and a 29 point-17 rebound performance.

    “Filip is a strong, athletic talent who will be an important addition to our backcourt, as he possesses the ability to score equally from the perimeter and off the dribble,” said Davis.

    Meyer is a two-time Associated Press Class C First Team All-State honoree who averaged 17.0 points, 10.3 rebounds, three blocks and two steals while shooting 57 percent from the field as a senior at Addison (Mich.) High School.

    “The culmination of hard work in recruiting put forth by the assistant coaches over the past two years is paying off and will continue to do so in the future,” said Davis. “I am looking forward to getting this group on campus and working together as a team toward our goals for the upcoming season.”

    Scott, Medjo and Meyer will join a young but experienced Chippewas squad that returns all five starters and 96 percent of its scoring from the 2013-14 team. Included in that group is All-MAC guard Chris Fowler, who ranked near the top of the conference in scoring, assists, steals and assist/turnover ratio last season, forward Blake Hibbitts, who moved into the top 10 in program history in three-point shooting in 2014, and forward John Simons, the team’s leading rebounder the last two seasons.

    Central Michigan men’s basketball is on Twitter. Follow head coach Keno Davis (@CoachKenoDavis) and the program’s official Twitter account (@CMUMensBBall) to get insider news and information and team updates. The Chippewas are also on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CMUMensBBall.

     

    *courtsey of CMUChippewas.com


              CMU Men's Basketball Insider - November 20, 2013         


              Kyle Randall Begins Pro Journey with NBA Summer League Experience         

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - Former Central Michigan point guard Kyle Randall got his first taste of professional basketball last month, appearing in three games for the Sacramento Kings' NBA summer league squad.

    The Kings played five games at UNLV's Thomas & Mack Center as part of the Las Vegas summer league, which ran from July 12-22.

    Randall played a total of 33 minutes in his three appearances. In his debut against Golden State on July 15, he scored three points, grabbed two rebounds and handed out two assists in 10 minutes of action. He posted two rebounds, three assists and a steal in 12 minutes two days later against Minnesota, then tallied two points, one rebound, two assists and two steals in 11 minutes against Atlanta in the Kings' summer league finale on July 19.

    "I know some other people had some doubts, but I reassured myself that I can play at that level," Randall said. "Obviously I have to keep improving, and there are definitely some noticeable things in my game I can improve on. I always thought I can compete at that level, and I think I answered a lot of questions for other people who didn't think that I could."

    Along with providing valuable playing experience against NBA competition, the summer league served as an educational opportunity for Randall to familiarize himself with the lifestyle of an NBA player.

    "That was great to take in," said Randall. "They also had a rookie orientation while we were there that talked about finances, marketing plans and things like that. The NBA just did a really nice job of incorporating everything about the NBA experience."

    Randall emerged as a dynamic offensive threat in his one season in Mount Pleasant, leading the Mid-American Conference in scoring (18.3 ppg) and earning All-MAC and NABC All-District second team accolades. He credits CMU head coach Keno Davis and his staff for giving him an opportunity to excel and helping prepare him for the next level of competition.

    "The coaches knew that I wanted to continue to play after college, so they coached me like a pro," Randall said. "They all have ties overseas or in the NBA, so they understand what it takes to be successful at that level. They gave me the freedom to play my game within the offense, and that really boosted my self-confidence."

    Davis, in turn, cannot overstate the impact Randall had on the program during his relatively short time as a Chippewa.

    "He fit perfectly for what we needed in our first year here," Davis said of Randall. "We knew we had mostly very young players who were hard workers but inexperienced. We knew the type of character Kyle has, which showed in the fact that he had graduated in three years, so we were hopeful he would be a leader for us during the transition year. In our style of play, we want to be explosive over the entire 94 feet of the floor both offensively and defensively, and Kyle was a perfect fit for that system. We were able to play to his strengths, but for him to lead the conference in scoring, I think was beyond any of our expectations.

    "I think the impact that Kyle Randall had here, for the most part, hasn't been seen yet," Davis said. "How our freshmen and other young players develop will be a direct result of the impact and influence Kyle had on them."

    So what's next for Randall? He currently is fielding contract offers from professional teams in Europe and plans to spend the 2013-14 season playing abroad.

    "The journey to the NBA is still going," he said. "I'm going to play overseas this coming season, then I'll do the NBA summer league again next summer and start that process again."

    And while Randall continues chasing his dream, Davis will continue to use him as a model for the type of student-athlete he wants in his program at CMU.

    "We tell recruits that we want you to be able to graduate from Central Michigan with opportunities, whether those opportunities are in the job market or continuing your basketball career," Davis said. "Kyle is a great example of that. He is going to have decisions to make, both in continuing to play basketball and when he enters the job market. Having those types of opportunities available is what will help continue to attract quality student-athletes to Central Michigan in the future."

     

    Link to Article


              Central Michigan's Keno Davis: A Chip off the old block        

    Detroit Free Press

    November 7, 2012
     

    Central Michigan's Keno Davis: A Chip off the old block

    By Mark Snyder
    Detroit Free Press Sports Writer

    When Central Michigan athletic director Dave Heeke set out to find a new basketball coach, he had to face reality.

    His first basketball coaching hire, Ernie Zeigler, approached the job from the outside, examining how other programs succeeded.

    Over Zeigler's six years, during which the Chippewas were 75-111, Heeke learned a valuable lesson: Central Michigan can't live like everyone else.

    "It's a niche program," Heeke said this summer, "a niche approach to having a system that brings in the right players."

    He described Zeigler's approach as, "Let's just bring in a lot of players and see where we can get."

    To be fair to Zeigler, that was what Central asked for when it hired the noted recruiter who would bring players to Mt. Pleasant who wouldn't come before. He brought in players, but it never added up to on-court success.

    So when Heeke fired Zeigler after last season, he sought a coach who would build.

    Heeke was selling a more attractive job than he was six years earlier, months after he took over as AD. Now he could offer a renovated Rose Arena (now the McGuirk Arena) with an attached, dedicated practice facility, and more financial support.

    One of Central Michigan's best selling points came from a rival, Ohio University, which reached the NCAA tournament's Sweet 16 -- a reminder to all that a quick turnaround is possible.

    So Mt. Pleasant was attractive. And Keno Davis was available.

    A proven winner

    There aren't many accoutrements in Davis' windowless, corner office in the McGuirk: A big-screen television for watching film, a prominent desk, couches, white walls and a few photos.

    No frills -- except for three large trophies behind the desk.

    In the Central Michigan athletic department, especially in the men's basketball program, those are foreign objects.

    The Chippewas have reached one NCAA tournament in the past 25 years, and that was a decade ago. In the past 21 years, they've had four coaches who have combined for a 211-388 record and .352 winning percentage.

    So when Davis, 40, unpacked those trophies -- as national coach of the year in 2007-08 when he led the 28-5 Drake Bulldogs -- there was instant credibility.

    "You saw what he did at Drake, a consistently underperforming program -- I don't think they'd had a winning season for 20 years," Heeke said.

    After one year as head coach at Drake (and four as an assistant), Davis jumped to Providence, only to be fired three years later.

    But Heeke had a wide view of Davis while watching him try to compete with the Big East monsters with few resources and player limitations. Heeke also saw in Davis -- who spent a year analyzing games on the Big Ten Network -- a Midwest familiarity.

    Meanwhile, Davis, who was fired at Providence with five years remaining on his contract, had the flexibility to be selective, and he felt Central Michigan was a perfect fit.

    Charting his own course

    Davis barely knew there were other professions when he was growing up.

    His father, Tom Davis, had three college head coaching jobs in Keno's first 14 years, before finally finding the right fit at Iowa, where he coached in 1986-99.

    His son stood by, never running wild on the court but always around it, watching and listening, understanding the demands on his father and his family.

    Never a star player, even in high school, Keno may have been good enough to play at a smaller, nonscholarship college, but instead he chose Iowa, where he was a student assistant.

    "I didn't want to be on the team," Davis said, "I didn't want to have a uniform. I didn't deserve it."

    Staying in Iowa City reinforced his career path. He spent eight years as an assistant at Southern Indiana and Southeast Missouri State, paying his dues as coaches without famous fathers would.

    When his father took the job at Drake in 2003, Keno joined as an assistant and, 2 1/2 years into the job, the Drake administration made him the coach-in-waiting.

    That positioned him to spend a year and a half recruiting players who would fit his up-tempo, pressure style, the one he learned alongside his father.

    "Having your father in a fishbowl that Iowa is with basketball, football and wrestling ... everybody's going to know who you are," Keno said. "That's kind of the negative, but there are a lot of positives.

    "It's the only way I've ever known. I was going to be scrutinized if I changed something my father didn't do offensively and defensively. One of the best pieces of advice coaching-wise from him was, 'You've got to go with what you believe.' "

    Handed the keys in 2007-08, he only had to start the car.

    Magical season

    The Bulldogs were picked ninth in the Missouri Valley Conference. There was one returning starter, and the other returnees were a three-year walk-on point guard, a power forward walk-on, a shooting guard who had averaged 4.5 points as a junior and a small forward who lost his job on the previous year's 17-win team.

    Yet they loved Davis, and he loved them back.

    "We weren't that fast, we weren't that deep, but we were a pretty tight-knit group," said Klayton Korver, a forward who set the school record for games played. "He gave us a ton of confidence. A lot of coaches are very controlling and 'You run my thing my way.' I thought it was a great coaching job. You guys know what you're doing. He just guided us. Incredible confidence."

    All those years of watching allowed Davis to go his own way. He rarely screamed; he always taught and showed no pretense.

    "I've tried to be every year more positive than the year before," Davis said. "The most success we've had at Drake that one year, we went in without any expectations, and I told them I wasn't going to yell at them after losses as long as they worked hard.

    "I want you to take that shot. I don't care if you miss it, I'm not going to take you out. It was that kind of attitude, that message and nature that allowed a team to have that kind of success. When expectations are higher, you change as a coach and you shouldn't. ... You should reward those teams that bring it every moment."

    It energized the players, who had the man who recruited them now guiding them. In mid-December that year, Drake won at Iowa for the first time in 20 years; by late January they were 16-1, cruising through The Valley and ranked for the first time in 33 years. The 20th win came Feb. 2, the first time at Drake since 1971. The MVC conference and tournament titles followed for the first time since that 1971 season.

    However, in the NCAA tournament, the No. 5 seed Bulldogs were upset by a last-second, overtime shot in the first round.

    Weeks later, Davis took an offer reported to be nearly $1 million per year from Providence.

    Lessons learned

    The three years in Rhode Island taught Davis what not to do.

    Don't bend to recruit players -- recruit the person as well. Embrace where you are -- not where others think you should be. Stay with your strategy. Be patient.

    None of those was achievable with the pressure at Providence, yet all seem within reach in Mt. Pleasant.

    Heeke gave Davis a five-year contract for $300,000 per year and told him he knows it will take time.

    When most of the team left after Zeigler's firing -- including Zeigler's talented son, Trey -- Davis was left with a new scenario: five returning players, only one who averaged more than three points.

    For the coaches, that meant filling out this year's team immediately. As assistants, Davis brought former NBA forward Kevin Gamble with him from Providence; a former Southeast Missouri State player, Kyle Gerdeman, from Davis' time there; and former Oakland University and CMU assistant Jeff Smith.

    Without a dominant player, playing time, the offense and the defense are all wide open.

    "He's more of a player's coach," said guard Austin Keel, one of the holdovers. "He teaches the game more, the fundamentals instead of just going out there to play. He's teaching ways with that criticism you can manipulate the game and produce more."

    No one in Mt. Pleasant is expecting this group to compete at the top of the MAC West. Yet three wins on this summer's trip to the Bahamas -- averaging 113 points per game -- provided confidence and optimism, even if it's distant.

    Along with the mantra of patience.

    "I like that calmness," Heeke said. "We needed some stability, some solid foundational elements to calm things here. It's going to be a process to rebuild ... the program. He's got those shoulders and demeanor to weather the storm."

    In Mt. Pleasant, optimism is a rare commodity.

    "We need to break the cycle," Heeke said. "We need to have a successful program here. The '70s were a terrific time, but that's a long time ago for college basketball."

    Contact Mark Snyder: msnyder@freepress.com. Follow him on Twitter @mark__snyder.

    More Details: The book on Keno

    Who: Keno Davis, 40, first-year men’s basketball coach at Central Michigan.

    Personal: Son of longtime college basketball coach Tom Davis; Keno was born in Pennsylvania and graduated from Iowa, where his father coached in 1986-99; wife Krista, children Mara and Brady.

    Coaching career

    1995-97: Assistant coach, Southern Indiana.

    1997-2003: Assistant coach, Southeast Missouri State.

    2003-07: Assistant coach, Drake.

    2007-08: Head coach, Drake (28-5).

    2008-11: Head coach, Providence (64-86).


     


              Summer Workouts        

     

     
    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - The majority of the 2012-13 Central Michigan men's basketball team will arrive in Mount Pleasant this weekend, in time to start the second session of summer school on Monday, and for the first time the CMU coaching staff will have an opportunity to work with the team prior to the fall semester.

    New NCAA legislation allows two hours of full-team skill instruction and six hours of strength and conditioning activities per week. In the past, NCAA rules prohibited coaches from working with their student-athletes in the summer.

    "It couldn't come at a better time for our program," said first-year head coach Keno Davis who has added seven new incoming recruits in the past two months. "With the combination of a new staff and so many new players, this should allow us to speed up the learning curve."

    "I'm excited about working with our incoming class," said Davis. "Our staff worked extremely hard to bring in the student-athletes who would be the best fit for CMU."

    Not only will the added time help players' progression on the court, but it is also an incentive to aid in progression toward graduation.

    Under the new rule, in order to have access to workouts with coaches, incoming freshmen must be enrolled in summer school. Sophomores must either be in summer school or have completed 30 semester hours with at least a 2.2 grade-point average, while juniors and seniors must continue making progress toward graduation and/or be in summer school.


              CMU Basketball Season Ticket Deposits        

     

    Central Michigan basketball fans can now put down a $25 deposit for season tickets for the 2012-2013 season!  Thanks for the support and Fire Up Chips!

     

    http://ev5.evenue.net/cgi-bin/ncommerce3/SEGetEventInfo?ticketCode=GS%3ACMICH%3AMBB12-13%3AMBBDP%3A&linkID=cmich&shopperContext&pc&caller&appCode&groupCode=MBB&cgc


              Fire Up Chips!!        
    Hudsonville Standout Hibbitts Added to CMU Roster

    MOUNT PLEASANT, Mich. - Highly touted 6-foot-7 all-area forward Blake Hibbitts, who led Hudsonville (Mich.) High School to back-to-back district titles, has joined the Central Michigan men's basketball roster for the 2012-13 season.

    Hibbitts originally signed a National Letter of Intent with Samford University following his junior year, but was released from his commitment due to a coaching change following the 2011-12 season.

    "Blake is the perfect fit for our program," said Central Michigan head coach Keno Davis. "His versatility will allow him to play multiple positions. His length, athleticism and ability to shoot the basketball will be a welcome addition to our roster."

    Hibbitts was a three-sport standout and National Honor Society member, excelling as a pitcher and quarterback and graduating with just under a 4.0 grade point average.

    As a senior, the 190-pounder averaged 17 points per game and shot 78 percent from the free throw line while Hudsonville went 17-6. He earned honorable mention all-state recognition by the Associated Press and was listed on the Grand Rapids Press all-area second team.

    Hibbitts also played with the Grand Rapids Storm AAU team alongside fellow Chippewa signee John Simons.


              1st Month at CMU        

    1st Month at CMU

    It has been a busy month at Central Michigan as we put together a staff, worked on scheduling, hit the recruiting trail and developed our student-athletes. However, I want to use this blog entry to talk about one of the most important factors for us to be a successful program...a great home crowd!

    Our staff is going to work hard as we reach out to the community and surrounding area of Mt. Pleasant to fill the seats. We will need our season ticket holders to continue their great support, past supporters to get back on board, and our students to come out in full force this year. A true home court will help us not only on the court, but also help build the CMU reputation across the state of Michigan and nationwide.

    Fire Up Chips!

    Coach Keno Davis


              DIWALI SHOW        
    Come join us for an extraordinary evening of amazing performances from all around Pittsburgh! It is a truly diverse and sensational show, complemented with great (and FREE) Indian food... don't miss this opportunity of celebrating Diwali with people from all over the community!

    Doors Open at 6pm
    Show starts at 6.30pm

    FREE with Pitt ID!!!
    $5 otherwise

    Featured Artists of the Evening:
    -Pitt Dance Ensemble
    -CMU Acapella
    -Nrityamala
    -PantheRaas
    -Steel City Bhangra
    ... and many more!
              Kv Closet Rod        
    ROCKDALE COUNTY WATER TREATMENT PLANT DOCK EXTENSION, WATER ...Clo closet clr clear cl2 chlorine cmp corrugated metal pipe cmu concrete masonry unit co cleanout shower curtain rod area drain american concrete institute acoustical glass beam structural kv kilovolt kw kilowatts kva kilovolt amperes kwh kilowatt hour ... Access Content Retirees Can View Want Ads At … Continue reading "Kv Closet Rod"
              Eşcinsellikle ilgili beş mit yazısına kerem tarafından yapılan yorumlar        
    Slm bn kerem antepliyim escinselim sunu demek istiyprum arkadaslar escinsellere ücüncü sinif gozunde bakilmasin biz kotu birsey yapmiyoruz escinsel olmak sucmu o da ben doguda yasiyorum kimseye soyleyemiyorym cok kotu bir durum arkadaslarim kiz sphbeti yaptiklari zaman bn birsey diyemiyorum cunku bn bir escinselim ama ne yapayim burda escinsel oldugumu soylesrm herkes bana tooop der biz top degiliz rscinseliz ama yinede hayat kosullari zor olsada escinsellikten gurur duyuyorum ama gelecegi dusunuyorum su an 18 yasindayim ya evlendikten sonra ne olacak. ..
              igra istine        
    Imam kicmu i ne zelim da je savijam, ako me razumes. wink


    Ima vise vrsta beskicmenjaka, zar ne? wink
              2017 softball state finals pairings updated through Saturday WITH PHOTO GALLERY        
    bDIVISION 1 Quarterfinals (at Wayne State CMU and U of M) iTuesday June 13ib G1 a target"_blank" href"httpwww.miprepzone.comoaklandresults.aspID21429"...
              2017 baseball state finals pairings updated through Saturday WITH PHOTO GALLERY        
    bDIVISION 1 Quarterfinals (at Wayne State CMU and U of M) iTuesday June 13ib G1 a target"_blank" href"httpwww.miprepzone.comoaklandresults.aspID21430"...
              2017 baseball state finals pairings updated through Friday WITH PHOTO GALLERY        
    bDIVISION 1 Quarterfinals (at Wayne State CMU and U of M) iTuesday June 13ib G1 a target"_blank" href"httpwww.miprepzone.comoaklandresults.aspID21430"...
              Algorithms group doubles!        

    I am super happy to announce that Amir Nayyeri will be joining our faculty at Oregon State next year! Amir completed his Ph.D. with Jeff Erickson at UIUC and has been, for the past year, post-doc’ing at CMU with Gary Miller.  Amir is an expert in combinatorial optimization in computational topology and geometry.  Not only […]

    The post Algorithms group doubles! appeared first on Glencora Borradaile.


              Techno Granny, Liplo, Live Streaming for Theatre and Other Events        
    LIPLOâ?¢ was tested in the cabaret genre in 2007 and 2008 and successfully streamed 15 performances live over the internet. This was an underground trial and was not highly publicized. The work was done in collaboration with CMU graduate Alex Geis of 21 Productions which continues today. When it was decided to test LIPLOâ?¢ for the theatre genre it was clear that the biggest obstacles would be the unions, so when Stephanie received positive responses from Actors Equity to continue discussions with AFTRA the day when professional live theatre could be streamed seemed reachable/possible. The goal is to test the live streaming so that the best possible online product can be made available. Questions arise such as â?? do we need a multi-camera, live edit feed, or does one camera with zoom and panning capability suffice? What does it feel like as the audience and what other things might be needed to make the live online viewing experience worthwhile (worth the money)? Is there great potential for audience and sponsorship? Does this present a realistic new revenue stream for companies and those who create live theatre? What is the realistic potential and how do we make this new activity equitable for all parties involved? These are the questions we sought to answer with this trial period. And, if a small company can succeed in answer these questions than a larger company shouldnâ??t have any problems at all making this workâ?¦ Guest Stephanie Riso: Stephanie Riso is lead developer of the LIPLOâ?¢ live entertainment portal and founder of two organizations: Pittsburgh Irish and Classical Theatre (PICT) which she began in 1996 with business partner Andrew S. Paul, and Cabaret Pittsburgh which recently dissolved due to the economic crisis. Stephanie holds a degree in vocal performance from Carnegie Mellon University, has performed professionally in the Pittsburgh and surrounding area, and recently participated in the prestigious BMI Lehman-Engel Musical Theatre Writing workshop in NYC as a composer/lyricist. She currently serves as operations director of PICT and is attempting to become the first to live stream professional theatrical performances over the internet. Stephanie is originally from Buffalo, NY and currently resides in Pittsburgh with her husband. EPISODE120 -
               La Atenas de Asturias: el asociacionismo musical en Avilés entre 1840 y 1936         
    Gutiérrez González, Carmen Julia (2008) La Atenas de Asturias: el asociacionismo musical en Avilés entre 1840 y 1936. In Delantera de paraíso: Estudios en homenaje a Luis G. Iberni. ICCMU Instituto Complutense de Ciencias Musicales, Madrid, pp. 295-312. ISBN 978-84-89457-39-3
              CMU Tech Company Aims to Empower Pittsburgh with Cleaner Air        
    Beatrice Dias has asthma, and her three-year-old has had his own respiratory issues, so she installed a personal air monitoring device known as a Speck to see if the air in her home was contributing to their health problems. “It was as simple as turning on the hood vent above the stove and realizing, ‘wait, the air quality is getting worse, what am I doing wrong? This was supposed to be good for it,’” she said. “But then I followed the trajectory of the air and realized the hood vent was just venting the air up as opposed out of the house.” Revelations like this is why the Community Robotics Education and Technology Empowerment (CREATE) Lab began selling Speck Monday. The air quality monitor detects fine particulates in a room by using a fan to create a vacuum that sucks the matter into the sensor.
              Taking a break on a high note...        
    Well, there's all kinds of good news this week -- Prof. Curtis Keyes with the adjuncts at EWU reports that he and his colleagues have gained the victory they so richly deserve! The illegality of their abrupt firing at a time when they were petitioning to organize a union was upheld by the U.S. Labor Dept. and the EWU administration has agreed to reinstate them, compensate those who lost classes mid-semester and has agreed to bargain with them in what all hope will be good faith.

    On another note, the non-tenured faculty at Michigan's CMU won yet another major victory -- they voted overwhelmingly in support of forming a union! So, it's on to the bargaining table for them!

    Congratulations to all; both victories are so well-deserved, and a great sign for adjunct unionization efforts across the board.

    On that cheerful note, "The Adjunct Voice" is going on indefinite hiatus. Between four Comp classes and two writing projects with deadlines looming, I find I have to get realistic. Union or no union, I haven't found a way to grade multiple drafts of 4+ papers per semester for 80 students without putting in monstrously long hours. Anyone have any ideas?

    If you've been following my efforts here, thanks! I would especially like to thank Vanessa Vaile for spreading the messages I've posted here to NFM's larger network and beyond. It's been an incredible summer for adjunct faculty issues, and I'm so happy to have good news to relate on my way out the (virtual) door!

    Last one out turn out the lights!!
              UTF Solidary Forever! (to the tune of "Mine eyes have seen the glory of...")        
    Thanks to Erin Fox, CMU Art/Theater Dept. for the following adaptation of a traditional labor song. We sounded wonderful singing it together today!

    Solidarity forever!
    Solidarity forever!
    Solidarity forever!
    For we make CMU strong!

    We're your teachers, we're your mentors, we assign the grades you earn!
    The right to form a union is our number one concern!
    Hopes for a better future will be realized when we learn
    That we make CMU strong!

    With the union's inspiration we'll negotiate health care
    Not to mention job security and wages that are fair!
    Which is why we're rallying here today to stand up and declare
    The we make CMU strong!

    We're so pleased that part-time faculty now have the right to vote!
    President Ross and trustee members finally listened and took note!
    They realized that temp faculty keep CMU afloat!
    For we make CMU strong!

    [reprise]

    Don't miss this one!...a rousing chorus of "Part Time Worker" (to the tune of "Part Time Lover")...courtesy of AFT-MI Organizer (and beloved Motown Diva) Lynn Marie Smith! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2d_Ourmq0J4
    Here's more coverage of CMU's big day! http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Union-of-Teaching-Faculty/115082651853728
    Sing On, Everyone!

              Details on CMU's agreement: planned 6/30 protests turn into celebration!        
    What a great rally, everyone! The show of solidarity in Mt. Pleasant today was wonderful -- we're so happy for you all!
    June 30, 2010
    [pictures & video at http://bit.ly/ausSDg]

    MOUNT PLEASANT, MICH.—Following four months of negotiations, Central Michigan University and the American Federation of Teachers have agreed on which nontenure-track faculty members will be recognized as members of a potential new bargaining unit. The adjunct faculty and their supporters, who had planned a protest rally for today, will still hold a rally at 11 o’clock this morning near the library on the Mount Pleasant campus to celebrate the agreement.

    Under the agreement, nontenure-track faculty who teach quarter time or more, with some exceptions, are eligible for representation.

    “The process that resulted in this agreement took time, as the administration and the union gathered all of the information necessary to craft an agreement that both parties found acceptable,” said AFT Michigan President David Hecker. “What counts is that we were able to reach this agreement. We look forward to a successful election and to joining with the administration to further enhance this great university.”

    CMU was notified in early March by the Michigan Employment Relations Commission that nontenure-track faculty had filed for union certification.

    “We are ecstatic about the opportunity to vote for union representation, and we look forward to a collaborative relationship with President Ross and the CMU administration,” said Mary Ann Freling, an adjunct professor who has worked for two decades in the English department.

    Ray Christie, vice provost for academic administration, said: “Central Michigan University has a long-standing and well-established positive relationship with collective bargaining units, and values the dedication, contributions and commitment of our faculty and staff toward the success of our students.”

    A unionization vote will be scheduled as the next step in the process. CMU will withdraw its request with MERC for a hearing on the matter. Across Michigan, thousands of nontenure-track faculty have formed unions or are in the process of doing so, including faculty at the University of Michigan, Ferris State University, Henry Ford Community College, Wayne State University, Michigan State University, Eastern Michigan University and Western Michigan University.

    _______________________________________

    Jon Curtiss jcurtiss@aftmichigan.org

    Organizer, AFT Michigan, AFL-CIO

    (734) 358-7004
              CMU adjuncts get an agreement!        
    Just in...this note from AFT Organizer, Chris Pomeroy, from CMU:

    Hello All,


    I am very pleased to inform you that an election agreement for non
    tenured-track faculty at CMU has been reached! We have a signed agreement
    on definition of unit and timing and type of election at CMU.

    As a result of this wonderful news, we will no longer be demonstrating in
    Grand Rapids on Wednesday. Thank you all for your commitment, without the
    threat of your action this agreement may not have been possible!

    Details will be forwarded as they are made available.

    Apparently, a celebration is now planned in place of protests in Mt. Pleasant (main campus), too! Congratulations, CMU-UFT!!
              Organizing Adjuncts...an International Topic!        
    One of the more than 1,000 workshops featured at the Social Forum this past week was our UPTF-sponsored offering, entitled "Voice for the Voiceless: Organizing Part-time Faculty." About twenty attendees, coming to the issue from different perspectives, packed the room: unionized adjuncts, those working on organizing, grad students thinking about their futures, and others who just care deeply about the state of higher education in this country. Two Turkish colleagues joined us, making it an international event: yes, there are adjuncts in Turkey!

    After intros, I focused my part of the presentation on what's happening out there in higher ed these days, and where the biggest challenges to faculty exist. We discussed the pitfalls of the "Anyone Can Teach" mantra put out there as higher ed continues to corporatize and casualize our profession. We discussed the extra challenges adjuncts face in today's corporatized schools and why unionization is almost essential if we wish to make the living we deserve and preserve the dignity of teaching--at any level!

    Importantly, we discussed the need to reframe the mixed messages adjuncts send to school administrations when we speak with an incoherent collective "voice." Every survey published seems to indicate that at least 40-50% of adjuncts are "satisfied" (more or less) with the status quo. Unfortunately, these surveys are mostly engineered (consciously or not) to generate responses that overplay the importance of "flexibility" and underplay dissatisfaction with our typical conditions of employment. School administrators can study these surveys and feel assured they're giving us what we want, based on our love of "flexibility." As we discussed, "units of flexibility" (as one community college v.p. calls us, according to Joe Berry) equal units of disposability! So we discussed the need for a more positive, unified message out there:

    "Fair Treatment for Adjuncts is Good for Higher Ed!" What would fair treatment look like? A handout listed several ideas--unfortunately, no one in the room could check off many items from their current experience!

    UPTF president Susan Titus then took over and led everyone in an exploration of the major features of organizing a local union. Locating and striking up a conversation with potential members is the first, sometimes difficult step. The painstaking, labor-intensive process of motivating everyone to collective action was another issue discussed: several attendees had great ideas, but it was clear that organizing is not for the faint of heart. Even so, the time is ripe, it is achievable, and worth the effort!

    Thankfully, we concluded on a hopeful note: Dan Kukuk from Central Michigan U's organizing team related the challenges CMU adjuncts have been having with including all adjuncts in their newly-forming union, and he asked for everyone's support for a June 30th action. Everyone signed "We Care" postcards to send to CMU administration, Labor Secretary Hilda Solis and the EWU Chancellor who recently fired all adjunct staff when they tried to form a union. The other Big Message that emerged that day was: we're in these challenges together, and solidarity will win the day!
              25 m infrared 14 inches plastic focusing indoor dome camera        
    1/3" SONY Super HAD ⅡCCD, 600TVL, 0Lux/LED ON, DC12V. LED: F5mm*30Pcs. Lenses: Fixed iris 4 ~ 9mm full-metal of F1.8 IR. Option:□9~ 22mm 2.8~11mm lens□IR-CUT dual filter switching components...Shenzhen CMU Security Technology Co., Ltd
              Source code for putting "a" or "an" in front of a word.        

    English is a funny language - you say "a usual person", but "an unusual person". There is no simple set of rules for how to decide this. Instead, you have to rely on whether the next word starts with a vowel sound.

    Instead, I think the "right" solution is just to have a list of the words that should be prefixed with "an".

    aardvark
    able
    ... words that should be prefixed with "an" ...
    
    I searched far and wide, but couldn't find one, so I created a list of words that should be prefixed with "an" myself, based on which words in the CMU pronunciation dictionary started with one of the vowel-like phonemes:
    ["AA", "AE", "AH", "AO", "AW", "AY", "EH", "ER", "EY", "IH", "IY", "OW", "OY", "UH", "UW"]

    Files for you to Download

    I am now sharing this list to the rest of the world (it's public domain, use it how you like.) That Python file contains a function should_preceed_with_an("phrase...") that returns True or False.

    A Django Template Filter

    I now use this code in my Django templates by doing:
    I am looking for {% templatetag openvariable %} phrase|a_or_an {% templatetag closevariable %} {% templatetag openvariable %} phrase {% templatetag closevariable %} 
    which will produce:
    I am looking for a cat.
    I am looking for an hour-glass.
    I am looking for an unusual person.
    I am looking for a usual person.
    
    To make use of a_or_an you have to define it in one of your app/templatetags/ files:
    from preceed_with_an import should_preceed_with_an
    
    @register.filter
    def a_or_an(phrase):
      if should_preceed_with_an(phrase): return "an"
      else: return "a"
    

              Where’s _why?        

    In March 2009, Golan Levin, the director of Carnegie Mellon University’s interdisciplinary STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, invited an enigmatic and famed computer programmer known to the virtual world only as “Why the Lucky Stiff” or  “_why”—no, not a typo—to speak at a CMU conference called Art && Code—also not a typo—an event where artsy nerds and nerdy artists gather to talk shop.

    _why came to Pittsburgh and presented his latest project to a room full of a student programmers and artists. He was scruffily handsome, seemingly in his early- to mid-30s, with shaggy brown hair falling in his eyes and a constant half-smile. He looked like a member of an indie band—he actually was in an indie band—or the leader of an experimental improv troupe.

    At this symposium, he wore a pair of oversize sunglasses and a tidy sports coat with a red pocket square, a silly riff on a stuffy professor’s outfit. He introduced himself as a “freelance professor.” “I don’t know exactly why I was invited here today. I’m not associated with anything of repute,” he admitted to giggles from the packed crowd.

    He riffed on his nom d’Internet, Why the Lucky Stiff: “Some people want to call me Mr. Why. My nametag was filed under ‘L.’ The thing is, it’s just a middle name. There’s no first or last. It’s just one middle name. That’s just the nature of it,” he said.

    Then he introduced his new product, a free interactive application called Hackety Hack, which he had built from scratch to solve a problem he called the “Little Coder’s Predicament” in a 2003 manifesto.

    The Little Coder’s Predicament arises from the following problem: We live in world of astonishingly advanced technologies, easy to use and all around us. Your grandmother has a smartphone. Your 2-year-old can play with an iPad. But the technology behind such marvels is complex and invisible, abstracted away from the human controlling it. Nor do these technologies offer us many ready chances to do basic programming on them. For nearly all of us, code, the language that controls these objects and in a way controls our world, is mysterious and indecipherable.

    Back in the old days, you could hack your Commodore 64 without too much trouble. But just try to get a sense of the millions of lines of code controlling a Windows computer, or the Google search engine, or your Android or iPhone. For starters, the user interface and legally enforced sanctity of the code will prevent you from even seeing it. And even if you managed to take a look, the code would be so complex you would struggle to understand it, let alone manipulate it.

    For that reason, _why explained in the “Little Coder’s Predicament”—and over and over again at conferences and panels—too few people were learning to code. The learning curve was too steep. There needed to be a simple, fun, awesome way to draw people in.

    “We need some instant results to give absolute beginners confidence. Simple methods for sending an email, reading a Web page, playing music,” he wrote. Moreover, novice programmers—especially kids—needed that ecstatic moment where they understand that they are controlling the computer, that programming ensures that the computer answers to them.

    That’s what Hackety Hack did.

    Hackety Hack begins by introducing kids to Ruby,  _why’s programming language of choice. Then it explains that programming is nothing more than giving a stupid, unthinking computer your commands. You are its boss. It answers to you. And you can make it do nearly anything with simple keystrokes and enough practice.

    Within a few minutes of using Hackety Hack, you can use real code to order a turtle to draw a line or a shape. In an hour, you can create a virtual library of your comics, or put jokes in pop-up boxes. Instantly, you are empowered as a creator. And eventually, the mysteries of how a computer works do not seem so mysterious after all.

    Hackety Hack solved the “Little Coder’s Predicament”: It was fun enough to engage a kid, and smart enough to teach her something to boot. But just a few months after launching it, to the astonishment of the community of Ruby programmers who treated him with something approaching messianic worship, _why vanished.

    On Aug. 19, 2009, his personal site stopped loading. He stopped answering email. A public repository of his code disappeared. His Twitter account—gone. Hackety Hack—gone. Dozens of other projects—gone.

    The popular Ruby message boards, listservs, and blogs descended into a state of panic. Had he been hacked? Who had heard from him? Was he in physical danger? And there was one especially pressing question, the irony of which hardly went unnoticed by passionate Rubyists: Why?

    ***

    Slate gives each of its staffers a month per year to undertake an ambitious project, one that attempts to do something new in Internet journalism. Tim Noah explained income inequality. Julia Turner explored the world of road signs. Dahlia Lithwick wrote a chick-lit novel in real time, with the help of her Facebook friends. I decided to try to learn computer programming.

    Why? I understand, if imperfectly, the laws that control the physical world around me. Ask me why an apple falls to the Earth or why a cork floats in water or why electrons do not collapse into the nucleus, and I can at least attempt an explanation. But the virtual world I live in is a mystery. Arthur C. Clarke wrote: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” For me, and for most of you, I suspect, the computer is just that: a glowing, magic box. Learning to program would help demystify the technologies I use daily and allow me to even create some humble magic of my own.

    But what language to learn? On the recommendation of my software-developer, project-manager, and computer-scientist friends, I decided to start with Ruby, for three reasons.

    First, it is an increasingly popular language, especially for Web applications. It underpins lots of cool services and sites I use on a consistent basis, such as Paperless Post and Living Social.

    Second, its code is relatively concise, making it easier to type out and therefore harder to mess up. Let’s say that we wanted to write a program that makes the computer say, “Hello, world!” In Ruby, the whole executable program reads:

    print “Hello, world!”

    That’s it. Now, say we wanted to do the same in Java, the programming language that runs on, for example, about 3 billion cellphones. Here’s how you would do it:

    class Hello       { 

            public static void main(String args[])      {

               System.out.println(“Hello, world!”);

            }

    }

    And you cannot mess up any of those little { or ), either. For fat-fingered dilettantes such as myself, Ruby is a far easier language to start with.

    Third, Rubyists possess an often exaggerated, yet nevertheless merited, reputation for being the quirky hug-everyone kids of the programming world. Their motto is MINSWAN, or Matz Is Nice So We Are Nice, a reference to the language’s legendarily sweet founder, Yukihiro Matsumoto, nom d’Internet Matz. We might just all get along.

    My language selected, I started off by acquiring and reading the seminal texts about programming. I ordered Steve Lohr’s brilliant history of programming, Go To, for a plain-English explanation of how a computer works and some background on software and hardware development. And I picked up the most highly recommended Ruby manuals: Programming Ruby, known as “the pickaxe book” for the rock-pick on its cover, and _why’s (poignant) Guide, a kind of graphic novel authored by the disappeared programmer that you can read online or print out for free. 

    A month to learn, a coffee in hand, I started reading. Lohr’s history I got through in a jiff. (Did you know the first “computers” were actually women hired to plug huge punch cards into even huger machines? Neither did I.) When I cracked open the Ruby manuals, though, I got lost in seconds.

    The pickaxe book first shows you how to install Ruby on your computer. (That leads to a strange ontological question: Is a programming language a program? Basically, yes. You can download it from the Internet so that your computer will know how to speak it.)

    Then the pickaxe book moves on to stuff like this: “Ruby is a genuine object-oriented language. Everything you manipulate is an object, and the results of those manipulations are themselves objects. However, many languages make the same claim, and their users often have a different interpretation of what object-oriented means and a different terminology for the concepts they employ.”

    Programming manual, or Derrida? As I pressed on, it got little better. Nearly every page required aggressive Googling, followed by dull confusion. The vocabulary alone proved huge and complex. Strings! Arrays! Objects! Variables! Interactive shells! I kind of got it, I would promise myself. But the next morning, I had retained nothing. Ruby remained little more than Greek to me.

    _why’s primer, the (poignant) Guide, was only a slight improvement. Dada or post-postmodern, is perhaps a more apt descriptor for the guide than poignant is. It starts with a cartoon of a cat, standing alongside an “elf and his pet ham.” The text opens with a note from _why saying he included an onion in the center of the guide. Why an onion? Because everyone will learn to write code so beautiful they will want to cry.

    The text is a cacophonous mix of high and low, sincere and twee, cluttered with pictures, collages, discursive sidebars, stories, and cartoons. The metaphors tend toward the bizarre. The elf, for instance, uses leaves and blue crystals for currency. One chapter is told in part through the life and times of one Dr. N. Harold Cham.

    In the most openly literary twist, _why, apparently distraught over his relationship with his suicidal, art-school-drop-out sister, abandons writing the book. The foxes and the cat take up his pen to redraw themselves and take the project over, until a costumed _why returns.

    And _why himself thought of it as a literary project. “The book I feel is closest to my book is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, which interleaves brief math puzzles and astronomical diagrams with the story,” he wrote to a listserv. “[I’m] interested in presenting an initial stab at giving literary value to a programming text. I’m also interested in getting people to at least feel what I feel when I program.”

    The book is enchanting but exhausting. More to the point, reading it cold did not push me any closer to actually being able to hack—a term that, by the way, means something like “code awesomely and efficiently,” rather than “break in.”

    Frustrated, I solicited advice on Twitter. Programmers replied with the tsk-tsking solemnity of a Greek chorus: You cannot learn to program by reading books, not without actually trying to write some code yourself! It would be like trying to learn Spanish by reading a dictionary, without ever attempting to utter “hola, el mundo!”

    Computer-programming languages are languages like any other: To acquire them, you absolutely must use them. I needed to write my first program.

    ***

    In late 2009, _why’s disappearance played out in real time on the Internet, as Rubyists noticed his projects had stopped loading and relayed the news on popular forums. It was not just one site or server, they fast realized. _why, his blog, his Twitter feed, and all of his open-source code had disappeared from the Internet, and all at once. The term of art is “infosuicide,” a rare but hardly unheard-of occurrence.

    At Ruby Inside, a popular Ruby news site, programmer and Ruby teacher Peter Cooper relayed the sudden disappearance of Ruby’s “own resident crazy genius.” He noted that _why’s works “are considered important by Rubyists not only for their usefulness but for their significant contribution to Ruby's culture, and if _why has truly fallen off the grid, it’s a big deal.”

    The hundreds of tweets and message-board posts went through the Kübler-Ross stages of grief. At first, disbelief. “He could have had his computer, or email hacked ... have to wait to see if we hear from him before we assume he actually cleared all the accounts himself,” one poster argued.

    Later came anger. Zed Shaw—a prominent hacker who infamously deserted Ruby—described the infosuicide as an affront. “Taking all of your code offline and erasing your whole persona without so much as a warning or helping people take over projects they spent years investing in is a dickhead thing to do,” he wrote on his blog.

    “That’s a rough thing to say, but I feel very strongly about this, because while I respect the idea of impermanence, I have no respect for someone who has such a complete disregard for other people’s investments and feelings.”

    Next came bargaining. Maybe he would come back soon, and was just busy with another project, some Rubyists held. “_why was to the ruby community what willy wonka was to chocolate. Maybe, just as the fictional Willy Wonka secluded himself in his chocolate factory for so many years … _why is simply secluding himself in his programming factory,” one hopeful post came.

    Much depression followed. “wow, how sad. that just ruined my day. he really was an idol to me. he's one of the main reasons I even tried ruby in the first place. I just love everything he did,” read one typical comment. Indeed, literally hundreds of hackers wrote to eulogize _why and explain how he had inspired them to learn to code.

    And for some, acceptance. The most passed-around response was an introspective one, from the programmer John Resig. “Looking at the cumulative work and art of _why it should become painfully obvious: The online presence of _why, and all the code, writing, music, and drawings that’ve been produced are a mere transitory portion of one person’s life,” he wrote.

    “He was constantly moving from project to project, blog to blog. Now he’s truly moved on and we should feel joy in having gotten to know him, and his art, over the past couple years.”

    But that came as cold comfort to the countless programmers _why inspired to code, or his many interlocutors in the Ruby community.

    ***

    In 1993, the Japanese programmer Yukihiro Matsumoto—“Matz”—dreamed up the Ruby language. The project came about somewhat accidentally, he told me as we sat in the bowels of San Francisco’s Moscone Center, where he was due to give a speech at the 40,000-person DreamForce cloud-computing conference.

    He felt some friction with the other languages he was using. He’d get distracted trying to manipulate code. He felt slowed down. He wished he could hack the code itself to get from A to B faster. He had been a programmer since childhood. He had studied programming languages as a university student. He intuitively saw a better way and set off to write a language.

    “Ruby is to make programmers happy,” he said, explaining that he wanted to think about building a language intuitive to programmers rather than one centered on the capabilities of the computer. “It is about human beings, and not about the machine.”

    Two decades later, Matz is an open-source guru and the central figure in the Ruby world, the ultimate arbiter of changes to the language and the person responsible for updating it as the needs and capabilities of programmers evolve. Currently, he is the “chief architect” for Ruby at Heroku, part of the massive cloud-computing company SalesForce, which runs on Ruby.

    The language gained some traction in Japan after Matz released it, though he said he did little to promote it. Its global success came in two waves. First, in 1999, a British programming-language obsessive and longtime developer named Dave Thomas found it on a Usenet message board and downloaded it.

    “I used to just play with languages,” he tells me, explaining that he would install any he could find just to test it out. “Normally, I’d play with them for a few minutes. With Ruby, I played for a whole morning. Then the whole afternoon.”

    His passion for Ruby led Thomas and his writing partner to produce the pickaxe book, which in turn introduced the language to a much broader English-language audience. If you were a developer looking to pick Ruby up, you didn’t need to just download it and muddle through. The pickaxe book could guide you.

    The second wave—the really big one—came in 2005, thanks to a Danish-born, U.S.-based programmer and entrepreneur named David Heinemeier Hansson.

    _why and Matz are perhaps the most beloved sons in a Ruby’s corner of the Internet. But DHH, as he is known, is undeniably Ruby’s biggest star. No less an authority than Google has named him “hacker of the year.” And he has been the subject of any number of fawning media profiles, including one in Wired that dubbed him a “philosopher-king” while noting his “boyish good looks.” (If you told me he had been in a sugar-pop band in the late 1990s, I would not dismiss it out of hand.)

    Back in 2005, he was building a Web-based project-management system called Basecamp, working in Ruby. He ended up building “a lot of infrastructure to make Ruby suitable for the task,” he tells me. And he realized the infrastructure would apply not just to Basecamp, but also to any number of Web applications. He built it out, and called it “Ruby on Rails.”

    To better explain for the uninitiated, Ruby on Rails is not a language, or a version of Ruby. It uses Ruby code to make building a website much faster and easier. Let’s say that you wanted to make a complicated Web-based product, such as an online invitation service. You could do all the programming yourself. But Ruby on Rails is a framework that includes a lot of the basic, necessary functions for you.

    Ruby on Rails caught on like wildfire. In the spring of 2006, for instance, a young entrepreneur named Jack Dorsey decided to build a micro-blogging service. Using Rails, it took only months to make and launch Twitter. (The site has since moved on to other frameworks and languages.) Thousands of other sites—including Github, Living Social, and Groupon—use the Ruby on Rails infrastructure too.

    Indeed, Rails became so popular that it converted thousands of programmers to Ruby. (When you build a site in Rails, you write in Ruby code.) How many? Well, it’s hard to rank the popularity of programming languages. There are thousands of them used by millions of programmers for a dizzyingly wide array of projects. There is no central repository, and most programmers work in more than one language, anyway. (Matz actually spends a lot of his time writing in C.) 

    But one ranking puts it 12th. Another puts it fifth among “scripting” languages, used for writing application software. Programmers described it to me as something like Italian—familiar enough, but not really common.

    ***

    I was stuck in the little coder’s predicament. Enchanting though the (poignant) Guide might be, it seems aimed at people who know how to program in other languages and want to pick up Ruby as well. And fun though Hackety Hack is, it is aimed at kids. So I moved on to still another _why project: TryRuby, a service that helps amateurs of all ages learn to code.

    The idea is brilliant: A screen pops up with just two boxes. In one, there are instructions. In the second, you type and hit enter—effectively creating little programs that are then executed and evaluated right there in the screen.

    Through the series of prompts, you slowly begin to absorb the basic lexicon of computer programming. A “string” is a set of letters the computer can process, surrounded by double quotes. “Methods” are commands that the program can perform, like the multiplication of numbers. “Arrays” are just lists. “Variables” are nicknames for often-used items.

    With these basic building blocks, you can start commanding the computer to do all sorts of things. You can save libraries of data, and then order the computer to go retrieve items from them. You can create pop up boxes with titles and bits of information, triggered by certain inputs. You can start linking parts of your program to the Internet.

    So, with TryRuby and a new Ruby-for-beginners program set up on my browser, I set out to build my first program: one ordering the computer to solve a math problem. In the case of Ruby, the whole program would read: “print 1 + 2.”

    But knowing a bit about a programming language, it turns out, does not necessarily mean knowing how to make your computer run a program. And working in a highly structured environment like TryRuby or Hackety Hack does not help you figure out how to create and run programs on your own machine.

    First, I needed to download Ruby, which like many languages comes as a free open-source file. (I later figured out that I did not even have to do that—my relatively new Mac already spoke it.)

    Second, I needed to figure out how to create and save a program—in my case, just a single line of text. I started off by saving it as a Word document, but it needed to be in plain text. I saved it in plain text, but I needed to adjust the settings to a more-specific format. And how does a computer run a new program, anyway? The answer, in my case at least, was through a utilitarian program called Terminal, a basic interface panel that lets you talk to your machine.

    I created my program. I saved it. I opened up Terminal, and told it that I would be talking to it in Ruby. I commanded it to run my program, carefully writing in the file name and where it would find it.

    It would not run. It took me more than an hour to figure out I had left in an extra space in my code, preventing the whole thing from working right. But then, after some 98 minutes and some serious Googling, a three showed up in my Terminal shell.  I had written a program. 

    ***

    What had happened to the ebullient, funny, and prolific programmer who was helping to teach me to program? Where had he gone and why?

    What seemed strangest about the disappearance was just how integral to the devoted community of Ruby programmers _why had been before his infosuicide. _why was not just famous within the Ruby community, but one of its creators. He had contributed thousands of lines of code to Ruby’s open-source libraries. He wrote one of the most famous guides to Ruby. Moreover, when the language was just gaining traction in the English-speaking world, _why became the equivalent of the Friday-evening bartender at the town’s only saloon, hosting a series of popular blogs and writing often on Ruby forums, evangelizing the language’s beauty and simplicity.

    He was also known for his energetically weird performances at conferences. Take for instance his appearance at the 2005 O’Reilly Open Source Convention, an annual event that draws a bevy of tech luminaries, open-source gurus, hackers, and free-software advocates.

    The panels featured that year were mostly standard nerdy, service-y fare. A Hawaiian-shirted Larry Wall, the creator of the popular programming language Perl, gave his annual, humorous “State of the Onion” address. DHH talked about Ruby on Rails.

    _why gave a panel with inscrutable title “A Starry Afternoon, a Sinking Symphony, and the Polo Champ Who Gave It All Up for No Reason Whatsoever”—an ode to Ruby, with video partially narrated by two cartoon foxes, shadow puppetry, and musical accompaniment.

    Attendees told me the presentation was “brilliant” and a “disaster.” An interactive element went horribly wrong when conference participants overloaded the convention hall’s servers. It hardly mattered. The conference-goers ate it up. “It was just magical,” says Glenn Vanderburg, a Ruby developer at Living Social.

    Indeed, such whimsy was part of why _why became such an icon in the Ruby community, a community that retains some serious whimsy in no small part because of him. “He was very beloved, very important,” Matz concurs.

    But few, if any, people knew about _why’s civilian identity. He booked conference tickets under a pseudonym. He never put down a credit card in front of other Ruby conference participants, instead paying in cash. He would leave public gatherings by just disappearing. He had even waged a campaign to get his Wikipedia profile killed.

    Nobody ever called him anything other than _why, or pressed him to break out from his online identity. There is a code of omertà around such things.

    In his writings, he evinced a longing for artistic purity coming from obscurity. “People cling to ideas, because they're supposed to be vouchers for a million dollars. no, write an obscure book. build something outside all that pressure. i guess treehouses for kids qualify,” he wrote in 2004.

    But after ­_why disappeared, the Ruby community wanted, and needed, _why’s open-source code back, and a few hours after the disappearance, work started in earnest to salvage anything that could be salvaged. Steve Klabnik is a lithe programmer with jet-black hair, save for a shock dyed white. An aspiring programming teacher, he adored Hackety Hack. When _why disappeared, he watched the boards to make sure somebody claimed it.

    “I just thought: This is really an important project, and whoever decides to pick it up, I’ll help them because I’m not ready for an open-source project. A day or two went by. Other projects got picked up, almost all the other projects, but nobody picked up Hackety Hack,” he told me. “I thought: I refuse to let this die, so I’ll start working on it. Maybe someone else will take it over for real.”

    Klabnik found much of the code for Hackety mirrored onto other servers. But he still needed to “reverse-engineer” the site itself. The endeavor felt important. But it also felt strange—like living in a dead man’s house, or trying to finish someone else’s painting. “When you pick up something so intensely personal, and such a work of art, it is strange,” he says. “I was very scared of doing anything to it, because I didn’t want to ruin his vision for the project.”

    Another programmer, Tennessee-based animal-welfare advocate Andrew McElroy, who goes by the online name Sophrinix, did much the same with TryRuby. “The day he disappeared, the first thing that came to me was, ‘Well, what about TryRuby?,’ ” he says. “I went onto the Ruby Reddit and asked if anyone had taken care of it. Nobody had, and nobody knew where the code was.”

    McElroy and a few other volunteers ended up reconstructing it, stitching together the few rescued pieces and painstakingly rewriting much of the rest of the site. “It needed work, too,” he says, noting that its security functions were inadequate and much of the code weak. But a month later, he got it back up and has been keeping it running ever since.

    Within a few short days of his disappearance, Rubyists had reclaimed and preserved virtually all of _why’s canon. Someone set up a single site with links to every shred of work he had done, hosted in new places. And in the meantime, the culture mourned.

    ***

    Of course, as Rubyists love Ruby, partisans of other languages love other languages. Discussions of beauty and elegance and utility seemed to me to be ubiquitous among coders, forever reaching for metaphors to describe how what might seem cold and mechanical in fact can feel like an ecstatic act of creation.

    In my reporting, a comparison to literature came up often: A well-written program begets a world far richer and more alive than its constituent letters and numbers and brackets suggest. We can see Prufrock trembling before his fruit, despite the brevity of T.S. Eliot’s poem. Similarly, small batches of humble code, carefully constructed, have give birth to radical new capabilities. Google, after all, is at its heart just an algorithm for ranking the popularity and quality of Web pages.

    _why himself repeatedly stressed programming’s creative potential. In the (poignant) Guide, he writes, “Vitamin R goes straight to the head. Ruby will teach you to express your ideas through a computer. You will be writing stories for a machine,” he says. “The language will become a tool for you to better connect your mind to the world.”

    Later on, he writes: “All you need to know thus far is that Ruby is basically built from sentences. They aren’t exactly English sentences. They are short collections of words and punctuation [that] encompass a single thought. These sentences can form books. They can form pages. They can form entire novels, when strung together. Novels that can be read by humans, but also by computers.”

    (Notably, the phrase “Why, the lucky stiff!” comes from Ayn Rand’s The Fountainhead, though I could never find _why commenting on whether that specifically is the source of his nickname. The book is about an individualist genius who eschews society to maintain the purity of his work.)

    As with spoken languages, different programming languages lend themselves to different creative forms. Some let the programmer control the world more easily, more quickly, more precisely, or more intuitively. Indeed, for each programmer and each project, a certain language might fit better than another.

    For the famed Dutch programmer Guido van Rossum, the ideal language is Ruby’s linguistic cousin Python, the language he wrote back in the 1980s and is now one of the most often used languages for Web applications.

    Rossum is currently a Google programmer, though he spends half of his time as Python’s “benevolent dictator for life,” meaning he has final say on any changes to the language itself. (Sergey Brin, or one of his coders, used Python when originally building the search engine, back in the 1990s, kicking off Python’s long relationship with the company.)

    “High-level” languages like Ruby and Python have become particularly popular for producing Web applications, compared with “low-level” languages like C, Rossum explained.

    “Let’s say I am giving directions for how to leave this room,” he says, gesturing to the white-walled, white-boarded Google office around him, visible in our Google+ hangout, a kind of video chat.

    “In Python, I would just say something like, ‘Get up and go through the door.’ In other languages, I might have to say something like, ‘Stand up, but not with so much force that you fall over, take three steps to the north, take one step to the east, approach the door, check that it is open, if it is not open, open it, then step through it with this amount of speed …’ ”

    “The programmer is abstracted from controlling the minutiae in the computer,” he notes. Sometimes, that might be a bad thing. Lower-level languages allow the programmer to manipulate the computer with more-precise instructions, for instance.

    But in developing for the Web, such succinctness, when well designed, is often invaluable to a hacker since it lets her code so much faster.

    Plus, over time, managing a larger corpus of code can weigh on a programmer, Rossum says. “There’s a theory out there that all programmers can only manage a certain number of lines of code,” he notes. “Say, 10,000 lines. In Python, you can have so much more programming in those 10,000 lines. You would need 100,000 lines to do the same thing in C.”

    ***

    Despite his intense efforts to preserve his anonymity, _why had been outed just before his infosuicide.

    An anonymous person or persons published a strange, vituperative Wordpress website—now down, though largely reproduced here—naming _why as a Salt Lake City-based programmer named Jonathan Gillette. (There’s no way to figure out who built the Wordpress site. There is no domain registry and little to do in the way of IP address tracing.)

    The evidence on the Wordpress site is extraordinarily detailed. There are photographs, phone numbers, IP addresses, educational details, addresses. It all points to the same individual: A thirtysomething graduate of the University of Utah, a resident of the Salt Lake suburb Sandy, a player in a local band. And it is seemingly conclusive. Back in 2002 and 2003, for instance, _why wrote to some Rubyists from his work computer, with his given name tagged down at the bottom of his email.

    Just after the disappearance, the woman named as _why’s wife seemingly confirmed that he was Jonathan. She tweeted: “Just eating a chickpea burger with _why. Did you hear that??? A CHICKPEA BURGER. Put THAT on Wikipedia!”

    On the Web, there was still doubt. Some of the IP traces and identifying data deep in the virtual underbrush pointed to a resident of Texas, or another Utah graduate. And a few prominent Rubyists, including Peter Cooper, keeper of Ruby Inside, insisted at first that the site had fingered the wrong guy.

    But nobody doubted that the publication such a site would be just the kind of thing to send fragile, private _why deep underground.

    In interviews, _why’s collaborators and virtual friends carefully suggested a secondary reason why he might have departed the net. Vanderburg, the Living Social programmer, puts it simply: “_why’s code was sloppy. He was an amazing thinker, but not as good when it came to execution. So, he saw a lot of people take his ideas, and then build them out into more sustainable or workable projects.”

    Klabnik, who now runs Hackety Hack, said much the same. “_why’s programming just really is not very good,” he said, adding, “That doesn’t mean he wasn’t brilliant.”

    Over and over, _why would build something, and something better would quickly supplant it, either a variation on ­_why’s work or a new approach. This isn’t surprising given Ruby’s commitment to open source, and given the whole programming world’s obsession with the newest, the quickest, the cleverest.

    Shortly before his disappearance, _why admitted the ubiquity of obsolescence was getting to him. He tweeted: “programming is rather thankless. u see your works become replaced by superior ones in a year. unable to run at all in a few more.”

    There were other, subtler hints and forewarnings threaded through his work. On his RedHanded blog, for instance, he once wrote: “Fortunately, as I’ve mentioned before, I have a strong feeling that I will die young without artifact. That I will make no lasting impression. This will be my avenue. So hold your horses, I just have a few more things to do in life and I’m sure I’ll be out of your hair.”

    But, even if the person behind _why wanted to disappear, _why has done anything but. The Streisand Effect proved tremendous. Among Rubyists, his offline identity as Jonathan Gillette has become accepted, and common, knowledge. And he only became more famous for having vanished.

    ***

    The “Ruby community”—a concept constantly bandied about among Rubyists, who seem self-conscious of their reputation as a clique, if a nice one—met for their 10th-annual RubyConf in late September 2011, at a hotel on the corner of Bourbon Street in New Orleans.

    The atmosphere? Something like “nerd carnival,” though in the positive, reclaimed sense of the term. At RubyConf, the biggest nerd is the best nerd, and every nerd is welcome. Participants wore their name tags strung around their necks with Mardi Gras beads and often put their Twitter handle above their real names. Fingerprint dustings of powdered sugar from beignets frosted Mac laptop after Mac laptop.

    During the day, participants—about 500 total, about 475 men, though my original count got thrown off by a few luscious ponytails —attended panels to hear their peers talk about best practices or cool new projects. Matz addressed the masses twice, first giving a laid-back keynote that opened with the line, “I am a mere programmer.”

    The panel that perhaps best encapsulated the spirit of the conference and the general demeanor of its participants was a session about a hodgepodge of coding minutiae. An overflow crowd filled the biggest conference room. At the front, behind a desk, sat a number of young Ruby coders. Even before they started, the crowd started giggling.

    The speakers hand-drew name cards, reading, left to right, “Thelma,” “Brenda,” “Sally,” “Janet,” and “Lois.” Brenda had a sea captain’s hat and a pipe. The panelists all sported varying days’ worth of facial-hair growth. The point would be, the moderator said, to learn as little as possible, and he encouraged everyone to leave to find a better panel to attend. The crowd roared.

    Later in the conference, Klabnik presented his updates to Hackety Hack in one of the several presentations that touched on the not-present and yet ever-present figure of _why, and his work.

    “I am slowly, systematically removing _why from the project,” he told the conference-goers. “It’s not because I don’t like _why, because _why was awesome … but you break up with a girl and you don’t keep pictures of her around your apartment for the rest of time.”

    “His goals were different than my goals,” he added. “It took me a long time to become okay with removing thousands of lines of code that _why wrote.” He also took a moment to argue against “celebrity hacking,” and the cult of personalities that sometimes develop in such communities.

    McElroy, who administers TryRuby, had coincidentally done much the same, removing _why’s original work from the project. He brought in the firm Envy Labs to reboot TryRuby and to take over its hosting costs.* (He was paying a hundred bucks or so out of pocket per month.)

    “It’s a lot faster, and it looks far better too,” he said, explaining that they reworked the site’s guts. He says he regrets that the code is no longer open-source, but says that Envy Labs has, at the very least, promised to keep it free for the thousands of people who use it every year.

    But _why is still venerated, his projects often cited by other programmers, his name brought up with something like nostalgia in Ruby forums, his presence felt at RubyConf. Last year, Vanderburg, the Living Social programmer, launched something called “WhyDay,” which occurs on the anniversary of _why’s infosuicide. A barebones website encourages hackers to devote a day to doing fun, imperfect, creative projects in the spirit of _why.

    A few hundred people participate each year. Thus far, Vanderburg admits, the projects “haven’t been very good. But I think that the broader spirit of _why lives on in the community, and you see it in the more creative output that people have.”

    Peter Cooper, the programming teacher who runs a Ruby news site, adds: “_why was a creation, a character,” he says. “And that character met the end. Of course, the person behind that character still exists. And we can venerate that character. But _why is over. There is no _why.”

    ***

    After a few days of working on math puzzles and other very simple programs, I moved onto games—popular homework for newbie programmers, since they can be easily subdivided into smaller pieces. You need to know the objective that you want to achieve. You need to think of or research ways to achieve it. Then you need to execute those steps.

    I decided to build a simple computer vs. hacker game of “Rock, Paper, Scissors”— “Rochambot” as I liked calling it. (It turns out, alas, this is a common joke.) I started with my description:

    print “Welcome to Rochambot!”

    print “This is a classic game of Rock, Paper, Scissors. Rock smashes Scissors but gets covered by Paper, Paper covers Rock but gets cut up by Scissors, and Scissors slashes paper but cannot stand up to Rock!”

    print “You will throw down your option, and the computer will too! Then the computer will tell you whether you won, lost, or tied. Type in Rock, Paper, or Scissors and press enter to play!”

    Easy part: Done. The explanation for the game would show up when someone ran the program. Now came the hard part. The person just needs to input their choice, like “Rock.” But the computer needs to pick its choice, and then evaluate who won what. How to do that?

    Well, first, the computer-picking-rock-paper-scissors-at-random bit. There’s a command in Ruby, “rand,” that picks a random number. I thought about assigning each number to an object—one is rock, two is scissors, three is paper. But I worried it might make it harder to code later on, making integers placeholders for objects. I researched, and realized I could manipulate the rand function to pick from a set of objects, rather than numbers. I produced:

    Rochambeau = [ “Rock”, “Paper”, “Scissors” ]

    Random = Rochambeau[rand(rand.3)]

    And then I filled in the rest of the game.

    case [human, computer]

    when [‘Paper’, ‘Rock’], [‘Rock’, ‘Scissors’], [‘Scissors’, ‘Paper’]

    print “You win!”

    when [‘Rock’, ‘Paper’], [‘Scissors’, ‘Rock’], [‘Paper’, ‘Scissors’]

    print “You lose!”

    when [‘Paper’, ‘Paper’], [‘Rock’, ‘Rock’], [‘Scissors’, ‘Scissors’]

    print “It’s a tie!”

    I had my pieces, but needed to make them work together—I needed to create the function where the computer picks, then the person picks, and then the computer names the winner. I could not quite figure it out, as it involved having the computer memorize its throw and then accept the user’s input.

    So, I did as advised: I asked Rubyists. A few emails later, I got directed to open-source code that performed the exact function I wanted—open-source code free for anyone to use and reuse at will. I felt somehow silly, as I could not crack the puzzle myself. “Don’t worry about it,” one of my new Ruby friends said. “All programming is pastiche :)”

    ***

    After my month of learning to code, I could build a number of small programs, such as simple games. I could name the basic building blocks of programming, such as if/then statements. I could also explain arrays and strings, the syntax and grammar and basic lexicon of the language. In doing so, I scaled what I think might be the steepest part of the coding learning curve, gaining a basic understanding of what programming languages actually do.

    For programming languages are, I was surprised to learn, not what the computer really speaks—those zeroes and ones remain deep in its digital chassis, far away from the person controlling the computer. No, programming languages are what the coder speaks to tell the computer what to do.

    Matz’s philosophy in creating Ruby was to build a language more sensitive to coders’ intuition and desires, reducing the amount of punctuation hackers need to put in their code, for instance. But even his more human-focused language remains geared toward experienced programmers, not new ones.

    Too often, they are left struggling to understand how to write and execute basic programs, swamped by learning all the new terminology and ignorant of how to avoid simple mistakes, like leaving extra spaces in your programs.

    But it is becoming much easier to learn to code—in no small part because so many programmers, like _why, have emphasized that it remains too hard to learn. There are resources like TryRuby and Hackety Hack. There is the excellent Scratch, which teaches kids to hack using visual “blocks” rather than having them type out each part of the code.

    Plus, in the past year, a slick site that teaches you simple coding has gone viral. Codecademy, the brainchild of two twentysomething entrepreneurs named Zack Sims and Ryan Bubinsky, works similarly to Hackety Hack. You are prompted to write very simple code on the site. (For instance, “Hey! Let's get to know each other. What's your name? Type it with quotes around it like this “Ryan” and then press enter on your keyboard.”)

    It urges you on, corrects you as you go, and grants you badges for completing certain benchmarks. With big venture capital backing and deserved positive coverage in many media outlets, including Slate, Codecademy has signed up more than 1 million users, including New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

    I spoke with Sims about how he came up with the idea, and he described nothing other than the Little Coder’s Predicament. “I read books and watched videos trying to learn to work in Ruby and Javascript,” he says, “But I was just endlessly frustrated with the resources available to me.”

    “Learning by doing is the most effective way to learn to code,” Sims says, so he and Bubinsky decided to build a site that would let you do just that. “You need that ‘Aha!’ moment in the discovery process,” he added.

    ***

    All that was left for me was to thank my virtual tutor _why, or at least to reach out to him. At RubyConf, most Rubyists agreed that _why would never talk to me, even if I found him. They parlayed stories of his infamous secrecy, and his discomfort with all the attention. People who had collaborated with _why for years had tried in vain to speak with him after his infosuicide, so I did not hold out much hope.

    Still, I wrote him a letter, informing him of the story and asking to talk. I left a phone message at his publicly listed home phone number, with the same information. And I told several of his former interlocutors to tell him to reach out to me, to ask on my behalf. I also called his employer as cited in the decade-old emails he wrote, Inetz Media Group, who informed me he had not worked there for years. Short of showing up on his doorstep—something I considered, if only fleetingly—I had not really found _why.

    It was a public-records search of patent applications that eventually led me to him. In November 2006, Jonathan Gillette and some of his collaborators submitted a patent application for a "system and method for deploying a virtual machine." I called Prowess Consulting, the Seattle-based firm that filed the application. Jonathan Gillette is not listed on the telephone directory prompt that comes up when you ring its main line. Eventually, I got to a receptionist. Yes, he works there, she said. No, she would not give me his direct line, or patch me through. I could send an email to her, and she would forward to him.

    Finally, late in my reporting, I got word back-channeled to me from another Salt Lake City programmer: Jonathan is _why, he is fine, and he just wants to be left alone.

    Correction, March 15, 2012: This article originally misidentified Envy Labs as IndyLabs. (Return to the corrected sentence.)


              Comment on Nissan To Sell Autonomous Cars By 2020 by Self-Driving CMU Car Changes Lane, Waits For Pedestrians In Test Drive        
    […] Nissan To Sell Autonomous Cars By 2020 […]
              Repulbic Security...        
    Well a quick look at some packet captures doesn't give me the warm fuzzies about republic's VoIP over WiFi implementation. Or maybe thats unfair, its just that its exactly as I feared, VoIP over WiFi with pretty much no security.

    All of their SIP packets seem to go in the clear, same with the RTP (voice transport). I see some SSL traffic to EC2 instances.

    Checking the IPs for most of the DNS resolves in the capture, shows that most (all) of the republic stuff is in EC2.

    For reference they're using G.711 PCMU for voice.

    I haven't quite figured out SMSes, at I think they're going through SSL (based on the timing)..

    They're using their phonebooth.net service for all of the SIP stuff -- also in EC2.

    The device does a DNS query for update.republicwireless.com -- all of the HTTPS traffic appears associated with the IPs this resolves to.


    Short answer: Don't use WiFI calling on public, or unencrypted WiFi, as people can really easily sniff your traffic -- yes, I mean listen to your calls, steal your SIP creds, etc. 

    WEP does not count as encryption in my book, use WPA2/AES.

    A suggestion to the republic folks? Enable cyrpto or disable WiFi calling when on unencrypted networks. I'd sooner the former than the latter.

    I'd post my captures, but I really don't feel like hanging that kind of data about me out there.

    Sorry guys.
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              CMU Girls On Spit Or Swallow        
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              China Will Overtake the US in Computing…Maybe, Someday…        
    [note: the following is a rough draft -- I appreciate comments as I work this into shape and add relevant links to further sources]

    December 6, 2011

    Abstract:
    Today, The New York Times published an article by Barboza and Markoff titled “Power in Numbers: China Aims for High-Tech Primacy.  This article echoes frequently expressed alarmist opinions that China is posed to take over the world.  I have lived in Beijing for the past 2.5 years as a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research Asia, I've taught Computer Sciences classes at Tsinghua University, and it is my opinion that China has major obstacles to overcome before becoming a high-tech powerhouse. The biggest of these is the the way creativity is discouraged in Chinese classrooms. Chinese students who spend time at western universities do pick up these skills. Creativity and the inclination to challenge norms in disruptive rather than incremental ways are at the heart of computing innovations. These traits are all but absent from Chinese universities. A solution I pose is an initiative called World Lab. We need a place for people from various cultures, backgrounds, and countries to come together to take risks in designing new technologies and to train students to become global leaders.

    Today's NY Times article by Barboza & Markoff, “Power in Numbers: China Aims for High-Tech Primacy,”  would lead you to believe that the title of this blog entry (“China Will Overtake the US in Computing”) is almost a certainty. I could not help reading this somewhat alarmist article without cringing, as it follows a pattern of reporting on China that I’ve seen from since before I moved to China in 2009 and that I have noticed more frequently over the past two years now that I’m more sensitized to the realities of China’s economic rise. This lack of subtlety and nuance on China is what I’ve come to expect from media outlets such as CNN and I am more surprised to see it from seasoned journalists who are respected for their expertise, Barboza for reporting here in China and Markoff for reporting on computing.

    As I prepare to leave next week to return to my position at the University of Washington, I am starting to reflect on what I have learned in my 2½ years in China. My own view is that there is incredible potential in the computing field in China – this is one of the many reasons I chose to pick up my family and move here. At the same time there are many important barriers to China’s eventual rise in computing and these barriers will not fall on their own without efforts at reforming both the educational system and government regulation, let alone certain Chinese cultural norms that are thousands of years old. That is why I’ve subtitled this blog entry “…Maybe, Someday…”. That is, I don’t believe China will rise above the US in computing anytime soon and if it is to do so, several important changes must first take place.

    In the rest of this article I’ll try to touch on 1) why am I qualified to even have an informed opinion on China’s rise in computing, 2) what I saw as the misconceptions or omissions in the Barboza & Markoff NY Times article, and 3) what I think China must do to reach its potential in computing and why I think this is a good thing and not something the West should be worried about.

    Who am I to Comment on Chinese Computing
    As I read the NY Times article I was a bit surprised by some of the folks they had used to comment on the state of Chinese computing. I started to think, “who are the proper experts on this topic?” Later as I pondered this question, I began to think I’m as good an expert as anyone, at least from the academic computer science side, to comment on the rise of China in computing. Why is that? 

    I have spent 2½ years living in China and in that time I have: worked at Microsoft Research Asia (MSRA), the top research organization in the country, taught at Tsinghua University, the top computer science department in the country, and organized several major technical research events in China. Before coming to China, I earned my PhD at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), one of the top computer science departments in the world, earned tenure at Berkeley (another top department), founded a start-up, ran a ubiquitous computing research lab for Intel, and served as a professor at the University of Washington (another top computer science department). More detail on my background is here. I think this experience puts me in good position to make an informed assessment on computing in China. You be the judge. I’m sure I’m not right on everything and these are just my opinions, but after two years I’ve seen quite a bit, talked to many people, and I’m starting to have a good feel for what is going on here in China.


    What is Wrong with the Rising View
    I believe there is no question that China is quickly rising in all endeavors, whether it is in terms of China’s economics, infrastructure (think ports, highways, freight railway, and high speed rail), education, science, or technology. It is an amazing sight to see firsthand and the energy one feels living here during this important time in history is quite incredible (more than even in Silicon Valley during the 1st Internet boom of the mid to late 90s). Computing is no different from these other areas and China has made huge strides in 20 years, as reported in the NY Times article.

    The key questions to ask are 1) where is China with respect to the US and the West in terms of computing today? and 2) where will China be in the future? The impressions that were given by the NY Times article on both of these questions is where I most felt the article lets the reader down. Let’s cover each of these in turn.

    Where is China Computing Today
     Academic computer science has been the underlying basis for many of the major commercial strides in computing in the US (e.g., the Internet, the graphical web browser, compression for wireless communications, cloud computing, speech recognition, web indexing and search, gesture and touch-based user interfaces, location-aware computing, etc.).

    China has made big strides in academic computer science over the past 20 years in terms of expansion of its programs and making a shift from mainly producing software for state-owned companies to undertaking leading edge computing research and education. In fact, China has passed major milestones in the past 5 years in terms of government support for research and in starting to publish in top computing journals and conferences.

    Everything’s Big in China
    Five to ten years ago, one would almost never see papers at the top academic computing conferences from China’s researchers, with the exception being papers from Microsoft Research Asia, which was started in Beijing back in 1998 by a group of Chinese and Taiwanese researchers who were trained in the US and worked in the US before returning to Asia. Today, there are many Chinese researchers who are publishing papers at top research venues. But, the number is still quite small given the large number of universities and researchers that are pursuing computing research in China. Computer Science & Technology is the largest undergraduate major in China and some estimates I’ve heard say there are over 1,000 computer science departments in China and over 1,000,000 computer science majors at a time across these departments. This is huge! The government is clearly making massive investments in computing.

    Supercomputing isn't so Super?
    One of the big accomplishments Chinese computer science has made given these investments over the last 5-10 years has been in Supercomputing: the very large, high speed machines often used for climate modeling, weapons simulation, etc. A couple of years ago China temporarily had the fastest machine in the world with the Tianhe-1A. This coveted spot on the TOP500 supercomputer list has traditionally been held by either US or Japanese supercomputers, though it changes all the time as new faster computers come into service.

    Although getting to the top of the list was a major accomplishment for China, the news of China’s conquest of supercomputing really didn’t seem to be big news for almost anyone I know in leading computer science departments. Why is that? I think most leading computer scientists believe that although supercomputers are useful for certain problems, this is a technology of the past that will simply improve incrementally with underlying processor improvements (in fact, most supercomputers today use conventional processors used in desktop computers rather than the special purpose processors used in the past).

    The big innovations in supercomputing have been in the programming models, network interconnects, and most recently in cooling/power usage. But, people seem to see much more important innovation going on in the cloud computing clusters that literally combine thousands of commercial processors together in standard racks connected with traditional networks in huge data centers around the world. This is the technology that powers Google, Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, and the many other web computing giants of the world and is then resold inexpensively to every little web site or mobile phone application that needs to do computing in the cloud. This type of architecture supports a far wider range of applications than supercomputing. Cloud computing is a hot topic in both industrial and academic computer science research and American computer scientists are clearly far in the lead in this area of work.

    Academic Publications
    In my own subfield of Ubiquitous Computing (ubicomp) and Human Computer Interaction (HCI), China is still in its early stages. Ubicomp has been around since 1991 and in those 20 years China has had almost no presence in the field (for example there were no papers from China at the 2010 UbiComp conference). This year I co-organized the conference with my colleagues at Tsinghua University and we held UbiComp 2011 here in Beijing (link). There were over 300 papers submitted and only 50 were accepted for presentation at the conference (a highly competitive 17% acceptance rate). Although this year we saw 38 papers submitted from China (last year there were only 10), only 3 of these papers with primary Chinese authors were accepted (and all of those were from Microsoft Research Asia). There were many US universities that alone had as many or more papers than all of China (e.g., Carnegie Mellon had seven and UW had four!).

    This trend is very similar at other top computing conferences: China had almost no representation 5 or 10 years ago and now there is a smattering of papers (e.g., 1-3 papers/year – out of a 30 paper program – the last couple of years at each of the top systems and networking conferences: SIGCOMM, NSDI, and SOSP). Again, the majority of these papers are coming out of Microsoft Research Asia, not the top Chinese universities.

    So we see China starting to be represented at major computing conferences, but Chinese researchers are at this stage no more impactful than many other smaller countries (e.g., France). Given the large number of universities and researchers pursuing computing in China, the interesting question is whether this a straight line that is going to continue its meteoric rise of the last few years (similar to China’s economic growth of ~10% for ten years) or is China’s impact in computing research going to start to grow at a much more modest rate (similar to many predictions of its economy growing at still fast yet more modest rates).

    Research Creativity: Students, Faculty, & Academic Structure
    Creativity, innovation, and “design thinking” have been some of the most overused buzzwords bandied about in the US business press over the last 3-5 years and this has especially accelerated in the few months since the passing of Steve Jobs. In computing research as well as in industry, creativity and innovation are also important topics. These hard to measure attributes are what we all believe lead to “impact”, which is also hard to measure, but is that which we are all after! Counting papers at top conferences or patents does not measure impact, but people (including me above) tend to sometimes fall back on this counting exercise, as it is easy to measure.

    Having interacted with many top Chinese students while here in China, at both MSRA (the top place to have an internship for a computer scientist in China) and at Tsinghua (the top CS department), I’ve gotten a chance to observe the level of creativity and innovation in these top students. We’ve also attracted some of the top design students in China to our lab (in addition to hiring top designers from the US and Europe). I’ve also been lucky to interact with the top Chinese research computer scientists (i.e., folks who already have their PhDs) at MSRA and at the universities.

    The simple fact is, the level of innovation and creativity in this cohort is much lower than in similar cohorts in the US. And in fact, the ones that are the best on the “creativity” scale almost invariably are folks who received their PhDs in the US/Europe or worked in the US/Europe. This is not to say those who haven’t left China for their education aren’t doing good work – as I mentioned above MSRA is one of the top places in the world for CS research and the researchers there are publishing at the top venues, but many of the most successful of these researchers have spent years under the tutelage of computer scientists who were trained in the West – almost going through a 2nd PhD while working at MSRA.

    The simple fact is if you are educated in the Chinese system, from primary school through university, you have a much harder chance of practicing being “creative” than if you were educated elsewhere. This is not a genetic trait (as many Chinese educated in the West have clearly shown), but a trait of the Chinese educational system, which is based on over a thousand years of Chinese culture.

    There are many articles (link) on how cultural underpinning of the Chinese educational system does a good job with the basics (e.g., the students in Shanghai beat the entire world on the PISA Test a year ago), but many here in China question whether the pervasive emphasis on memorization, test taking, and a cultural imperative that almost requires copying the teacher (link art article) and the past “masters” leads to a population that cannot think “outside of the box” (link).

    Again, this lack of creativity is cultural and obviously there are folks who don’t fit the system and are creative and innovative (the art scene in China is growing by leaps and bounds). For many years, the top students in China have left the Chinese system for graduate school in the US. Although some of these students start out in America as brilliant and hard working students, many do not show much creativity when they start. They have learned not to question the professor, or others in positions of authority, and they are used to being told what to do rather than coming up with ideas on their own. But, many soon rise above this after a few years of practice and have turned into some of the top stars in the field (e.g., my own classmates at Carnegie Mellon, Harry Shum and Qi Lu, are now two of the top executives at Microsoft (links)).

    I have personally advised students like this that have gone onto great computing careers, relying on their innovation and creative skills everyday. But this was only after 5-6 years in the “American” higher education system. My colleagues have often told me of similar examples. Now many Chinese are also aware of this key difference in our educational systems. The latest trend among middle class and wealthy Chinese is to send their kids to the US for their undergraduate degrees or even their high school education (some 200,000? were studying in the US this year alone link).

    Now this trend by itself would cause one to believe that China will overtake the US in computing as this massive cohort of students return to China after earning their degrees. Although the “sea turtle” trend of returning to China after several years of working in the US continues, it doesn’t appear as common as some would believe. Many Chinese students become very accustomed to what is still an easier life in US cities and often choose to remain in America. In fact, a more important “glue” for these students might be the far more streamlined US corporate life (many Chinese companies are still fairly byzantine in their politics and structure and corruption is still a major problem). In fact, recent reports show that most wealthy Chinese are starting to secure homes and passports in the West, often for the educational opportunities outlined above, but also to avoid environmental degradation, corruption, and find access to healthcare (link report).

    Last Spring I attended a major National Science Foundation workshop on computer science research collaboration with China (http://current.cs.ucsb.edu/nsf-uschina11/). Of the 80 attendees, over half were Chinese who were now professors at American universities. In computing research, many Chinese with US PhDs might be staying in the US for the prospect of working at a better university and with better graduate students than they can in China. Will this change soon?

    One of the major differences I’ve noted between Chinese universities (and in fact Chinese organizations in general) and American universities is the power structure exposed in the academic hierarchy. American universities are hierarchical in that Full Professors make decisions about Associate and Assistant Professors, and Associate Professors in turn also make decisions (e.g., tenure) about Assistant Professors. But, I’ve also noticed that in the top departments I’ve been in that the more “senior” faculty understand that a lot of the innovation and best work occurs in the groups led by the “young” Assistant Professors and we in fact “protect” them so as to allow them to better develop and get this great work accomplished (e.g., we do not give them a lot of tedious committee work to do and we encourage them to teach advanced courses in their specialized areas rather than large, general undergraduate courses).

    In Chinese universities, there is far more power and money concentrated in the hands of the senior faculty. In many universities the Assistant Professors are just that – they assist a senior faculty member and have no true independent agenda of their own. In a fast moving field like computer science, I believe this structure is bound to fail and cannot keep up with the changes in technology that occur so rapidly. Certainly more rapidly than the 10 years or more it will take a hotshot young faculty member to rise to the top of that hierarchy.

    Today’s computing technology is nothing like it was 10 years ago! I believe this structural impediment makes it hard for anyone to name a computer science researcher in a Chinese university that they would say is one of the top in the world in their subfield (other than the few famous names, e.g., Andy Yao – a Turing Award winner, who have been “imported” to Chinese universities).

    This means that unless the Chinese universities change this system, it will take many years (15-20) before their CS departments could even have a chance of being stocked from top to bottom with world-class computer scientists. And that would assume they start producing the top scientists here in China (which hasn’t happened yet) or start importing them from abroad (only a few have come so far). Again, this is not to say there aren’t good people here already. There are plenty of good people working in Chinese universities. For example, Prof. Yuanchun Shi, my co-chair for UbiComp 2011 from Tsinghua, is doing lots of great research in her group at Tsinghua. These folks are just spread thin and not a single Chinese computer science department has the strength of even a top 25 or maybe even a top 50 computer science department in the United States. This will be hard to change anytime soon without a massive change in hiring practices as well as in how those people are treated when they come on board.

    Startups
    Although academic computer science research in China isn’t yet all it can be and has some major impediments to its continued improvement, I believe the start-up scene is a bit healthier. Although I am not an expert on this, I try to keep up by following the top China tech blogs and writers on twitter (cite niubi, wolfegroupasia, tricia, kaiserkuo, affinitiy china, china law) and pay attention to what is going on at the key start-up events (e.g., TechCrunch Beijing was the most recent such activity).

    I’ve also spent time chatting with and reading the works of folks who do study the start-up scene closely, such as Vivek Wadhwa (@wadhwa), professor at Duke and Stanford, who studies high-tech entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley and around the world. Professor Vwada has commented recently on the healthy start-up scene he has encountered while traveling in China (link). Noticing that this culture is starting to come to terms with the need to try and fail and start over again, as has fueled the amazing rise of Silicon Valley’s companies.

    The conclusion I’ve come to from watching the Chinese start-up scene is that 1) it is vibrant, 2) some major early movers, especially on the Internet, e.g., Baidu, Alibaba, Sina, have already amassed fairly dominant positions in their niches as happened in the US (though we know as Yahoo has shown most recently that these positions can be lost easily), and 3) the amount of venture funding and number of startups are both increasing rapidly. 

    In addition to these traditional spaces for innovation, there are other cool things that happen in China that are an outgrowth of its manufacturing innovation. In particular, the entire Shanzhai market (link), which started with fake name-brand goods, including phones and purses, has quickly moved into making novel new products. Again, they tend to be useful tweaks (e.g., multiple SIM card phones, new shapes, etc.) rather than major innovation. This might be where lots of the creative engineers end up in China as these types of folks may not have conformed with the rigid educational system to get into the elite schools.

    There is innovation in the China computing startup world, but the type of innovation that happens in start-ups and in industry tends not to be the innovation that will pay off for the entire computing field in 10 years (e.g., the invention of the internet and many of the other computing advances I noted in the introduction to this article). Start-ups tend to take ideas that have already been floating around for a while and repurpose them to a new problem or incrementally improve on them. China’s start-ups are especially known for this incremental improvement strategy. As noted tech environmental crusader Peggy Liu (@shanghaipeggy) wrote today on Twitter, “China is not good at radical innovation, but it's great at tweakovation.” This quote exactly captures the type of activity happening most often in China’s startup scene.

    This criticism for copying and tweaking rather than innovating is probably overblown, but continues to be said in and about the Chinese computing industry. One of the biggest names in China Tech funding, Kai Fu Li, founder of Innovation Ventures and former Google China Head, Microsoft Research Asia head, and all around Chinese high tech success story (from Taiwan), now has the nickname in China of “Start-Copy Li” (check for proper translation) for the propensity of companies in his venture portfolio to simple copy a popular western web site and give it some minor Chinese characteristics. For instance, there were hundreds of Groupon clones in China just a few months ago.

    So although start-ups in China might be healthy, if a little less innovative than in the West, I do not think this is a fundamental problem for Chinese computing. The bigger question is can they really make the type of fundamental advances in the future that in the past led the US computing industry to its dominance. And can the Chinese make those advances if they are not first taking place in academic research. I do not believe they can and therefore encourage the Chinese to keep upgrading the educational system and infrastructure – but with more than just increased funding. I believe the structure needs to change (see below).

    Patents
    One argument for China’s future dominance in the fundamental underlying technologies of computing is the large Chinese patent portfolio. The NY Times article pointed out how China has overtaken Europe in number of patents filed and is catching up to the US and Japan. What the article fails to mention is that many, many people believe that many of these Chinese patents are bogus (link Vivek, China La blog) and come out of 1) a quota system that requires organizations to produce a certain number of patent filings per year regardless if they are actually any good and 2) a tendency to copy foreign patents, make minor changes to them, and then use these as trade barriers to western companies trying to do business in China (link China law blog). Leaving this type of information out of the NYTimes article really distorts the patent story. When paired with the lack of strong intellectual property rights protection in China, the patent story leads one to believe that China will not be able to innovate in the future.

    How China Can Reach its Computing Potential
    My analysis above might leave you with the opinion that I think China’s computing field is going nowhere fast. That is far from the truth. I think China will continue to improve in computing for two major reasons. First, computing in China will improve simply due to China's massive size: (1) in 1.3B people there are going to be a lot of great ones, no matter what barriers you put in their way and (2) the domestic market by itself will be huge and thus a great opportunity! Second, the large investment in technology research funding coming from the government (growth on the order of 10%/year for 10 years) will allow a lot of researchers to carry out many ambitious projects. But, I believe that instead of fearing China, we should see that China reaching its potential in computing could change the world in a very positive way and it is something we should try to help with.

    China is Part of the Solution
    Why do we want Chinese computing to succeed? I believe that the major problems that the US faces, the rest of the world faces, and China especially faces. China is key to helping solve these problems and by helping China’s research and education system in computing, we have a better chance of creatively solving these problems together. These are problems in:
    •  Sustainability: maintaining the environment, and stopping global warming in particular
    • Education: Improving education for all in both the basics as well as in creativity and innovation
    • Healthcare: Creating a healthcare system that will care for an aging population (North America, Europe, and China all suffer from this) as well as all one that will service all citizens at a reasonable price
    All three of these problem areas will have solutions that involve government, policy, and pricing. Yet they also are problems where major technology innovations, especially computing technology innovations, can make a major positive impact. By working together with China on these problems we can help improve the world.

    World Lab
    In light of this view, I’ve been working the last few months on trying to create a new, multidisciplinary research institute that is jointly housed between a major Chinese university and an American university. This World Lab will become known as the place for risk taking, breaking the mold, inventing the future, and tackling the major problems facing the world. We will apply a new methodology I term “Global Design” to find a balance between design and technology, between human-centered & technology centered approaches, between academia & industry, and between Eastern and Western culture. The World Lab will push the boundaries of what is possible and invent the future today. This institute will help train the students and leaders of tomorrow’s universities and companies to be free thinkers who can create the solutions that society will need to solve these challenging problems.

    I believe China’s rise in computing is remarkable, but the future is not assured. As a computer scientist I support helping China improve in computing because I believe it will help the world as well as the population of China. The problems are complex and success is not assured, but together I think we can create a better world.


    Disclaimer: The opinions set out in this article are those of James Landay and do not represent the opinions of the University of Washington, Microsoft Corp., Intel Corp, or anyone else (unless they decide to say so – which I’d appreciate).

    Acknowledgements: Thanks to Ben Zhao from UCSB (@ravenben) for some of the data on top networking and systems conferences. Thanks to Frank Chen (@frankc), Lydia Chilton, Aaron Quigley (@aquigley), Robert Walker, and Sarita Yardi (@yardi) for helpful comments on this essay.


    My Background


    Unlike other computing academics who have commented on Chinese computing, I’ve not just dropped into China for a week or two here or there and developed an impression. I’ve actually been living here full time for 2½ years. In that time I’ve helped build a new research group at Microsoft Research Asia(link), taught a course at Tsinghua University(link), co-organized a major international computing conference(link), started a major computing lecture series/symposium on new uses of computing(link), traveled to many different universities to speak, visit, and meet the students and faculty, and attended several meetings of the top computing faculty in China (a few of which also were attended by their US counterparts link: http://www.nsfc.gov.cn/Portal0/InfoModule_479/30695.htm).

    I’ve also thrown myself into reading much of the press and blogs on innovation and start-ups in China and I’ve tried to go to events here in Beijing on these topics when I could. I also chat with others about these topics whenever I get a chance. As an expat you can easily meet some of the movers and shakers in this circle even when living in a city of 20M+.

    In addition to my time in China, I think I’ve also been lucky to have been at the center of some of the top places in computing over the last 20 years. I obtained my PhD in Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University (link). CMU is ranked by most as one of the top departments in the world. I was a faculty member and received tenure in CS at UC Berkeley (link), another one of the world’s top departments. Until coming to China, I was a faculty member in Computer Science at the University of Washington (link), another top department. At UW we’ve built one of the top programs in the world in Human-Computer Interaction and Design (link), which is a field that is at the forefront of envisioning and building the future of computing technology.

    I also have industrial experience. In addition to the last 2½ years at Microsoft Research Asia, unquestionably the best computing research organization in all of Asia, I was the co-founder and CTO of a silicon valley-based start-up (NetRaker) while on the faculty at Berkeley and I ran a ubiquitous computing research lab for Intel in Seattle for 3 years (link). The researchers at the Intel lab invented many leading edge technologies in that time, including the city-scale, beacon-based location capabilities that were originally found on the iPhone and every single smart phone since (link), activity inference technology that uses sensors to tell what physical activities you are doing in the real world (e.g., running, walking, biking, taking stairs, etc.), which is just starting to show up in products in its most basic form (e.g., the FitBit (link)), and other very cool technologies that hopefully you will hopefully see in products some day in the future.

    So, I think I’ve got a pretty significant amount of experience in computing research at the top academic institutions, industrial experience through my time at Intel and Microsoft, and start-up experience through NetRaker, that when combined with my time and study in China puts me in a fairly strong position to comment on where China is in computing and where it might be going.


              Sensor-tech university research, beloved by media, not by markets        

    Americans are worried about the risk of seniors falling.  It’s a YARP ("Yet Another Research Project"). Yay.  Carnegie Mellon researchers have provided this 2016 insight based on a survey -- accompanying their engineering project to 'solve' the problem. Coined to describe those special projects run by professors and grad students who appeared to have no access to the Internet to see what others have already developed and commercialized. But they have significant grant money that has yet to run out.


    Groundhog Day.  Seems like we’ve heard this one before. In the CMU project, they’re working on "active fall-prevention sensors for both senior care facilities and private homes that can determine both who is in danger and where they are… even if they are not wearing their Life Alert®." To these two guys, that pendant is like Kleenex – it’s the only one they know, no search performed to see if that brand is, uh, a good choice. But wait, have senior care facilities expressed interest or willingness to upgrade/build with active fall-prevention sensors? Well, maybe not just yet.


    If you research it, the media will come.  How unique:  promote a survey that confirms that people worry about their parents falling. Maybe the media will seize upon that insight. See how the NY Times hoped in 2001 that