Ð’ Інституті Патона виявили незаконну фабрику Bitcoin        
На одному з об'єктів Інституту електрозварювання ім. Патона СБУ і Нацполіція виявили незаконну фабрику Bitcoin
          Howard Marks, who has called past market bubbles, says 'I don't understand what's behind bitcoin'        
Bitcoin has gotten a lot of fanfare lately, but not from Howard Marks, a legendary value investor on Wall Street.
          Comment on The Crypto stock that’s better than GBTC by CoinSpeak        
OA was a bull on MGTI months ago. I'm not sure if he still follows it. I am writing as a survivor of the dotcom boom/bust. I think crypto will be bigger than the Internet in terms of financial transactions. So I don't argue with people who say Crypto is a bubble. Look at the youtube videos. The hysteria is real. But if/when the bubble pops the survivors will rise from the ashes stronger than ever. Crypto will survive a bubble and become ubiquitous. I say that with 100% certainty. I believe Bitcoin will survive and boom, even if it manages to shoot itself in the foot and lose market dominance.
          Comment on Rally caps on: Bitcoin correction is OVER by CoinSpeak        
I buy and hold Bitcoin. Most crypto traders have a goal to increase the stash of their preferred crypto. I trade alt coins to increase my Bitcoin stash. For that I use bittrex.com. Stay away from Poloniex.com there too many rumors about insolvency. I use 1broker.com to trade CFDs denominated in Bitcoin. I also have a traditional brokerage account which I often forget to check. Mostly I've been trading in and out of GBTC and building a position in MGTI...which is up over 20% today.
          Comment on Rally caps on: Bitcoin correction is OVER by velth        
Do you trade Bitcoin thru a trading platform, or a wallet?
          Comment on Bitcoin downside target: $1400 by CoinSpeak        
Zero.
          U.S. Department of Justice Indicts Russian National and Bitcoin Exchange        

          Comments: Акции, распродажи, купоны на 07.08-13.08.2017        
Colorful iGame 1050Ti Graphics Card
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          Comment on BTCCNY Price Technical Analysis: Traders Wary of Gov’t Bitcoin Regulation by Vlad Ilnitskiy        
https://coinidol.com/russian-tax-service-to-treat-bitcoin-as-a-foreign-currency/ Russian Tax Service To Treat Bitcoin As A Foreign Currency
          In Search of The First Transaction        
At the height of an eventful week – Cloud and IoT developments, Open Source Think Tank,  Linux Foundation Summit – I learned about the fate of my fellow alumnus, an upperclassman as it were, the brilliant open source developer and crypto genius known for the first transaction on Bitcoin. Hal Finney is a Caltech graduate who went […]
          Trade Bitcoin Online        
Understand how you can cash in on the rise of Bitcoin, with a regulated online broker or a Bitcoin exchange.
          How to Invest in Bitcoin        
Invest in Bitcoin in minutes and without commission with one of the following brokers.
          Bitcoin Online Brokers        
Looking for ways to spend your Bitcoins? Compare online brokers and trading sites that accept Bitcoins.
          FinTech - CBOE plans to launch bitcoin futures, announces agreement with Winklevoss brothers' digital currency exchange, A second version of bitcoin has launched. Could it threaten the original?, From AI (Alternative Investments) to AI (Artificial Intelligence)        
CBOE plans to launch bitcoin futures, announces agreement with Winklevoss brothers' digital currency exchange From CNBC.com: The Chicago Board Options Exchange, the largest U.S. options exchange, is planning to launch its own bitcoin derivatives trading products by early next year. Pending review f...
Article Link
          IRS Clarifies Tax Treatment of Bitcoins        
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           RT @yo9fah Over 9 million PCs infected - ZeroAccess botnet uncovered http://tco/N8jBTvws -- mainly in USA, mining BitCoins        
2012-09-20 08:08:36 - sambowne : RT @yo9fah Over 9 million PCs infected - ZeroAccess botnet uncovered http://tco/N8jBTvws -- mainly in USA, mining BitCoins
          ä½œè€…:cndx        
指正几点错误,希望知错能改正。【1】常见的一对二交易才226Byte,只要付0.2mBTC就可以在甚至繁忙时都能及时确认,并非作者说的0.5mBTC了。【2】这个1MB限制是由中本聪亲自设定的,并且其没有任何在代码层面写入未来扩容的代码,只是在社区讨论,讨论也说过希望尽量保持区块较小的愿望。(见http://8btc.com/thread-31250-1-1.html )【3】Core为了根本上解决比特币“又贵又难用”,开发了SW隔离验证+LN闪电网络。能实现秒速确认,和极低手续费,能达数万笔/s的处理能力。但是硬扩派以改动较大为由阻碍升级,而是推有很打分裂币圈风险,和节点中心化风险的BU硬分叉。【4】Mike发布Bitcoin XT,后来知道XT失败后Mike说什么吗?他说比特币失败,对于一个说比特币失败的人,他的方案会值得信吗?【5】BU开发者不遵守BIP开发章程是事实,到现在了连基础的BIP9升级规范都没有遵守没有自己的版本号,激活门槛也不给出,理论有51%就激活的可能,另外EB不设限给了矿工过大的权力。【6】Circle并未离开,其实区块链就是比特币是币圈的一部分的。等未来SW+LN后,秒速确认超低手续费了,其还会直接用比特币。
          ä½œè€…:BW.COM        
Circle为比特币及blockchain做了很多努力,进行了很多工作。Bitcoin is not blockchain, blockchain is not bitcoin.
          Â«Ð”октор Веб»: обзор вирусной активности в июле 2017 года        

31 июля 2017 года

Главное

Как правило, в середине лета редко происходят значительные события в сфере информационной безопасности, однако нынешний июль стал исключением из этого правила. В начале месяца специалисты компании «Доктор Веб» обнаружили в приложении для организации электронного документооборота M.E.Doc полноценный бэкдор. Чуть позже вирусные аналитики установили источник распространения троянца BackDoor.Dande, воровавшего информацию о закупках медикаментов у фармацевтических компаний. В конце месяца был установлен факт компрометации портала государственных услуг Российской Федерации (gosuslugi.ru). Также в июле было выявлено несколько опасных вредоносных программ для мобильной платформы Android.

ГЛАВНЫЕ ТЕНДЕНЦИИ ИЮЛЯ

  • Обнаружение бэкдора в программе M.E.Doc
  • Выявление источника распространения бэкдора Dande
  • Компрометация портала госуслуг

Угроза месяца

Популярное на территории Украины приложение для организации электронного документооборота M.E.Doc было разработано компанией Intellect Service. В одном из компонентов этого приложения, ZvitPublishedObjects.Server.MeCom, вирусные аналитики «Доктор Веб» обнаружили запись, соответствующую характерному ключу системного реестра Windows: HKCU\SOFTWARE\WC.

#drweb

Этот же ключ реестра использовал в своей работе троянец-шифровальщик Trojan.Encoder.12703. Вирусные аналитики исследовали файл журнала антивируса Dr.Web, полученного с компьютера одного из наших клиентов, и установили, что этот энкодер был запущен на пострадавшей машине приложением ProgramData\Medoc\Medoc\ezvit.exe, которое является компонентом программы M.E.Doc:

#drweb

Дальнейшее исследование программы показало, что в одной из ее библиотек — ZvitPublishedObjects.dll — содержится бэкдор, который может выполнять следующие функции:

  • сбор данных для доступа к почтовым серверам;
  • выполнение произвольных команд в инфицированной системе;
  • загрузка на зараженный компьютер произвольных файлов;
  • загрузка, сохранение и запуск любых исполняемых файлов;
  • выгрузка произвольных файлов на удаленный сервер.

Кроме того, модуль обновления M.E.Doc позволяет запускать полезную нагрузку при помощи утилиты rundll32.exe с параметром #1 — именно так на инфицированных компьютерах и был запущен Trojan.Encoder.12544. Подробнее о расследовании «Доктор Веб» читайте в опубликованной на нашем сайте статье.

Статистика

По данным статистики Антивируса Dr.Web

#drweb

  • Trojan.DownLoader
    Семейство троянцев, предназначенных для загрузки на атакуемый компьютер других вредоносных приложений.
  • Trojan.InstallCore
    Семейство установщиков нежелательных и вредоносных приложений.
  • Trojan.BtcMine
    Семейство вредоносных программ, которые втайне от пользователя применяют вычислительные ресурсы зараженного компьютера для добычи (майнинга) различных криптовалют – например, Bitcoin.

По данным серверов статистики «Доктор Веб»

#drweb

  • JS.DownLoader
    Семейство вредоносных сценариев, написанных на языке JavaScript. Загружают и устанавливают на компьютер другие вредоносные программы.
  • JS.Inject.3
    Семейство вредоносных сценариев, написанных на языке JavaScript. Встраивают вредоносный скрипт в HTML-код веб-страниц.
  • Trojan.InstallCore
    Семейство установщиков нежелательных и вредоносных приложений.
  • Trojan.DownLoader
    Семейство троянцев, предназначенных для загрузки на атакуемый компьютер других вредоносных приложений.
  • Trojan.PWS.Stealer
    Семейство троянцев, предназначенных для хищения на инфицированном компьютере паролей и другой конфиденциальной информации.

Статистика вредоносных программ в почтовом трафике

#drweb

  • JS.DownLoader
    Семейство вредоносных сценариев, написанных на языке JavaScript. Загружают и устанавливают на компьютер другие вредоносные программы.
  • JS.Inject.3
    Семейство вредоносных сценариев, написанных на языке JavaScript. Встраивают вредоносный скрипт в HTML-код веб-страниц.
  • Trojan.PWS.Stealer
    Семейство троянцев, предназначенных для хищения на инфицированном компьютере паролей и другой конфиденциальной информации.
  • Trojan.Encoder.6218
    Представитель семейства троянцев-вымогателей, шифрующих файлы на компьютере и требующих от жертвы выкуп за расшифровку.
  • Trojan.InstallCore
    Семейство установщиков нежелательных и вредоносных приложений.

По данным бота Dr.Web для Telegram

#drweb

  • Android.Locker.139.origin
    Представитель семейства Android-троянцев, предназначенных для вымогательства. Они показывают навязчивое сообщение якобы о нарушении закона и о последовавшей в связи с этим блокировке мобильного устройства, для снятия которой пользователю предлагается заплатить определенную сумму.
  • EICAR Test File
    Специальный текстовый файл, предназначенный для тестирования работоспособности антивирусов. Все антивирусные программы при обнаружении такого файла должны реагировать на него в точности таким же образом, как в случае выявления какой-либо реальной компьютерной угрозы.
  • Joke.Locker.1.origin
    Программа-шутка для ОС Android, блокирующая экран мобильного устройства и выводящая на него изображение «синего экрана смерти» ОС Windows (BSOD, Blue Screen of Death).
  • Android.SmsSend.20784
    Представитель семейства вредоносных программ, предназначенных для отправки СМС-сообщений с повышенной тарификацией и подписки пользователей на различные платные контент-услуги и сервисы.
  • Trojan.PWS.Stealer
    Семейство троянцев, предназначенных для хищения на инфицированном компьютере паролей и другой конфиденциальной информации.

Шифровальщики

#drweb

В июле в службу технической поддержки компании «Доктор Веб» чаще всего обращались пользователи, пострадавшие от следующих модификаций троянцев-шифровальщиков:

Опасные сайты

В течение июля 2017 года в базу нерекомендуемых и вредоносных сайтов было добавлено 327 295 интернет-адресов.

Июнь 2017Июль 2017Динамика
+ 229 381+ 327 295+ 42,6%

В середине июля потенциально опасным для пользователей неожиданно стал портал государственных услуг Российской Федерации (gosuslugi.ru), на котором вирусные аналитики компании «Доктор Веб» обнаружили потенциально вредоносный код. Этот код заставлял браузер любого посетителя сайта незаметно связываться с одним из не менее 15 доменных адресов, зарегистрированных на неизвестное частное лицо, как минимум 5 из которых принадлежали нидерландским компаниям. В процессе динамической генерации страницы сайта, к которой обращается пользователь, в код разметки веб-страниц добавляется контейнер <iframe>, позволяющий загрузить или запросить любые сторонние данные у браузера пользователя. Все уязвимости сайта gosuslugi.ru были устранены администрацией ресурса спустя несколько часов после публикации новости об этом инциденте.

Другие события в сфере информационной безопасности

В 2011 году компания «Доктор Веб» сообщила о появлении троянца BackDoor.Dande, шпионящего за фармацевтическими компаниями и аптеками. Исследовав жесткий диск, предоставленный одной из пострадавших организаций, вирусные аналитики установили, что троянца скачивал и запускал в целевых системах один из компонентов приложения ePrica, которое используют руководители аптек для анализа цен на лекарства и выбора наиболее подходящих поставщиков. Этот модуль загружал с сервера «Спарго Технологии» установщик BackDoor.Dande, который и запускал бэкдор на атакуемых компьютерах. При этом указанный модуль имел цифровую подпись «Спарго».

Проведенный компанией «Доктор Веб» анализ показал, что компоненты BackDoor.Dande были встроены непосредственно в одну из ранних версий инсталлятора ePrica. Среди модулей троянца присутствует установщик бэкдора, а также компоненты для сбора информации о закупках медикаментов, которые получают необходимые сведения из баз данных аптечных программ. При этом один из них использовался для копирования информации о закупках фармацевтических препаратов из баз данных программы 1C. Важно отметить, что даже после удаления ПО ePrica бэкдор оставался в системе и продолжал шпионить за пользователями. Подробности проведенного специалистами «Доктор Веб» исследования ПО ePrica изложены в опубликованной на нашем сайте статье.

Вредоносное и нежелательное ПО для мобильных устройств

В начале месяца специалисты компании «Доктор Веб» обнаружили троянца-загрузчика Android.DownLoader.558.origin в популярной игре BlazBlue, доступной в каталоге Google Play. Эта вредоносная программа могла незаметно скачивать и запускать непроверенные компоненты приложений. Позже вирусные аналитики исследовали опасного троянца Android.BankBot.211.origin. Он мог управлять зараженными мобильными устройств

          BITCOIN : What is it? How does this work?        
Okay, so maybe you would've been wondering from a while that what is a bitcoin that everyone has been talking about, how does this thing work and more importantly, how you can get them. So calm down peeps because you are about to know everything.


Basically, a BITCOIN is peer-to-peer payment system and digital currency introduced as open source software in 2009 by pseudonymous developer Satoshi Nakamoto.
It is a cryptocurrency, so-called because it uses cryptography for security. Users send payments by broadcasting digitally signed messages to the network. Transactions are verified, timestamped, and recorded by specialized computers into a shared public transaction history database called the block chain. The operators of these computers, known as miners, are rewarded with transaction fees and newly minted bitcoins.

Don't be surprised after knowing this but Bitcoin's exchange rates are way to high. It is damn true 1 BTC(bitcoin) has currently 952.5 USD. Isn't that super crazy. If you don't believe feel free to check the exchange rates here yourself.

That was the very basic knowledge about a bitcoin. But how does this thing work exactly ? This is the question that causes confusion. Here's a quick explanation.

Well you can watch this video for explanation of what is a bitcoin and how does this thing work or you can read the summary after the video.
Afraid of AI? Fire ants have sticky pads so they can form rafts, build towers, cross streams, & order takeout. We can CRISPR these guys to fight Skynet. (video, video, paper)

If you like this sort of Stuff then please support me on Patreon.

 

  • 222x: Bitcoin less efficient than a physical system of metal coins and paper/fabric/plastic; #1: Python use amongst Spectrum readers; 3x: time spent in apps that don't make us happy; 1 million: DigitalOcean users; 11.6 million: barrels of oil a day saved via tech and BigData; 200,000: cores on Cray super computer;$200B: games software/hardware revenue by 2021; $3K: for 50 Teraflops AMD Vega Deep Learning Box; 24.4 Gigawatts: China New Solar In First Half Of 2017; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • sidlls: I think instead there is a category error being made: that CS is an appropriate degree (on its own) to become a software engineer. It's like suggesting a BS in Physics qualifies somebody to work as an engineer building a satellite.
    • Elon Musk: AI is a fundamental existential risk for human civilization, and I don’t think people fully appreciate that
    • Mike Elgan: Thanks to machine learning, it's now possible to create a million different sensors in software using only one actual sensor -- the camera.
    • Amin Vahdat (Google): The Internet is no longer about just finding a path, any path, between a pair of servers, but actually taking advantage of the rich connectivity to deliver the highest levels of availability, the best performance, the lowest latency. Knowing this, how you would design protocols is now qualitatively shifted away from pairwise decisions to more global views.
    • naasking: You overestimate AI. Incompleteness is everywhere in CS. Overcoming these limitations is not trivial at all.
    • 451: Research believes serverless is poised to undergo a round of price cutting this year.
    • Nicholas Bloom: We found massive, massive improvement in performance—a 13% improvement in performance from people working at home
    • @CoolSWEng: "A Java new operation almost guarantees a cache miss. Get rid of them and you'll get C-like performance." - @cliff_click #jcrete
    • DarkNetMarkets: We're literally funding our own investigation. 
    • Tristan Harris: By shaping the menus we pick from, technology hijacks the way we perceive our choices and replaces them with new ones. But the closer we pay attention to the options we’re given, the more we’ll notice when they don’t actually align with our true needs.
    • xvaier: If I have one thing to tell anyone who is looking for business ideas to try out their new programming skills on, I strongly suggest taking the time to learn as much as possible about the people to whom you want to provide a solution, then recruiting one of them to help you build it, lest you become another project that solves a non-issue beautifully.
    • @sebgoa: Folks, there were schedulers before kubernetes. Let's get back down to earth quickly
    • Mark Shead: A finite state machine is a mathematical abstraction used to design algorithms. In simple terms, a state machine will read a series of inputs. When it reads an input it will switch to a different state. Each state specifies which state to switch for a given input. This sounds complicated but it is really quite simple.
    • xantrel: I started a small business that started to grow, I thought I had to migrate to AWS and increase my cost by 5xs eventually, but so far Digital Ocean with their hosted products and block storage has handled the load amazingly well.
    • danluu: when I’m asked to look at a cache related performance bug, it’s usually due to the kind of thing we just talked about: conflict misses that prevent us from using our full cache effectively6. This isn’t the only way for that to happen – bank conflicts and and false dependencies are also common problems
    • Charles Hoskinson: People say ICOs (Initial Coin Offering) are great for Ethereum because, look at the price, but it’s a ticking time-bomb. There’s an over-tokenization of things as companies are issuing tokens when the same tasks can be achieved with existing blockchains. People are blinded by fast and easy money.
    • Charles Schwab: There don't seem to be any classic bubbles near bursting at the moment—at least not among the ones most commonly referenced as potential candidates.
    • Sertac Karaman: We are finding that this new approach to programming robots, which involves thinking about hardware and algorithms jointly, is key to scaling them down.
    • Michael Elling: When do people wake up and say that we’ve moved full circle back to something that looks like the hierarchy of the old PSTN? Just like the circularity of processing, no?
    • Benedict Evans: Content and access to content was a strategic lever for technology. I’m not sure how much this is true anymore.  Music and books don’t matter much to tech anymore, and TV probably won’t matter much either. 
    • SeaChangeViaExascaleOnDown: Currently systems are still based around mostly separately packaged processor elements(CPUs, GPUs, and other) processors but there will be an evolution towards putting all these separate processors on MCMs or Silicon Interposers, with silicon interposers able to have the maximum amount of parallel traces(And added active circuitry) over any other technology.
    • BoiledCabbage: Call me naive, but am I the only one who looks at mining as one of the worst inventions for consuming energy possible?
    • Amin Vahdat (Google):  Putting it differently, a lot of software has been written to assume slow networks. That means if you make the network a lot faster, in many cases the software can’t take advantage of it because the software becomes the bottleneck.

  • Dropbox has 1.3 million lines of Go code, 500 million users, 500 petabytes of user data, 200,000 business customers, and a multi-exabyte Go storage system. Go Reliability and Durability at Dropbox. They use it for: RAT: rate limiting and throttling; HAT: memcached replacement; AFS: file system to replace global Zookeeper; Edgestore: distributed database; Bolt: for messaging; DBmanager: for automation and monitoring of Dropbox’s 6,000+ databases; “Jetstream”, “Telescope”, block routing, and many more. The good: Go is productive, easy to write and consume services, good standard library, good debugging tools. The less good: dealing with race conditions.

  • Professor Jordi Puig-Suari talks about the invention of CubeSat on embedded.fm. 195: A BUNCH OF SPUTNIKS. Fascinating story of how thinking different created a new satellite industry. The project wasn't on anyone's technology roadmap, nobody knew they needed it, it just happened. A bunch of really bright students, in a highly constrained environment, didn't have enough resources to do anything interesting, so they couldn't build spacecraft conventionally. Not knowing what you're doing is an advantage in highly innovative environments. The students took more risk and eliminated redundancies. One battery. One radio. Taking a risk that things can go wrong. They looked for the highest performance components they could find, these were commercial off the shelf components that when launched into space actually worked. The mainline space industry couldn't take these sort of risks. Industry started paying attention because the higher performing, lower cost components, even with the higher risk, changed the value proposition completely. You can make it up with numbers. You can launch 50 satellites for the cost of one traditional satellite. Sound familiar? Cloud computing is based on this same insight. Modern datacenters have been created on commodity parts and how low cost miniaturized parts driven by smartphones have created whole new industries. CubeSats' had a standard size, so launch vehicles could standardize also, it didn't matter where the satellites came from, they could be launched. Sound familiar? This is the modularization of the satellite launching, the same force that drives all mass commercialization. Now the same ideas are being applied to bigger and bigger spacecraft. It's now a vibrant industry. Learning happens more quickly because they get to fly more. Sound familiar? Agile, iterative software development is the dominant methodology today. 

Don't miss all that the Internet has to say on Scalability, click below and become eventually consistent with all scalability knowledge (which means this post has many more items to read so please keep on reading)...


          Stuff The Internet Says On Scalability For July 7th, 2017        

Hey, it's HighScalability time:

 

 

What's real these days? I was at Lascaux II, an exact replica of Lascaux. I was deeply, deeply moved. Was this an authentic experience? A question we'll ask often in VR I think.

If you like this sort of Stuff then please support me on Patreon.
  • $400k: cost of yearly fake news campaign; $50,000: cost to discredit a journalist; 100 Gbps: SSDP DDoS amplification attack; $5.97BN: wild guess on cost of running Facebook on AWS; 2 billion: Facebook users; 80%: Spotify backend services in production run as containers; $60B: AR market by 2021; 10.4%: AMD market share taken from Intel; 5 days: MIT drone flight time; $1 trillion: Apple iOS revenues; 35%-144%: reduction in image sizes; 10 petabytes: Ancestry.com data stored; 1 trillion: photos taken on iPhone each year; $70B: Apple App Store payout to developers; 355: pages in Internet Trends 2017 report; 14: people needed to make 500,000 tons of steel; 25%: reduced server-rendering time with Node 8; 50-70%: of messages Gmail receives are spam; 8,000: bugs found in pacemaker code; 

  • Quotable Quotes:
    • Vladimir Putin: We must take into account the plans and directions of development of the armed forces of other countries… Our responses must be based on intellectual superiority, they will be asymmetric, and less expensive.
    • @swardley: What most fail to realise is that the Chinese corporate corpus has devoured western business thinking and gone beyond it.
    • @discostu105: I am a 10X developer. Everything I do takes ten times as long as I thought.
    • DINKDINK: You grossly underestimate the hashing capacity of the bitcoin network. The hashing capacity, at time of posting, is approximately 5,000,000,000 Gigahashes/second[1]. Spot measurement of the hashing capacity of an EC2 instance is 0.4 Gigahashes/second[2]. You would need 12 BILLION EC2 instances to 51% attack the bitcoin network.[3] Using EC2 to attack the network is impractical and inefficient.
    • danielsamuels && 19eightyfour~ Machiavelli's Guide to PaaS: Keep your friends close, and your competitors hosted.
    • Paul Buchheit:  I wrote the the first version of Gmail in a day!
    • @herminghaus: If you don’t care about latency, ship a 20ft intermodal container full of 32GB micro-SD cards across the globe. It’s a terabyte per second.
    • @cstross: Okay, so now the Russian defense industry is advertising war-in-a-can (multimodal freight containerized missiles):
    • Dennett~ you don't need comprehension to achieve competence.
    • @michellebrush~ Schema are APIs. @gwenshap #qconnyc
    • Stacy Mitchell: Amazon sells more clothing, electronics, toys, and books than any other company. Last year, Amazon captured nearly $1 of every $2 Americans spent online. As recently as 2015, most people looking to buy something online started at a search engine. Today, a majority go straight to Amazon.
    • Xcelerate: I have noticed that Azure does have a few powerful features that AWS and GCP lack, most notably InfiniBand (fast interconnects), which I have needed on more than one occasion for HPC tasks. In fact, 4x16 core instances on Azure are currently faster at performing molecular dynamics simulations than 1x"64 core" instance on GCP. But the cost is extremely high, and I still haven't found a good cloud platform for short, high intensity HPC tasks.
    • jjeaff: I took about 5 sites from a $50 a month shared cPanel plan that included a few WordPress blogs and some custom sites and put them on a $3 a month scaleway instance and haven't had a bit of trouble.
    • @discordianfish: GCP's Pub/Sub is really priced by GB? And 10GB/free/month? What's the catch?
    • Amazon: This moves beyond the current paradigm of typing search keywords in a box and navigating a website. Instead, discovery should be like talking with a friend who knows you, knows what you like, works with you at every step, and anticipates your needs. This is a vision where intelligence is everywhere. Every interaction should reflect who you are and what you like, and help you find what other people like you have already discovered. 
    • @CloudifySource: Lambda is always 100% busy - @adrianco #awasummit #telaviv #serverless
    • @codinghorror: Funny how Android sites have internalized this "only multi core scores now matter" narrative with 1/2 the CPU speed of iOS hardware
    • @sheeshee: deleted all home directories because no separation of "dev" & "production". almost ran a billion euro site into the ground with a bad loop.
    • We have quotes the likes of which even God has never seen! Please click through to ride all of them.

  • The Not Hotdog app on Silicon Valley may be a bit silly, but the story of how they built the real app is one of the best how-tos on building a machine learning app you'll ever read. How HBO’s Silicon Valley built “Not Hotdog” with mobile TensorFlow, Keras & React Native. The initial app was built in a weekend using Google Cloud Platform’s Vision API, and React Native. The final version took months of refinement. â€ŠGoogle Cloud’s Vision API was dropped because its accuracy in recognizing hotdogs was only so-so; it was slow because of the network hit; it cost too much. They ended up using Keras, a deep learning library that provides nicer, easier-to-use abstractions on top of TensorFlow. They used on SqueezeNet due to its explicit positioning as a solution for embedded deep learning. SqueezeNet used only 1.25 million parameters which made training much faster and reduced resource usage on the device. What would they change? timanglade: Honestly I think the biggest gains would be to go back to a beefier, pre-trained architecture like Inception, and see if I can quantize it to a size that’s manageable, especially if paired with CoreML on device. You’d get the accuracy that comes from big models, but in a package that runs well on mobile. And this is really cool: The last production trick we used was to leverage CodePush and Apple’s relatively permissive terms of service, to live-inject new versions of our neural networks after submission to the app store. 

  • And the winner is: all of us. Serverless Hosting Comparison: Lambda: Unicorn: $20,830.83. Heavy: $120.16. Medium: $4.55. Light: $0.00; Azure Functions: Unicorn: $19,993.60. Heavy: $115.40. Moderate: $3.60. Light: $0.00; Cloud Functions: Unicorn: $23,321.20. Heavy: $138.95. Moderate: $9.76. Light: $0.00; OpenWhisk: Unicorn: $21,243.20. Heavy: $120.70. Medium: $3.83. Light: $0.00; Fission.io: depends on the cost of running your managed Kubernetes cloud. 

  • Minds are algorithms made physical. Seeds May Use Tiny “Brains” to Decide When to Germinate: The seed has two hormones: abscisic acid (ABA), which sends the signal to stay dormant, and gibberellin (GA), which initiates germination. The push and pull between those two hormones helps the seed determine just the right time to start growing...According to Ghose, some 3,000 to 4,000 cells make up the Arabidopsis seeds...It turned out that the hormones clustered in two sections of cells near the tip of the seed—a region the researchers propose make up the “brain.” The two clumps of cells produce the hormones which they send as signals between each other. When ABA, produced by one clump, is the dominate hormone in this decision center, the seed stays dormant. But as GA increases, the “brain” begins telling the seed it’s time to sprout...This splitting of the command center helps the seed make more accurate decisions.

Don't miss all that the Internet has to say on Scalability, click below and become eventually consistent with all scalability knowledge (which means this post has many more items to read so please keep on reading)...


          Å to su bitcoin, blockchain i kriptovaluta?        
Zamislite novac iza kojeg ne stoje banke, složene i skupe institucije koje njime upravljaju. Novac koji je u cijelom svijetu prisutan, svuda...
          The Bitcoin fork        
If you're interested in crypto-currencies, then maybe you've heard about this. If not, then maybe you want to watch this video to learn how a decentralized (=no government monopoly power) currency evolves.



This site is tracking the fork(s), which are set to occur in the next few days and months (depending on the definition).

Here, btw, is a very entertaining site that will explain Ethereum (another crypto currency) according to whether you're a scammer, nerd, artist, etc.

          Links of interest        
  1. OMICS (a fraudulent open access journal) now has a journal for climate change deniers whose logic includes "the ‘greenhouse theory’ cannot be correct because real greenhouses have glass roofs and the atmosphere does not."
  2. Looking for online videos to learn economics? Here. (Oh, and don't forget that economics is not a science!)
  3. My "thoughts on sustainable solutions" (PDF slides and 58 min MP3)
  4. Water managers are wasting money and/or harming the environment by taking too much water in California, where "water users appeared to more easily achieve the water use reductions requested by utilities during more recent droughts" and Orange Country (California) water managers consistently over-estimate demand [pdf]
  5. Circle, a blockchain-based FinTech company is offering zero cost, "bank rate" multi-currency transfers. I signed up but have not tried it yet.
  6. Bitcoin Energy Consumption Index, (premature) Ethereum Obituaries and WTF is Ethereum? (A good primer)
  7. "Writing advice to my students that would also have been good sex advice for my high school boyfriends"
  8. Not-the-Onion: Bic pens... for her. Read the reviews!
  9. Mumbai was built on a wetlandsthe origin of London's sewers and how Amsterdam invented bike sharing
  10. "Water Security and Climate Change: The Need for Adaptive Governance"
  11. How bureaucracy fails (UK edition)
H/T to TL

          Sally Satel on Organ Donation        

kidney.jpg Sally Satel, psychiatrist and resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges of increasing the supply of donated organs for transplantation and ways that public policy might increase the supply. Satel, who has received two kidney donations, suggests a federal tax credit as a way to increase the supply of organs while saving the federal government money. She also discusses the ethical issues surrounding various forms of compensation for organ donors.

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Readings and Links related to this podcast episode

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This week's guest: This week's focus: Additional ideas and people mentioned in this podcast episode: A few more readings and background resources: A few more EconTalk podcast episodes:

Highlights

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0:33

Intro. [Recording date: July 6, 2017.]

Russ Roberts: Sally Satel recently wrote an article with Alan Viard entitled "The Kindest (Tax) Cut: A Federal Tax Credit for Organ Donations," and that's going to be our topic for today.... So, you bring a special perspective to kidney donations. Talk about your personal story.

Sally Satel: Yeah. I got a kidney in 2006; and then I got another kidney a year ago, almost a year ago today. And, when I got my first one it was sort of a surprise. A lot of people who know that they're going to need a kidney--well, by definition, they know that they're going to need a kidney. What I meant is that they have certain illnesses--they are either diabetic, or they've got lupus, severe hypertension that's been poorly managed for a while, high blood pressure. People know they are at risk for this, for kidney failure. But my case was sort of a surprise. I just went to the doctor for a regular checkup. This is the part of the story that scares everyone, because I felt completely fine. And during a routine blood draw, found out that I had--well, that I had kidney failure. Which is rather easy to diagnose. It's a test called a creatinine level. But when you go for a regular blood draw, a routine blood draw, that's one of the indexes they measure. So, they tested it again, and that was the same. So, the clock was ticking for me, because I knew from my medical training that if you have kidney failure, you need a new kidney, or you will languish on dialysis for years. And no matter how long you are on dialysis, your life will be prematurely shortened. I mean, people have lived for 20 years, even a little longer, on dialysis. Some people tolerate it better than others. That's a process where your blood is cleansed of toxins about 3 times a week for about 4 hours at a time; you go to a clinic. Most people feel very debilitated by it. The average person on dialysis can't hold a job. But some do. And, some people--it isn't as psychologically devastating to some folks. But others find it so distressing, they are actually--suicide is not that unusual. So, the idea of being tethered to that machine, while, granted, it would keep me alive. Now, if my liver had failed and I didn't get a transplant, that would be it. So, kidney dialysis does keep people alive for awhile. But it just seemed like a really, really half a life. So, I knew I needed a kidney, but I didn't know exactly when I would need dialysis. So, as I said, the clock started ticking. And it turned out I had a good year before the function got to the point where I really was becoming physically debilitated. But it was very hard finding a donor. And that's what kind of galvanized me, this whole issue of the shortage. But, just in terms of finding a donor, as I say, it was extremely difficult. It's not like every day you ask people for a body part. And I didn't have--I have a very tiny family. And, to make a long story short, none of them--I didn't feel I could ask any of them. And in fact I never really asked anyone. I would do it all differently if, heaven forbid, there is yet a third time I have to go through this--see, I'm very nice to my interns. But I would just talk about it with folks and wasn't even being coy. I just sort of thought magically, 'Oh, well some people will think of being a donor, and it will work out.' But it became pretty clear that it wasn't working out. And a lot of people actually said they would do it; and I appreciate that in that I know they wanted to be--I know they felt empathy for my situation; but in the end, basically, a lot of them got cold feet and backed out. And then you're in this terribly awkward position, because you really can't be angry. I mean it's an enormous thing to ask, and it would be incredibly presumptuous to have the expectation that they owed you anything. So, I was really getting very demoralized and about to get ready to go on dialysis. And, Virginia Postrel, who I knew, not very well, had been at a cocktail reception somewhere--this was in November of 2005--and she ran into a mutual friend and asked that friend how I was. And the friend said, 'Not so hot. She needs a kidney.' And, Virginia went--I think the next went to her computer--I remember the subject line; I still have a printout of her email--it said, 'Serious Offer.' And she said, 'So-and-so told me you needed a kidney, and if I match, I will do it.' And I think she followed up a few minutes later with another email: 'I won't back out.' And, so, she went through with it. This was March of 2006. And I'm almost as grateful to Steve, her husband, as to her, because that was one of the reasons that two of my friends, other of my friends who had seriously considered donating did not go through with it--because their spouse basically said, 'It's the kidney or a divorce.' So, you kind of underestimate how important family buy-in is, in something like this. But, you know, God bless both of them. So she did it. And clearly I got a lot smarter. And Virginia did very well and she wrote some, I think very powerful articles about the importance of donating organs. And I suspect she influenced a few people. I know an article I wrote about the whole experience back in 2007--for about 2 years afterwards, I got emails from people. It was the most gratifying thing that's ever happened to me in my life: People saying, 'I read your article and I decided to donate to a stranger.' So I feel my work is done. Anyway, so that had a happy ending. Then I took on, in addition to my various interests, at AEI (American Enterprise Institute), I also took on the interest of how to expand the organ supply.

7:53

Russ Roberts: Virginia Postrel was a guest on EconTalk, and we talked about that. It is an incredible gift, kindness, an amazing thing. I want to talk about your second donor in a second. But first I want to stick with Virginia. And you are psychiatrist--so you are somewhat, at least, if not very self-aware of the emotional component to this. How did that, the receiving of that organ, affect you? You made a joke, 'I got a lot smarter.' I think that was an allusion to the fact that you have Virginia Postrel's kidney.

Sally Satel: Yes--

Russ Roberts: But how did it affect you psychologically? And how do you think it affected her? And have you and she talked about it?

Sally Satel: Oh, of course. You're certainly not the first person to ask me that. But I always find that a curious question. Some people have actually said, 'Do you still see Virginia?' My goodness! Yes, I see Virginia. And she's remained magnificent. You know, as she wrote about it, and as she acted the entire time--you know, we were planning to do this, because there's quite a bit of a workup medically, and to some extent psychologically for the donor--which is done by the medical center; and you know, and rightly so. So, she acted the whole time like, 'Well, let's just get this thing over.' And, in fact--and she's written about it. She said, her attitude--these are her words: I was 'very instrumental about it.' You know: 'I had something she needed, and I knew she had no one else to give it to her, and clearly, it truly was a life and death, or at least a quality-of-life-and-death solution'--I mean, 'situation.' And she did. And I mean, while, on the one hand of course I'm just speechless with gratitude--and I would actually, occasionally feel tearful in that first year, and a few years after with what I think of what she did for me. But, it was sort of [?]--I kind of shared her sense and hoped that I would feel the same way if the tables were turned and someone I knew needed one. But, you know, the sense of--I didn't feel--of course, I kid when I said my IQ went up: I could only wish. But, people do talk about--they kind of romanticize the whole process. I felt, and especially with hearts, as you can imagine--heart transplants--but they actually feel like a sort of piece of the person, almost spiritually, you know, inside them, or they feel a little change in their personality. And both of us were sort of, 'You know, I think, listen, we just exchanged organs'--or rather, she gave me one. And again, thank God. I wish I were wealthy: I would endow a wing wherever she wanted. But, I just feel like she's--of course, I mean a bond with her that I'm sure you don't feel with even your closest friend. It has a quality that's different and almost primitive in some way. But in a charming way.

10:59

Russ Roberts: But that kidney didn't work out completely.

Sally Satel: Yeah. It should have lasted about 15 to 20 years. Living kidneys last about 15 to 20 years. And ones you get from deceased people, cadaver kidneys, about 10 to 12. So, hers should have lasted longer. Also, because I wasn't on dialysis first. And that tends to also detract from the longevity of the kidney of like, a deceased or living kidney, if you've already been on dialysis for quite a while. So, I was an ideal candidate to have her kidney last, you know, quite a while. But, just make a long story short: I ended up getting pneumonia--possibly from the immunosuppressant--because you know you have to be on immunosuppressive drugs forever, so that your own immune system doesn't attack the new organ. But anyway, so I got a fairly serious pneumonia. So, then, it becomes very difficult, because in order to fight off the pneumonia, your immune system needs to be unleashed. But if it's unleashed, it's also going to attack the kidney. So it's a very delicate balance. Which I lost. Although, again, it was a gradual matter. It took about 3 years for Virginia's kidney to really, you know, for all the mileage, basically to run out. And so I knew about 2 years even before, it was probably going to fail completely, that I needed to start looking for another one.

Russ Roberts: So that's rather incredible; but I just have to ask a medical question first. So, your body, 8 or 9 years after getting this kidney--which looked something quite similar to your original kidney that you were born with. It's a kidney. It's not a repurposed Lego toy or a repurposed liver: It's a kidney. And 8 or 10 years later, your body still is angry at it and would reject it if you were not on immunosuppressant drugs?

Sally Satel: Oh, yeah.

Russ Roberts: That's so interesting to me. I didn't realize that.

Sally Satel: Oh, yes. That's true of all organs, and all transplants. And some organs are--some organs are--I think the word is 'immunogenic' than others. Which--kidneys are, bone marrow is, actually livers are--any organ will be rejected if there is no immunosuppression. But apparently people who have liver transplants need to take fewer--a smaller dose--of immunosuppressants. For some reason it's more resistant to rejection.

Russ Roberts: What's the rejection --what happens? What would have happened if you didn't take immunosuppression drugs, say, a few years after?

Sally Satel: Well, in two weeks, if you stop--if you stop taking immunosuppressant drugs completely, then within two weeks, 2-4 weeks, your organ just starts to fail. So, your complete metabolic milieu just goes out of balance. And if your kidney shuts down, basically--you don't, there's no way for fluid to leave your body. So, at its worst, you know, it would back up into your lungs and impede breathing. Although, by the time it gets to that part, you've been, such metabolic derangement[?] you are already somewhat delusional, or delirious, I should say. But, yeah, it happens. You know, people stop dialysis, for example, which is effectively the same thing: that's your external kidney, you could argue.

Russ Roberts: Right. Sure.

Sally Satel: And within about 2 weeks, if you have zero kidney function--some people always have a little residual kidney function--but if you truly have none, few people will last more than about a month. And that's called uremic poisoning--just a quaint term for it.

Russ Roberts: But you got a second kidney, from--this was a stranger?

Sally Satel: No. No. This is another earthbound saint. This woman is named Kim Hendrickson. And she was a kind of a witness to all this trauma during, before I met--well, as I said, I knew Virginia slightly, but before Virginia agreed to do this for me back in 2005. And Kim was a research assistant for Michael Greva [? Michael Greve?--Econlib Ed.]--I'm sure many folks probably know. He's a Constitutional lawyer who was a scholar who was at AEI at the time. And she was his assistant, and my friend. And she saw all this happening. And she thought: 'Wow, if you need another one, I'm keeping mine warm.' At the time, she couldn't do it because she was--just got married, wanted to have children; and understandably wanted to have her kids first, before she subjected herself to--it's a fairly small risk--but, you know, didn't want to complicate things for her future family. I understand completely. Also, at the time, she was--well, she still is--Blood Type B. And, at the time, you had to have the same Blood Type as your donor. But again, the science of immunology has made such progress that now you can get a kidney from a donor who doesn't even have your blood type. And, you do a little more preparation than last time. So, I had to go into the hospital a few days earlier, and then, what is called plasmapheresis: but basically they take out--they filter out some of the cells that would otherwise attack the new organ at the--right when it's introduced. And so, they were able to do that. And her kidney is working fine; and she did it; and that time around, the stress level was next to zero. Because, what made the experience of the transplant so difficult was not the surgery. You know, to tell you the truth, it's over. Right? I left the hospital in 5 days, 6 days. And I'm not that stoic, but actually all I needed was Tylenol. Not that it didn't hurt--but I mean--and then you recover. The scary parts are whether it's going to be rejected--in other words, whether your immune system will still overpower the efforts to suppress it; or whether you get an infection--because, again, you are immuno-suppressed, and they really do industrial strength immunosuppression at the time of the surgery. And that makes you very prone to infection--you are not supposed to go on a train or a crowded place or a plane for about 6 months. And I actually did get an infection and I had to go back, but only for 4 days; and the antibiotics were incredibly effective. And then I came home. And that was that. So, again, the difficult part, for me, was finding that donor; and Kim took that anxiety, just completely removed it. So, I'm so grateful.

18:21

Russ Roberts: Let's talk about the policy implications, or policy environment--which to review, which people have forgotten from our past episodes on this, which I'll put a link up to. So, let's say you were talking to me when you needed that second kidney and I'd said, 'You know, Sally, you are a nice person, but this is just a real hardship for me. But I'd do it $10,000.' Now, that's not a legal transaction, right? I cannot sell you my kidney. Can I give--I can donate a kidney to a stranger--and evidently I can donate a kidney to a particular stranger. So, there's a waiting list right now that's frighteningly long of people who are on dialysis who would like a kidney. They get one when someone just donates to the list. But Kim didn't donate to the list. She donated to you. Explain how that worked.

Sally Satel: Sure. So, among living donation--and then we'll get to deceased donation--but among living donation, which accounted for--I have the numbers here somewhere--but which accounted for a little under--well, there were 18,000 kidney transplants last year, and about 5600 of them came from living people. The remainder came from, obviously from deceased; but not 18,000-5600, because you can get more than one kidney--

Russ Roberts: 18,000, because you can get two from a--

Sally Satel: Yeah. In any case, a living donor either comes from a friend or a relative. And that's the typical scenario. There are some amazing souls, called good-Samaritan donors, who just listen to EconTalk and think, 'Wow, the shortage is just terrible.' Twelve people every day die because nobody is able to give them a kidney, or they could not survive the list--which now has 98,000 people on it. So, someone listens to this, goes to a GW (?) and says, 'I just want to be an anonymous kidney donor.' So, that's called Nondirected Donation. When someone gives to someone they know, a friend or a relative, that's Directed. Another form of Directed could be--and I don't imagine this happens very much, is, if I heard that your uncle needed a kidney, and I really just didn't want to deal with it--I just wanted to give him the kidney, and I could just literally go to the hospital and say, 'Please give my kidney to Russ's uncle.' But I think that's more common in the Deceased scenario, where your neighbor is on dialysis, and heaven forbid your kid is in a terrible accident and ultimately dies and you could say, 'Please give my son's kidney to Russ's uncle.' And, so that would be a Directed Deceased. But most Deceased kidneys, which come from people who are mainly brain dead, although there are some other mechanisms, but it's mainly brain dead individuals, those kidneys, right, go to the next person on the list, which pretty much is a first-come, first-serve as far as the kidney queue.

Russ Roberts: 98,000 people are on the list--

Sally Satel: Oh, Russ, it went down--

Russ Roberts: and 18,000 are available. So, that means there's 80,000 disappointed people who are going to have to wait till next year. And some of them of course don't make it. They die.

22:11

Russ Roberts: So, the first question--I'm sure someone's asked you this. It's not a comfortable question. I think it comes to mind. It's not my way of looking at the world; but there are people who look at the world this way. They would say, 'You had no right to two kidneys when there were 98,000 people on that list. You should have donated Kim's kidney--you should have asked Kim to give to the next person on that waiting list.' What's your response to that?

Sally Satel: If somebody said that to me, I would ask them--

Russ Roberts: Sally, I'm really glad you are here. Right?

Sally Satel: Thanks.

Russ Roberts: I don't know your work as well as I could or should. But, I'm glad you are alive. But it's an interesting question of, when there's a shortage like this, of who should get this precious thing. And--

Sally Satel: Yeah. Right. Right. Well, there are two answers to that. And I would truly ask the person who asked me that question: Why don't they consider donating? My other question to them is, would you please join our effort to change, frankly, the law--the ban--against rewarding people who would like to save someone's life? Let's be able to do that.

Russ Roberts: I mean, my view is: Kim is allowed to give her kidney to whoever she wants, and if it happens to be you, that's her choice. So, I have no problem with it. But I am sure there are many people who don't think she should have that choice, and who would resent or judge--that's the system for that aspect of it.

Sally Satel: Yeah. If they did though, the reality is, Kim would say, 'Well, tough. Now, I'm keeping it.'

Russ Roberts: Right.

23:48

Russ Roberts: The other question I had, and I don't know if you know about this, so you can certainly say you don't know. But, my understanding is that if you are a person of means and you don't want to wait on that list, you can go to certain countries in the world. We talked about--I think it's Iran--is it Iran that has--?

Sally Satel: Iran, but you couldn't go there. But, yes. This is a--

Russ Roberts: This is a separate issue. But a person could; or they could go somewhere else, where an Iranian kidney could be transferred to you, or it could be Turkey. Who knows where. But I would think that, given how valuable this is, you'd think it would be difficult to keep people from, stopping people from making the transaction. I guess the barrier is the medical system, because if I say to you--well, I don't know why. But let's say it this way. You come to me. I'm at the cocktail party. I hear you need a kidney. And I say to you, 'You know, Sally, I'd really like to give you a kidney, but it seems to me that it's a big pain--I was going to say in the neck--but a big pain in the side. I don't want to give it up. But, you know, if you made it worth my while, I think we could work something out.' And so, I quote, direct my kidney to you, but then you buy me a Ferrari six months afterwards--is anybody keeping an eye on that? I hope they're not; but--

Sally Satel: Nah. I don't think they are. And I'm sure this kind of thing goes on. And I would be happy to engage in that myself, if, you know, if that happened, and it was someone I could trust. Because you really do--it's uncomfortable. Well, let me back up. I didn't talk about MatchingDonors.com, which is a website, kind of like a Jdate thing except it's Kdate--you are looking for someone to give you a kidney. And it's totally legal. You can go on it right now, MatchingDonors.com, and it is, again, no money is exchanged; and there's a big warning sign that it's illegal to exchange any money. But that's a mechanism that I did try at first, before the guy backed out. And that's when Virginia came along. But that's relevant to what you just asked me, because there are people on that website who are looking for green cards--I mean, they are looking for something, in exchange. And, I've also gotten a lot of letters from people who say, 'I wish this was during the Recession.' I got so many letters from people saying, 'I wish I could sell my kidney, and get out of foreclosure'--or, one woman had ICU (Intensive Care Unit) bills to pay; another man lost his business. And every one of those letters--every person said, 'And I would be saving someone.' So, I grant you, even if they didn't have that, even if there wasn't that humane dimension to it, I still think it would be legitimate for people to be able to be rewarded for saving someone's life. But, the fact is that both the financial and the humanitarian dimensions intermingle. All the people who wrote to me--it was really kind of moving, and you wish they could have been able to do that.

Russ Roberts: Yeah. I often emphasize--I think it's a really important point--that money certainly motivates people; it's not the only thing that motivates people. There are many, many, many intrinsic rewards that we receive, or punishments for the things that we do. And financial incentives, both positive and negative are not the only things that motivate us. They can motivate us, though. And they can certainly co-exist with those other motives. So, certainly if I sold you a kidney for $25,000, or a new car, or whatever it was, I hope I'd still also, in addition to that, the satisfaction of knowing that a person whose health was impaired was now healthy and had a better chance of living a good and healthy life. So, I think that's a really important point. So, I have--in theory; maybe we'll get to this in a little bit--but I have in theory no problem with a market for kidneys where people buy and sell. I assume they would also get the satisfaction from helping people, not just the money. I don't see any reason why those things are exclusive, and I think it's a terrible mistake to think that they are.

28:13

Russ Roberts: Now let's move to your proposal. You have suggested in this article that the Federal government incentivize kidney donors with a tax credit. So, explain how that might work.

Sally Satel: A tax credit would just be one option. And I'll locate it in a larger context, and then I'll tell you what our plan was. But, the general idea--and, I think people have been talking about this since--I once found a paper from 1968. The first kidney transplant was in 1953. And soon, within a decade, people already realized that there was going to be a shortage, even though we officially didn't set up The List until 1984 in this country. But the idea is--well, think about, I guess, first, what you don't want to happen. You don't want someone to rush into this kind of thing and then regret it. Now, maybe you are going to say, 'Well, that happens all the time in human transactions.' And that's probably true. But in this case, if you were to design an ideal system--this is a transaction, kind of unlike other things. There are some analogies and we could talk about that. But, it's a momentous kind of engagement for a person to donate. So, you want to make sure they are not rushing into something that they regret. And so, this is why a free market, a classic free market, is not something that has ever seriously been considered, in terms of proposals. So, the general idea is that, there is a third party--and it could be the government; it could be a government-appointed charity; or even this could be at the state level--that is the provider of the benefit. And the benefit is not immediate cash. Because, again, you want to prevent a scenario where a desperately poor person is rushing to do this and then going to regret it. So, you don't offer what desperately poor people want, which is immediate cash. So, the kinds of rewards that people have talked about are [?] tax credits; or, a contribution to someone's 401k; loan forgiveness; or they could, for example, forward the benefit to a charity of their choice. But you get the idea. And, as I said, a third party would administer this. And there would probably be a waiting period built in, about 6 months to a year, again, for a cooling-off kind of aspect to it. And, the funding for this could come from dialysis, which is--payments for dialysis from Medicare, which is the largest payer of dialysis are 7%--seven percent--of the entire Medicare budget. So, it's about $90,000 a year for each person. So that could easily underwrite the value of the benefit. Which most people have pegged around $50,000, but it's just really almost an intuitive amount. So, the tax credit, if that were the route that was taken--it would be a refundable tax credit; so, people who didn't pay tax at all would be able to benefit. And they would get $5000 a year, either as a refunded benefit or off your taxes if you paid taxes. But that wouldn't kick in--we put in a lot of protections, and it's quite paternalistic--but it wouldn't kick in for a year. And then, again, it would be $5000 a year. And if it were refundable, it would be $5000 a year for 10 years. And if it were, if a person were paying taxes, I think we said they could have the $25,000 after 5 years. But the idea is to, again, dampen the magnitude of the incentive. And I can tell you why we are twisting ourselves in a pretzel to do this kind of thing. The answer, very quickly, is because of the intense opposition to this idea that has been mounted by much of the transplant community. Although, to the credit of the transplant surgeons, they are more receptive to it, and have become more receptive to it over the years.

Russ Roberts: I think they would be. They have a financial incentive. I want to interrupt, because I find it utterly fascinating. Obviously, there's a pragmatic aspect to what you are proposing, which I respect; I have no problem with it. I don't agree with the outlines of it, though. And I just want to make the case against it, and you can either say, 'Well, it's pragmatic,' or you can disagree with me, whatever you want. It's remarkable to me--first of all, of course, the doctor--the surgeon--is not expected to do this life-saving surgery, life-transforming surgery as a charitable act. No one says to the surgeon, 'We'll give you a $50,000 tax credit for every one of these you do,' or a $5000--whatever it is. We're not--I don't want you to get paid for it, of course, because that would be immoral and it might make you think that the human body is like, oh, I don't know, a slag mine, some kind of coal mine. So, we're not going to pay you directly, and we're not going to pay you right away, because I want you to do it for the good of the patient. So, obviously, the surgeon is somehow managed to live a decent life and survive being paid directly a full, semi-market--it's not a market amount, of course, because it's all messed up--but they get cash. They get what's called cash. And yet, you are going to make a poor person who wants to transform the life of their child, for example, wait 5 years to get their money. You are going to make them wait--

Sally Satel: Well, it's [?] a year, but--

Russ Roberts: No, but they are only going to get $5000 the first year.

Sally Satel: Oh, okay. All of it.

Russ Roberts: Yeah. To get all of it is going to be over a few years. And then, the idea that they might want to help their kid now: 'Too bad. We're going to make you wait 6 months so you can be sure you are not going to regret it.' Um, I find it interesting that--of course, I'm a messed up person; I'm an economist--but I find it interesting that anyone would object to this. So, the people--I'm fascinated--

Sally Satel: Welcome to [?]

Russ Roberts: What? Oh: Welcome to your world. So, who would--I mean, I think there are different ways to think about it. If you did a survey and said, 'Are you in favor of letting people buy and sell their kidneys?' I think the number would be 98% to 2% against. But if you said, 'If a poor person is really desperate and they can save someone's life, should they be allowed to sell their kidney and thereby get their child a college education?' I think the number would be very different than 98-to-2. And I'm curious how politically you think that works out. Why is it--a better way to say it: Is there a vested interest here that I'm not thinking about yet, when I work on it, who would be harmed by this? I mean, that the people who run the list, they are very important now, and they get a lot of attention, and they have a purpose in life that might be hurt by the fact that this market would work better if we had these incentives even though they are roundabout. Who would be against this? Who is against this?

Sally Satel: Well, start with the National Kidney Foundation. They have been the most vociferous opponent. And they actually did actively try to sabotage--I know I'm not supposed to talk about specific legislation, but efforts, years ago, that were made to try to rethink the National Organ Transplant Act, which is the legislation that forbids any kind of exchange. But--

Russ Roberts: Why are they against it? Why would the National Kidney Foundation, which is supposedly in favor of people being helped who are struggling with kidney issues--why wouldn't they be thrilled that, say, I don't know, 75,000 would get kidneys than now?

Sally Satel: Well, I'm baffled, as well. But I can tell you what they say.

Russ Roberts: Yeah: what do they say?

Sally Satel: Well, they say a few things. They start using the language of 'commodification'--in other words, you are treating people like spare fenders in a junk yard. They are afraid you are--'it will taint the process,' I've heard. It will devalue human life. It will--and then they say something that's actually something one could measure, because it's an empirical matter--that it will crowd out altruistic giving. And, worse, that it will just crowd out giving in general. But that's testable. I've actually looked into--go ahead.

37:54

Russ Roberts: That's possible. Right? I was going to say that--it's possible that if you don't--and this is an argument made for blood donation, as well: If you are not going to get the moral satisfaction of helping someone, and now it becomes something you can just buy and sell, you won't donate, because it's tawdry. Which just means that, as an economist, it just means you better set the price a little higher than you thought you might have needed to, to overcome--you might lose the, what is it, the 5000 people who donate right now, willingly, out of an incredible human kindness? And so, now you are going to get as many people as you want to donate out of mercenary motives. And--

Sally Satel: Exactly. Exactly. I see your point exactly.

Russ Roberts: I know you do.

Sally Satel: To the extent that anyone would be dissuaded, I would, as a psychiatrist, say, 'Well, gee, are we talking about altruism or narcissism? What was really motivating you--was social signaling motivating you?' But in any case, maybe it was. And then we know that is powerful for some people. But, well, okay, then I'm sorry that you won't be able to save someone. But here are 10 other people in line who would love to do it. So, that gets into the question of motivation, which is also held very dearly by the National Kidney Foundation, other opponents, which is: it has to be done for the right reasons. But this is what we hear from the National Kidney Foundation, what you hear from some particularly vocal transplant surgeons and nephrologists. Although, as I said, as a group, the transplant surgeons are--they did a poll of their organization in 2009, and the vast majority, 75%, were in favor of at least testing this idea. So, I do give them credit. But I have to tell you, I've looked at all the polls that have been done on this. And, the public is much more open-minded than the experts. And then we bring in the bio-ethicists--

Russ Roberts: Well, that's because the public--there are many of us who have relatives who have kidney problems. We want to help them. I just have to go back to the National Kidney Foundation for a second. I don't know anyone in the National Kidney Foundation. I know nothing about the NKF (National Kidney Foundation) or whatever it's called. But, it's not like a, um, it's not like the AARP (American Association of Retired Persons), the American Association of retired people which has millions of members. The National Kidney Foundation is a nonprofit--I assume. Its headquarters, I assume, are in Washington, D.C. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Sally Satel: No, I think they are.

Russ Roberts: And they have some number of people in that building in Washington, D.C.--maybe 100. I doubt they have a thousand. What does it mean to say they are against it? Why do they matter? And, politically, why does anyone care what the National Kidney Foundation thinks?

Sally Satel: Yeah, they matter a lot. To my deep chagrin. Because they are the first organization that Congress, Congressional offices think of. They always say, 'Well, what does the NKF think?' It's kind of like a cancer issue: What does the NCI (National Cancer Institute), what does the American Cancer Society think they have? They have disproportionate influence. And they have a PAC (Political Action Committee) as well. But it is unfortunate--

Russ Roberts: Who would donate money to that PAC?

Sally Satel: Oh, anyone who is--see people who get, people who, people who have gotten deceased kidneys, and people who--they actually have--

Russ Roberts: I get it. It's okay. I get it. Obviously there's some sense of gratitude there, because they are the coordinators of the list, and they make a donation, or whatever. But I'm not giving them another penny until they change their view on monetary incentives. And I don't give them a penny now, so it's not much of a threat. But, it's a fascinating issue.

41:47

Russ Roberts: Let's take one of their arguments more seriously--we're picking on them, and of course it's not of course just them. They are not alone. It's not like they are the only people against this. There are a lot of people who are troubled or uneasy about monetary incentives. And I understand that. Would it--let's take the commodification idea seriously. Is there something immoral--or, we have taboos about it--but if we think about it rationally a little bit, is there something immoral about sharing a body part for money? I mean, that's really what it comes down to. What I think is fascinating--and the reason I bring up the surgeon thing--it wasn't my idea, forget who wrote about it first where I read it, but--it's fascinating: That's not commodification, that the surgeon's hands are used to make money to rip out somebody's kidney and shove it into somebody else's body. We don't consider that person somehow morally troubled. And yet, somehow--and they make money, real cash. And yet, somehow, if we are to do it, who don't have their--what, high priest status? I don't know what's the--I mean, I'm in an ornery mood, hearing your plight. It's just interesting that this idea--'commodification' is an interesting word, right? It sounds awful. I don't know really what it means when I push it.

Sally Satel: Well, it's one of the three words that are used to, frankly--I don't want to sound melodramatic but [?] folks like me, and I'm not the only one, heaven knows--Richard Epstein, a lot of us, Virginia, are vocal about changing the law. But commodification, exploitation, and coercion are the holy trinity that's supposed to end the discussion. But, you are exactly right. The one person who takes the risk and gives the thing of value gets nothing. Commodification, from what I can--becomes pretty clear from people who brandish that word in a menacing way. What they really are concerned about is having respect for the donor, and treating him or her well. And of course, that is essential. That is the basis of an ethically sound system. In fact, I would say there are at least four elements. One is respect for the person's capacity to make a decision about something that might be in his own best interest. Then of course, informed consent. These are all the things that are not, of course, in a black market. Yet, folks who have debated the others say, 'Well, if we do this here we'll have a black market.' You want to say, 'What?' We have a black market. Frankly, we have a thriving global black market in organs--because we don't have a transparent system. But, anyway: Respect for the person's autonomy, informed consent; protecting their help--which of course doesn't happen in a black market at all. And in fact, even in our current system, if you don't have health insurance and you have a complication a few months after you've donated--granted, probably most hospitals will help you out. But they don't have to. In fact, in our plan there would be health insurance for at least two years, so that if there were complications, a person would be guaranteed to be taken care of.

Russ Roberts: You know what that reminds me of? It reminds of--I think if you are in the Baseball Hall of Fame, you get a lifetime pass to any park in America. It kind of should be. This is not a serious comment. But there is something emotionally satisfying about the idea that if you have crossed into a hospital to voluntarily help save a life with one of your organs, you should be able to walk into a hospital for the rest of your life and say, 'I need this. Give it to me,' and they should just say--

Sally Satel: At least a gift shop--

Russ Roberts: Yeah. And they should just say, 'Yeah, you are one of those? You're in. It's all taken care of. It's free. Here's your free pass.' But that's a little extreme.

Sally Satel: Well, I was just going through my internal list, the conditions that need to be satisfied to allay the fact that someone is not being respected. So, you reward them amply. Obviously, if you gave them a buck, now that would be exploitation. But you reward them in a generous way. Gratitude is expressed. And that's really all that needs to happen. And none of it happens in a black market, of course. But it can easily happen here. And it happens already, except there's no money attached to it. But in this case, there would be a reward for people who would like, again, to benefit while they save someone's life.

46:25

Russ Roberts: You spoke loosely a minute ago--you said the one person who doesn't get anything out of it is the donor. But, of course, the donor does get the emotional satisfaction--

Sally Satel: Oh, definitely.

Russ Roberts: which is enormous. I know you meant that. It just was a figure of speech.

Sally Satel: Thank you.

Russ Roberts: But, it's an interesting question: I'm now going to take the critics of our perspective a little more seriously. Interesting question: Let's suppose, just hypothetically, that the market price--whether we're a literal market, which I understand, I agree is unlikely; no one proposes seriously except maybe me, and three other people. But let's say we went to some system where we allowed this sort of arm's length, third party compensation via the tax system or something else, that you'd like to encourage. And let's say that number got to be a million dollars. Okay? That's what it took. And someone, maybe a foundation steps forward and says, 'I don't just want to save the 98,000 people on the list. I want to save the x-hundred thousand, 500,000, whatever it is, who are at risk. And rather than wait till they go on dialysis, they should just get a new kidney. And I'm going to pick a large enough number, compensating them, that the donors, enough will step forward.' And that turns out to be worth a million dollars. Now, I'm going to say something really tacky here, which is--but it's mildly amusing for EconTalk listeners. Somebody who has been listening to EconTalk since 2010 has heard about Bitcoin. And I have a friend who mocks me because I knew about Bitcoin in 2010 and missed the boat. Of course, he wasn't an EconTalk listener then, so he missed the boat, too. So, it's kind of a mutual make-fun-of-each-other thing. But it would be an interesting thing to think about--you have two people in your life who did something unbelievably generous--what this system you are encouraging would do would put a monetary value in some dimension on their kindness. And it also in a way would suggest what they gave up to give you a kidney. That, it's one to say, 'Well, they risked their life'--which they did. It's one thing to say that they went through surgery, which is painful and scary, which they did. They also had recovery that they endured, which they did. And now you are telling them, 'And by the way, you could have made a million dollars. You gave away that precious thing.' Now, my view on that is: That makes it even sweeter to them, that they did something--in a way, it enhances their generosity. But perhaps some people would say it creates bitterness; it takes the emotion out of it. I don't know. What are your thoughts on that? [More to come, 49:01]

(16 COMMENTS) Posted at http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2017/07/sally_satel_on.html.

          DTNS 3085 – AR You Not Entertained?        
Our experiences with Augmented Reality plus updates and clarifications on the Bitcoin fork. With Tom Merritt, Patrick Beja and Rob Reid. MP3 Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org. Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Follow us on Soundcloud. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be … Continue reading DTNS 3085 – AR You Not Entertained?
          DTNS 3084 – Simple Human Monkey Minds        
Do we want AIs to make up their own languages? Plus, the coming Bitcoin fork and the budget Australian robot that won Amazon’s competition. MP3 Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org. Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Follow us on Soundcloud. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of … Continue reading DTNS 3084 – Simple Human Monkey Minds
          8/10/2017: ARTS: WHY HBO HACKERS DEMANDED BITCOIN        
The digital currency bitcoin is the payment of choice for HBO’s cyberattackers. Bitcoin allows people to buy goods and services and exchange money without involving banks, credit-card issuers or other third parties. Although bitcoin isn’t widely used,...
          Kommentar zu Bitcoins: Teufelszeug oder Währung der Zukunft? von Thorsten Hirsch        
Naja, da Bitcoin erst 2009 startete, können es 2008 weder Libertäre noch Anarchisten genutzt haben. Selbst 2009 hat kaum jemand außer Satoshi Nakamoto und seinen Bekannten etwas von Bitcoin gewußt. Die genossenschaftliche Einschätzung zur Zukunft von Bitcoin scheint zudem etwas anders auszufallen als die von Herrn Bielmeier, schließlich arbeitet das Innovation Lab der DZ BANK gerade daran, den Kunden von Volks- und Raiffeisenbanken den Kauf von Bitcoins zu ermöglichen ohne dabei den Umweg über ominöse Tauschbörsen gehen zu müssen.
          The political implications of bitcoin        
Prior to the publication of John Maynard Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, balanced budgets reflected the received wisdom for governments. By making the case for debt spending in times of recession (and the virtually ignored case for restricting spending in times of growth), Keynes gave political leaders a license to abandon the requirement of balance. Continue Reading...
          Bitcoin is (Nearly) All Dead        
Earlier this year I declared that Bitcoin was (nearly) dead. But as The Princess Bride’s Miracle Max once explained, “There’s a big difference between mostly dead and all dead. Mostly dead is slightly alive. Continue Reading...
          An Evangelical College Becomes First in the U.S. to Accept Bitcoin        
Christians colleges aren’t usually known for being on the cutting-edge of technology. But The King’s College, an evangelical college located in New York City, is leading the way by becoming the first accredited college in the United States to accept Bitcoin for tuition and other expenses: “The King’s College seeks to transform society by preparing students for careers in which they help to shape and eventually to lead strategic public and private institutions. Continue Reading...
          How Bitcoin Could Help the World’s Poor        
Bitcoin is dead, long live Bitcoin. A few weeks ago the IRS killed off any chance that Bitcoin could become a mainstream currency. That’s probably for the best since it clears the way for it to become something much more important: the world’s first completely open financial network. Continue Reading...
          How the IRS Killed Bitcoin as a Currency        
“For federal tax purposes, virtual currency is treated as property.” With those ten words, the IRS has made it more difficult — if not impossible — for bitcoin and other virtual currencies from gaining widespread, mainstream acceptance as a currency for commercial transactions. Continue Reading...
          Bitcoin is (Nearly) Dead        
Last year I wrote a series of blog posts about what Christians should know about Bitcoin. In response, one astute reader pointed out an odd juxtaposition: my conclusion seemed to imply that Christians should avoid Bitcoin “at all cost” and yet the Acton Institute accepts donations in Bitcoin. Continue Reading...
          Acton Institute Now Accepts Bitcoin Donations        
Over the course of 2013 we’ve enabled new methods of giving including Dwolla and PayPal.  Additionally, recurring monthly donations are now possible via PayPal and credit card. This week we’re introducing the ability to donate with Bitcoin, the popular digital currency.  Continue Reading...
          The Regulators Are Coming for Bitcoin        
Last month, in my series on Bitcoin, I wrote that for the crypto-currency to succeed it will one day have to become trusted by more mainstream consumers, which requires adding such features as regulatory oversight and a centralized monetary authority—the very features of other currencies that Bitcoin was created to avoid. Continue Reading...
          Bitcoin as ‘Super Fiat’ Currency        
Joe has done us all a real service in putting together his three part (1, 2, 3) primer on Bitcoin (full PDF here). I am curious, though, what the justification is for referring to Bitcoin as a “commodity” currency. Continue Reading...
          Quel avenir pour la crypto monnaie ?        

Bitcoins, Ethereum ou encore Dash, ces monnaies cryptées et virtuelles permettent de procéder à des achats de manière complètement anonyme.

Cet article Quel avenir pour la crypto monnaie ? est apparu en premier sur BuzzWebzine.


                  
From Jenna Orkin

Column: Sixteen years after 9/11, the American public deserves answers, not secrecy
Senator Bob Graham

GI and AI are going to turbocharge 'fake news' and make it far harder to tell what's real


Uzbekistan jails ex-president's daughter, socialite Gulnara Karimova, under massive fraud charges
Trump is looking for dirt on Iran, and it looks like the run up to the Iraq war

Vietnam pushes back after threats from Beijing over drilling in the South China Sea

Romans are about to go eight hours a day without water

Gauntlet Thrown: House Judiciary Demands Special Counsel To Investigate Comey, Lynch, And Clinton

Imran Awan Subscribed To Pedo-Centric YouTube Channel Exposed By Tosh.0

The Globalist One World Currency Will Look A Lot Like Bitcoin

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Rents Across The US Hit A New All Time High

Study: Sperm Count In Western Men Cut In Half Over Last 40 Years ...

          Learn How To Invest in Cryptocurrency for only $15!        
You’ve probably heard of the most popular cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, but there are a ton of new cryptocurrencies emerging every year, presenting an intriguing opportunity for the savvy investor. Cryptocurrencies are decentralized digital currencies which use encryption techniques to regulate and verify the transfer of funds, and they're growing in popularity globally. You've probably heard of the most popular cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, but there are a ton of new cryptocurrencies emerging every year, presenting intriguing opportunities for the savvy investor. Save 91% off the Beginner's Guide to Cryptocurrency Investing! Learn more Don't know where to start? CrackBerry Digital Offers is here to help with the Beginner's Guide to Cryptocurrency Investing. This course features 27 lectures and hours of content that is available to you 24/7, giving you everything you need to know to get into cryptocurrency investing. You'll learn a system for investing in altcoins and learn how to t...
          A fork in the road: a Bitcoin battle royale        
bitcoin laundering split fork(TECH NEWS) Bitcoin couldn't handle the heat from all sides and has split in two.


          QualityStocksNewsBreaks – SinglePoint, Inc. (SING) Acquires $Weed Cryptocurrency        
Specialized holding company SinglePoint, Inc. (OTC: SING) this morning announced its purchase of the $Weed cryptocurrency from joint venture partner First Bitcoin Capital (OTC: BITCF). Aimed at solving the payment problems that currently exist in the cannabis industry, WeedCoin is already listed on three exchanges, and SinglePoint intends to list and market the currency on […]
          QualityStocksNewsBreaks – SinglePoint, Inc. (SING) Provides First-Hand Look at Development of New Bitcoin Exchange        
Specialized holding company SinglePoint, Inc. (OTC: SING) this morning offered a first-hand look at its new bitcoin exchange aimed at solving the payments issues plaguing today’s cannabis industry. When completed, the new in-house solution will enable consumers to obtain bitcoin at any point of sale. In addition to bitcoin, SinglePoint is currently in negotiations to […]
          QualityStocksNewsBreaks – SinglePoint, Inc. (SING) Sees Continued Momentum with Plans to Develop Bitcoin Payment Solution        
SinglePoint’s (OTC: SING) management team, in a recent audio press release, said the company is poised to make two to three additional acquisitions as SinglePoint sees further opportunity in the legal marijuana market and medical cannabis. The company is working to support cannabis dispensaries with an innovative cryptocurrency bitcoin solution and is also helping legal […]
          Latinoware 2014 aí vamos nós!        

Introdução

Após 5 anos volto a Latinoware, evento da comunidade de Software Livre que ocorre em Foz do Iguaçu - Paraná - Brasil.

Além das conexões pessoais, trocas de chaves pgp, desvirtualizações de amigos virtuais, chops e etc… tem uma extensa e rica programação. Assim, para minha organização pessoal, listo abaixo as palestras ou oficinas que pretendo participar. Se você estiver por lá, nestes horários, poderemos compartilhar as mesmas coordenadas de espaço-tempo :-)

O que pretendo participar/assistir/comparecer

A programação completa (com sinopse de cada palestra/oficina/keynote) pode ser vista aqui.

15/10/2014

  • 10h - 11h - GNU/Linux - It is not 1984 (or 1969) anymore - Jon “Maddog” Hall
  • SIMULANDO FENÔMENOS COM O GEOGEBRA - Marcela Martins Pereira e Eduardo Antônio Soares Júnior
  • 12h - 13h - Espaços abertos colaborativos Guilherme Guerra
  • 13h - 14h - (comer alguma coisa) e tentar me dividir entre: O analfabetismo tecnológico e a formação dos professores Antonio Carlos C. Marques e Internet das Coisas: Criando APIs para o mundo real com Raspberry Pi e Python Pedro Henrique Kopper
  • 14h -16h - Abertura Oficial da Latinoware
  • 16h - 17h - Edição de vídeos na prática com kdenlive Carlos Cartola
  • 17h - 18h - red#matrix, muito mais que uma mídia social. Frederico (aracnus) Gonçalves Guimarães

16/10/2014

  • 10h - 11h - Direitos autorais e os cuidados ao utilizar serviços “da nuvem” e “gratuitos” para construir objetos educacionais Márcio de Araújo Benedito
  • .
  • 11h - 12h - Colaboração e Ferramentas Livres: possibilidades de contra-hegemonias na Escola. Sergio F. Lima
  • 12h - 13h - Professor Livre! O uso do software livre nas licenciaturas. Wendell Bento Geraldes
  • 13h - 14h - (comer alguma coisa) e Padrões abertos de documentação - ODF. Fa Conti
  • 14h -15h - Bitcoin, o futuro do dinheiro é open source (e livre). Kemel Zaidan e Plataforma Open Hardware para Robótica. Thalis Antunes De Souza e Thomás Antunes de Souza
  • 15h - 16h - Mozilla e Educação, como estamos revolucionando o ensino de habilidades digitais. Marcus Saad
  • 16h - 17h - Arduino Uno x MSP 430. Raphael Pereira AlkmimYuri Adan Gonçalves Cordovil
  • 17h - 18h - Inclusão de PCDs na Educação - Com Software Livre é Possível. Marcos Silva Vieira

17/10/2014

  • 10h - 12h - Presença digital: não basta estar lá, tem que participar. Frederico (aracnus) Gonçalves Guimarães Será um “mão na massa” :-)
  • .
  • 12h - 13h - Acho que vou almoçar :-)
  • 13h - 14h - Educação e tecnologia com recursos livres. Marcos Egito
  • 14h -14:15h - Foto oficial do Evento
  • 14:15h - 15:15h - Introdução ao Latex. Ole Peter Smith
  • 15:15h - 16:15h - abnTeX2 e LaTeX: normas “absurdas” e documentos elegantes. Lauro César
  • 16:15h - 17:15h - Data Science / Big Data / Machine Learning E Software Livre. Eduardo Maçan

Se você estiver por lá, faça contato!


          Ð¡ÐºÐ°Ð½Ð´Ð°Ð»ÑŒÐ½Ð°Ñ биржа BTC-e объяснила, как собирается возвращать средства клиентам        

Представители BTC-e опубликовали план действий по погашению долгов перед клиентами Сообщение со ссылкой на свежую запись на Bitcointalk биржа опубликовала в своем Twitter. В сообщении биржа информирует, что получила контроль над 55% средств клиентов. Остальные средства — арестованы, преимущественно это фиатные деньги. Из-за проблем с Управлением по борьбе с финансовыми преступлениями Минфина США, биржа не […]

Запись Скандальная биржа BTC-e объяснила, как собирается возвращать средства клиентам впервые появилась PaySpace Magazine.


          Where are my bitcoins, Mark Karpeles?        
Download this post in PDF format Today, Mark Karpeles, the CEO of the bankrupted MtGox bitcoin exchange, pleaded “not guilty” in the embezzlement case against him in Tokyo. He was arrested in August 2015, after it became clear that earlier claims by him were false that MtGox was hacked and 480 million dollars in bitcoins … Continue reading Where are my bitcoins, Mark Karpeles?
          Co může přinést první bitcoinový ETF?        
Má ještě vůbec smysl nakupovat přímo bitcoiny, když se připravují první burzovně obchodovaný fond (Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust; rozhodnutí regulátora se čeká v první polovině března) a futures kontrakty na tuto kryptoměnu? Téma pro hosty pořadu Investice...1
          Le monete virtuali sono legali?        

Chi, come noi, s’interessa di business e di nuove tendenze nel modo imprenditoriale, non poteva esimersi dal valutare le monete virtuali. Da mesi il Bitcoin è parte della quotidianità ed è sempre più frequentemente oggetto di attenzione perché la sua esposizione mediatica lo rende appetibile agli occhi dei network d’informazione. Il Bitcoin è il precursore di […]

Il Blog di Biz & BitTutti i diritti sono riservati, è necessario il consenso per pubblicare queste informazioni altrove.


          BITCOIN... IL FUMO E' TANTO...        
Domanda:
Chi stabilisce il tasso ufficiale di scambio del bitcoin con altre valute?

Non esiste un ente dedicato a tale scopo, non esiste un ente, un istituto, che sia ufficialmente dedicato a tale funzione... alla funzione di scambio.
Quindi come avviene?

Avviene che ci sono soggetti PRIVATI (come singoli o anche sottoforma di società commerciali), che "creano" direttamente (tramite il mining) i bitcoin e poi... li "vendono"... ovvero li "scambiano".

Il bitcoin non è una MONETA; le monete hanno valore intrinseco, sono beni di scambio essi stessi... l'oro è una moneta, il sale è stato una moneta (salario), le pecore sono state moneta (pecunia)... le scatolette di tonno, potrebbero essere moneta... la banconota (nota del banco),anche quella più bella e decorata, non ha valore intrinseco, se non irrisorio, e tantomeno il bitcoin che non ha nemmeno intrinsecamente il valore residuale della banconota stampata.
Il bitcoin è una VALUTA, al pari di Euro e Dollari, etc... sono tutte VALUTE.
Il bitcoin NON HA valore intrinseco, ma vale in quanto rappresentazione di moneta.
Ora la moneta esistente è fatta di beni, che vengono rappresentati dalle valute a corso legale.
Queste valute a corso legale sono "collegate" ai "beni reali", alla "moneta", tramite legami "fiduciari" che portano dalle valute ai beni reali... in mezzo a questo legame ci stanno gli intermediatori, ovvero le banche; le quali, nonostante tutto, sono soggetti giuridici, e sottoposte a tutta una serie di norme e anche di garanzie per i correntisti fino ai 100.000E
Quello che è successo di recente ai correntisti di un paio di banche Cipriote (riduzione del 37% dei saldi di conto corrente superiore alla soglia dei 100.000E) è esattamente A GARANZIA dei correntisti fino ai 100.000.
Le banche in oggetto hanno avuto enormi perdite consolidate, a causa della ristrutturazione del debito greco... La Grecia, in pratica ha detto di non voler più restituire i soldi presi in prestito se non nella misura del 40%
In questo modo, le banche che hanno prestato soldi alla grecia hanno subito una perdita consolidata del 60% di quello che hanno prestato.
Dato che le banche, quando prestano, prestano soldi dei correntisti, la perdita deve essere ripianata salvo dichiarare bancarotta.
In caso di bancarotta tutti i depositi sono "persi" e quelli inferiori ai 100.000 possono fare ricorso al fondo di garanzia.
In questo caso, le banche hanno usato i depositi dei correntisti "ricchi", per non intaccare quelli dei correntisti meno ricchi.
Una scelta, abbastanza "socialista"... e tutto sommato la meno peggiore che una bancarotta "classica".

Ma cosa succede nel caso dei bitcoin?
Ci sono soggetti "privati" che "ottengono" bitcoin dal sistema tramite il software a disposizione... questo software, sebbene operi in ambiente distribuito, svolge la FUNZIONE di banca centrale, ovvero di "GENERATORE UNICO DI VALUTA", ovvero non esiste nessun altro generatore se non quello.
La generazione di valuta è "gratuita"... non è richiesto nessuna controparte in moneta.
per cui il bitcoin non ha un valore intrinseco perchè è una valuta, ma non ha valore nemmeno come valuta, perchè non è collegato in alcun modo ad alcuna moneta o bene di scambio.
Insomma, se non fosse che il bitcoin è un token telematico, sarebbe alla stessa identica stregua di una immagine di una banconota che, viene gratuitamente distribuita sulla rete e che tutti possono stamparsi col la loro stampante... chi più ne stampa più ne ha.
Cioè, invece di esserci un solo soggetto autorizzato a "creare" banconote, ce ne sono infiniti; unico limite è la velocità di creazione, e il numero massimo di banconote creabili.
Velocità di creazione della valuta e ammontare della valuta, sono scelte che spettano alla banca centrale.
Troppa valuta crea svalutazione, inflazione, troppo poca valuta crea deflazione... se inflazione e deflazione siano buone o meno, dipende dai punti di vista... di sicuro il bitcoin è stato pensato per non "adeguarsi" alla massa monetaria, e pertanto, per finire inevitabilmente su un percorso deflattivo...
Non è che non esite una banca centrale del Bitcoin... la banca centrale è stata virtualizzata, programmaticamente definita all'interno del software... l'autore del software si è autonominato direttore della banca centrale ed ha impostato un pilota automatico a sua discrezione.
Rimane il fatto che il bitcoin è una valuta che non ha nessun collegamento con la moneta, e quindi non ha valore nè intrinseco (è una valuta) nè estrinseco tramite soggetti di garanzia.

Allora, torniamo alla domanda:
Chi stabilisce il tasso ufficiale di scambio del bitcoin con altre valute?

Nessuno.
Non c'è un tasso ufficiale di scambio.
C'è un numero di soggetti, individui, o anche società, che hanno "ottenuto", direttamente, o da altri, un certo numero di bitcoin e li "vendono".
Un po' come si vendono le figurine o i giochini degli ovetti Kinder.
Ovviamente, nel momento in cui ci sono soggetti che vendono e soggetti che comprano, là, si forma il "prezzo".

Il prezzo più anche diventare molto alto... ma questo ha poco a che fare con il valore del bitcoin come "valuta", ma piuttosto come valore "di mercato" che, ovviamente, dipende molto dalla domanda e pertanto anche da fattori di marketing.
E' un po' come un quadro... che magari può anche essere acquistato per 1 mil. di Euro (e quell'acquisto nel fissa il "valore")... ma non è detto che potrà essere rivenduto alla stessa cifra... non è nemmeno detto che si troverà qualcuno disposto a comprarlo.

Faccio un esempio molto semplice.
Tizio "crea/ottiene dal sistema" 1000 bitcoin... li mette in vendita... e trova Caio che glieli compra per 1000 Euro.
Tizio con i 1000 euro si paga una vacanza... ora non ha più nè gli euro nè i bitcoin ma se l'è spassata per in po'.
Caio, invece, ha fatto una transazione con Sempronio di 1000 bitcoin, per l'acquisto di una vacanza, dicendogli che valgono 1000E che ha dato a Tizio.
Sempronio, va da Tizio e gli dice, ti do 1000 bitcoin così tu mi dai 1000Euro... ma Tizio dice... io i 1000E non ce li ho più... non ero mica obbligato a tenerli... non sono mica una banca... fatteli comprare da qualcun'altro i tuoi bitcoin.

Ecco, si intuisce abbastanza facilmente che il bitcoin, in regime di libero mercato, e senza alcun soggetto garante, e senza alcun obbligo e responsabilità in capo agli "agenti di scambio", si presta molto bene a diventare un classico "schema ponzi".

http://bitcoinwatch.com/

Il controsenso di oggi è questo:
Che per non fidarsi di valute a corso legale e delle banche, si finisca per fidarsi ad occhi chiusi di un sistema puramente numerico e di intermediatori assolutamente privi di alcun obbligo e responsabilità.
Saluti e...
buoni controsensi a tutti.



          Russia Launches $100 Million Bitcoin-Mining Operation        
– Russia Launches $100 Million Bitcoin-Mining Operation: In what some have called a “watershed” moment for bitcoin, Bloomberg reports that a company co-owned by an aide to Russian President Vladimir Putin is seeking to expand Russia’s bitcoin-mining industry, leveraging Russia’s cheap energy to rival China as the world’s largest mining market. The company, known as ... Read more
          Keeping Up With The Cryptocurrencies – Goldman Answers Institutional Investors’ Questions, Targets Bitcoin $3915        
FYI. – Keeping Up With The Cryptocurrencies – Goldman Answers Institutional Investors’ Questions, Targets Bitcoin $3915 * * * PayPal: Donate in USD PayPal: Donate in EUR PayPal: Donate in GBP
          The public vs private debate on blockchain        
Bitcoin promised to open up the current financial system but blockchains run by top-tier banks would be the opposite of that libertarian dream
          A bitcoin-like transaction ledger for corporate documents        
Since the bitcoin network is already getting obscenely large, using their ledger is not necessarily possible, but the same technology could be modified for our specific purpose.  This network would be specifically for the containing of hashes of ever corporate document in every corporation.  As each and every document is created and subsequently edited, it’s hash is

Read more


           Cybersecurity Vulnerability in Healthcare Organizations: Consequences and Collaborative Solutions         

By Miles Indest, J.D./M.B.A candidate at Tulane University A recent cyber-attack on a prominent hospital has drawn significant attention to cybersecurity vulnerability within the healthcare industry. Last month, Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center was forced to pay hackers $17,000 in bitcoin in order to unlock its computer systems that were controlled by “ransomware.” Healthcare organizations with lax cybersecurity protocols have more to fear than disgruntled patients or private lawsuits; they may face prosecution from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the US Department of Justice (DOJ)....


           Hackers Demand Multi-Million Dollar Ransom From Hollywood Hospital Following Cyber-Attack: Hospital Record System Out of Commission for Over a Week (Part 1 of 2)         

By George F. Indest IV, Director of System Services, The Health Law Firm, and George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law (Part 1 of a 2 part blog) For more than a week, the computer systems at Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center have been offline following a cyber-attack. The hospital has, apparently, also been locked out of all access to patient electronic health records (EHR). The unknown hackers are demanding a $3.6 million ransom to release the data. The hackers are demanding payment in Bitcoins, which will be untraceable if paid....


          Bitcoin, App Security, and Oracle's Controversial Licensing Policies        
Discover how blockchain, the tech behind bitcoin, is extending its reach beyond financial services into new industries. Also learn from developers about the pros and cons of componentizing application software, examine what a recent court case shows about Oracle's licensing policies, and more. Published by: ComputerWeekly.com
          Ð¯Ð²Ð»ÑÐµÑ‚ся ли криптовалюа Bitcoin «пузырём»?        
Несмотря на недавнее снижение курса, Bitcoin всё ещё торгуется на уровнях в четыре раза дороже, чем год назад. Среди финансовых экспертов с самого начала не было единого мнения по поводу сущности этой криптовалюты...
          Ð¡Ñ‚артап из Сингапура облегчит платежи Bitcoin        
Цифровая валюта Bitcoin и другие криптовалюты становятся всё более популярными среди обычных пользователей, но оплачивать ими очень неудобно. Ситуация должна скоро кардинально измениться...
          ÐŸÑ€Ð¾Ð³Ð½Ð¾Ð· для Bitcoin: курс криптовалюты снова растёт        
После продолжительного падения главная криптовалюта мира Bitcoin снова вернулась к восходящему тренду, чтобы, возможно, достичь новых рекордных отметок своей стоимости, как это было в июне текущего года...
          Steve McKay The Bitcoin Code System Trading Is A SCAM?        

Steve McKay The Bitcoin Code System Trading Is A SCAM? The Bitcoin Code System Review Is The Bitcoin Code A Scam Or Legit? Does The Bitcoin Code Software Works? My The Bitcoin Code Review Explore The Real Truth About Steve McKay The Bitcoin Code Software Until Invest in It The Bitcoin Code System is a … Continue reading Steve McKay The Bitcoin Code System Trading Is A SCAM?

The post Steve McKay The Bitcoin Code System Trading Is A SCAM? appeared first on Quick Cash System Review.


          Make Your Bitcoin Fortune$$$ Today!        
There Are Fortunes$$$ Made Everyday With Bitcoin. NOW IT'S YOUR TURN! Profit From The Emerging World Of Crytopcurrencies. For More Info: CLICK ► HERE
          Waspada! Ransomware Cerber Bisa Curi Dompet Bitcoin        
RAKYATKU.COM - Ransomware Cerber yang terkenal karena bisa mengenkripsi file korban, telah menerima update baru. Sekarang, ini telah mendapatkan kemampuan untuk mencuri password browser dan kredensial…
          Reactie op Doorbraakinnovaties in de logistiek – blockchain door Bruis van Driel        
De crux zit hem erin dat afgesproken standaarden gerespecteerd dienen te worden. Dit nastreven wordt exponentieel moeilijker met de toename in het aantal participanten en processen. Bij AirBnB zijn er vijf participanten (huurder, verhuurder, bank voor elk van hen, airbnb). Van hoe bitcoin opgezet is heb ik niet veel verstand, maar zijn het er drie volgens mij (miner, koper, verkoper). Bij (inter)nationaal transport zijn dit er veel meer (koper, verkoper, fabriekant, voor elke modaliteit (lucht, weg, rail, (deep-)sea) een of meerdere vervoerders, terminals, luchthavens, banken voor elke partij, kredietverstrekkers, lokale, regionale, nationale en supranationale overheden. Vooral in die laatse groep financiele instelling en overheden zit een grote hoeveelheid complexititeit die niet te sturen is omdat overheden zich in het algemeen slecht laten sturen en al zeker niet in de richting van een standaard die geen direct gewin oplevert. De marktpartijen in de industrie zullen ook niet snel afstappen van systemen waarin veel geld is geinvesteerd De technologie in delen van de keten inbrengen zal wel lukken, maar om de hele keten dezelfde technologie te laten gebruiken gaat nog (teintallen) jaren duren, wat niet wil zeggen dat het niet geprobeerd moet worden. Maar disruptive zou ik het dan niet meer willen noemen
          Skomentuj Wychowanka Illuminati opisuje organizację, którego autorem jest JerryInhig        
emergency medicine oral boards <a href="http://ritalin.guildomatic.com" rel="nofollow">buy ritalin bitcoin</a> marshall school of medicine
          Comment on One Year On : Commemorating the Failure of the Ouya : Part 1 by ouyaaaa        
My Ouyas are on literally 100% of the time on order to mine for Bitcoins so I wouldn't know.
          My friend emailed billionaire Howard Marks about Bitcoin. Here’s his response–        
Today is one of those days when I feel blessed to have such wonderful and interesting people in my life. A few months ago I introduced you to Ben Yu, a Silicon Valley-based entrepreneur who’s easily one of the most unique people I know. I first met Ben when he came to our summer entrepreneurship camp a few years ago. I knew instantly that he was bright… and different. He had already won the prestigious Peter Thiel fellowship, dropped out of Harvard, and started a successful company (in which I invested, alongside many of our Total Access members). Among his many talents and interests, Ben is heavy into cryptocurrency. And […]
          You won’t believe this stupid new law against Cash and Bitcoin        
This one is almost too ridiculous to believe. Recently a new bill was introduced on the floor of the US Senate entitled, pleasantly, “Combating Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing, and Counterfeiting Act of 2017.” You can probably already guess its contents. Cash is evil. Bitcoin is evil. Now they’ve gone so far to include prepaid mobile phones, retail gift vouchers, or even electronic coupons. Evil, evil, and evil. These people are certifiably insane. Among the bill’s sweeping provisions, the government aims to greatly extend its authority to seize your assets through “Civil Asset Forfeiture”. Civil Asset Forfeiture rules allow the government to take whatever they want from you, without a trial […]
          Bitcoin is Back!        
(Author: Davide Galletti) Questo è l’ultimo articolo di una trilogia dedicata al mondo Bitcoin. Nel primo articolo il focus era sul protocollo, il secondo articolo è stato dedicato al potenziale innovativo di Bitcoin mentre in questo articolo vogliamo fare il punto a 6 mesi dal primo articolo. Politicamente i segnali di questi ultimi mesi sono […]
          Bitcoin 2.0        
(Author: Davide Galletti) Nel precedente articolo sul protocollo Bitcoin abbiamo parlato di come questo sistema peer-to-peer offra un sistema decentralizzato per il trasferimento di diritti di proprietà. Oggi vogliamo iniziare parlando delle caratteristiche che lo rendono sicuro, per poi esplorare alcune novità che riguardano possibili evoluzioni della piattaforma, meglio note come Bitcoin 2.0. Il meccanismo […]
          BitCoin, Open Source Innovation at Work        
(Author: Davide Galletti) BitCoin is a peer-to-peer payment network powered by an open source protocol implementing a triple bookkeping system solving the double-spending problem. The first practical application of BitCoin is actually the bitcoin digital currency itself. BitCoin is a break-through innovation, and its importance is growing exponentially day by day, as you might have […]
          Clint Eastwood’s advice on Bitcoin speculation        
In 1559 while on a trip to southern Bavaria, Swiss scientist Conrad Gesner spied a curious flower in the garden of a diplomat in Augsburg. The flower was called a tulip, derived from the Persian word dulband, meaning “turban,” which described its conspicuous shape. Gesner was intrigued. He asked the man who owned the flower about its origins and determined that it came from Constantinople in the Ottoman Empire, modern-day Istanbul. Soon the tulip began spreading across Western Europe. It was rare, something that only the very wealthy could afford to import directly from Constantinople. By the early 1600s the rage had caught on to the upper middle class, especially […]
          The real reason to own Bitcoin        
In 1483, just as Johannes Gutenberg’s new moveable type printing press was spreading across Europe, Sultan Bayezid II of the Ottoman Empire issued a staunch decree banning the machine from his realm. At the time the Ottoman Empire was the dominant superpower in the world, having conquered most of the Middle East, North Africa, and southeastern Europe. But Bayezid was afraid of the new technology. He and his advisors felt that the printing press would too easily allow information and new ideas to spread across his empire. And they believed this would threaten their control and offend the religious establishment. So not only did Bayezid ban the printing press, he […]
          23 mai Lundi de l'IE , organisés par le Cercle d'Intelligence Economique du MEDEF ILE-DE-FRANCE, nous vous invitons à l'événement suivant Le phénomène blockchain quels enjeux, quels usages         
Secuobs.com : 2016-04-19 17:35:47 - Global Security Mag Online - La blockchain est le protocole qui sous-tend notamment les crypto-monnaies telles que le Bitcoin Mais ses potentialités dépassent largement cet usage Le protocole blockchain apporte la couche de confiance décentralisée qui manquait encore à l'Internet Il est vraisemblable que le phénomène blockchain provoque, dans les mois et les années qui viennent, un véritable bouleversement de l'économie numérique Toutes les grandes institutions mondiales, à commencer par celles du monde bancaire, se sont - Événements
          La blockchain, nouvel ange-gardien des sociétés d'assurance         
Secuobs.com : 2016-04-12 16:37:09 - Global Security Mag Online - Née avec l'avènement du bitcoin et des crypto-monnaies, la blockchain - technologie d'enregistrement des transactions sur un grand livre sécurisé, peut trouver des applications dans tous les secteurs d'activités Elle doit contribuer pleinement à la révolution que connaît aujourd'hui le marché de l'assurance et représente à l'évidence une belle opportunité pour réinventer notre industrie Big data, dématérialisation ou encore machine learning, la digitalisation a créé un séisme dans de nombreux pans de - Points de Vue
          REVISION: Bitcoin Financial Regulation: Securities, Derivatives, Prediction Markets, and Gambling        
The next major wave of Bitcoin regulation will likely be aimed at financial instruments, including securities and derivatives, as well as prediction markets and even gambling. While there are many easily regulated intermediaries when it comes to traditional securities and derivatives, emerging bitcoin-denominated instruments rely much less on traditional intermediaries. Additionally, the block chain technology that Bitcoin introduced for the first time makes completely decentralized markets and exchanges possible, thus eliminating the need for intermediaries in complex financial transactions. In this article we survey the type of financial instruments and transactions that will most likely be of interest to regulators, including traditional securities and derivatives, new bitcoin-denominated instruments, and completely decentralized markets and exchanges. We find that Bitcoin derivatives would likely not be subject to the full scope of regulation under the Commodities and Exchange ...
          [PAGANDO] INDEXCLIX - Commis Monthly - Refback 80% - Rec. pago 9        
INDEXCLIX - Commis Monthly - Refback 80% INDEXCLIX PAGO MINIMO: 2$ PROCESADORES: Payza, PM, Bitcoin, Payeer, Solidtruspay ANUNCIOS: Varios de 0.005 y 0.0005, sin AUTOFOCUS REFERIDOS DIRECTOS. En standard. 100.- GENERAN LOS REFERIDOS: 0.006 INTERFVAALO ENTRE PAGOS. 7 días FORO: SI Admin:  WhoisGuard Protected    Panama    2448108855bd4b708ea264b9472b236c.protect@whoisguard.com Registro: Cuidado con las cookies. Comprueba upline. Si no sale, limpia cookies antes o utilizar ...
          [NUEVA] RAISEPOINTS - Standard - Refback 80%        
RAISEPOINTS - Standard - Refback 80% PROCESADORES DE PAGO: PayPal, PAYZA, PerfecMoney y Bitcoin. PAGO MÍNIMO STANDARD: 4$ INTERVALO ENTRE PAGOS: 6 DÍAS. PROTECCIÓN ANTISCAM: NO. ADFOCUS: NO. TODOS JUNTOS: NO. ANTICHEAT: NO. MAXIMO RD PARA FOROCLIX: 100 MAXIMO RR STANDARD: 200. ANUNCIOS: $0.01 y $0.0005 ANUNCIOS QUE GENERAN: $0.005 SI NO QUIERES INVERTIR, AYUDAS AL PROYECTO Y GANAS EL REFBACK. MEMBRESIA premium: 80$ POR UN AÑO. REFERIDOS RENTADOS: 2=0.60$ 5=1$ 10=2$ BONO Habrá ...
          Bitcoin Holders Please Read This        
Tweet As many of you know I went into mostly cash from my Bitcoin position leading up to tomorrow’s fork.  There were and in many ways are still to many unknowns.  However I took advantage of one of the many … Continue reading
          Episode-2046- Cryptocurrency in the Real World ~ Who’s Using it and for What        
TweetBailey Reutzel is an independent freelance journalist covering the intersection of finance, culture and technology. She started writing about bitcoin in early 2013 for American Banker and PaymentsSource and has since become one of the leading journalists covering cryptocurrency, blockchain … Continue reading
          Bitcoin Smashes New Value Record!        

The value of the Bitcoin has never been greater! Bitcoin, the digital crypto-currency has hit a new high. In a manner that is baffling both investors and tempting those peeking through the window of mining, the value of the digital currency continues to grow. So what is it exactly that is sustaining this growth? Particularly […]

The post Bitcoin Smashes New Value Record! appeared first on eTeknix.


          Quest'uomo vuole lo Stato svizzero sullo smartphone        
Daniel Gasteiger è un ex investitore bancario e vuole attuare niente di meno che la rivoluzione digitale dello Stato svizzero. Pioniere della tecnologia civica, si autodefinisce ingenuo. Proprio questa ingenuità potrebbe avvantaggiarlo nella sua missione. "Una giornalista di una radio locale mi ha appena chiesto perché collaboriamo solo con il piccolo cantone di Sciaffusa", ci dice Daniel Gasteiger. "Semplicemente perché lì sono innovativi!" Daniel Gasteiger si interessa di pionieri, i cosiddetti "first mover". Lui vede sé stesso come tale. In questo solco, la sua startup per prestazioni con la tecnologia blockchain (utilizzata in particolare per i Bitcoin), Procivis, ha recentemente annunciato che insieme al cantone di Sciaffusa creerà un'identità elettronica (identificativo digitale, ID) per i cittadini. Questo contributo fa parte di #DearDemocracy, la piattaforma di swissinfo.ch sulla democrazia diretta. A livello nazionale questo gigantesco progetto sarà maturo per una ...
          FDR1932 True News: Bitcoin, Free Markets and Economics 101        
Why we would be better off without seat belts - everything in the free market balances out, Bitcoin versus Gold is just one example.

          FDR1933 True News: Vancouver Riots, Greek Austerity and Bitcoin Thefts        
A roundup of the latest news by philosopher Stefan Molyneux, host of Freedomain Radio, the largest and most popular philosophy show on the web - http://www.freedomainradio.com

          FDR1935 Freedomain Radio Sunday Call in Show, June 12, 2011        
More on Bitcoins, the evolutionary value of child abuse, the emotional aftereffects of divorce, and the road to a truly free society.

          FDR1986 Freedomain Radio Sunday Show, 28 August 2011        
A rebuttal to 'Why I am not a Libertarian,' anarchism and authority, Bitcoins and the state, lie detectors, sense-data and philosophy, and the economics of debt.

          Comment on What is E-Dinar? – Revealed! by SerahAO        
This is something I will definitely look into investing in. Never heard of E-Dinar until your post. I did hear of bitcoin though buy never really investigated further. I'll make sure I research this one out! Thanks a lot:)
          Comment on What is E-Dinar? – Revealed! by Jason        
I never heard of E-Dinar until now. I've heard of Bitcoins before, but never realized what it was either. I feel as if these currencies are somewhat like stocks and dealing with trading. It does look like E-Dinar is the next currency to invest. Thanks for the heads up!
          Las estrellas gatunas de Instagram que están haciendo de oro a sus dueños        

Si pensabas que el negocio de ser 'youtuber' era la gallina de los huevos de oro, aún hay un mundo mucho más sorprendente: el de los ‘influencers’ de cuatro patas. Gatos, perros y otros tipos de mascotas han dado el salto a Instagram consiguiendo millones de seguidores de todo el mundo y convirtiéndose así en un nicho publicitario muy atractivo para las empresas. De hecho, los dueños de los felinos más famosos de la Red pueden llegar a ganar 15.000 dólares (cerca de 13.000 euros al cambio actual) por publicar una foto a su cuenta bajo el patrocinio de alguna marca.

Así lo asegura Loni Edwards, el fundador de The Dog Agency, una empresa de gestión de talento de mascotas famosas en redes sociales. “Las mascotas tienden a tener una mejor acogida entre el público, ya que llega a todos, ya seas un adolescente o un abuelo”, cuenta Edwards. De hecho, el abogado norteamericano dejó su bufete para fundar esta agencia después de ver como su propio bulldog francés se convertía en una superestrella de Instagram.

A diferencia de los 'influencers' humanos, los gatos no pueden generar polémicas o decir algo inadecuado. Eso, sumado al ya tradicional amor de los internautas por los mininos, ha hecho que la empresas estén empezando a invertir publicidad en el mundo animal de Instagram, donde cuentas de gatos y perros no tienen nada que envidiar en seguidores a la de grandes 'influencers' de carne y hueso: las sutiles apariciones de productos y los no tan disimulados anuncios han aterrizado en el mundo animal.

Estrellas felinas de las redes sociales

Según un estudio de Neoreach, la audiencia más felina en las redes sociales es eminentemente femenina, ya que el 76% de los seguidores de cuentas de mininos son mujeres. Además, suele tratarse de usuarios jóvenes, de entre 17 y 29 años, lo que para muchas empresas supone el desafío del momento: conquistar al público 'millennial'. Y, por último, los datos revelan que la pasión gatuna no entiende de fronteras, ya que estas cuentas son todo un éxito desde Estados Unidos hasta Malasia.

El gato más seguido del mundo en redes sociales tiene los mismos ‘followers’ que Rafa Nadal en Instagram: 2,2 millones. Además, cuenta con la friolera de 8,7 millones de seguidores en Facebook. No es otro que el archiconocido Grumpy cat, que a muchos les resultará familiar por la avalancha de 'memes' que le han catapultado al éxito desde que su cara cayó en internet allá por 2012. Este gato con cara de cascarrabias ha protagonizado las últimas campañas de Friskies, la multinacional de piensos para gatos, lo que sin duda habrá dejado una buena cuantía de dinero en casa de los dueños.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BXGlJwXh6SH/?taken-by=realgrumpycat

Pero Grumpy no es el único que ha sacado partido de su singular forma de ser. Otro gato que se encuentra en la cresta de la ola es Nala Cat, una minina que tiene su propio ‘merchandising’ y que, al igual que el gato gruñón, protagoniza anuncios y publicaciones publicitarias en Instagram con piensos, bolsas de viaje para gatos, desinfectantes y un largo etcétera. Lo cierto es que esta ola de fama les vino de sorpresa a los dueños, quienes abrieron la cuenta para contar la historia de Nala, a la que encontraron sin dueño, y concienciar a la gente sobre el abandono de mascotas.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVahjaPj7jn/?taken-by=nala_cat

Pero si hay una historia de superación en la singular nómina de los gatos 'influencers' es la de Bub, un gato que también fue encontrado sin hogar pero con signos de haber sido maltratado. Las lesiones visibles de este felino no le impiden hacer vida normal y hacer felices a sus cerca de 3 millones de seguidores entre Facebook e Instagram. Lo que significa que, además, Bub es una máquina de hacer dinero, aunque esta vez por una buena causa: desde que inauguró su cuenta en 2012, ha conseguido recaudar más de 300.000 $ (255.000 euros) para la Asociación Americana de Prevención contra el Maltrato Animal.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BXWCOp-l7QN/?taken-by=iamlilbub

No obstante, estos tres rentables casos son solo la punta del iceberg. De hecho, según Edwards las cuentas de animales con miles de seguidores pueden generar entre unos 2.000 y 5.000 $ (1.700 y 4.250 euros) por publicación patrocinada. Sin embargo, estas cuentas de gatos que cuentan con millones de seguidores repartidos por todo el mundo ingresan probablemente entre 10.000 y 15.000 $ (entre 8.500 y 12.650 euros, respectivamente), según las estimaciones del propio Edwards.

De hecho, la mayoría de dueños de animales 'influencers' han dejado sus puestos de trabajo habituales para dedicarse de lleno a este nuevo mundo que requiere de regularidad y originalidad en cada publicación. Al menos, si no se quiere perder el éxito de la nueva gallina de los huevos de oro de las redes sociales.


Con información de Neoreach y ABC News. Imagen de Gage Skidmore

La era digital está ayudando a transformar el mundo con rapidez, no te pierdas:

- Drones por la ciencia: así están contribuyendo los robots voladores al progreso

- Estos guantes ‘low cost’ permiten mandar wasaps usando la lengua de signos

- Las claves de Bitcoin Cash: cómo y para qué ha surgido esta moneda paralela

- Pillados en Google: criminales que acabaron entre rejas por buscar sus delitos

The post Las estrellas gatunas de Instagram que están haciendo de oro a sus dueños appeared first on Cooking Ideas.


          Ep. 246 – Homeowners Take Out Mortgages To Buy Bitcoin, LA Admits Number Of Registered Voters At 144%, Why The Left Hates Us So Much        
In this episode of The Realist News podcast: Homeowners take out mortgages to buy Bitcoin, cars and wine. LA admits number of registered voters at 144% of resident citizens of voting age. Michael Snyder: Why does the left hate us so much?
          Ep. 245 – Bitcoin Surges Towards Record Highs, Biggest Bond Bubble In History Is About To Burst, Tenx Took off Friday        
In this episode of The Realist News podcast: Bitcoin surges towards record highs as 'Bitcoin Cash' crashes over 70%. Greenspan ominously warns that the biggest bond bubble in history is about to burst. Tenx (pay token) took off friday.
          Ep. 243 – Silver Gold Man, Dow Jones Industrial Average Hits 22,000, Web Bot Hit        
In this episode of The Realist News podcast: Silver gold man - here is the expose on this coward. The Dow Jones industrial average hits 22,000 for the first time in U.S. history. Web bot hit from June crypto report - Bitcoin mining on gov. PC.
          Bitcoins: Satoshi Nakamoto is John Galt        
Everything is a matter of time and perspective. Watching a movie in the first row can lead to misunderstand it. In December we have seen the price of Bitcoins fluctuate like a roller coaster. From a valuation of 500 at … Continue reading
          Bitcoins: How to Ride the Wave of disruption in Finance?        
“Disruption” is the name of an angel investor’s game. The best thing that can happen is to deal with companies offering investment opportunities with teams that have the ability to transform the industry in which they operate. Investing in companies … Continue reading
                  
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          Acelerador Profesional*        
© admin for Ariel Arrieta [D-MKTG], 2013. | Permalink | No comment | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: américa latina, Ariel Arrieta, bitcoins, Digital Ventures, emprendedor, Entrevista, fondo, forbes, incubadoras, InZearch, Nota de Tapa, NXTP Labs, perfil, puntocom Feed enhanced … Continue reading
          IDFPR Requests Comment on “Digital Currency Regulatory Guidance”        
CHICAGO – Secretary Bryan A. Schneider with the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (“IDFPR”) has announced the release for comment of the Department's proposed “Digital Currency Regulatory Guidance” on decentralized digital currencies, such as Bitcoin, Dogecoin, Litecoin, Ethereum, and Zcash.
          Illinois Bank Regulators on National E-cash Panel         
CHICAGO – Manuel Flores, Acting Secretary of the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation participated in a national panel discussion today in Chicago on the impact electronic payments systems and currencies like Bitcoin will have to consumer protection, state law, and banks and non-bank entities chartered or licensed by the states. The Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS) Emerging Payments Task Force hosted the event.
          Visa Taps Blockchain for Cross-Border Payment Plan        
Visa is putting a bitcoin-style network to work as it aims to take on a new market, the large and complex cross-border payments made between businesses.

          It’s the downtime in ransomware that might do the most damage        
Ransomware continues to make headlines. Unfortunately, notwithstanding all the news, there are businesses that are still not adequately protecting their data and, as a result, fall victim to ransomware. But even if a business does regain access to its data after paying that Bitcoin ransom, it has no doubt suffered downtime. Perhaps not surprisingly, downtime [...]
          Security for Startups: A 10-Step Affordable Plan to Survival in Cyberspace        
This post originally appeared in TechCrunch.

In the past two years, cyberspace has clearly changed in ways that threaten every online business, big or small. Startups now use the cloud infrastructure that mature companies do, and quickly aggregate large, juicy caches of private user data and payment credentials. As malware infestations scale to scour the â€œlong tail” of targets, they don’t discriminate between the Fortune 50 and the TechCrunch 50.
In fact, some increasingly common attacks — like DDoS extortion — specifically target smaller, more vulnerable businesses, whose loose cowboy cultures, shallow security expertise, fragile infrastructure and fresh capital make for easy pickings.
Jeremy Grant at NIST reports â€œa relatively sharp increase in hackers and adversaries targeting small businesses.” According to a recent survey, 20 percent of small businesses in Canada reported cyber losses last year. Who knows how many more fell victim and just don’t know it?
“Startups are incredibly vulnerable to cyber attacks in their first 18 months. If a business thinks that it’s too small to matter to cybercriminals, then it’s fooling itself with a false sense of security.” – Brian Burch, Symantec (CNN)

For many attacks—API disruption, marketplace fraud, IP theft—the smaller the target, the greater the damage. Startups often lose a year or more when targeted by identity thieves, nation-states, hacktivists, competitors, disgruntled employees, IP thieves, fraudsters or Bitcoin miners. Evernote, Meetup, Feedly, Vimeo, BaseCamp, Shutterstock, MailChimp and Bit.ly all fell victim to extortion rackets, and Code Spaces shut downaltogether. “When our API collapsed under a DDoS attack, we experienced more customer churn in that one day than we had in the entire two years since our launch,” recalled one CEO.
StubhubUber, and Tinder struggle to battle fraud in their marketplaces. Uber employees themselves were caught defrauding competitor Gett. EvernoteBit.ly,FormspringDropboxCupid MediaZendesk, SnapchatClinkleMeetMeLastPass (a password security company!) and many others have had to tell users they lost their passwords or payment credentials to hackers. Cyber thieves stole $5 million worth of Bitcoins from Bitstamp, and destroyed Mt. Gox and Flexcoin. Hackers exposed the content and identities of Yik Yak accounts. The CEOs of HB GarySnapchat and many other startups have been vilified following the theft and publication of embarrassing emails. Google routinely blacklists websites for weeks due to malware. Appstudio,SendGridHB Gary and others have been defaced or even permanently shut down by anti-Western hacktivists for political reasons. For OnlyHonest.com, the damage appears to have been fatal.
And even if your startup beats the odds and survives its infancy without a serious incident, playing catch up later will cost many times more in time, money, reputation and distraction as you change architectures, re-writing code, moving infrastructure, re-imaging laptops, migrating email, and replacing billing systems.
But until your startup can afford a CISO, how do you protect your mission, IP, brand, assets, employees, and capital from cyber threats? For startups with limited resources and intense focus, what’s the right measured response to these threats?
To help our portfolio companies answer these questions, I surveyed Silicon Valley startups to understand their regrets and successes in mitigating cyber losses. I interviewed technical founders, Engineering VPs, CTOs and CISOs to hear what measures they wish they’d taken sooner, or in some cases, later. I also tapped security gurus like Dan Farmer (author, inventor of SATAN), Barrett Lyon (anti-DDoS warrior, hero of Fatal System Error), and Richard Clarke (author, top cyber intelligence officer in the White House and State Department).
I learned that adopting strong security practices is much easier to do when a company is young, while they still enjoy a small attack surface and a manageable number of devices to track. I was encouraged to hear that some basic, affordable practices â€“ both technical and cultural â€“ can mitigate the greatest risks to startups, positioning them well to develop a strong cyber posture as they grow.
So I now advise founders to download and consider these recommendations from Day One, and review the team’s progress quarterly. A secure organization starts at the top with the CEO, but demands a team effort. Whether you’re in a leadership position in finance, engineering, operations or finance, or simply in a position to influence those who are, following this 10-step plan could potentially save your venture.

BVP-Cyber-Security-Graphic
Cyber security will remain unsolved for as long as people compete for resources on a planet with digital assets. We face this challenge together, so as you read, please think about what may be missing, and share your feedback. As a VC, I share the entrepreneur’s goal – to minimize the distraction of cyber threats so each startup can focus on its mission. Keep in mind that if you want your venture to make a dent in the world, you can’t let hackers make a dent in you.

          The Failure of Cyber Security and the Startups Who Will Save Us        
2014 will be remembered as the year the cyber dam broke, breached by sophisticated hackers who submerged international corporations and government agencies in a flood of hurt. Apple, Yahoo, PF Changs, AT&T, Google, Walmart, Dairy Queen, UPS, eBay, Neiman Marcus, US Department of Energy and the IRS all reported major losses of private data relating to customers, patients, taxpayers and employees. Breaches at Boeing, US Transportation Command, US Army Corps of Engineers, and US Investigations Services (who runs the FBI’s security clearance checks) reported serious breaches of national security. Prior to last year, devastating economic losses had accrued only to direct targets of cyberwarfare, such as RSA and Saudi Aramaco, but in 2014, at least five companies with no military ties -- JP Morgan, Target, Sony, Kmart, and Home Depot – incurred losses exceeding $100M from forensic expenses, investments in remediation, fines, legal fees, re-organizations, and class-action lawsuits, not to mention damaged brands.

The press has already reported on where things went wrong at each company, promoting a false sense of security based on the delusion that remediating this vulnerability or that one would have prevented the damage. This kind of forensic review works for aviation disasters, where we have mature, well understood systems and we can fix the problems we find in an airplane. But information networks are constantly changing, and adversaries constantly invent new exploits. If one doesn’t work, they simply use another, and therein lies the folly of forensics.

Only when you step back and look at 2014 more broadly can you see a pattern that points toward a systemic failure of the security infrastructure underlying corporate networks, described below. So until we see a seismic shift in how vendors and enterprises think about security, hackers will only accelerate their pace of “ownership” of corporate and government data assets.

The Sprawl of Cyberwarfare

The breaches of 2014 demonstrate how cyberwarfare has fueled the rampant spread of cyber crime.

For the past decade, the world’s three superpowers, as well as UK, North Korea and Israel, quietly developed offensive capabilities for the purposes of espionage and military action. Destructive attacks by geopolitical adversaries have clearly been reported on private and public sector targets in the US, Iran, South Korea, North Korea, Israel, Saudi Arabia and elsewhere. While Snowden exposed the extent of cyber espionage by the US, no one doubts that other nations prowl cyberspace to a similar or greater extent.

The technical distinction of these national cyber agencies is that they developed the means to target specific data assets or systems around the world, and to work their way through complex networks, over months or years, to achieve their missions. Only a state could commit the necessary combination of resources for such a targeted attack: the technical talent to create zero-day exploits and stealthy implants; labs that duplicate the target environment (e.g. the Siemens centrifuges of a nuclear enrichment facility); the field agents to conduct on-site ops (e.g. monitoring wireless communications, finding USB ports, or gaining employment); and years of patience. As a result of these investments in “military grade” cyber attacks, the best of these teams can boast a mission success rate close to 100%.

But cyber weapons are even harder to contain than conventional ones. Cyberwar victories have inspired terrorists, hacktivists and criminals to follow suit, recruiting cyber veterans and investing in the military grade approach. (Plus, some nations have started targeting companies directly.) No longer content to publish malware and wait for whatever data pop up, criminals now identify the crown jewels of businesses and target them with what we call Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs). You want credit cards? Get 56 million of them from Home Depot. You want to compromise people with the most sensitive secrets? Go to straight to the FBI’s archive of security clearances. You want the design of a new aircraft? Get it from Boeing. You need data for committing online bank theft? Get it for 76 million households at JP Morgan Chase.

That’s why cyberspace exploded in 2014.

This is Not the Common Cold

But why are the crown jewels so exposed? Haven’t these companies all spent millions of dollars every year on firewalls, anti-virus software, and other security products? Don’t their IT departments have security engineers and analysts to detect and deflect these attacks?

The problem is that up until this year, corporate networks were instrumented to defend against generic malware attacks that cause minimal damage to each victim. Generic malware might redirect your search page, crash your hard drive, or install a bot to send spam or mine bitcoin. It’s not looking for your crown jewels because it doesn’t know who you are. It may worm its way to neighboring machines, but only in a singular, rudimentary way that jumps at most one or two hops. It’s automated and scalable – stealing pennies from all instead of fortunes from a few. If it compromises a few machines here and there, no big deal.

But with Advanced Persistent Threats, a human hacker directs the activity, carefully spreading the implant, so even the first point of infection can lead to devastation. These attacks are more like Ebola than the common cold, so what we today call state-of-the-art security is only slightly more effective than taking Airborne (and that’s a low bar). As long as corporate networks are porous to any infection at all, hackers can launch stealth campaigns jumping from host to host as they map the network, steal passwords, spread their agents, and exfiltrate data. Doubling down on malware filters will help, but it can never be 100% effective. All it takes is one zero-day exploit, or a single imprudent click on a malicious email, tweet or search result, for the campaign to begin. Or the attacker can simply buy a point of entry from the multitudes of hackers who already have bots running on the Internet.

Too Big Data

The dependence on malware filters is only half the problem. Ask any Chief Information Officer about his or her security infrastructure and you will hear all about the Secure Operation Center in which analysts pour over alerts and log files  (maybe even 24/7) identifying anomalies that may indicate security incidents. These analysts are tasked with investigating the incidents and rooting out any unauthorized activity inside the network. So even if someone can trespass the network, analysts will stop them. And indeed, thousands of security products today participate in the ecosystem by finding anomalies and generating alerts for the Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) system. Every week a new startup pops up, touting an innovative way to plow through log files, network stats, and other Big Data to identify anomalies.

But sometimes anomalies are just anomalies, and that’s why a human analyst has to investigate each alert before taking any pre-emptive action, such as locking a user out of the network or re-imaging a host. And with so many products producing so many anomalies, they are overwhelmed with too much data. They typically see a thousand incidents every day, with enough time to investigate twenty. (You can try to find more qualified analysts but only with diminishing returns, as each one sees less of the overall picture.)

That’s why, for example, when a FireEye system at Target spotted the malware used to exfiltrate 40 million credit cards, it generated an alert for the Secure Operations Center in Minneapolis, and nothing happened. Similarly, a forensic review at Neiman Marcus revealed more than 60 days of uninvestigated alerts that pointed to exfiltrating malware. SONY knew they were under attack for two years leading up to their catastrophic breach, and still they couldn’t find the needles in the haystack.

And yet, the drumbeat marches on, as security vendors old and new continue to tout their abilities to find anomalies.  They pile more and more alerts into the SIEM, guaranteeing that most will drop on the floor. No wonder APTs are so successful.

A Three Step Program

"Know Thy Self, Know Thy Enemy" - Sun Tzu, The Art of War

We need to adapt to this new reality, and the cyber security industry needs to enable it. Simply put, businesses need to focus their time and capital on stopping the most devastating attacks.

The first step here is to figure out what those attacks look like. What are your crown jewels? What are the worst case scenarios? Do you have patient data, credit cards, stealth fighter designs, a billion dollars in the bank, damning emails, or a critical server that, if crippled by a Distributed Denial of Service attack, would cause your customers to instantly drop you? As you prioritize the threats, identify your adversaries. Is it a foreign competitor, Anonymous, disgruntled employees, or North Korea? Every business is different, and each has a different boogeyman. The good news is that even though most CEO’s have never thought about it, this first step is easy and nearly free. (Cyber experts like Good Harbor or the BVP-funded K2 Intelligence can facilitate the process.)

Second, businesses need real-time threat intelligence that relate to their unique threatscapes. Almost every security technology depends upon a Black List that identifies malicious IP addresses, device fingerprints, host names, domains, executables or email addresses, but naturally they come with generic, one-size-fits-all data. Dozens of startups now sell specialized threat intel, such as BVP-funded Internet Identity, which allows clusters of similar companies to pool their cyber intelligence, or BVP-funded iSight Partners, whose global field force of over 100 analysts track and profile cyber adversaries and how to spot them in your network. What better way for your analysts to investigate the most important incidents, than to prioritize the ones associated with your most formidable adversaries?

"This is a global problem. We don't have a malware problem. We have an adversary problem. There are people being paid to try to get inside our systems 24/7"         
- Tony Cole, FireEye VP on CNN

And finally, security analysts need fewer alerts, not more. Instead of finding more anomalies, startups would better spend their time finding ways to eliminate alerts that don’t matter, and highlighting the ones that do. They would provide the analysts with better tools for connecting the alerts into incidents and campaigns, tapping into the skills of experienced “military grade” hackers to profile the attack patterns.

Outlook

The challenge of securing data today is obviously complex, with many other pressing opportunities for improvement such as cloud security, mobile security, application security and encryption. But as cyberwar spreads to the commercial Internet, re-orienting enterprise security to focus on Advanced Persistent Threats should be the single most important initiative for businesses and vendors alike. Of course, inertia is powerful, and it may take boards of directors, CISOs, product managers, entrepreneurs, and venture capitalists another tumultuous year in cyberspace to get the message.

          Bitcoin Soars to Record as Buyers Look Beyond Miners' Split        

When Ethereum’s hard fork took place a year ago, it was the original version of the cryptocurrency that garnered the most adherents subsequently. That now also appears to be happening following the bitcoin hard fork.


          LedgerX gets U.S. approval for derivatives on digital currencies         

You may remember back on March 10th when the Winklevoss twins failed to have an ETF approved for bitcoin on the basis that it was not regulated and it did not have the transparency of other asset classes. That decision held back the price for two weeks.


          Bitcoin Soars as Upgrade Backers Hoist Beers to Armistice        

For a globally traded asset the inability to ever mint more than 21 million coins seems like an arbitrarily tight constraint. Among the factors that represented medium-term challenges for bitcoin include the fact more than 16 million have already minted. The difficulty of minting each new coin becomes progressively more difficult so the supply issue was an inhibiting factor growth. Alternative coins such as Ethereum already possess a built-in ability to expand supply in an orderly manner. All of these factors were putting pressure on the bitcoin community to react. Their response appears measured and looks like they will succeed in avoiding a hard fork event.


          Bitcoin Split Risks Increase         

Bitcoin was set up so that no more than 21 million coins could ever be mined. More than 16 million have already been created, with the complexity of each successive block growing progressively more expensive to solve. With bitcoins already priced out to 6 decimal places that limitation has asked legitimate questions about the sustainability of the global market when supply is so limited. That has led to a debate between monetary purists and miners who want to support the value by withholding supply and others who wish to see dynamic supply to allow the market to grow.


          A Trader So Secret They're Only Known by a Number Just Made Over $200 Million in One Month         

Interest in cryptocurrencies has surged this year with stories, such as this one, of riches made almost overnight attracting legions of private investors into the market. The immutability of bitcoin and the anonymity of holding its, the ability to transfer currency across borders without government interference and the fact supply is limited are all aspects of the market which appeal to investors. However, it is the smart contracts aspect of the cryptocurrency market that represents where it can grow and which lends it utilitarian value.


          Email of the day on companies benefitting from cryptocurrency mining:        

Thank you for this question. I’ve done quite a bit of digging and I can’t find ARM listed as a manufacturer of chips that can be used to mine cryptocurrencies.

While the number of cryptocurrencies is proliferating it is important to highlight that not all use the same kind of technology. For example bitcoin mining is largely confined to ASIC machines manufactured in China and sold on Amazon for example. This article contains quite a bit of detail of which are the best machines.


          Email of the day - on bitcoin        

Thank you for this topical question. The supply of bitcoin might be limited but the number of different cryptocurrencies is limited only by the imaginations of anyone who wants to create one. Therefore we can conclude a bubble is evident because supply within the asset class is increasing rapidly, as is investor interest with the explosion in demand for mining equipment i.e. graphics cards.


          Kik App Debuts Digital Currency Amid Bitcoin Boom        

Tech startups have cottoned onto the fact that cryptocurrencies are based on reasonably easily repeatable strings of code so they can create their own. Monero, Dash, NeosCoin, MaidSafeCoin, SysCoin, SIBCoin, Couterparty, ShadowCash, Storjcoin X, Nexus, Potcoin, Synereo, NAV Coin and Stellar Lumens, to name a few, have all been created in the last two years and that’s leaving out the large ones like Ethereum and Ripple.


          Are Cryptocurrencies Becoming a New Asset Class?        

Bitcoin has been discovered by US investors. At least that is what the flow on fiatleak.com tells me. When I was looking at the website in March, China accounted for the vast majority of traffic but today US volumes outpaced China by 5:1. The other largest buyers are the EU, Russia, Brazil and South Africa.


          If you bought $100 of bitcoin 7 years ago, you'd be sitting on $75 million now         

At the Tech Symposium I spoke at in London last week Charlie Morris made a number of important points about bitcoin which I found very educative. The most important of these was his point relating to the fact that bitcoin is a digital asset rather than a currency so it is a misnomer to describe it as a cryptocurrency. The best way to value bitcoin is in the strength of the network supporting it and therefore it is a barometer for the prevalence and acceptance of blockchain.


          Update for Customers With Bitcoin Stored on Coinbase         

This is not exactly great news for investors in bitcoin since the essence of the platform is that the blockchain is inalienable and now they find that there are going to be two blockchains.


          SEC Decision on the proposed Winklevoss bitcoin ETF         

Bitcoin was subject to quite acute volatility in the aftermath of the decision; falling from $1300 to below $1000 before recovering somewhat and rallying rather impressively today.


          Winklevoss Twins Lose Bid for Bitcoin Trade Fund        

I have not been tempted by Bitcoin but like any big mover it charts well. I assume that we have seen another peak for the potentially lengthy medium-term.


          Bitcoin May Go Boom: A Guide to This Week's Big SEC Decision         

Bitcoin is a speculative vehicle with unique characteristics that make it especially attractive for people looking to skirt capital controls and other forms of official surveillance. To date Chinese traders have dominated volume but if the SEC allows ETFs to track the price then it will potentially open up additional sources of demand from investors seeking an alternative asset class.


          We Must Leave the EU Quickly; It is Falling Apart Faster Than I Thought        

‘Those whom the gods wish to destroy, they first make mad’, including driving them into the EU. It will be a rude awakening for political Remainers, from the House of Lords to Scottish Nationalists.

It is hard to see how the breakup of the EU could not be disruptive, not least because it is the last outcome that many people have expected. They bought into the concept of an EU gravy train, without questioning the flawed economics of this reckless experiment. This will be the focus of many books and university economics courses for decades to come.

Allister Heath feels that we should leave quickly. I have long favoured a rapid exit from the EU but the UK Government appears to have felt that this was too controversial and risky, not least in terms of public opinion, plus UK businesses and also foreign businesses with divisions in Britain. This view may be correct.

At this point, time may work in the UK’s favour, although there are certainly plenty of risks, mainly in the form of EU bad debts. This will all be very contentious, although I maintain that over the longer term, Europe including the UK will be far better off as a trade association of independent, self-governed countries with their own currencies. For convenience, they can also maintain a separate commercial currency, such as a version of the euro or bitcoin, if they wish. This trade association would be for mutual convenience within Europe but the individual countries should also be free to trade with other countries, where there are mutual interests and trade synergies. The last thing Europe should want or need is more trade barriers.

A PDF of Allister Heath's column is posted in the Subscriber's Area.


          The Markets Now        

I look forward to another lively and enjoyable evening, which features the return of Dr David Brown who will discuss the new Industrial Revolution.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, recently consolidating a short-term overbought condition. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs during the rest of this week. If indices such asNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Conversely, watch out over the next few months if the early November reaction lows are broken. Note how well theUK’s FTSE 100 Indexhas performed, benefitting considerably from all the inform commodity shares.

Keep an eye onChina’s Shanghai A-Shares Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. China remains an enigma; bullish and bearish views could not be further apart, so keep an eye onBitcoin which fallen back sharply. China’s government has clearly moved to stem this route for exporting capital and the Offshore Renminbi has also established a peak of at least near-term significance.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th,and to hear your views as well. Come along to contribute and enjoy the fun.

Stop Press:Iain Little’s colleague, Bruce Albrecht, will be joining Markets Now on the 16thand delivering a short chart-based presentation.


          Bitcoin Falls 6% After PBOC Shanghai Inspects Trading Platform         

Bitcoin is a small market compared to national currencies, However there is no getting around the fact that Chinese traders represent the majority of participants in that market. Therefore rather that Bitcoin representing the primary organ for money leaving the country it has been the victim of its own limited success by embarrassing monetary policy makers.


          The Markets Now        

I look forward to another lively and enjoyable evening, which features the return of Dr David Brown who will discuss the new Industrial Revolution.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, recently consolidating a short-term overbought condition. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs during the rest of this week. If indices such asNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Conversely, watch out over the next few months if the early November reaction lows are broken. Note how well the UK’s FTSE 100 Index has performed, benefitting considerable from all the inform commodity shares.

Keep an eye onChina’s Shanghai A-Shares Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. China remains an enigma; bullish and bearish views could not be further apart, so keep an eye onBitcoin. Rich Chinese are said to be behind Bitcoin’s sharp rise in their efforts to get money out of the country.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th,and to hear your views as well. Come along to contribute and enjoy the fun.

Stop Press:Iain Little’s colleague, Bruce Albrecht, will be joining Markets Now on the 16thand delivering a short chart-based presentation.


          The Markets Now        

I look forward to another lively and enjoyable evening, which features the return of Dr David Brown who will discuss the new Industrial Revolution.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, recently consolidating a short-term overbought condition. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs during the rest of this week. If indices such asNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Conversely, watch out over the next few months if the early November reaction lows are broken.

Also, keep an eye onChina’s Shanghai A-Shares Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. China remains an enigma; bullish and bearish views could not be further apart, so keep an eye onBitcoin. Rich Chinese are said to be behind Bitcoin’s sharp rise in their efforts to get money out of the country.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th,and to hear your views as well. Come along to contribute and enjoy the fun.

Stop Press:Iain Little’s colleague, Bruce Albrecht, will be joining Markets Now on the 16thand delivering a short chart-based presentation.


          The Markets Now        

I look forward to another lively and enjoyable evening, which features the return of Dr David Brown who will discuss the new Industrial Revolution.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, recently consolidating a short-term overbought condition. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs in the first two weeks of January. If indices such asNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Conversely, watch out of the early November reaction low is broken.

Also, keep an eye onChina’s Shanghai A-Shares Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. China remains an enigma; bullish and bearish views could not be further apart, so keep an eye onBitcoin. Rich Chinese are said to be behind Bitcoin’s sharp rise in their efforts to get money out of the country.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th,and to hear your views as well. Come along to contribute and enjoy the fun.

Stop Press: Iain Little’s colleague, Bruce Albrecht, will be joining Markets Now on the 16th and delivering a short chart-based presentation.


          The Markets Now        

I look forward to another lively and enjoyable evening, which features the return of Dr David Brown who will discuss the new Industrial Revolution.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, recently consolidating a short-term overbought condition. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs throughout January. If indices such as theNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Looking further ahead, I would give the upside the benefit of the doubt provided the early November reaction low is not challenged.

Also, keep an eye onChina’s Shanghai A-Shares Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. Sharp reactions inBitcoin and the offshore Chinese Renminbi suggest that China is trying to slow its currency outflow.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th,and to hear your views as well. Come along to contribute and enjoy the fun.


          Bitcoin Suffers Biggest Fall in Two Years Following China Currency Gains        

I have been pointing out in recent audios that China represents the majority of Bitcoin trading and what goes on in that country is likely to have a profound impact on the value of the cryptocurrency. In many respects we might look on Bitcoin as the anti-Renminbi because it tends to do best when Chinese investors are worried about the stability of their domestic currency.


          The Markets Now        

I look forward to another lively and enjoyable evening, which features the return of Dr David Brown who will discuss the new Industrial Revolution.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, recently consolidating a short-term overbought condition. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs in the first two weeks of January. If indices such asNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Conversely, watch out of the early November reaction low is broken.

Also, keep an eye onChina’s Shanghai A-Shares Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. China remains an enigma; bullish and bearish views could not be further apart, so keep an eye onBitcoin. Rich Chinese are said to be behind Bitcoin’s sharp rise in their efforts to get money out of the country.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th,and to hear your views as well. Come along to contribute and enjoy the fun.


          The Markets Now        

I look forward to another lively and enjoyable evening, which features the return of Dr David Brown, who will discuss the new Industrial Revolution.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, recently consolidating a short-term overbought condition. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs in the first two weeks of January. If indices such asNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Conversely, watch out of the early November reaction low is broken.

Also, keep an eye onChina’s Shanghai A-Shares Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. China remains an enigma; bullish and bearish views could not be further apart, so keep an eye onBitcoin. Rich Chinese are said to be behind Bitcoin’s sharp rise in their efforts to get money out of the country.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th,and to hear your views as well. Come along to contribute and enjoy the fun.


          The Markets Now        

We will have a few political revolutions to discuss as well. I look forward to seeing our interesting subscribers at another lively and enjoyable evening.

Meanwhile, I hope subscribers have profited from the Trump bull market rally, currently short-term overbought. It will be interesting to see how Wall Street performs in the first two weeks of January. If indices such asNasdaq Compositeremain steady, let along firm, we could see another upside momentum move. Conversely, watch out of the early November reaction low is broken.

Also, keep an eye on China’s Shanghai Index, because the world’s second largest economy is the next biggest international influence after Wall Street. China remains an enigma; bullish and bearish views could not be further apart, so keep an eye onBitcoin. Rich Chinese are said to be behind Bitcoin’s sharp rise in their efforts to get money out of the country.

It will be interesting to discuss all of this at Markets Now on January 16th, and to hear your views as well. Come along and enjoy the fun.


          Shopping with Bitcoin: a comprehensive guide for beginners        

Bitcoin is digital money, and the best thing about money is spending it. So here is the most comprehensive guide I could put together about shopping with bitcoin, to help […]

The post Shopping with Bitcoin: a comprehensive guide for beginners appeared first on Cryptorials.


          Follow The Coin        

CEO & FOUNDER

Follow The Coin is the homepage of digital currency and FinTech The leading video news platform with the best Bitcoin and FinTech coverage online.

Join our engaged community! www.FollowTheCoin.com Youtube.com/FollowTheCoin @FollowTheCoin Facebook/FollowTheCoin 


          Seu SUPER PAI merece um SUPER PRESENTE!!Vem pra Compushop Importados        
Seu SUPER PAI merece um SUPER PRESENTE!! Vem pra Compushop Importados aproveitar nossas inúmeras promoções pra presentear seu Herói! #COMPUSHOPIMPORTADOS #SUPERPAI #SUPERHEROI #SUPERPRESENTES PUBLICIDADE. PUBLICIDADE: BITCOIN#Capitanbado As transferências internacionais e câmbio. Em vez de usar uma mudança de bolso ou um cartão bancário de rua, você pode pagar instantaneamente uma conta com sua carteira móvel […]
          Ser reconhecida como uma empresa de referência mundial em inovação para negócios por meio das moedas digitais.        
Ser reconhecida como uma empresa de referência mundial em inovação para negócios por meio das moedas digitais. Preparem-se… Dia 15 de outubro o Rio de Janeiro será palco do nosso próximo encontro. #SomosMinerWorld #Bitcoin #OpenRioMiner #MoedasDigitais Unimos o mercado de medas digitais e todos os lucros possíveis de se obterem com ele. Por meio do […]
          MINERWORLD:ABRA SUA CONTA BITCOIN AQUI        
#Revista Vip presente. Www.revistavip.info BITCOIN#Capitanbado https://www.facebook.com/BitcoinCapitanBado/ Você deixa seu dinheiro no Banco? Pois é um dia eu também fiz isso… Não seria melhor o dinheiro trabalhar para você ao invés de fingir que te pagam alguma coisa… Chama BITCOIN CAPITANBADO,WHASSAP. +595 984 202944 que dobramos seu capital em 12 meses. ABRA SUA CONTA AQUI.> https://backoffice.minerworld.com.br/waldirvip […]
          Bitofertas Patrocinadora Oficial da seleção Brasileira Master com maquininhas que recebem débito ,crédito e BITCOIN!!!!        
Anúncio: Venha fazer parte da mais sólida empresa de investimentos e empreendedorismo de Bitcoin do mercado. A única que possui Pool de Mineração no Paraguay,China e México , Trading, Casa de Câmbio,...

Isso é apenas um resumo! Para saber os detalhes dessa oportunidade, acesse o blogdosrepresentantes.com
          æ±äº¬ã‚¹ã‚¿ãƒ¼ãƒˆã‚¢ãƒƒãƒ—ゲートウェイに参加して来てプレゼン内容をざっくりまとめてみたよ!        

今週はこちらのイベントの参加して来ました!


f:id:g08m11:20141116231234j:plain
http://tokyo-startup.jp/


http://instagram.com/p/vcjxgywYrU/



始まったオープニング映像がめちゃくちゃ凝ってて
いつものスタートアップのイベントと違うなーといった印象からスタート。


「TOKYO STARTUP GATEWAY 2014」は
単にビジネスプランコンテストというだけでなく、
「人を育てるコンテスト」であり、
「世界を変えるビジネス」であり、
「起業家かが起業家を育てる」こと

がコンセプトになっていて特別、webやアプリに特化している訳ではなく
そのポリシーに反していない事業は全て対象といった印象を受けました。

審査員パネルディスカッション

「起業のきっかけは?」

村口さん:自分自身が独立してみることから始めた。シリコンバレーの影響を受けた。97,98から独立。山一証券倒産も大きいターニングポイント。

橋本さん:ネガティブな理由。父親との事業倒産からの連帯保証人による2億8000万円の借金ができた。
その後からサラリーマンに戻ったが、会社とけんか別れして自分で独立した。

駒崎さん:元々は学生起業家としてベンチャーを設立。その後、フリーターになって
NPOを設立。

「投資家は起業家のどこを見ているか?」

村口さん:事業家のアイデアは山ほどあるが需要と供給のミスマッチが起きてる。
誠実さが大事。世論では「勝つ為には何でもやれ」という風潮だが、
その前に「誠実に取引ができること」、「根性」、「行動力」
「無名であること」、「貧乏であること」、「若いこと」を私は見ている。

「旧世代との戦い方/転がし方のコツとかある?」

駒崎さん:世の中の規制や仕組みは変えられる。ただ変え方としては机上の空論ではなく、実験的に自分が先に行動して
実績を出すことが重要。それを「変える側(規制なら政治家)」にアピールすることが大事。

「2020年に向けて注目していることを含めて何か一言」

橋本さん:注目しているのはメイドインジャパン。伝統工芸の部分。中国との価格競争でつぶれる事態を無くしたい。
海外のミドル層、アッパー層向けのサービス。それ以外には少子化やシングルマザーを支援するビジネスに注目。
ビジネスとして動けるモデルの起業家が出てきてほしい。


村口さん:IT革命によるマシンスペック向上によるもの。IoT。人と人がつながるサービスは増えたけど物と物が繋がるサービスが
求められる。メーカー資源をITと繋ぐ。BitCoinに関係するサービス。PM2.5に始まる環境問題を解決するサービス。
巨大な問題は巨大なチャンスという認識。


駒崎さん:ビジネスチャンスは腐るほど。課題先進国は日本だけ。働き手は2/3に減る。課題解決先進国になって、
解決策を諸外国にシェアして人類に貢献することができる。

ファイナリストのプレゼン

こちらはPCの電源不足や自分の興味/関心の都合により、全てのプレゼン内容が書かれている訳ではありません。予め、ご了承ください。

世の中のいい道とランナーを繋ぐWEBサービス|“道”を資源と捉えた持続可能な地域活性 大森さん

経歴:ランニングのNPOを設立した経歴。
社会情勢:市民ランナー1000万人に増加。マラソン大会は1000回以上開催。
市場規模:ランニングウェアは数百億、旅行の市場規模は2兆円。
概要:地域とランナーを繋ぐサービス
詳細:イメージとしてはtripeeceのランニング特化版。
・いい道と拠点の検索、予約
・ツアー申し込み
・旅とランの情報が入る
・お気に入りコースをコレクション
・ユーザーフォローからのコミュニケーション
所感:
・アンケート結果などの引用元が不明。その結果って正しいの?
・サービスイメージがよくわからない。プロト大事。
・リクルートやtripeeceが同様のサービスを開始した時の対策および、対応が不明。
・審査員の駒沢さんの質問内容がほぼコンサル。損益分岐点やキャッシュフローについて質問するのは良い。

僕ならこんなことしたい

・初級、中級、上級などに分けてユーザーは家の近くだろうが旅行先だろうが気軽に参加することができるサービスに振り切る。

フィリピン貧困層8000万人向け流通サービス 木部さん

経歴:サリサリストア(全国に70万店舗ある小売店でBOPの方が購入先)と提携。2000店舗開拓済み。サリサリストアにコンサルを実施。マーケティング実施。
社会情勢:フィリピンの経済成長率は高いが貧しい人が多い。購入先も異なる。サリサリストアだと商品が高い。
流通構造の課題(サリサリストアはメーカー契約出来ない)
市場規模:?
概要:?
詳細:
・サリサリストア専門のフリーペーパーの発行
・店舗登録アプリとデータベースの運用
所感:
・サービスイメージがよくわからない。プロト大事。動画大事。
・自己紹介の順序がおかしい。最初の方が良い。
・熱意が伝わってこない。プレゼン大事。
・大手や資源がある企業が同様のサービスをしてきたらの対応や対策が不明。
・このサービスでもともとの課題って解決するか不明。

僕ならこんなことしたい

・アッパーやミドル層向けの家事代行マッチングサービス

電力予報!センサー技術、電力需要予測、金融技術を組み合わせた次世代の電力ビジネスです。 陳さん

経歴:電力関係のメーカーのエンジニアから、今は大学生。
社会情勢:電力小売全面自由化、電力切り替えの意欲が高まっている。
市場規模:?
概要:?
詳細:
・スマートメータなどのデータがベース。
・消費者データと電力データのマッチングをアルゴリズム化していることが強み。
・SECOMやJALカードと提携して顧客データを囲い込む予定。
・新電力から電力料金の1%の販売手数料により年間11億円ほどが見込める。
所感:
・めちゃくちゃ説明が丁寧。
・ユーザーヒアリングしたのか気になった。
・審査員の森川さんが電力業界にも知見があって驚いた。

僕ならこんなことしたい

・電力自由化向けの教育アプリ
・電力自由化の料金診断アプリ

縫製業のクラウドソーシング 伊藤さん

経歴:縫製業を10年間運用してきた。縫製職人を1週間で約100名集めることに成功。ダンス衣装の個人ネットショプを実現。
社会情勢:日本の縫製技術は世界最高。後継者不足。技術者不足。残り10年で縫製業界はつぶれる見込み。
市場規模:市場規模4000億円のc2c市場。年間221億の規模。
概要:縫製職人と個人ネットショッピングのマッチングサービス
詳細:
・ユーザーがやるのは服のイメージを伝えるだけ。
・職人の独立も支援可能
・デザインやパターンはnutteが代行
・ユーザーはオリジナルデザインをwebでデザインするか、写真で送る、クラウドソーシングでイメージだけを伝えて
 デザインをnutteがする。
・類似サービスshitateruとの差別化は以下の通り。
・一般個人であるユーザサグメント。
・ロット数が少数で可能
・C2Cというビジネス形態の違い
・β版が2015年の1月にリリース。
所感:
・めちゃくちゃ説明が丁寧。
・課題意識とそのアクションプランが直結していて良いと思う。
・アプリ開発に1年は掛かり過ぎな感じ。
・メイドインジャパンという今の時代にマッチしていて良いと思う。

僕ならこんなことしたい

・アクセサリー版nutte
・nutteの縫製職人によるwebオンライン動画サービス

日本発祥“富山の置き薬”で、アフリカ農村部の人々に薬へのアクセスを提供するソーシャル・ビジネス 町井さん

経歴:アフリカによるNPOの活動経験あり。一時的な支援ではなくて持続的に回せる仕組みが必要と考えたのかきっかけ
社会情勢:アフリカの医療は問題だらけ。(医療費高くて待ち時間長い。)
市場規模:?
概要:アフリカBOP向け置き薬のシステム
詳細:
・日本発祥の置き薬のシステムをそのままアフリカへ輸出するもの。
・タンザニアから参入してアフリカ全体へ展開予定(人口増加率などを考慮)
・日本の製薬会社から箱詰めして、アフリカへ輸送
・NPO法人申請
・日本財団との差別化は
 漢方薬を現地で調達しているかどうかが違い。日本で調達しているため偽薬が0になっている。
 日本財団はモンゴルで手一杯。セグメントの違い。
・移送コストの部分は日本しかないもののコストはしようがないが、現地で調達出来る部分は
 現地でというmixしていって固定費を下げる仕組みを入れていく。
所感:
・めちゃくちゃ説明が丁寧。
・課題意識とそのアクションプランが直結していて良いと思う。
・メイドインジャパンという今の時代にマッチしていて良いと思う。

僕ならこんなことしたい

・日本の余剰薬の在庫を持ち必要な人が格安で手に入れることができるアフリカBOPの薬ECサービス

経験豊富なエンジニアが開発の詰まりの即時解決をサポートする、オンライン技術相談サービス 上田さん

経歴:IT企業のインターン経験あり。自分の遅延問題が社外エンジニアに効いたら一発で解決したことがきっかけ。
社会情勢:開発の遅れやシステムの欠陥・障害などが発生。日本のweb市場は成長率が高い。
市場規模:18万ほどいる日本のスタートアップがターゲット。海外では既にいて大型資金調達済み。
概要:アフリカBOP向け置き薬のシステム
詳細:
・社外のエキスパートが教える。
・10分は1000円〜利用可能。
・コアタイムアドバイザーと登録アドバイザーで解決
・ニーズなどのヒアリングは実施済み。
・フリーランスの方が登録
・サービスリリース⇒動画会員⇒世界展開
所感:
・めちゃくちゃ説明が丁寧。
・課題意識とそのアクションプランが直結していて良いと思う。
・利用しまくってその分のコストの相殺の仕方をどうするかが不明確。
・質問の仕方で得られる効果が変動しやすそう
・エンジニアのインセンティブの捉え方が難しそう

僕ならこんなことしたい

・格安の定額制で外部の優秀なエンジニアに回答して貰えるサービス
・自分の理想のメンターが選べるマッチングサービス

ハイレベルなマンガイラストの作画技術を、オンラインで学ぶことができるWEBサービス 伊藤さん

経歴:DeNA入社。漫画家志望により美大卒。
社会情勢:日本の漫画文化は海外で大人気
市場規模:1.2億に向けてリリースする。
概要:アフリカBOP向け置き薬のシステム
詳細:
・漫画イラストのオンラインサービス
・ホワイトベースの市場であること
・メインターゲットは趣味で書いてるユーザーや作家ではないが志望している15〜24歳の女性
・無料動画レッスンを作成、その後、有料動画レッスンを作成していく
・一期目から40万ダウンロードを実現して三期目に450万ダウンロードを実現予定
所感:
・めちゃくちゃ説明が丁寧。
・pixivやnico動がやった方が早い気がする。
・動画レッスンがどの分まで貯まってリリースするのかでバズるかどうか決まりそう。
・動画レッスンを載せる作家やコンテンツ提供者のモチベーション維持が肝な気がする。

僕ならこんなことしたい

・格安の定額制で外部の優秀な漫画家に回答して貰えるサービス
・ムゲンアップなどイラストクラウドソーシング向けのイラストe-learning特化型B2Bサービス
・漫画特化型ポートフォリオ作成サイト


結果発表

オーディエンス賞

移動はもうヒトがするべき仕事じゃない!一輪運搬車(ねこ車)のEV化キットで現場を効率的に 嘉数さん

優秀賞

移動はもうヒトがするべき仕事じゃない!一輪運搬車(ねこ車)のEV化キットで現場を効率的に 嘉数さん
空ぶクルマによる非日常体験サービスで、次世代の子供達に夢と感動を提供します 中村さん

最優秀賞

日本発祥“富山の置き薬”で、アフリカ農村部の人々に薬へのアクセスを提供するソーシャル・ビジネス 町井さん


          512 Making Choices Based On "Scarcity" (BitCoin Related) - Simple Programmer Podcast        

Making Choices Based On "Scarcity" (BitCoin Related)

Lately, someone contacted me about a HUGE opportunity with BitCoin. In this email, he said that the price was going up like 2x in the same evening. Something happened and I couldn't read the email that night.0

Bottom line: I missed the opportunity.

At first, I got irritated. How could I miss such opportunity?

However, after some time I realized I was making this choice based on scarcity. And I must tell you why you SHOULDN'T be doing this.

Real Estate Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjwWT1Xy3c4VWM_cpbXXYIYSaLjiTdtA-
Doing Things With Unbounded Upsides: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_-nuY7hhg8

Buy Simple Programmer SHIRT: https://store.simpleprogrammer.com/

Simple Programmer Podcast

 


          IMMERSION 2014 Early Registration Ends May 23        
IMMERSION 2014 early registration closes Friday, May 23. Sponsored by Disney and Target, IMMERSION 2014 features speakers and exhibits by Disney Animation Studios, the Smithsonian Institution, Google, Microsoft, Stratasys, Oculus, Oracle, Bitcoin and more. Speakers, exhibitors and registration details are online at http://summit.ImmersiveEducation.org Building on the success of the previous 8 years of Immersive Education […]
          Decentralized Long-Term Preservation        
Lambert Heller is correct to point out that:
name allocation using IPFS or a blockchain is not necessarily linked to the guarantee of permanent availability, the latter must be offered as a separate service.
Storage isn't free, and thus the "separate services" need to have a viable business model. I have demonstrated that increasing returns to scale mean that the "separate service" market will end up being dominated by a few large providers just as, for example, the Bitcoin mining market is. People who don't like this conclusion often argue that, at least for long-term preservation of scholarly resources, the service will be provided by a consortium of libraries, museums and archives. Below the fold I look into how this might work.

These institutions would act in the public interest rather than for profit, and thus somehow be exempt from the effects of increasing returns to scale. Given the budget pressures these institutions are under, I'm skeptical. But lets assume that they are magically exempt.

The whole point of truly decentralized peer-to-peer systems is that they cannot be centrally managed; for example by a consortium of libraries. A system of this kind needs management that arises spontaneously by the effect of its built-in incentives on each individual participant. Among the functions that this spontaneous management needs to perform for a long-term storage service is to ensure that:
  • the storage resources needed to meet the demand are provided,
  • they are replaced as they fail or become obsolete,
  • each object is adequately replicated to ensure its long-term viability,
  • the replicas maintain suitable geographic and organizational diversity,
  • the software is maintained to fix the inevitable vulnerabilities,
and that the software is upgraded as the computing infrastructure evolves through time. Note that these are mostly requirements on the network as a whole rather than on individual peers. The SEC's report on Initial Coin Offerings recognizes similar needs:
Investors in The DAO reasonably expected Slock.it and its co-founders, and The DAO’s Curators, to provide significant managerial efforts after The DAO’s launch. The expertise of The DAO’s creators and Curators was critical in monitoring the operation of The DAO, safeguarding investor funds, and determining whether proposed contracts should be put for a vote. Investors had little choice but to rely on their expertise.

By contract and in reality, DAO Token holders relied on the significant managerial efforts provided by Slock.it and its co-founders, and The DAO’s Curators, as described above.
Even in the profit-driven world of crypto-currencies, the incentive from profit doesn't always lead to concensus (see the issue of increasing the Bitcoin block size, and the DAO heist), or to the provision of resources to meet the demand (see Bitcoin's backlog of unconfirmed transactions). Since we have assumed away the profit motive, and all we have left is a vague sense of the public interest, the built-in incentives powering the necessary functions will be weak.

This lack of effective governance is a problem in the short-term world of crypto-currency speculation (see the surplus GPUs flooding the market as Ethereum miners drop out). It is a disaster in digital preservation, where the requirement is to perform continuously and correctly over a time-scale of many technology generations. Human organizations can survive much longer time-scales; 8 years ago my University celebrated its 800-th birthday. Does anybody believe we'll be using Bitcoin or Ethereum 80 years from now as it celebrates its 888-th?

We have experience in these matters. Seventeen years ago we published the first paper describing the LOCKSS peer-to-peer digital preservation system. At the software level it was, and has remained through its subsequent evolution, a truly decentralized system. All peers are equal, no peer trusts any other, peers discover others through gossip-style communication. At the management and organizational level, however, formal structures arose such as the LOCKSS Alliance, the MetaArchive and the CLOCKSS Archive to meet real-world demand for the functions above to be performed in a reliable and timely fashion.

Trying by technical means to remove the need to have viable economics and governance is doomed to fail in the medium- let alone the long-term. What is needed is a solution to the economic and governance problems. Then a technology can be designed to work in that framework. Blockchain is a technology in search of a problem to solve, being pushed by ideology into areas where the unsolved problems are not technological.
          Is Decentralized Storage Sustainable?        
There are many reasons to dislike centralized storage services. They include business risk, as we see in le petit musée des projets Google abandonnés, monoculture vulnerability and rent extraction. There is thus naturally a lot of enthusiasm for decentralized storage systems, such as MaidSafe, DAT and IPFS. In 2013 I wrote about one of their advantages in Moving vs. Copying. Among the enthusiasts is Lambert Heller. Since I posted Blockchain as the Infrastructure for Science, Heller and I have been talking past each other. Heller is talking technology; I have some problems with the technology but they aren't that important. My main problem is an economic one that applies to decentralized storage irrespective of the details of the technology.

Below the fold is an attempt to clarify my argument. It is a re-statement of part of the argument in my 2014 post Economies of Scale in Peer-to-Peer Networks, specifically in the context of decentralized storage networks.

To make my argument I use a model of decentralized storage that abstracts away the details of the technology. The goal is a network with a large number of peers each providing storage services. This network is:
  • decentralized in the sense that no single entity, or small group of entities, controls the network (the peers are independently owned and operated), and
  • sustainable, in that the peers do not lose financially by providing storage services to the network.
I argue that this network is economically unstable and will, over time, become centralized. This argument is based on work from the 80s by the economist W. Brian Arthur1.

Let us start by supposing that such a decentralized storage network has, by magic, been created:
  • It consists of a large number of peers, initially all providing the same amount of storage resource to the network.
  • Users submit data to be stored to the network, not to individual peers. The network uses erasure coding to divide the data into shards and peers store shards.
  • Each peer incurs costs to supply this resource, in the form of hardware, bandwidth, power, cooling, space and staff time.
  • The network has no central organization which could contract with the peers to supply their resource. Instead, it rewards the peers in proportion to the resource they supply by a token, such as a crypto-currency, that the peers can convert into cash to cover their costs.
  • The users of the network rent space in the network by buying tokens for cash on an exchange, setting a market price at which peers can sell their tokens for cash. This market price sets the $/TB/month rent that users must pay, and that peers receive as income. It also ensure that users do not know which peers store their data.
Although the income each peer receives per unit of storage is the same, as set by the market, their costs differ. One might be in Silicon Valley, where space, power and staff time are expensive. Another might be in China, where all these inputs are cheap. So providing resources to the network is more profitable in China than in Silicon Valley.

Suppose the demand for storage is increasing. That demand will preferentially be supplied from China, where the capital invested in adding capacity can earn a greater reward. Thus peers in China will add capacity faster than those in Silicon Valley and will enjoy not merely a lower cost base because of location, but also a lower cost base from economies of scale. This will increase the cost differential driving the peers to China, and create a feedback process.

Competition among the peers and decreasing hardware costs will drive down the  $/TB/month rent to levels that are uneconomic for Silicon Valley peers, concentrating the storage resource in China (as we see with Bitcoin miners).

Lets assume that all the peers in China share the same low cost base. But some will have responded to the increase in demand before others. They will have better economies of scale than the laggards, so they will in turn grow at the laggards' expense. Growth may be by increasing the capacity of existing peers, or adding peers controlled by the entity with the economies of scale.

The result of this process is a network in which the aggregate storage resource is overwhelmingly controlled by a small number of entities, controlling large numbers of large peers in China. These are the ones which started with a cost base advantage and moved quickly to respond to demand. The network is no longer decentralized, and will suffer from the problems of centralized storage outlined above.

This should not be a surprise. We see the same winner-take-all behavior in most technology markets. We see this behavior in the Bitcoin network.

I believe it is up to the enthusiasts to explain why this model does not apply to their favorite decentralized storage technology, and thus why it won't become centralized. Or, alternatively, why they aren't worried that their decentralized storage network isn't actually decentralized after all.

References:

  1. Arthur, W. Brian. Competing technologies and lock-in by historical small events: the dynamics of allocation under increasing returns. Center for Economic Policy Research, Stanford University, 1985. in Arthur, W. Brian. Increasing Returns and Path Dependence in the Economy, Michigan University Press, 1994.

          Archive vs. Ransomware        
Archives perennially ask the question "how few copies can we get away with?"
This is a question I've blogged about in 2016 and 2011 and 2010, when I concluded:
  • The number of copies needed cannot be discussed except in the context of a specific threat model.
  • The important threats are not amenable to quantitative modeling.
  • Defense against the important threats requires many more copies than against the simple threats, to allow for the "anonymity of crowds".
I've also written before about the immensely profitable business of ransomware. Recent events, such as WannaCrypt, NotPetya and the details of NSA's ability to infect air-gapped computers should convince anyone that ransomware is a threat to which archives are exposed. Below the fold I look into how archives should be designed to resist this credible threat.

Background

Before looking at the range of defenses an archive could deploy, some background on the ransomware threat.

What Is Ransomware?

Ransomware is a class of malware which, once it infects a system, typically behaves as follows:
  • It searches the network for other systems to which it can spread, either because they have vulnerabilities the ransomware knows how to exploit, or because credentials for those systems are available on the infected system.
  • It encrypts all data writable by the infected system with a unique key, and reports the key and the system's ID to the ransomware's headquarters.
  • It informs the user that their data has been encrypted, and that the user can obtain a key to decrypt it by paying a ransom, typically in Bitcoin.
Some ransomware operations, Cerber is an example, have a sterling reputation for customer service, and if paid are highly likely to deliver a key that will permit recovery of the data. Others are less professional and, through bugs, incompetence, or a get-rich-quick business model may accept payment but be unable or unwilling to enable decryption. Of course, paying the ransom merely encourages the ransomware business, already worth by some estimates $75B/yr.

From the archive's point of view, ransomware is a similar threat to other forms of external or internal attacks, such as a disgruntled sysadmin, or a catastrophic operator error. The consequence of infection can be the total loss of all stored data. I'm just using ransomware as an example threat because it is timely and credible.

How Is Ransomware Delivered?

I've been asked "Archives don't have much money, so why would ransomware target one?" It is true that archives are less lucrative targets than FedEx, Maersk, SF Muni, Rosneft, WPP, the UK NHS and other recent victims of ransomware. But it is a misconception to think that ransomware is targeted at lucrative systems. For example, a nation might think that destroying the archive of another nation would be an appropriate way to express displeasure.

Like other forms of malware, ransomware is delivered not just by targeted means, such as phishing emails, but also by many different scattershot techniques including Web drive-bys, malicious advertising, compromised system updates, and in the case of WannaCry a network vulnerability. And, since recent ransomware exploits vulnerabilities from the NSA's vast hoard, it is exceptionally virulent. Once it gets a toehold in a network, it is likely to spread very rapidly.

Defenses

I now examine the various techniques for storing data to assess how well they defend against ransomware and related threats.

Single copy

Let us start by supposing that the archive has a single copy of the content in a filesystem on a disk. We don't need to invoke ransomware to know that this isn't safe. Failure of the disk will lose the entire archive; bit-rot affecting either or both of a file and its stored hash will corrupt that file.

Disk Mirror

One way to protect data is by directing each write to two identical disks, mirrors of each other. If one fails the data can be read from the other.

But when one fails the data is no longer protected, until the system is repaired. The safety of the data depends on the operator noticing the failure, replacing the failed disk, and copying the data from the good disk to the replacement before the good disk fails.

For well-administered systems the mean time to failure of a disk is long compared to the time between operators paying attention, so if disks failed randomly and independently it would be unlikely that the good disk would fail during repair. Alas, much field evidence shows that failures are significantly correlated. For example, raised temperatures caused by cooling system failure may cause disks to fail together.

Disk mirroring doesn't protect against ransomware; the writes the malware uses to encrypt the data get to both halves of the mirror.

Filesystem Backup

Another common technique is to synchronize a master copy with a slave copy in a different filesystem on a different disk. If there is a failure in the master, the system can fail-over, promoting the slave to be the new master and having the operator (eventually) create a new slave with which it can be synchronized.

Although this technique appears to provide two filesystems, the synchronization process ensures that corruption (or encryption by ransomware) of the master is rapidly propagated to the slave. Thus it provides no protection against bit-rot or ransomware. Further, because both the master and the slave filesystems are visible to (and writable by) the same system, once it is compromised both are at risk.

Network Backup

There are two ways data can be backed up over a network to a separate system, push and pull. In push backup, data is written to a network filesystem by the system being backed up. This is equivalent to backing up to a local filesystem. Ransomware can write to, so will encrypt, the data in the network filesystem.

Pull backup is better. The remote system has read access to the system being backed up, which has no write access to the network file system. Ransomware cannot immediately encrypt the backup, but the pull synchronization process will overwrite the backup with encrypted data unless it can be disabled in time.

Both mirroring and backup have a replication factor of two; they consume twice the storage of a single copy.

RAID

Disk mirroring is technically known as RAID 1. RAID N for N > 1 is a way to protect data from disk failures using a replication factor less than two. Disk blocks are organized as stripes of S blocks. Each stripe contains D data blocks and P parity blocks, where D+P=S. The data can be recovered from any D of the blocks, so the raid can survive P failures without losing data. For example, if D=4 and P=1, data is safe despite the loss of a single drive at a replication factor of 1.25.

RAID as such offers no protection against bit-rot. Some RAID systems provide the option of data scrubbing. If this is enabled, the RAID system uses a background task to identify individual bad blocks and repair them before they are detected as the result of a user read. Data scrubbing can prevent some forms of bit-rot, typically at the cost of some performance. Anecdotally it is rarely enabled.

But, since the content still appears in a single filesystem, any compromise of the system, for example by ransomware, risks total loss. As disk capacity has increased but disk transfer speed and the unrecoverable bit error rate (UBER) have not increased to match, the time needed after the operator has noticed a disk failure to fill the replacement disk and the size of the data transfer involved mean that single parity RAID (S-D=P=1) is no longer viable.

Erasure Coding

RAID is a form of erasure coding, but more advanced systems (such as IBM's Cleversafe) use erasure coding to spread the content across multiple systems in a network rather than multiple disks in a system. This can greatly reduce the correlation between media failures. Since the erasure-coded storage appears to applications as a filesystem, it provides no protection against ransomware or other application system compromises.

Two Independent Copies

Why is it that none of the approaches above defend against ransomware? The reason is that none provides independent replicas of the data. Each system has a single point from which the ransomware can encrypt all copies.

Suppose the archive maintains two independent copies, independent in the sense that they are separate in geographic, network and administrative terms. No-one has credentials allowing access to both copies. Although both copies may have been originally ingested from the same source, there is no place from which both copies can subsequently be written or deleted. Now the ransomware has to infect both replicas nearly simultaneously, before the operators notice and take the other replica off-line.

Three Independent Copies

Of themselves, 2 independent copies do not protect against more subtle corruption of the data than wholesale encryption. It is often assumed that storing hashes together with the data will permit detection of, and recovery from, corruption. But this is inadequate. As I wrote in SHA-1 is Dead:
There are two possible results from re-computing the hash of the content and comparing it with the stored hash:
  • The two hashes match, in which case either:
    • The hash and the content are unchanged, or
    • An attacker has changed both the content and the hash, or
    • An attacker has replaced the content with a collision, leaving the hash unchanged.
  • The two hashes differ, in which case:
    • The content has changed and the hash has not, or
    • The hash has changed and the content has not, or
    • Both content and hash have changed.
The stored hashes are made of exactly the same kind of bits as the content whose integrity they are to protect. The hash bits are subject to all the same threats as the content bits.
For example, if an attacker were to modify both the data and the hash on one of two replicas, the archive would be faced with two different versions each satisfying the hash check. Which is correct? With 3 independent copies, this can be decided by an election, with the replicas voting on which version is correct.

Alternatively, techniques based on entangling hashes in Merkle Trees can be used to determine which hash has been modified. These are related to, but vastly cheaper than, blockchain technologies for the same purpose. The problem is that the Merkle tree becomes a critical resource which must itself be preserved with multiple independent copies (making the necessary updates tricky). If ransomware could encrypt it the system would be unable to guarantee content integrity.

Four Independent Copies

If one of the three independent copies is unavailable, the voting process is unavailable. Four independent copies is the minimum number that ensure the system can survive an outage at one copy.

Lots of Independent Copies

Just as with disks, it turns out that outages among notionally independent copies are correlated. And that archives, unable to afford intensive staffing, are often slow to notice and respond to problems, lengthening the outages. Both make it more likely that more than one copy will be unavailable when needed to detect and recover from corruption.

Tape Backup

The traditional way to back up data was to a cycle of tapes. To over-simplify, say the cycle was weekly. Each day the data would be backed up to, and overwrite, the same day's tape from the previous week; a replication factor of 7 that was only affordable because tape was so cheap compared to disk. With this traditional approach ransomware would have to be a good deal cleverer. It would need to intercept the backups and encrypt them as they were written while delaying encryption of the disk itself for a whole backup cycle.

In practice things would be more complex. Writing to tape is slow, and tape is not that much cheaper than disk, so that complex cycles interleaving full and incremental backups are used. Generic ransomware would be unlikely to know the details, so would fail to destroy all the backups. But recovery would be a very slow and error-prone process, unlikely to recover all the data.

Write-Once Media Backup

One excellent way to defend against ransomware and many other threats (such as coronal mass ejections) is to back the data up to write-once optical media. Kestutis Patiejunas built such a system for Facebook, and it is in production use. But few if any archives operate at the scale needed to make these systems cost-effective.

How Does This Relate To LOCKSS?

Nothing in the foregoing is specific to the LOCKSS technology; it all applies to whatever technology an archive uses. The LOCKSS system was designed to cope with a broad range of threats, set out initially in a 2005 paper, and elaborated in detail for the 2014 TRAC audit of the CLOCKSS Archive. Although these threat models don't specifically call out ransomware, which wasn't much of a threat 3 years ago, they do include external attack, internal attack and operator error. All three have similar characteristics to ransomware.

Thus the LOCKSS Polling and Repair Protocol, the means by which peers in a LOCKSS network detect and repair damage such as encryption by ransomware, was designed to operate with at least 4 copies. Assuming that no copy is ever unavailable when needed is not realistic; as with any preservation technology 4 is the minimum for safety.

Our experience with operating peer-to-peer preservation networks of varying sizes in the LOCKSS Program led us to be comfortable with the ability of these networks with realistic levels of operator attention to detect damage to, and make timely repairs to, content provided they have 7 or more peers. As the number of peers decreases, the level of operator attention needed increases, so there is a trade-off between hardware and staff costs.
          Blockchain as the Infrastructure for Science? (updated)        
Herbert Van de Sompel pointed me to Lambert Heller's How P2P and blockchains make it easier to work with scientific objects – three hypotheses as an example of the persistent enthusiasm for these technologies as a way of communicating and preserving research, among other things. Another link from Herbert, Chris H. J. Hartgerink's Re-envisioning a future in scholarly communication from this year's IFLA conference, proposes something similar:
Distributing and decentralizing the scholarly communications system is achievable with peer-to-peer (p2p) Internet protocols such as dat and ipfs. Simply put, such p2p networks securely send information across a network of peers but are resilient to nodes being removed or adjusted because they operate in a mesh network. For example, if 20 peers have file X, removing one peer does not affect the availability of the file X. Only if all 20 are removed from the network, file X will become unavailable. Vice versa, if more peers on the network have file X, it is less likely that file X will become unavailable. As such, this would include unlimited redistribution in the scholarly communication system by default, instead of limited redistribution due to copyright as it is now.
I first expressed skepticism about this idea three years ago discussing a paper proposing a P2P storage infrastructure called Permacoin. It hasn't taken over the world. [Update: my fellow Sun Microsystems alum Radia Perlman has a broader skeptical look at blockchain technology. I've appended some details.]

I understand the theoretical advantages of peer-to-peer (P2P) technology. But after nearly two decades researching, designing, building, deploying and operating P2P systems I have learned a lot about how hard it is for these theoretical advantages actually to be obtained at scale, in the real world, for the long term. Below the fold, I try to apply these lessons.

For the purpose of this post I will stipulate that the implementations of both the P2P technology and the operating system on which it runs are flawless, and their design contains no vulnerabilities that the bad guys can exploit. Of course, in the real world there will be flaws and vulnerabilities, but discussing their effects on the system would distract from the message of this post.

Heller's three hypotheses are based on the idea of using a P2P storage infrastructure such as IPFS that names objects by their hash:
  • It would be better for researchers to allocate persistent object names than for digital archives to do so. There are a number of problems with this hypothesis. First, it doesn't describe the current situation accurately. Archives such as the Wayback Machine or LOCKSS try hard not to assign names to content they preserve, striving to ensure that it remains accessible via its originally assigned URL, DOI or metadata (such as OpenURL). Second, the names Heller suggests are not assigned by researchers, they are hashes computed from the content. Third, hashes are not persistent over the timescales needed because, as technology improves over time, it becomes possible to create "hash collisions", as we have seen recently with SHA1.
  • From name allocation plus archiving plus x as a “package solution” to an open market of modular services. Heller is correct to point out that:
    The mere allocation of a persistent name does not ensure the long-term accessibility of objects. This is also the case for a P2P file system such as IPFS. ... Since name allocation using IPFS or a blockchain is not necessarily linked to the guarantee of permanent availability, the latter must be offered as a separate service.
    The upside of using hashes as names would be that the existence and location of the archive would be invisible. The downside of using hashes as names is that the archive would be invisible, posing insurmountable business model difficulties for those trying to offer archiving services, and insurmountable management problems for those such as the Keeper's Registry who try to ensure that the objects that should be preserved actually are being preserved. There can't be a viable market in archiving services if the market participants and their products are indistinguishable and accessible freely to all. Especially not if the objects in question are academic papers, which are copyright works.
  • It is possible to make large volumes of data scientifically usable more easily without APIs and central hosts. In an ideal world in which both storage and bandwidth were infinite and free, storing all the world's scientific data in an IPFS-like P2P service backed up by multiple independent archive services would indeed make the data vastly more accessible, useful and persistent than it is now. But we don't live in an ideal world. If this P2P network is to be sustainable for the long term, the peers in the network need a viable business model, to pay for both storage and bandwidth. But they can't charge for access to the data, since that would destroy its usability. They can't charge the researchers for storing their data, since it is generated by research that is funded by term-limited grants. Especially in the current financial environment, they can't charge the researchers' institutions, because they have more immediate funding priorities than allowing other institutions' researchers to access the data in the future for free.
I have identified three major problems with Heller's proposal which also apply to Hartgerink's:
  • They would populate the Web with links to objects that, while initially unique, would over time become non-unique. That is, it would become possible for objects to be corrupted. When the links become vulnerable, they need to be replaced with better hashes. But there is no mechanism for doing so. This is not a theoretical concern, the BitTorrent protocol underlying IPFS has been shown to be vulnerable to SHA1 collisions.
  • The market envisaged, at least for archiving services, does not allow for viable business models, in that the market participants are indistinguishable.
  • Unlike Bitcoin, there is no mechanism for rewarding peers for providing services to the network.
None of these has anything to do with the functioning of the software system. Heller writes:
There is hope that we will see more innovative, reliable and reproducible services in the future, also provided by less privileged players; services that may turn out to be beneficial and inspirational to actors in the scientific community.
I don't agree, especially about "provided by less privileged players". Leave aside that the privileged players in the current system have proven very adept at countering efforts to invade their space, for example by buying up the invaders. There is a much more fundamental problem facing P2P systems.

Four months after the Permacoin post, inspired in part by Natasha Lomas' Techcrunch piece The Server Needs To Die To Save The Internet about the MaidSafe P2P storage network, I wrote Economies of Scale in Peer-to-Peer Networks. This is a detailed explanation of how the increasing returns to scale inherent to technologies in general (and networked systems in particular) affect P2P systems, making it inevitable that they will gradually lose their decentralized nature and the benefits that it provides, such as resistance to some important forms of attack.

Unconfirmed transactions
The history of Bitcoin shows this centralizing effect in practice. It also shows that, even when peers have a viable (if perhaps not sustainable) business model, based in Bitcoin's case on financial speculation, Chinese flight capital and crime such as ransomware, resources do not magically appear to satisfy demand.

As I write, about 100MB of transactions are waiting to be confirmed. A week and a half ago, Izabella Kaminska reported that there were over 200,000 transactions in the queue. At around 5 transaction/sec, that's around an 11-hour backlog. Right now, the number is about half that. How much less likely are resources to become available to satisfy demand if the peers lack a viable business model?

Because Bitcoin has a lot of peers and speculation has driven its value sky-high, it is easy to assume that it is a successful technology. Clearly, it is very successful along some axes. Along others, not so much. For example, Kaminska writes:
The views of one trader:
... This is the biggest problem with bitcoin, it’s not just that it’s expensive to transact, it’s uncertain to transact. It’s hard to know if you’ve put enough of a fee. So if you significantly over pay to get in, even then it’s not guaranteed. There are a lot of people who don’t know how to set their fees, and it takes hours to confirm transactions. It’s a bad system and no one has any solutions.
Transactions which fail to get the attention of miners sit in limbo until they drop out. But the suspended state leaves payers entirely helpless. They can’t risk resending the transaction, in case the original one does clear eventually. They can’t recall the original one either. Our source says he’s had a significant sized transaction waiting to be settled for two weeks.

The heart of the problem is game theoretical. Users may not know it but they’re participating in what amounts to a continuous blind auction.

Legacy fees can provide clues to what fees will get your transactions done — and websites are popping up which attempt to offer clarity on that front — but there’s no guarantee that the state of the last block is equivalent to the next one.
Source
Right now, if you want a median-sized transaction in the next block you're advised to bid nearly $3. The uncertainty is problematic for large transactions and the cost is prohibitive for small ones. Kaminska points out that the irony is:
given bitcoin’s decentralised and real-time settlement obsession, ... how the market structure has evolved to minimise the cost of transaction.

Traders, dealers, wallet and bitcoin payments services get around transaction settlement choke points and fees by netting transactions off-blockchain.

This over time has created a situation where the majority of small-scale payments are not processed on the bitcoin blockchain at all. To the contrary, intermediaries operate for the most part as trusted third parties settling netted sums as and when it becomes cost effective to do so. ... All of which proves bitcoin is anything but a cheap or competitive system. With great irony, it is turning into a premium service only cost effective for those who can’t — for some reason, ahem — use the official system.
There's no guarantee that the axes on which Bitcoin succeeded are those relevant to other blockchain uses; the ones on which it is failing may well be. Among the blockchain's most hyped attributes were the lack of a need for trust, and the lack of a single point of failure. Another of Kaminska's posts:
Coinbase has been intermittently down for at least two days.

With an unprecedented amount of leverage in the bitcoin and altcoin market, a runaway rally that doesn’t seem to know when to stop, the biggest exchange still not facilitating dollar withdrawals and incremental reports about other exchanges encountering service disruption, it could just be there’s more to this than first meets the eye.

(Remember from 2008 how liquidity issues tend to cause a spike in the currency that’s in hot demand?)
These problems illustrate the difficulty of actually providing the theoretical advantages of a P2P technology "at scale, in the real world, for the long term".

Update: In Blockchain: Hype or Hope? Radia Perlman provides a succinct overview of blockchain technology, asks what is novel about it, and argues that the only feature of the blockchain that cannot be provided at much lower cost by preexisting technology is:
a ledger agreed upon by consensus of thousands of anonymous entities, none of which can be held responsible or be shut down by some malevolent government
But, as she points out:
most applications would not require or even want this property. And, as demonstrated by the Bitcoin community's reaction to forks, there really are a few people in charge who can control the system
She doesn't point out that, in order to make money, the "thousands of ... entities" are forced to cooperate in pools, so that in practice the system isn't very decentralized, and the "anonymous entities" are much less anonymous than they would like to believe (see here and here).

Radia's article is a must-read corrective to the blockchain hype. Alas, although I have it in my print copy of Usenix ;login:, it doesn't appear to be on the Usenix website yet, and even when it is it will only be available to members for a year. I've made a note to post about it again when it is available.


          Another Class of Blockchain Vulnerabilities        
For at least three years I've been pointing out a fundamental problem with blockchain systems, and indeed peer-to-peer (P2P) systems in general, which is that maintaining their decentralized nature in the face of economies of scale (network effects, Metcalfe's Law, ...) is pretty close to impossible. I wrote a detailed analysis of this issue in Economies of Scale in Peer-to-Peer Networks. Centralized P2P systems, in which a significant minority (or in the case of Bitcoin an actual majority) can act in coordination perhaps because they are conspiring together, are vulnerable to many attacks. This was a theme of our SOSP "Best Paper" winner in 2003.

Now, Catalin Cimpanu at Bleeping Computer reports on research showing yet another way in which P2P networks can become vulnerable through centralization driven by economies of scale. Below the fold, some details.

Cimpanu writes:
the Bitcoin network, despite counting thousands of nodes, is largely hosted on a small number of ISPs (networks, Autonomous Systems — AS). For example, 13 ISPs host 30% of the entire Bitcoin network, while 39 ISPs host 50% of the whole Bitcoin mining power.

Furthermore, most of the traffic exchanged between Bitcoin nodes passes through a small number of ISPs. In exact numbers, just three ISPs handle 60% of all Bitcoin traffic, right now.
and this fact is being exploited via BGP hijacks:
Based on statistical data, researchers say they’ve found that around 100 Bitcoin nodes are the victims of BGP hijacks each month, with the largest number of BGP hijacks happening in November 2015, when 8% of the entire Bitcoin nodes (447 at the time) were the victims of such incidents.
The research is described in Hijacking Bitcoin: Routing Attacks on Cryptocurrencies by Maria Apostolaki, Aviv Zohar and Laurent Vanbever, who write:
While challenging, we show that two key properties make routing attacks practical: (i) the efficiency of routing manipulation; and (ii) the significant centralization of Bitcoin in terms of mining and routing. Specifically, we find that any network attacker can hijack few (<100) BGP prefixes to isolate ∼50% of the mining power — even when considering that mining pools are heavily multi-homed.
They show two classes of routing-based attacks on the Bitcoin network are feasible:
First, we evaluate the ability of attackers to isolate a set of nodes from the Bitcoin network, effectively partitioning it. Second, we evaluate the impact of delaying block propagation by manipulating a small number of key Bitcoin messages.
BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) is a long-standing vulnerability of the Internet, so it is not surprising that it can and is affecting the Bitcoin network. The more interesting part of their research is that it illuminates second-order effects of economies of scale on P2P networks. Economies of scale drove Bitcoin mining from home computers into large data centers. Economies of scale drove these data centers to be located in a few areas with very cheap power and cooling. Thus these data centers naturally used the few ISPs that served these areas, leading to centralization at the network level, and thus to vulnerabilities caused by centralization at the network level.
          WannaCry : une partie des bitcoins liés aux rançons convertis en Monero, une cryptomonnaie dont les transactions seraient « non traçables »        
WannaCry : une partie des bitcoins liés aux rançons convertis en Monero
Une cryptomonnaie dont les transactions seraient « non traçables Â»

Le bot_Twitter de suivi des adresses Bitcoin utilisées par les auteurs du ransomware a récemment détecté une activité sur ces derniers. On sait que les cybercriminels ont procédé en multiples retraits pour un montant total en bitcoins équivalent à 140 000 $. De récents développements de Forbes à ce sujet indiquent qu'une partie de ces...
          Le ransomware Cerber se dote d'une fonctionnalité lui permettant de voler des portefeuilles Bitcoin et les mots de passe associés        
Le ransomware Cerber se dote d'une fonctionnalité lui permettant de voler des portefeuilles Bitcoin
et les mots de passe associés

Depuis sa découverte en mars de l'année dernière, le ransomware Cerber n'a eu de cesse d'évoluer. Pour rappel, il infiltre le système et chiffre divers fichiers (.jpg, .doc, .raw, .avi, etc.). Après un chiffrement réussi, le ransomware se sert d'une voix synthétique pour prévenir l'utilisateur : « Attention ! Attention ! Vos documents, photos, bases...
          Ransomware damages rise 15X in 2 years to hit $5 billion in 2017        

          The week in GRC: Libor to be phased out in 2021 and Finra appoints new top enforcer        

This week’s governance, compliance and risk-management stories from around the web

– The European Central Bank arranged a rescue of Banco Popular Español in June in the face of a run that left the lender close to collapse. But according to The Wall Street Journal, Banco Popular’s problems ran deeper, touching an area that has been difficult for European regulators to address: poor governance. Governance experts say the bank’s problems included board members who weren’t independent enough from management and deals with companies that had ties to the board.

Corporate governance shortcomings are more common at European banks than at their US counterparts, experts say. A Banco Popular spokesperson said Spain’s securities regulator reviewed and had no objection to the bank’s designation of board members as independent. A board member can be considered independent for up to 12 years under Spanish law, the spokesperson noted.


Bloomberg reported that a former UBS Group compliance officer and a day trader charged by UK regulator the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) with making £1.4 million ($1.8 million) from insider trading pleaded not guilty in a London court. Fabiana Abdel-Malek and Walid Choucair entered the pleas at a hearing on Monday. They were accused by the FCA of committing five counts of insider dealing between June 2013 and June 2014. The FCA alleged Abdel-Malek obtained the information through her role at UBS. The trial has been scheduled for October 2018.


– US bank CEO pay is settling at more than twice the average pay of bank bosses in Europe, and shareholders are more determined than ever to prevent such US norms taking hold across the Atlantic, the Financial Times reported. ‘Investors are working very hard to contain what they perceive to be a US pay escalation from infecting other geographies,’ said John Roe, head of analytics at Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS). ‘At the behest of’ those investors, he said, ISS now excludes US companies from the ‘peer analysis’ it does to assess whether executives in Europe, Canada and Asia are being paid in line with industry norms. 


– Meanwhile, the WSJ noted that Trump administration regulators have signaled they want to abandon plans to further regulate pay on Wall Street, but that aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act and changes in the economics of the banking industry have already resulted in tougher compensation controls.

Portions of the Dodd-Frank mandate – including making pay more sensitive to risk and long-term results – are part of guidelines adopted by the Federal Reserve and other agencies. Regulators including the SEC recently dropped efforts to craft those tougher provisions from their published agendas. But big banks have moved to rein in pay, pressured by shareholders seeking higher dividends and stock buybacks, because they work under higher capital requirements that have pressured profitability and squeezed the amount of money available for compensation.


– German generic drug company Stada Arzneimittel said its board of directors had recommended that shareholders accept an improved takeover bid by private equity firms Bain Capital and Cinven, according to The New York Times. The deal, which valued Stada at $4.8 billion, came after a bid in June by Bain and Cinven was unable to get support from 75 percent of shareholders. The new offer has a lower threshold for acceptance of 63 percent. ‘The executive board has reached the conclusion that the current offer appropriately reflects both the enterprise value and the growth potential of Stada,’ said Engelbert Coster Tjeenk Willink, Stada’s CEO.


– The WSJ reported that Americans – reputed to be the most litigious people in the world – are filing fewer lawsuits. Fewer than two in 1,000 people claiming to be victims of inattentive motorists, medical malpractice, faulty products and other civil wrongs filed tort lawsuits in 2015, down sharply from 1993, when roughly 10 in every 1,000 Americans filed such suits. A range of factors are fueling the decline, including state restrictions on litigation, the increasing cost of bringing suits, improved auto safety and a long campaign by businesses to turn public opinion against plaintiffs and their lawyers.


– The SEC announced that Bryan Wood had been named director of the agency’s office of legislative and intergovernmental affairs. He will advise SEC chair Jay Clayton, commissioners and the SEC staff on legislative matters, provide technical assistance on securities-related legislation to Congressional committees and staff, assist in preparing SEC testimony for Congressional hearings, and co-ordinate with other government entities. Wood spent 10 years on Capitol Hill, most recently as senior adviser and counsel at the House Financial Services Committee.


– Bitcoin options exchange LedgerX won approval from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to clear bitcoin options, making it the first US federally regulated platform of its kind, the WSJ said. The venue will allow traders to place options bets on virtual currencies, which have recently posted some of the wildest swings across global markets. LedgerX, which plans to launch in the fall, will offer institutional investors bitcoin puts and calls, contracts that allow them to sell or buy, respectively, at designated prices.


– The SEC issued a report warning that offers and sales of digital assets by ‘virtual’ organizations are subject to the requirements of the federal securities laws. Such offers and sales, conducted by organizations using distributed ledger or blockchain technology, have been referred to as, among other things, ‘initial coin offerings’ or ‘token sales’. Whether a particular investment transaction involves the offer or sale of a security, regardless of the terminology or technology used, will depend on the facts and circumstances, including the economic realities of the transaction.


Bloomberg reported that the FCA issued proposals for ensuring senior staff of financial services firms can be held to account for misconduct on their watch, extending rules already in place for banks to almost all firms. The FCA proposed applying five conduct rules to all staff at firms it supervises. It will also demand that senior managers’ responsibilities are clearly set out so that they can be held responsible for their own and their staff’s actions. The proposals follow a 2015 decision by HM Treasury to apply the rules to all sectors of the industry.

‘This is about individuals, not just institutions,’ said Jonathan Davidson, executive director of supervision for retail and authorizations at the FCA. ‘The new conduct rules will ensure individuals in financial services are held to high standards, and that consumers know what is required of the individuals they deal with.’


– Republican SEC commission member Michael Piwowar urged the US Department of Labor to scrap its fiduciary rule for brokers offering retirement advice, saying it was misguided, Reuters reported. In a comment letter to department, Piwowar said the rule could harm the broker-client relationship. The rule, which has been partly implemented and was proposed during the Obama administration, has been championed by consumer advocates and retirement non-profits. Piwowar said the rule was too dismissive of the important role that disclosures required by the SEC can play in helping guard against conflicts of interest.


– The WSJ said shareholders of SL Green Realty this year for the first time rejected the office building landlord’s 2016 compensation, saying it was too generous and wasn’t sufficiently aligned with investors’ interests. In a non-binding say-on-pay vote in June, investors rejected the company’s 2016 compensation package. SL Green was one of several real estate investment trusts (REITs) in the recently ended proxy season that had their executive pay rejected, marking an unusually strong rebuke of a sector that is generally lauded for its compensation practices.

The chair of SL Green’s compensation committee, John Alschuler, said management was disappointed by the outcome and takes the opinion of its shareholders very seriously. Alschuler said SL Green is a ‘frugal company’ given that its total overhead costs are low compared with comparable REITs.


– FCA chief executive Andrew Bailey has called for the London Interbank Offer Rate (Libor) to be phased out in 2021 and replaced by more reliable alternatives, according to the FT. Bailey said Libor was unable to fulfil its objective of measuring the price banks pay to borrow from each other because this activity has fallen so sharply since the financial crisis. He noted that there had been major governance improvements by the banks that submit rates to create Libor and there was no evidence of fresh wrongdoing. But he added that the present situation was unsustainable.


– State Street Global Advisors pledged in March to throw its weight behind the issue of gender diversity on boards this year, the WSJ noted. The firm found 468 US companies it owns shares in lacked a single female board member, but of that group roughly 400 companies failed to address gender diversity in any meaningful way. The firm then voted against the re-election of directors charged with nominating new board members at each of these companies.

‘The fact that you have more than 400 companies was surprising to me,’ said Rakhi Kumar, head of asset stewardship at State Street Global Advisors, referencing the almost 470 companies that lacked a female board member. Boards have been slow to add women for various reasons, including their infrequent turnover and preference for experienced CEOs. But there has also been pressure from big institutional investors.


– The SEC said Jessica Magee was named associate regional director for enforcement in the agency’s Fort Worth regional office. She succeeds David Peavler, who left the SEC in May. Magee joined the SEC as a staff attorney in the enforcement division in 2010. She became senior trial counsel in 2012, was promoted to assistant regional director in 2015 and became regional trial counsel in 2016.

– The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (Finra) promoted Susan Schroeder to executive vice president and head of enforcement. In addition, Finra said it plans to consolidate its existing enforcement functions into a new, unified enforcement group led by Schroeder, as a result of the self-regulatory organization’s self-evaluation and improvement initiative.

The new unit will bring together two distinct enforcement teams within the organization. One will handle disciplinary actions related to trading-based matters found through the market regulation division’s surveillance and examination programs, and the other will handle cases referred by other regulatory oversight divisions including member regulation, corporate financing, the office of fraud detection and market intelligence, and advertising regulation. Schroeder has been acting head of enforcement since the departure of Brad Bennett earlier this year.


– Procter & Gamble (P&G) sparred with activist investor Nelson Peltz, according to the WSJ, with the two sides debating whether the company’s latest results prove a turnaround is taking hold. P&G executives argued that the company’s higher profit and sales showed progress on efforts to cut costs and refocus on its biggest brands, building their case against Peltz’s demand for a board seat.

But Peltz’s Trian Fund Management issued a statement saying the company continues to lose market share and is saddled with ‘excessive costs and bureaucracy.’ P&G CEO David Taylor said he would listen to Peltz but there was no reason to revisit the company’s strategy or give the activist a board seat.


– Randal Quarles, President Donald Trump’s pick to become the Federal Reserve’s point person on financial regulation, told lawmakers he would support changes to the central bank’s stress tests for big banks, the WSJ reported. At his confirmation hearing before the Senate Banking Committee, Quarles criticized ‘the lack of transparency that has surrounded’ the annual tests, which have become the key regulatory hurdle large US banks face.


Reuters reported that Halliburton will pay $29.2 million to settle civil charges that it violated Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) rules related to books, recordkeeping and internal accounting controls while doing business in Angola. The SEC said Halliburton’s former vice president, Jeannot Lorenz, separately agreed to pay a $75,000 penalty in connection with the alleged violations. Both the company and Lorenz settled without admitting or denying wrongdoing. Halliburton said the US Department of Justice (DoJ) had also investigated the matter and was planning to close it out without filing related criminal charges.

The investigation began after the company received an anonymous allegation about possible FCPA violations in December 2010. The company said it ‘promptly’ reported the tip about possible corruption to the DoJ, conducted its own internal investigation and co-operated with the government. A lawyer for Lorenz could not be reached immediately for comment.


– The WSJ said the three nominees to join the CFTC promised to complete a long-delayed rule on position limits in derivative markets, although the two Republicans and one Democrat disagreed on the specifics. The Republican nominees both argued in favor of robust exemptions to any rule. The nominees – Republicans Dawn Stump and Brian Quintenz and Democrat Russ Behnam – received little pushback from members of the Senate Agriculture Committee at the hearing, and the committee’s top Republican and Democrat said they were eager to move quickly to confirm the nominees and restore the commission to full strength.


          Comment on Resofund Special Show by Pete Loggie        
How about a bitcoin donation button?
          Tech News Today 1825: Google's AMP Stamp        

Tech News Today (MP3)

Bloomberg's sources say that Apple is planning to release a new version of the Apple Watch this year with cellular connectivity and is expected to be showcased along with Apple's big iPhone announcement sometime this Fall.

Google is developing a new feature for publishers that's similar to Snapchat's Discover feature, called Stamp. It uses Google's AMP to deliver swipe-based stories created by publishers and surface in Google search.

LinkedIn is developing a new feature to connect its users in a fashion that's similar to Tinder. Users can swipe through people in their area, from their alma mater, or within their LinkedIn network. If both parties are interested, a connection is made.

Plus, Coinbase is getting in on Bitcoin Cash after all, more leaks of the new Google Pixel phone, and Sam Machkovech from Ars Technica shares his review of the Dark Tower film.

Hosts: Jason Howell and Ron Richards

Guest: Sam Machkovech

Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-today.

Thanks to CacheFly for the bandwidth for this show.


          This Week in Google 416: Mr. Nutter Butter Has a Message for You        

This Week in Google (MP3)

US Digital Service - making government better. Alphabet Q2 earnings up, stocks down. Chrome's ad blocker is available to devs. Not everybody likes Google's plan to track offline sales. Is privacy a fad? Facebook hits 2 billion users. Bitcoin splits, and miners revolt. ACLU supports John Oliver. Millenials confused by discovery of broadcast TV.

  • Jeff's Number: $600/head SV restaurant with gold-flecked steaks
  • Matt Cutt's Thing: Hack the Pentagon!
  • Kevin Marks' Stuff: IndieWeb.org, Liberty Foundation, extra thumb prosthetic

Hosts: Leo Laporte and Jeff Jarvis

Guests: Matt Cutts and Kevin Marks

Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google.

Thanks to CacheFly for the bandwidth for this show.


          This Week in Tech 625: Walking to the Bodega        

This Week in Tech (MP3)

Apple pays $506 million and €1.7 billion for patent infringements. Trump says that Apple will build 3 big plants in the US; Apple declines to comment. Apple kills the iPod Nano and Shuffle. Coders aren't happy about the new spaceship campus. Amazon, Alphabet, and Twitter stocks slide after earning reports, but Facebook is flying high. Your Roomba is NOT spying on you. Sweden leaks private info of all its citizens. Hackers crack safes, pwn voting machines, and inject code into mice at DEF CON. Flash is finally dying - in 2020. Everything you ever wanted to know about the upcoming Bitcoin split but were afraid to ask.

  • Alex "Will" Wilhelm sleeps in Leo's parents' bedroom.
  • Mike Murphy was NOT bought by Steve Job's widow this week.
  • Steve Kovach can see the Empire State Building right now.

Host: Leo Laporte

Guests: Alex Wilhelm, Mike Murphy, and Steve Kovach

Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech

Bandwidth for This Week in Tech is provided by CacheFly.


          Hackers post stolen HBO 'Game of Thrones' scripts online, demand bitcoin ransom        
A hacker or hackers going by the name "Mr. Smith" dumped a trove of stolen HBO files online Monday, hinting at the extent of the network's security breach last week.The files include five "Game of Thrones" scripts and a month's worth of emails from Leslie Cohen, the network's vice president for film programming. This is the second data dump from the recent hack, according to the Associated Press.The hackers also demanded [...]
          Bitcoin for FOSS Projects        
Bitcoin for FOSS Projects
          Bitcoin Exchange Coincheck Unveils $450k Startup Investment Fund        
Tokyo-based cryptocurrency exchange Coincheck is launching a new investment fund.
          $100 Million: Coinbase Raises Biggest-Ever Round for Bitcoin Startup        
Coinbase has closed what is likely the largest-ever funding round by a startup building on a public blockchain and providing cryptocurrency services.
          UK Police Want to Change the Law to Make Bitcoin Seizures Easier        
A research office backed by a number of U.K. police groups has proposed changing the country’s laws to make seizing bitcoin holdings easier.
          SegWit in the Wild: 4 Lessons Bitcoin Can Learn from Litecoin        
How will SegWit impact the bitcoin network? Data from the already upgraded litecoin blockchain can provide an answer.
          Bring on the Forks: Bitcoin Traders See Improving Price Outlook for 2017        
How is bitcoin's recent fork affecting price forecasts? According to bitcoin traders, the weather ahead looks unexpectedly sunny.
          Full Steam Ahead? Segwit2x Reaffirms Bitcoin Hard Fork Plan        
Segwit2x has reconfirmed plans to move forward with its 2mb hard fork in three months. Will this lead to another split?
          Litecoin Prices Hold Steady Near $50 as Bitcoin Locks In SegWit        
Litecoin continues to hover near all-time highs – a move that suggests it could be developing staying power in a diversified crypto market.
          From Kill Switch To Bitcoin, 'WannaCry' Showing Signs Of Amateur Flaws        
Cops have a decent shot at catching run-of-the-mill online scammers — say, the guy selling a car that's just too good to be true on Craigslist. But catching ransomware attackers is generally much more difficult — unless they slip up. The criminals behind the "WannaCry" ransomware attack may have done just that. Experts are now seeing some amateur flaws emerging including an easy-to-find kill switch and the unsophisticated way the attackers are demanding bitcoin from their victims. Ransomware "tends to be a crime that is born on the Internet, born through kits sold on the dark web that already pre-build in anonymity of the perpetrators," said police detective Nick Selby, who specializes in cybercrime. Those "kits" Selby describes are what experts think they're seeing with WannaCry. Somebody's using software tools created by somebody else. "The ransomware itself, we have seen that before in the wild and it's not that sophisticated," said Paul Burbage, malware researcher for Flashpoint
          FS202 Dauerregensendung        
Ach immer diese Sendungen, wo es die ganze Zeit regnet und kurz vor der Sendung fast nichts im Sendungsplan steht. Dieses Mal wird es wirklich meta, wenn wir die Klimazombiekalypse durchsprechen und wie man sich da am besten vorbereitet und welche Auswirkungen Kryptowährungen darauf haben. Denis erläutert dazu noch die ganze komplizierte Scheiße, die gerade bei Bitcoin abgeht und Tim meldet Vollzug im Durchpimpen seines Mac Pro. Also alles wie gehabt.
          FS197 Trucker’s Hitch        
In kleinerer Runde treffen wir zusammen und besprechen zunächst einmal ausführlich hukls Erlebnisse in England, wo er jüngst seinen Segelschein machte. In dem Zuge begeistern wir uns über Knoten und Pfeifen und fordern ein Fach "Leben" in den Schulen. Dann reden wir über den Mac und neueste Trends im Bitcoin-Universum, schauen Software und Vögeln beim Imitieren von Sprache zu, nehmen einen 8-Bit-Computerkurs und fallen dann ins Bett.
          FS192 Rechnungswesen im Autohaus        
Nach einer ausgesetzten Sendung sind wir wieder da. Wir reden ausführlich über die Herausforderungen der digitalen Zettelordnung und Bankkontenverwaltung und ziehen dann durch das Internet um uns über ungesicherte Atombomben, Bitcoin, Go und anderes zu verzetteln. Enjoy the Show.
          In eigener Sache: Neues Unterforum Kryptowährungen und Mining [Notiz]        
Kryptowährungen wie Bitcoin werden immer wichtiger. Mittlerweile entwickeln sie sich von einem Randphänomen zum viel diskutierten und wichtigen Thema
          Kryptowährungen: Ethereum-Handelsvolumen erneut vor Bitcoin        
Der Kurs von Kryptowährungen richtet sich stark nach dem Kurs der ersten und größten Währung dieser Art: Bitcoin. Durch den Anstieg nach der vermiedenen Soft Fork und der Hard Fork, die Bitcoin Cash hervorbrachte sonst aber kaum Auswirkungen hatte, entwickelten sich auch Altcoins wie Ethereum positiv.
          Lawmakers want Australia to recognize bitcoin as official currency        

Lawmakers want Australia to recognize bitcoin as official currency

The post Lawmakers want Australia to recognize bitcoin as official currency appeared first on CalvinAyre.com.


          Thursday's News Links        
[Bloomberg] U.S. Stocks Slump, Volatility Spikes on Korea Spat: Markets Wrap

[Bloomberg] Gold Beats U.S. Stocks as North Korea Worries Drive Haven Demand

[Reuters] U.S. producer prices record biggest drop in 11 months

[Bloomberg] Junk Yields Lining Up With Treasuries Sign of Bubble for BofA

[Reuters] Buoyant bitcoin stirs crypto-bubble fears

[CNBC] China may be hurting its own banks by forcing them to drop risky assets

[NYT] A Missing Tycoon’s Links to China’s Troubled Dalian Wanda

[CNBC] Pentagon plan for pre-emptive strike on North Korea would reportedly launch from base in Guam

[Reuters] North Korea details Guam missile plan, calls Trump's warning a 'load of nonsense'

[Reuters] China seethes on sidelines amid latest North Korea crisis

[Reuters] Exclusive: U.S. destroyer challenges China's claims in South China Sea

[FT] Supranational debt issuance more than doubles in a decade
          Reply to Bitcoins aux enchères en Australie on Mon, 30 May 2016 22:01:42 GMT        

Selon le Financial Times, les autorités australiennes s’apprêtent à vendre aux enchères 24 518 bitcoins saisis dans le cadre d’affaires pénales en 2015. La vente commencera le 20 juin prochain et se déroulera pendant 48 heures. C’est la première vente de ce genre en Australie. Aux États-Unis, le United States Marshals Service a déjà organisé quatre ventes de ce type : 29 … Continuer la lecture de Bitcoins aux enchères en Australie Source: Bitcoin.fr


          Bitcoin lập đỉnh 3.500 USD, đắt gần gấp 3 so với 1 ounce vàng        
Bitcoin vẫn chÆ°a hết làm bất ngờ nhà đầu tÆ° sau khi phá mốc 3.000 USD, đồng tiền này lại tiếp tục lập đỉnh mới 3.500 USD. Theo CoinDesk, giá của bitcoin đã có lúc chạm mức 3.525,04 USD trong chiều ngày hôm qua, trước khi giảm xuống khoảng 3.400 USD vào sáng nay. NhÆ° […]
          Bitcoin Flat Vector Icon        

Bitcoin Flat Vector Icon – simple flat style coin with bitcoin symbol isolated on white background. Download free bitcoin icon as AI and EPS. Learn about bitcoin. Powered by Shutterstock

The post Bitcoin Flat Vector Icon appeared first on SuperAwesomeVectors.


          withdrawl using bitcoin        

New to bitcoin banking and so confused bout where and how my $ goes.

 managed to deposit using bitcoin but took a while for my $ to show up in casino account and I was really worried that I had somehow not sent it correctly. However it did eventually credit  in my casino account. Now I want to withdrawl and I'm just afraid that if I do it wrong I'll lose my withdrawl $ or not be able to figure out how to actually get it back to my bank.

Plus casino has denied my other withdrawl request options. I am US player.

Can someone please explain the process??

Thanks,

Lizzer


          FortuneJack Casino        

Hello, members of the LCB community!

My name is Natalie, and as the community manager at FortuneJack Casino, I'd like to give you all the full rundown on who we are, and why we're different.

FortuneJack is a cryptocurrency casino pioneer. A leader of the niche, we've fostered a community of likeminded players by providing the features that make carefree cryptocurrency gambling second nature. From the selection and quality of games to the promotions and security technology, this is the most transparent, trusted, and thrilling place to place bets.

The FortuneJack team was founded with over 20 years of gambling industry experience – a portfolio that spans some of Eastern Europe's most renowned land-based and online casinos. Our mission was to take all of the features we and our bettors loved about online gambling, take it to the next level, and make it specific to cryptocurrency players.

We've partnered with the industry's leading and most renowned software providers, offering you both quantity and quality – the best of both worlds. With Microgaming, Evolution Gaming, Playson, XPG, and so much more (and many more to come), we have the best of the best.

We offer an incredibly low 1% house edge and provide instant provable fairness verification. (Instant, not 24 hours).

We pay the withdrawal fees for you, and as a BitGo™ partner, processing times for funds to be reflected in your account are nonexistent, no matter what cryptocurrency you prefer: Bitcoin, Dogecoin, Litecoin,       Dash, ETH, Monero.

All year, we offer free spins, giveaways, deposit bonuses, reloads, and other promotions to give you extra bankroll boosters on a consistent basis.

The only thing we're missing is you. Join here, and start a new chapter in online gaming, where unrivaled, imaginative entertainment is just a few clicks away.

If there is anything else you'd like to know, ask away! 


          $25 Btc redemption        

I was thinking of redeeming my chips into Bitcoin. Any good trusted online casinos with fair video poker?


          User Activated Hard Fork (UAHF) scheduled to activate on August 1.        


Received this update from Coinbase 
 
Dear Coinbase Customer,

We are contacting you to make you aware of recent developments in a number of proposals for technical changes to Bitcoin. All BTC stored on Coinbase will remain safe during these events described below.

The User Activated Hard Fork (UAHF) is a proposal to increase the Bitcoin block size scheduled to activate on August 1. The UAHF is incompatible with the current Bitcoin ruleset and will create a separate blockchain. Should UAHF activate on August 1, Coinbase will not support the new blockchain or its associated coin.

The User Activated Soft Fork (UASF) is a proposal to adopt Segregated Witness on the Bitcoin blockchain and could result in network instability. It is scheduled to activate at the same time as the UAHF.

To ensure the safety of customers’ funds, we will temporarily suspend BTC deposits, withdrawals, and buy/sell starting approximately 4 hours before activation of either fork.

If you do not wish to have access to UAHF coins, and do not wish to access your BTC during the fork, you are not required to take any action.
If you do wish to have access to UAHF coins or access your BTC during the fork, you should send your BTC from Coinbase to your external address by July 31.
For more information on these potential Bitcoin forks, please refer to this article: https://support.coinbase.com/customer/portal/articles/2844217-uahf-uasf-faq.

Thank you,

Coinbase Team 
Check out our Status Page and Twitter for the latest updates from Coinbase.

Hope this is helpful,

jade 


          Should minimum bet on casino more lower??        

All of you already know that bitcoin price going up and sky like rocket in the last 2-3 months.. So it made the lowest payline and minimum bet on any slot game going higher too..

So here my personal hope and wish for all bitcoin casino. They change and lowering exchanging price for Bitcoin again credit casino by half. Here example at 2 bitcoin casino which is i was regular player there..

Example and detail info:

- game : fruit zen slot game.

- balance : 2 mbtc

- bet/roll :  minimum

At bitcasino.io (20 credit minimum)

For 2 mbtc will had 200 credit and only can play 10 roll on fruit zen.

At Bitstarz.com (10 credit minimum)

For 2 mbtc will had 200 credit and only can play 20 roll on fruit zen..

In my opinion, because this bitcoin prize atleast for both casino we had 400 credit for 2mbtc balance (can play 20x at bitcasino.io, 40x at bitstarz.com)..

So how do you think?? 

Pliss share below your oppinion about bitcoin prize again betting in bitcoin casino..


          How about having Bitcoin banks?        

Bitcoin has risen in ways we cannot imagine! Having started as a normal E-currency, bitcoin has in a few years surpassed all currencies and is now being used by most people.

Only one thing is remaining: to turn it into a physical currency with its own automatic teller machines. How wonderful would that be?!


          Are you shocked at the bitcoin prices ?        

I am SHOCKED at the descrease increase here! Just one month ago they hot the 2,000$ (usd) mark and now they are nearly 2800$? That is insane.I use to bid TONS of these now I cannot even afford a FRACTION of one! blah! Great way to gamble IF it's smaller bids,casinos STILL haven't (bitcoin) caught on to "LOWER YOUR BETS!" that's why business is not "booming" the way it should ugh lol What are your thoughts are on the casino's not adjusting their wagering requirements on some of the most popular games (or requesting the game maker's/owners to do so!) and the price/rising/falling of bitcoin in whole? Thanks!i_love_lcb


          Space casino        


777We are glad to present online-casino Space Casinocards

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(BITCOIN, VISA, MASTERCARD, MAESTRO, Skrill, Neteller, Bank Transfer, PAYSAFE CARD, Sofort, QIWI, Yandex.Money, etc.)
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Space Casino - Best Online Casino!


          What is your normal way of buying bitcoin?        

Many bitcoin users DO NOT like giving out their ID (identification) and this is kinda the point of bitcoin to begin with!!?? It seems as of late and even in recent years of course SCAMS ARE THE BIGGEST PART OF THE DIGITAL CURENCIES BTC INCLUDED!evil

It's sad but true how do you buy them?


          Bitcoin Games        

Hello!

My name is Mandy, and I represent Bitcoin Games, and here is a sneak peak into our site: 

Bitcoin Games launched in 2016 and offers an exclusive crypto casino. We have seven games available based on the original Las Vegas video poker machines. There is no need to register your account; just log on through the LCB link and start playing. There are no deposit or withdrawal limits and payouts are instant. There is a minimum expected return of 99% on all games, and all games are provably fair.

I'm here to assist you with any questions you may have. I look forward to hearing from you.

Enjoy and good luck!

Best regards,

Mandy Goldberg


          Have you ever thought of yourself as a gambling addict?        

I have a story to tell.Bare with me,it's long but may help someone out here on LCB.Most people just call me baby,it's my nickname and I am 34 years old.I use to be a mother (tragic story) and now I am a gambling addict of 10 years.I have lost over 250,000 usd due to my problems,and it seems I can NEVER stop no matter how hard I try.I even resorted to the old "chargeback" trick and got banned from most  casinos I use to play at,I had all debit cards (banks) taken away from the banks,bank accounts shut off ect.

This has been a life threatening addiction to me and I have lost everything for it as well.I could have easily paid off my car,home,and bought new vehicles,saved money for retirement (I am disabled) and I just lost 2 businesses due to? Gambling.My main source? BITCOINS.I think they are the devil and my little secret weapon against my own quest for a cure of depression.If you feel your an addict: DO NOT GAMBLE ANYMORE unless you have someone watching your spending and you can start to control yourself,the MINUTE you feel like your getting out of control? STOP. CALL PROFESSIONAL HELP AND STOP... PERIOD.

My story is much deeper than this but as not to flood the board I just wanted everyone who has problems with gambling a Chance to come out and discuss it sometimes seeing that your not alone can be such a blessing. smiley

Believe me,your not alone and if you feel like you wake up thinking about getting online and gambling? YOUR NOT ALONE: I AM WITH YOU! I know the feeling! I have been BANNED too: If your banned from many/most chains/sister casinos of the "big boys" from credit card deposits? YOUR NOT ALONE.

In my opinion this post has much merit to it and surprised I have seen more about addiction on the site,we are all here as gamblers indeed however we must help those in need of help if they go to far I JUST stop being a "compulsive" gambler,if you need any help at all tips/tricks or an ear I am an PM away! I check my email everyday! I am sorry your going thru your pain,we all have our addictions to cover what is really wrong,and gambling my friend is your escape.


          Buoyant bitcoin stirs crypto-bubble fears        

          Ð¡ÐºÑ€Ð¸Ð¿Ñ‚ для bitcoinzebra.com для биткоинов        

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В качестве сокращения вместо «биткойн» часто пишут латинские btc. Такая запись похожа

Курс биткоинов может упасть!

[22.07.2015] Обновление граббера сайта irr.ru для скрипта продажи авто В связи с обновлениям

bash — Википедия

$BASH: путь к исполняемому файлу bash $BASH_VERSINFO[n] массив, состоящий из 6 элементов

Биткойн — Википедия

Countryside Mountains V. Огромная карта Countryside Mountains V для GTA 4.Этот грандиозный мод Железный

Скрипт (бот) для умножения

08.07.2014· Встроенное видео· БЕСПЛАТНАЯ РАЗДАЧА НОВЫХ СКРИПТОВ ЗДЕСЬ: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYj9G ссылка под

PHP скрипты для сайта

23.10.2014· Встроенное видео· С помощью бесплатной программы Mirbox у Вас есть возможность получать на халяву
Здесь можно быстро купить биткоин без комиссий. Мгновенный вывод биткоин
Бесплатный скрипт для заработка биткоинов на автомате BTC Flow. Видео. Скрипт iMacros для BTC
всё для мобильного телефона Отзывы о телефонах: последние добавления:
Курс биткоинов на ближайшее время. Оперативный прогноз экспертов. Стоит ли покупать


          Ð¡Ð‘У вылавливают чеканщиков Bitcoin-валюты. Действительно ли майнеры вне закона        
Правоохранители начали облаву на денежные суррогаты и на майнеров криптовалюты в Украине
          Ð’ киевском институте электросварки обнаружили незаконную Bitcoin-ферму        
В институте электросварки им.Патона обнаружили незаконную Bitcoin-ферму
          Bitcoin Mania: How To Create Your Very Own Crypto-Currency, For Free        
With Bitcoin now worth potentially more than an ounce of gold, I’m capping off my series of Bitcoin posts with an attempt to answer a recurring question. How to go about creating your very own crypto-currency. When looking at the various crypto-currencies that have emerged over the last few months, most, [...]
          Global Bitcoin Computing Power Now 256 Times Faster Than Top 500 Supercomputers, Combined!        
I admit, like a lot of others, I’ve found myself with a bit of a bitcoin obsession lately. I find the vast amount of effort it takes to create something that doesn’t actually exist, completely fascinating. So I decided to find out how much computing power is exerted in the [...]
          Crypto-Currency Bubble Continues: Litecoin Surpasses Billion Dollar Market Capitalization        
(Update: Global Bitcoin Computing Power Now 256 Times Faster Than Top 500 Supercomputers, Combined!) Following yesterday’s news that Bitcoin had passed the $1000 mark, the halo effect continues this morning with the crypto-currency market capitalization site coinmarketcap.com reporting that Litecoin has joined the billion dollar virtual currency club. Litecoin is currently [...]
          The Top 30 Crypto-Currency Market Capitalizations In One Place        
(Update: Cryto-Currency Bubble Continues: Litecoin Surpasses Billion Dollar Market Capitalization) With Bitcoin passing $1000 this morning (it has sincedropped), the halo effect of the rising the cypto-currency bubble has had a dramatic effect on many of the other virtual currencies. One of the biggest winners has been Litecoin, which has risen [...]
          C4 Launches World’s First Bitcoin Certification Program        

The CryptoCurrency Certification Consortium (C4), has announced the world’s first Bitcoin certification program aimed at...

The post C4 Launches World’s First Bitcoin Certification Program appeared first on Bitcoinist.com.


          ä½œè€…:比特币x望虹        
【#监管#与匿名:谁会笑到最后?】 åŽŸæ–‡ï¼šã€ŠCrypto-anarchists Versus Government, Who Will Win The War to Regulate Bitcoin?》作者:约翰·布什(Joh… http://t.cn/8sDE4dX
          Banki przechodzą na bitcoin        

Kilka dni temu 15 japońskich banków ogłosiło przystąpienie do systemu Ripple.

Co to jest Ripple?

Ripple to mówiąc ogólnie Bitcoin dla banków. Jest to system szybkich internetowych transakcji dla instytucji finansowych. Taki, powiedzmy, Elixir, ale z nieporównywalnie lepszymi możliwościami. Ripple jest zdecentralizowany i oparty na koncepcji konsensusu - podobnie jak Bitcoin.

Przez ostatnie 3 lata kolejne banki dołączały do sieci Ripple i tempo tego dołączania rosło. Informacja o 15 bankach japońskich (kolejne 15 czeka w...

          Sztuka bitcoinowa        

Bitcoin żyje. Bitcoin zdobywa świat.

Powoli.

W lipcu w świecie bitcoina nastąpiło "przekręcenie licznika" - nagroda za blok (nowe bitcoiny w systemie są wypłacane za dokonywanie obliczeń w celu potwierdzania transakcji) wynosi nie 25, ale 12.5 BTC.

Wielu ludzi przewidywało cenowe perturbacje. Źle przewidzieli. Bitcoin wzruszył tylko ramionami i żyje dalej.

Pojawiają się też nowe projekty, jak na przykład Ethereum. Ale jeżeli uważasz, że wyjaśnienie zwykłemu człowiekowi czym jest bitcoin wymaga sporo wysiłku, czasu i umiejętności, to...

          Bitcoin the beginning        

Kto ma wiedzę o ekonomii i trzeźwiejsze spojrzenie na świat, ten wie, że świat zbliża się do największego w historii kryzysu systemu monetarnego.

To nieuniknione i nieodwracalne. Światowy dług przekracza już trzykrotnie światowe PKB i stale rośnie. A to tylko dług jawny. Istnieją znacznie większe zobowiązania ukryte, których nie wpisuje się w formalny bilans, na przykład zobowiązania państwa wobec przyszłych emerytów - to dług ukryty. Fakt, że się go nie umieszcza w statystykach niczego nie zmienia - jego skutki są tak samo niszczące.

To właśnie dlatego, że istnieją te dwie...

          Bitcoin i Biedronka        

Bitcoin przestawia się zwykle albo jako ciekawostkę, albo jako zagrożenie.

Ale Bitcoin jest czymś więcej niż jedno i drugie. Jest propozycją zmiany podejścia do zagadnienia transakcji i roli pieniądza w tych transakcjach. Zmiany rewolucyjnej. Ale zmiany realistycznej.

Dziś w powszechnej świadomości transakcje wykonujemy po to, żeby mieć pieniądze, a pieniądze mamy po to, żeby kupować za nie towary.

Bitcoin wymusza inny model: transakcje wykonujemy po to, żeby mieć możliwość wykonywania innych transakcji. Kupujemy po to, żeby w przyszłości sprzedać. Sprzedajemy po to, żeby w...

          Niebezpieczny Bitcoin        

"Bitcoin nie ma przyszłości", "to nieudany projekt", "ludzie niebawem przestaną go używać" - takie cytaty można znaleźć na stronie "TVN24 Biznes i Świat".

Autorem tych słów jest Mike Hearn, jeden z ważniejszych programistów oprogramowania tego, co znamy dziś pod nazwą "bitcoin". Mike zrezygnował z projektu,...

          Bitcoin jest jak Polska        

Kto nie wie co to jest bitcoin, ręka w górę!

Ci co podnieśli ręce, wyjść.

Albo nie. Nie wychodzić. Poczytać to.

A temu, komu się nie chce wyjaśniam w makabrycznie uproszczonym skrócie: bitcoin to elektroniczna waluta, która istnieje wyłącznie jako zapis w Wielkiej Globalnej Internetowej Księdze Transakcji. Księga jest jedna, jest jawna, i każdy ma do niej dostęp. Obsługa transakcji odbywa się wyłącznie przez komputery, a cały system jest zaprojektowany w dwóch...

          W co państwo może bitcoin pocałować        

Jan Fijor napisał na swoim blogu, że bitcoin nie służy wolności. Bo "elektroniczny pieniądz łatwo poddać kontroli".

Janek to doświadczony przedsiębiorca i warto go słuchać. Ale na temat bitcoina opowiada głupoty. A to z tego powodu, że nie rozumie zupełnie jak to działa. Operuje na błędnych skojarzeniach (bitcoin = elektroniczny odpowiednik pieniędzy). Jak większość ludzi zresztą.

Błędne myślenie bierze się najczęściej z niezrozumienia, a niezrozumienie ze złego używania pojęć. Skoro mało kto potrafi wytłumaczyć...

          Jak działa BitCoin?        

Pewnie coś tam słyszałeś: jest gdzieś jakiś BitCoin i robi się popularny. Co to jest BitCoin? Jakieś komputerowe, wirtualne pieniądze. Może nawet zacząłeś czytać gdzieś artykuł na ten temat, ale odpadłeś w akapicie gdzie gość zaczął gadać o szyfrowaniu AES prywatnego klucza 512-bitowym hashem.

Krótko mówiąc: prawdopodobnie nie wiesz jak działa BitCoin i podchodzisz do niego jak do Biblii: normalny człowiek nie zrozumie, więc lepiej nie tykać. Wielu ludzi uważa, że to taka nowa zabawka dla fanatyków komputerowych.

Kiedyś to samo mówili o...

          Wednesday Morning Spice        
Bolt's final event. Inside the secret ballot. Trump and the Boy Scout lie. The 99 ice cream is dying. Bitcoin splits in two. Cheetahs and Kings in Europe. The KISS cow. Channing Tatum's parenting problem.
          Mr CryptoCoins: 80 day 200% ROI bitcoin Ponzi scheme        
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          Tech at Night: Insurance companies may attack innovation. A group even more absurd than Bitcoin zealots.        
Remember during the height of the Edward Snowden media frenzy, how his defenders would dutifully parrot every word RT said about him? Here’s your great Snowden defender now. RT and Snowden are the enemies of liberty, peace, and the United States of America. Bitcoin is the fantasy tool of ideologues, the 21st century version of […]
          Tech at Night: Bitcoin sites continue to fall to thefts. A big Satellite TV bill is coming.        
Started a new job officially this week, which means I personally have a new day to day schedule. This is going to be an adjustment. I’ll hopefully have a minimal disruption of Tech, but we’ll see at first. Remember how Edward Snowden kept claiming that he was just protecting American privacy and exposing NSA overreach? […]
          à¸à¸²à¸£à¹€à¸žà¸´à¹ˆà¸¡à¸›à¸£à¸°à¸ªà¸´à¸—ธิภาพความปลอดภัยให้กับ Google Account         
   
                   การเพิ่มประสิทธิภาพการป้องกัน 
                             (Google Account)



ภาพโดย : ด.ญ.พีระศรี  à¸•à¸°à¸«à¸™à¹ˆà¸­à¸‡

                    เมื่อสัปดาห์ที่ผ่านมา...(11กันยายน 25557) ในขณะที่พวกเราใจจดใจจ่อ รอยลโฉมหน้าตาเจ้า IPhone 6  à¸§à¹ˆà¸²à¹€à¸¡à¸·à¹ˆà¸­à¹„หร่มันจะคลอดตัวเป็นๆออกมาเป็นทางการซะที ในขณะที่สาวก Google ตัวน้อยๆอย่างเรา  à¸à¹‡à¸•à¸à¹ƒà¸ˆà¹„ปกับเขาเล็กน้อยถึงปานกลาง เมื่อเกิดเหตุไม่คาดฝันที่ดั๊นมีกระแสร้อนแรงไม่แพ้ iPhone6 à¹€à¸£à¸·à¹ˆà¸­à¸‡à¸¡à¸µà¸­à¸¢à¸¹à¹ˆà¸§à¹ˆà¸²à¸¡à¸µ Hackerมือดี (Hackerทำเลวกลับเรียกว่า"มือดี" แล้วแฮคเกอร์ทำดีมันจะเรียกว่าอะไรหว่า)  à¹„ด้ Hack Password ของบัญชีผู้ใช้ GMail กว่า 5 ล้านบัญชี ทำให้รั่วไหลออกมาอยู่บนฟอรั่มของ Russian Bitcoin ซึ่งแหล่งข่าวหลายแห่งมองว่า มันเคยเป็นเรื่องเก่าที่เกิดขึ้นมานานแล้ว  à¹à¸•à¹ˆà¸à¸§à¹ˆà¸² 60 % ผู้ใช้กลับบอกว่า Password ที่รั่วไหลออกมานั้น ถูกต้องตรงกับบัญชี GMail จริงๆ ซึ่งเรามองว่ามันก็น่าจะเป็นเรื่องจริง  à¹€à¸žà¸£à¸²à¸°à¸„งเป็นไปไม่ได้ที่รหัสผ่านที่รั่วไหลออกมานั้นจะถูกต้องเกินกว่า 60 %  à¸—าง Google เองออกมาชี้แจงให้สาวกเข้าใจแล้วว่า เหตุการณ์ดังกล่าวไม่เกิดจากช่องโหว่ของระบบ Google เลยแม้แต่น้อยครับ (หากเป็นสำนวนไทยก็น่าจะประมาณว่าคนเอาไปใช้ก็ใช้ต่างกรรมต่างวาระใช้สะเป๊ะสะปะอีลุยฉุยแฉก) ซึ่งในความเป็นจริงแล้ว Google เองเค้าก็มีระบบป้องกันให้เราระมัดระวังและใส่ใจเป็นพิเศษตั้งหลายวิธี ซึ่งผู้เขียนจะรวบรวมมาให้เรามาตั้งค่าใช้งานกัน เพื่อป้องกันข้อมูลอันเป็นที่รักสูงสุดของเรา คงไม่ใช่เรื่องดีแน่ ถ้า Account ของเราถูกนำไปใช้ในทางมิชอบด้วยกฏหมาย แต่สำหรับผมแล้ว ไม่ว่าระบบใดๆในโลกถ้าหากแขวนไว้กับเครือข่ายเป็นเรื่องง่ายที่จะถูกขโมย ต่อให้คุณใช้เมล์ของแต่ละองค์กรก็ตามเหอะ..แม้แต่ทำเนียบขาวประเทศมหาอำนาจ ยังถูกHacker อาจหาญย่องผ่านเครือข่ายขโมยข้อมูลสำคัญมาแล้ว..นับประสาอะไรเราๆท่านๆ ฉะนั้นสำหรับวันนี้ไม่มีอะไรมาก หากท่านคิดว่าข้อมูลที่ท่านหามาได้ติดอยู่ในมือของท่าน มันจะตามท่านไปบนเชิงตะกอนกองเพลิงในตอนสุดท้ายบั้นปลายของชีวิตแล้วหละก็ แนะนำว่าท่านควรติดมันไว้ใน Thrumdrive อย่างเดียวนั่นแหละ และก็เดินย้ำเท้าอยู่กับพื้นปลอดภัยอย่าได้ไปต่อใส่ Internet ที่ไหน..แค่นี้ก็ปลอดภัยแล้วครับ  à¸ˆà¸²à¸à¸‚่าวดังกล่าวทำให้  wordpress.com  à¸•à¸±à¸”สินใจรีเซ็ตระบบลูกค้าที่สมัครเข้าใช้ด้วย Gmail นับแสนกว่าบัญชีและแจ้งให้ลูกค้าใช้รหัสผ่านใหม่ แต่ไม่ต้องกลัวครับหากเราใช้เป็นประโยชน์มหาศาลจาก Google มากมายกว่าข้อเสียเพียงเล็กน้อย  à¸œà¸¡à¸ˆà¸°à¸žà¸²à¹„ปหาวิธีเพิ่มประสิทธิภาพอย่างยิ่งยวด มาดูกัน แต่ก่อนอื่นลองติดตามดูวิดีโอของน้องซี..ผู้น่ารักก่อนครับ 





                 Google Account รวมถึง Gmail คือหนึ่งเครื่องมือการทำงานของผม เช่นเดียวกันครับคนทั่วโลกก็นิยมใช้เช่นเดียวกัน ทำอย่างไรเราจะอยู่กับมันอย่างมีความสุขและปลอดภัยต่างหากสำคัญ  à¸ˆà¸¸à¸”เด่นของเก๊าคือรับส่งข้อมูลที่รวดเร็วกว่าบรรดาเมล์อื่นๆ เพราะ Googleเค้าจะมี Serverย่อย ติดตั้งอยู่ในแต่ละประเทศ(รวมถึงประเทศไทยด้วย) และข้อสำคัญเมื่อท่านสมัคร Account แล้วต้องเปลี่ยนภาษาเป็นภาษาของประเทศนั้นๆด้วย ระบบจึงจะเสถียรด้วยความเร็วอย่างยิ่งยวด  à¹à¸¥à¸°à¹ƒà¸™à¸ªà¹ˆà¸§à¸™à¸—ี่สำคัญของ Gmail ได้พัฒนาระบบความปลอดภัยในระดับที่เรียกว่าดีที่สุดอยู่แล้ว เพราะ Gmail ก็คือหนึ่งในหลายๆบริการของค่าย Google เสริชเอ็นจิ้นอันดับหนึ่งของโลก  (ชมขนาดนี้ได้ค่าตัวไหมเนี้ยตู)


                    แต่ท่านเชื่่อไหมครับในความปลอดภัยที่ Google พัฒนาขึ้นมานี้ มีคนมากกว่า 90% เกิดความประมาทดั่งที่พระพุทธองค์ได้ตรัสปัจฉิมโอวาทแก่ภิกษุทั้งหลายว่า
 â€œà¸ à¸´à¸à¸©à¸¸à¸—ั้งหลาย บัดนี้ เราขอเตือนท่านทั้งหลาย สังขารทั้งหลายมีความเสื่อม ความสิ้นไปเป็นธรรมดา ท่านทั้งหลาย จงบำเพ็ญไตรสิกขา คือศีล สมาธิ ปัญญา ให้บริบูรณ์ด้วยความไม่ประมาทเถิด” 
                บางครั้งเรามัวหลงเพลิดเพลินไปกับเทคโนโลยีจนเกิดความประมาทใส่ข้อมูลอะไรต่อมิอะไรส่วนตัวเต็มไปหมด  à¹„ม่ได้ใช้ความปลอดภัยที่   Google เค้ามอบสิ่งนี้ให้มาติดตั้งให้ครบถ้วน จึงทำให้มีการแฮกเกอร์มือดี(มันทำเลวชัดๆเรียกมันว่ามือดี) เจาะฐานอีเมล์ของเราได้อย่างต่อเนื่อง


how-works-img-1
เรามาตั้งระบบป้องกัน 2 ชั้น กัน
               à¸«à¸¥à¸²à¸¢à¸„นกลัวมันจะก่อให้เกิดความรำคาญแน่นอน  à¸«à¸¥à¸±à¸‡à¸ˆà¸²à¸Gmail ได้ออกเมนูการบริการใหม่ประมาณ 3ปีแล้วมั้ง ได้แก่การป้องกันเมล์แบบ 2 ขั้นตอน ก่อนชาวบ้านชาวช่องเค้าอีก (2-step verification) เมื่อผู้ใช้เข้าระบบเมล์ จะมี SMS แจ้งรหัส Verification Code à¸„ล้ายๆกับระหัส OTP ของระบบธนาคาร Ibanking ที่ผมใช้บริการอยู่  à¹€à¸›à¹‡à¸™à¸•à¸±à¸§à¹€à¸¥à¸‚ 6 หลัก และจะต้องนำมาป้อนเข้าระบบ จึงจะสามารถเข้าใช้บริการเมล์นั้นได้ 
              หลายคนกังวลว่า หากต้องกรอกระหัสผ่านทุกวันนอกเหนือจากระหัส Gmail คงจะน่าเบื่อทีเดียวเชียวแหละ ไม่ต้องกังวลครับมันสามารถบันทึกไว้ในเครื่องได้ 30 วัน เมื่อเรามาใช้เครื่องเดิมใน 30 วันนี้ ไม่ต้องใช้ Codeทุกวี่ทุกวันดอกนะจ๊ะนายจ๋า.....อีนี้คอนเฟิร์มจริงๆจร้า!  à¹€à¸žà¸£à¸²à¸°à¹€à¸£à¸²à¸ªà¸²à¸¡à¸²à¸£à¸–เลือกได้ว่าจะบันทึก 30วันหรือไม่ แต่ถ้าเป็นเครื่องส่วนตัวที่ใช้คนเดียวควรบันทึก ถ้าเป็นเครื่องสาธารณะ เช่นร้านอินเตอร์เน็ต หรือที่ทำงานที่ใช้งานร่วมกันหลายคน ก็ไม่ควรบันทึก เพราะคนใช้งานต่อ จะเข้าใช้เมล์เราได้หากเราพลั้งเผลอลืมออกจากระบบ นอกจากไม่บันทึก Code บนเครื่องที่เป็นสาธารณแล้วแล้วเมื่อเข้าใช้งาน Internet Cafe ยังต้องล้างประวัติ..ล้างคุกกี้ด้วย (แหม..ชื่อน่าหมั่ม..จริงๆ) ซึ่่งผมจะกล่าวต่อไปครับ จริงๆแล้วหากท่านไม่ได้ตั้งรหัสผ่านแบบ 2 ชั้น ท่านก็ควรเปลี่ยนรหัสผ่านทุกๆ 3เดือนนะครับ..ไม่ใช่เรื่องยากใช่ไหมครับ..แต่เป็นเรื่องที่เราควรใส่ใจต่างหาก..ไป๊ครับเราไปตั้งค่าสูงสุดกัน 
คลิ๊กอ่านวิธีตรวจสอบและตั้งค่าป้องกัน

อ้างอิง : 

          CCTV exposed. Why understanding network security is so important.        

For those of you who are regulars on Geekzone you’ll know one of my pet peeves is people who don’t understand the huge security risk associated with port forwards. Configuring a port forward in your router or firewall is something configured by people every day, with the vast majority probably failing to consider the security risks of something that’s so easily done.

Opening up your network to allow traffic from anywhere on the Internet to directly access your PC or hardware behind your router and/or firewall removes an entire layer of security, and allows anybody on the Internet to directly access your PC or hardware on the port(s) that have been forwarded. If there are security exploits in either the software on your PC or the hardware it could easily compromise your entire network and your security.

If you’re running a VoIP setup and port forward port 5060 you’re opening your IP PBX or phone system up to what will be a never ending attack from bots and scripts trying to find holes your system for the purpose of routing illegitimate calls.  By setting up a port forward to CCTV equipment you run the risk of your security cameras being left wide open for anybody on the Internet to view for both entertainment and for possible malicious purposes.

In recent days we’re once again seen a mainstream media article on Stuff discussing compromised or poorly configured CCTV cameras in New Zealand that can be openly viewed by anybody on the Internet. While Stuff have chosen not to name where these cameras are linked from, the source is insecam.org, a site that proclaims itself as “the world biggest directory of online surveillance security cameras”. This story is very similar to another run in 2014 in the NZ Herald discussing the very same issue with cameras in New Zealand viewable on the insecam website.

cctv image 1

cctv image 3

While this site lists only lists openly viewable CCTV equipment, IoT search tool Shodan is the best resource on the Internet for discovering hardware devices (both CCTV and other) that are exposed to the Internet. Many of these devices are “compromised” because of one simple flaw – either configuring port forwards to allow remote access, or enabling UPnP allowing the devices to create their own port forwards for remote access. It’s worth pointing out here that the insecam website isn’t doing anything illegal – they’re simply aggregating content that’s all publically accessible.

If you’ve got CCTV cameras then it’s not an unrealistic requirement to want to view these remotely. Most systems these days offer web access and/or mobile apps allowing you to view your cameras from anywhere in the world, and many even pitch remote access as a key selling point. The simplest way to configure remote access is to set up a port forward allowing direct access to the camera itself, a Network Video Recorder (NVR) or a Digital Video recorder (DVR).

Some equipment may also be UPnP enabled to make this process even easier – if you have a router with UPnP capabilities and the UPnP functionality is enabled on both your router and the CCTV equipment you may have your CCTV equipment exposed to the Internet even without your knowledge. By having a port forward or UPnP enabled you’ve exposed your CCTV system to the entire Internet and it’s now as a secure as the hardware you’re using.. And that’s where the problems start.

Many people clearly never change default passwords of some of the equipment viewable on the Internet. Many brands of cheap Chinese CCTV equipment also run embedded software of dubious quality with very well known exploits and hacks. Many also contain backdoor passwords, meaning that even if you change the password these devices can still be accessed by anybody with this knowledge. As many of these systems are never upgraded by installers or end users, flaws that have been fixed can often still exist for the life of the system.

The issues also extend beyond somebody snooping on your video feeds – some of these exploits can also be used to turn your hardware into a bot capable of being used for major DDoS attacks, or even turned into a tool for mining bitcoins. In September 2016 one the world’s largest DDoS attacks against krebsonsecurity was reportedly performed with the assistance of over 145,000 compromised CCTV cameras.

In my day job as a network engineer I’ve had numerous dealings with security companies who lack even basic fundamental knowledge when it comes to networking and security. Concepts of networking are something that many people will fail to grasp, with many people relying on the advice of others or a “she’ll be right” mentality rather than seeking proper advice from an expert.

There have been many threads here on Geekzone about CCTV systems and comments posted by people who have been told that “nobody knows your IP address”, “you’re on a dynamic IP address which keeps changing so nobody will find you”, “I’ll change the port to something random so they won’t find you” or “if you make your password secure you’ll be fine”. Statements like this show a fundamental lack of knowledge, and when they’ve given by people posing to be security experts, should really be raising alarm bells. Having a public IP that changes regularly or changing ports offers absolutely nothing in the way of security. Likewise having a secure password is meaningless if a backdoor master password exists on your device.

If you’re wanting remote access to most hardware on an internal network there is only one safe way to do this – by using a Virtual Private Network (VPN). By using an appropriate router with a built in VPN server you can connect your remote PC or phone via VPN and then safely browse your cameras with no risk of your cameras or data being exposed to the entire Internet. If access is only required from specific connections then you could also look to restrict access to a locked down range of public IP addresses to ensure your cameras are not unnecessarily exposed.

If you have an IP camera, NVR or DVR that’s exposed to the Internet using port forwards or you have UPnP enabled you should be taking immediate steps to secure it. If your knowledge of networking doesn’t extend to configuring a VPN then you should be disabling remote access and/or UPnP until such time as you are able to implement a VPN or lock down access to specific IP ranges.

If your security or CCTV installer has no issues with allowing port forwards then you should be on the lookout for a new installer. You’re not just compromising your own safety and security, you’re also compromising the safety, security and end user experience of everybody on the Internet if your hardware can be compromised and used as a bot for DDoS attacks.


          Comment on DemixMine Review | Scam or Legit | All you need to Know by Judeworld        
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          Comment on How to Buy Bitcoin With Debit/Credit Card in Nigeria 2017 by Judeworld        
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          Comment on How to Buy Bitcoin With Debit/Credit Card in Nigeria 2017 by Judeworld        
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          MOEDA DE WORLD OF WARCRAFT PASSA A VALER MAIS DO QUE A DA VENEZUELA        
Resultado de imagem para MOEDA VIRTUAL DE WORLD OF WARCRAFT PASSA A VALER MAIS DO QUE A MOEDA DE VERDADE DA VENEZUELA
A coisa está braba na Venezuela
Recentemente, um usuário do Twitter venezuelano twittou comentando que 1 dólar americano valia 8493.97 bolívares no mercado negro de câmbio do país. Em World of Warcraft, é possível comprar-se 8385 peças de ouro por dólar americano, ou seja, a taxa de conversão estava em praticamente 1 para 1, mas ainda não havia se aproximado.

Pois bem, isso já faz alguns dias, e desde então, a moeda venezuelana desvalorizou-se mais ainda, com a taxa de câmbio tendo passado dos 8,493.97 bolívares para 11,185.95 bolívares. Levando-se em consideração que a menor taxa de dólares para peças de ouro em World of Warcraft foi de 10 mil peças para 1 dólar, atualmente, 1 peça de ouro em World of Warcraft vale cerca de 1,21 bolívares, ou seja, o dinheiro virtual de World of Warcraft, de fato, vale mais do que o dinheiro de verdade da Venezuela.

Isso é algo bizarro de se imaginar, mas não chega a ser um mistério do porquê, afinal de contas, a Venezuela tem sofrido com sérios problemas de desabastecimento, alta inflação e sérios conflitos entre a população civil e o governo.
Seja como for, esperamos que a situação da Venezuela melhore, e que o Bolívar volte a bater o Ouro de World of Warcraft, para o bem dos venezuelanos.
O Atual presidente da Venezuela proibiu qualquer pessoa de tirar passagens só de ida do país, tornando isso um crime, para que a população não fuja para outras nações vizinhas como o Brasil.
Com informações de Fox Business.
guest author area 51  Questão
Profundo conhecedor da cultura pop, fã de conspirações/mitos e lendas é o principal meio de arranjar uma treta com famosos e pseudo-famosos da web.. Twitter / Facebook

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          5 Top Apps for Bitcoins        
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          The Essential Guide to Bitcoins        
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          Choose which Australian Political Party to vote for by their Website Design!        
For those of you who are not Australian citizens and therefore are not voting in our Federal election, you need to know that here - voting is compulsory. If you don't vote without a good reason, then you get fined. The upside is we get a better representation of our citizens in our voting results. The downside is that some people just come in and 'spoil' their voting paper by scribbling on it, and others 'donkey vote' - that is just vote in the order that the selections appear.

We have a bi-cameral system, so two voting houses - the lower house or House of Representatives (where the government is formed), and an upper house or Senate, which is meant to be where our seven states and territories are represented - but in practice it acts as a bit of a safety valve on the excesses of the lower house.

It looks like we are going to have a close result, with perhaps neither major party ( Labor or Liberal - sort of like Democrats and Republicans in the USA, or Labour and Conservatives in the UK) getting a substantive majority. That means some of the minor parties - and there are a few of them - might get a guernsey in deciding who forms government in the lower house.

In the Senate, it is almost certain that neither of the major parties will get a majority (they haven't over the last couple of elections), and that one or a combination of minor parties will hold the balance of power.

After reading a post on Facebook which quoted KnowYourParties - I was inspired to wonder what would happen if you applied a design critique to each of the parties website design, and determined your vote that way?

Many thanks to the writer of KnowYourParties, whose descriptions I have borrowed entirely.

Health Australia Party
Rebranding of the Natural Medicine Party, which was probably a better description. Anti-vaxxers, fluoridophobes and homeopaths trying to expand their business via changes to medical legislation.
Their colour theming leaves a lot to be desired. They chose a good template, and then ruined it with their 'Byron Bay' hippy logo. Wasted screen realestate on an image of a bunch of anonymous people (are these their candidates?). OK, on the plus side its clean and clear, unlike their grubby anti-science views.

Seniors United Party of AustraliaFinally, a voice in parliament for the wealthiest generation that ever lived.
I think KnowYourParties description is a little harsh, or maybe that's just because as over 55yoa - they purport to represent my age group! The website looks like some ex IT geek put it together circa 1993 when the Mosaic web browser came out and allowed graphics. Unfortunately this website is comically representative of those they probably wish to recruit.


Family First
But only if your family consists of a white Christian man, a white Christian woman and at least two white Christian children and you believe everyone else is headed straight for hell.
Look, I like orange, and blue is a natural contrast, but this is just horrible - or horribly STRONG. Unfortunately 'Bob Day' sounds like some kind of annual celebration of bobbing for apples, when in fact they are bobbing for Jesus. This site is unrepresentative of what they stand for - no christian iconography anywhere.


Liberal Democrats Headed by David Leyonhjelm, who made it into the Senate in 2013 because of a herd of Lib voters being too stupid to correctly identify their preferred party. The Lib Dems are committed Libertarians whose ability to ignore all of the evidence on every possible issue would make any cult proud. 
Awful logo - and its repeated. Its very hard to carry off yellow on a white background. Did anyone realise that at the centre of this photo - its focus in fact is nothing? I think its meant to be on their leader. That top menu - you just don't see, and the slogan is just not important enough to win my vote - besides the fact that their view of the world is loathsome.

VOTEFLUX.ORG | Upgrade Democracy
 Flux (n) – an abnormal or morbid discharge of blood or other matter from the body. Whenever there’s a bill before the Senate, you use an app to discharge your opinion into a tame crossbencher and tell him (yes, it’s always going to be a him) which way to vote on each bill. Founded by two Bitcoin consultants, and works on the same blockchain principle, whatever the hell that means.
Well, they look like a software company. What's with the black background? Sooo web design circa last millennium. Pretty logo though. Unfortunately that headline reads like a 404 error.


Liberal
You wake up in an ice bath and realise that your left leg is missing, and Rupert Murdoch tells you that brown people and greenies and reds all conspired to steal your leg and are coming back for the rest of your limbs, but then why is Rupert wearing a blood-stained hospital gown, and why does his left leg look familiar, and there, on the knee, isn’t that the scar that you got when you were ten years old and fell off your bicycle?
Well, this is actually well designed in the main. Its responsive, and works well, with the leader front, centre and active. Pity about that horrible medallion logo thingy (WTF! Blue and yellow again!) What function is it meant to perform - an award? a certification? a mark of quality? Or is it just meant to NOT look anything like the Liberal party logo? Malcolm looks very presidential, and there is no sign of those nasty right wing climate deniers and homophobes.

The Nationals
You wake up in a shed and realise that your left leg is missing, and Rupert Murdoch tells you that brown people and greenies and reds all conspired to steal your leg and are coming back for the rest of your limbs, but then why is Rupert wearing a blood-stained hospital gown, and why does his left leg look familiar, and there, on the knee, isn’t that the scar you got when you were ten years old and got kicked by a horse?
Now this is interesting - the nationals take the iconography of the green movement and apply it to their arch enemy's? Given that in all their difficult seats, it is green leaning independents, or actual greenies that are their greatest threat - I expect this adoption of green iconography is intentional. Except for that horrible logo, and the specific shades of green and yellow they have chosen - this looks pretty good. Not that I'd vote for them - given their leader is one of the biggest climate deniers out there. Wise not to feature his image.

Democratic Labour Party (DLP)
If you’re an economic progressive yet somehow still a dyed in the wool Christian homophobe, this is the party for you.
That logo looked old fashioned when Bob Santa Maria commissioned it. Alternatively it looks like the logo used for film awards on advertising. The slogan is soooo dated and fuddyduddy, and about spelling! The graphic representing a subject cloud, without actually being one is very folksy.

Science Party
 Formerly the Future Party. They’re still naïve, but now they’ve got a full quiver of policies, mostly geared toward fixing the shitblizzard of the last three years.
Like the logo - although a bit more finance company than scientific. Love the image - now that's aspirational! On design - they are in contention for my vote.

Australian Cyclists Party
 Does exactly what it says on the box.
Yep - what he said. Logo is good, but could be better. Bit of waisted space at the top there right of the logo. What is it with blue and green? I'd consider voting for them, if some of their number didn't ride like crazed loons on footpaths, and are so un-evolved they don't know what a bicycle bell is for. It's to warn me that you are coming up my arse!

Shooters, Fishers and Farmers
This party is like the time I hurt my back a few years ago and thought the problem would go away like it always had before, except it didn’t and now I live with chronic back pain.
The only thing that is wrong with this logo, is that it should have a big red 45 degree line through that circle! Go and murder some defenceless animal somewhere else you vermin. Annoyingly, other than the appalling logo and social and political views, the website is quite well designed - which I suppose just goes to show that you can't judge a book by its cover. When did they add 'farmers' to their name? Was it when that farmer murdered that environment protection officer? Odious people.

Voluntary Euthanasia Party
As advertised.
Great logo, clever setup, because the power of their campaign is in the power of individual stories. Worthy of support for their design, and for their opinions in my view.

Socialist Alliance
The kind of socialists you can actually have a conversation with.
Well, it had to be red didn't it. The 'vote' message is a bit self evident. They are in need of a good slogan, and all that empty space around the logo is a waste. Other than the words - there is no real visual demonstration of what they stand for. Could do better.

Rise Up Australia Party
The actual worst. Founded by someone who got thrown out of Family First for too much hate speech, which is like getting kicked out of Labor for not doing anything.
This website is pretty foul - which I suppose does reflect the views of the party. The logo is hideous, and the functionality of the website is woeful. Let me give you some examples - it has a loader that tells you the percentage loaded - while you wait and wait (is it a flash site?). When you scroll down (try it if you can bare it) - you just get the tops of each of the candidates heads. I'd give you a screen shot if the party wasn't so vile. Oops, I couldn't resist. The menu is mid page, and has way too many items of varying sizes. On the plus size, it is responsive (unlike their mindset), and uses icons for its policy areas. That is the best thing I can say about the site, and the party.

Labor
The post-war European centre right party for Australia today. 
Not as sophisticated as Liberal, but that heading and logo are so much better. They have an image, where the focus of it is actually on their leader. Slogan good and clear, and I like the 'stand with us' phrase as opposed to 'Vote 1' and their ilk. Solid effort but room for improvement.

Online Direct Democracy – (Empowering the People!)
Like VOTEFLUX, but with PollyWeb instead of the Bitcoin blockchain. (If you say that sentence backwards at the stroke of midnight when the moon is full, Lucifer will appear and grant you three votes on bills that will never get up.) 
As Windows is to Apple - this is to good design. Is that a blue planet in a black hole? At least the're honest - its all about the technology not the people. No, just no.

Derryn Hinch’s Justice Party
It turns out that this is about Derryn Hinch’s notion of justice, not about bringing Derryn Hinch to justice. Which is disappointing. A Federal party campaigning on State issues, implying either ignorance or extreme cynicism. My money is on cynicism.
Derryn, your rich enough to afford better. The logo is ugly and literal. Judge Judy has a better one. This site is a bit of a stinker. I must implement a new rule of web design: never use dot points on a home page. The only honest bit of design is the implication that Derryn is the harbinger of justice - 'Hinch Justice'.

Jacqui Lambie Network
Anatomically incorrect: the logo is a map of Tasmania, but the policy platform is an arsehole. 
Black and orange - a favourite combination of mine. Have you noticed that they have deepetched Jacqui's hair so that it looks like an upside down map of Tasmania? Actually, this, a little like the candidate is straight shooting, without her muddling of words and images.
Pirate Party Australia
Basically progressive, and I agree with them on most things, but their ideas on intellectual property are anti-artist and their views on tax are just idiotic.
Ok, the logo is cute, the pirate ship is cute, the font is good, and the layout good, if a little old fashioned. Its a little staid really - not what you expect from outlaws.

Pauline Hanson’s One NationHave you ever licked a gallbladder?
It galls me to say it, but good logo. Fortunately that is where it stops. Too many stock graphics. No visual breathing space, and justified text. Enough said.


Veterans Party Supporting veterans with no nonsense, no political game playing and absolutely no policies.
Looks more like a recruitment advert for the forces. They always say, one strong image is better than a whole lot of bad ones. Ain't that the truth.

Secular Party of Australia
Basically pretty great, but there are a couple of issues where the commitment to secularism starts to look a little like Islamophobia.
The imagery here just says 'We want your money'. Not sure that is a good way to introduce yourself to the public - unless you're a televangelist. Logo - do I have to say it?

CountryMinded
I don’t agree with everything they say, but I’m not really their target audience. This is essentially the party that the National Party should be.
Blue and green again, really? Badly chosen template, and that logo needs to be shot. With a shotgun.

Socialist Equality Party
Trotskyists. Well-intentioned but fanatical. These are the people who never forgot that Che’s real first name was Ernest.
The site is quite mild mannered in design. That is almost a 'liberal' blue. Nice touches of red though.

Katter’s Australian Party
Uncle Ho and Margaret Thatcher cohabiting in a single mind.
Red, red, red. Reds all over the bed. We already know that Bob is deaf to nuance (shooting . . . Orlando). Apparently he is blind to colour as well. Other than that - a professional website.

Palmer United Party
The earth will shake violently, trees will be uprooted, mountains will fall, and all binds will snap – Palmer will be free. Palmer will go forth with his mouth opened wide, his upper jaw touching the sky and his lower jaw the earth, and he will swallow Odin in a single gulp. Flames will burn from his eyes and nostrils, and his sons will come after to swallow the sun and the moon.
That map of Australia is a crime against cartography, and vexillology (look it up). I love the meaninglessness of the slogan. I am surprised that they are still featuring the image of the morally (and possibly literally) bankrupt Clive.

Citizens Electoral Council
Possibly just straight-up insane. Climate deniers, but economically kinda socialist. Anti-Semitic and possibly white supremacist, but pro-immigration. They also claim that the Port Arthur massacre was commissioned by the British royal family and implemented by a mental health NGO.
Worst political website for this election. I would say it was designed by a server engineer, but that would be unfair to the design skills of server engineers. Just all types of wrong, which I suppose reflects their policies.

Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party
The Eddie the Eagle of befuddled right-wing governance.
Blue and green again. Is this a thing? Other than that, if you can't design a good logo, just use the words - and they did (I'm ignoring the ubiquitous southern cross on the wrong angle at the top).

Animal Justice Party
Better people than me.
. . . and not to be confused with Animal Farm Justice Party. Logo looks like The Wilderness Society for animals. I know the image is about live exports, but cute cat video's are more loveable.

The Arts Party
Sound policies, surprisingly shitty logo. Come on Arts Party, you had one job to do.
What he said. One job. Menu wrapping is a crime.

Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting)
Fielded candidates for the last six Federal elections. Seventh time lucky, guys.
Couldn't organise a supervised visit - let alone a live website.

Mature Australia
Your racist Western Australian aunt.
OK this screen grab doesn't do it justice - looks like I timed it badly. Pretty logo, but what he said about the views. '2 cent tax' - they can't add up.

Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group)
The party’s charter is just a bunch of bible quotes. It’s like we’re in Pennsylvania in the fucking 17th Century.
They bought a good wordpress template, and a good shot of parliament house. Pity they didn't spend as much money or care on their depressingly unimaginative, and proportionally challenged logo.

Australian Sex Party
Are you turned on by sound economic and social policies with a strong evidence basis? Then number the box and put your ballot in the slot.
OK, you did well with the logo, but seriously - an industry that has some of the most imaginatively designed sex websites and you came up with this? Its definitely not sexy, and I'm not sure it makes people take you seriously either.

Australian Progressives
A broad suite of evidence-based best practice policies that only seems progressive because Australia is such a regressive ideological clusterfuck.
Great site - get rid of that horror of a logo.  It doesn't say 'progressive'. It says . . . oh sorry I fell asleep with a pen in my hand.


Nick Xenophon Team
A bit far to the right for me personally, but Xenophon has done exactly what an independent senator is supposed to do, and pretty close to exactly what he said he would do. Which is refreshing.
Oh South Australia, you are such contrarians, but you always did have good food, and good arts. You win a boutique non-industrial prize for the orange and black combo, and a reneable power commendation for making a name like 'Xenophon' into a brand.

Drug Law Reform
Single issue party focused on treating drug use as a health issue rather than a criminal one. The stance seems well reasoned. It’s just a bit hard to take them seriously when their logo is a hemp leaf.
What he said about the logo. Some terrible images in that carousel, including a quote from Richard Branson. The green isn't even pretty.

Sustainable Australia
Formerly the Stable Population Party. They want a ‘sustainable’ population through lower immigration. If they actually cared about sustainability they’d be calling for a lower global population, but instead they’re calling for reduced population growth in a country with only 24 million people. Which means that what they are is simply racist.
Loathsome website, loathsome policies, loathsome logos.

The Greens
Yes, they wear suits now, but at least those suits are made from sustainable bamboo in a small Liberian social enterprise that sponsors education initiatives for orphaned girls.
I want to love the greens, but they have three things I am having trouble coming to grips with. The logo (OK, I can nearly forgive, as it has become their brand); this website (which commits several crimes against font usage, colour, and layout), and Lee Rhiannon. I support their ethos, but some of their policies (their small business policy from the last election seems to have disappeared) are just naive - like the design - those icons especially.

Australian Liberty Alliance
Angry Anderson (remember him? didn’t think so) vowing to stop the Islamisation of Australia. Last time I checked, Islam was holding steady at 2.2% of the population, so maybe one bald dickhead is all it takes to hold the hordes at bay.
A site designed last decade I think - or from when Angry Anderson last had a hit. Don't start me on the logo.

Renewable Energy Party
Single issue, seems good prima facie, but founded by Peter Breen, who was Ricky Muir’s only staffer for a time. I can’t figure out whether this is a good sign (Breen taught Muir how to be a halfway decent senator) or a terrible sign (how can someone go from the petrolhead party to a renewables party and expect to be believed?).
Like the look of this - simple and clean. Like clean energy - it takes a lot of work to make something look this simple.

Marijuana (HEMP) Party
Entirely about legalising weed, and there’s no suggestion that they’ve thought about a policy position on any other issues. My concern is that they’d side with anyone who takes snacks into the chamber
The design got all to hard, so they went for a smoke. Cheap shot, I know - but look at that site. Green and yellow. Really.

Anti-paedophile Party
Fair enough, but they’re also anti-sex education. So they’re imbeciles.
Unfortunately, this website looks as creepy as the people they say they oppose.


Oh, I'm exhausted! Believe me, this is more exhausting than actually filling out the Senate voting tablecloth.  Good luck tomorrow (June 2nd), and read the voting instructions, because they have changed.

I'm just looking forward to the time when the politicians of the two major parties work out that Australians do support smaller parties, and quite like when they have to discuss things with each other and argue policy. They actually don't like their government to be in total control like fascists. They like it when there is a multi-party approach to government.

Happy voting.



          El ransomware Cerber roba ahora contraseñas del navegador y datos de carteras de Bitcoin        
El ransomware Cerber no para de evolucionar con el fin de provocar el mayor daño posible. Si a finales de 2016 informamos que empezó a atacar bases de datos, ahora nos hemos hecho eco de que la versión más reciente[...]
          Summer skirt, maxi skirt, tie dye skirt, boho skirt, rainbow skirt, tiered skirt, festival skirt : Funky Collection by Nuichan        

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          Marc Andreessen on Venture Capital and the Digital Future        
Marc Andreessen, venture capitalist and co-creator of the early web browser Mosaic, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how success in venture capital is more about winners that you missed and not losers that you backed. Other topics discussed include the rise of the developing world and the smartphone revolution, why Bitcoin is paving the way for innovative uses of the internet, an optimistic view of the future of journalism, changes in the healthcare system, and the future of education around the world.
          Gavin Andresen on the Present and Future of Bitcoin        
Gavin Andresen, Chief Scientist of the Bitcoin Foundation, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about where Bitcoin has been and where it might be headed in the future. Topics discussed include competing cryptocurrencies such as Dogecoin, the role of the Bitcoin Foundation, the challenges Bitcoin faces going forward, and the mystery of Satoshi Nakamoto.
          AMD and NVIDIA preparing graphics cards for cryptocurrency mining        
A new rumor has just started to spread in the industry, a rumor we heard from few sources. AMD & NVIDIA to release graphics cards for ‘Bitcoin’ mining AMD and NVIDIA are both facing problems with the stock of their power efficient and cost effective graphics cards due to the popularity of cryptocurrency mining. In order to […]
          Payment Processors Are Profiling Heavy Metal Fans as Terrorists        

If you happen to be a fan of the heavy metal band Isis (an unfortunate name, to be sure), you may have trouble ordering its merchandise online. Last year, Paypal suspended a fan who ordered an Isis t-shirt, presumably on the false assumption that there was some association between the heavy metal band and the terrorist group ISIS.

Then last month Internet scholar and activist Sascha Meinrath discovered that entering words such as "ISIS" (or "Isis"), or "Iran", or (probably) other words from this U.S. government blacklist in the description field for a Venmo payment will result in an automatic block on that payment, requiring you to complete a pile of paperwork if you want to see your money again. This is even if the full description field is something like "Isis heavy metal album" or "Iran kofta kebabs, yum."

These examples may seem trivial, but they reveal a more serious problem with the trust and responsibility that the Internet places in private payment intermediaries. Since even many non-commercial websites such as EFF's depend on such intermediaries to process payments, subscription fees, or donations, it's no exaggeration to say that payment processors form an important part of the financial infrastructure of today's Internet. As such, they ought to carry corresponding responsibilities to act fairly and openly towards their customers.

Unfortunately, given their reliance on bots, algorithms, handshake deals, and undocumented policies and blacklists to control what we do online, payment intermediaries aren't carrying out this responsibility very well. Given that these private actors are taking on responsibilities to help address important global problems such as terrorism and child online protection, the lack of transparency and accountability with which they execute these weighty responsibilities is a matter of concern.

The readiness of payment intermediaries to do deals on those important issues leads as a matter of course to their enlistment by governments and special interest groups to do similar deals on narrower issues, such as the protection of the financial interests of big pharma, big tobacco, and big content. It is in this way that payment intermediaries have insidiously become a weak leak for censorship of free speech.

Cigarettes, Sex, Drugs, and Copyright

For example, if you're a smoker, and you try to buy tobacco products from a U.S. online seller using a credit card, you'll probably find that you can't. It's not illegal to do so, but thanks to a "voluntary" agreement with law enforcement authorities dating back to 2005, payment processors have effectively banned the practice—without any law or court judgment.

Another example that we've previously written about are the payment processors' arbitrary rules blocking sites that discuss sexual fetishes, even though that speech is constitutionally protected. The congruence between the payment intermediaries' terms of service on the issue suggests a degree of coordination between them, but their lack of transparency makes it impossible to be sure who was behind the ban and what channels they used to achieve it.

A third example is the ban on pharmaceutical sales. You can still buy pharmaceuticals online using a credit card, but these tend to be from unregulated, rogue pharmacies that lie to the credit card processors about the purpose for which their merchant account will be used. For the safer, regulated pharmacies that require a prescription for the drugs they sell online, such as members of the Canadian International Pharmacy Association (CIPA), the credit card processors enforce a blanket ban.

Finally there are "voluntary" best practices on copyright and trademark infringement. These include the RogueBlock program of the International Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition (IACC) in 2012, about which information is available online, along with a 2011 set of "Best Practices to Address Copyright Infringement and the Sales of Counterfeit Products on the Internet," about which no online information is found. The only way that you can find out about the standards that payment intermediaries use to block websites accused of copyright or trademark infringement is by reading what academics have written about it.

Lack of Transparency Invites Abuse

The payment processors might respond that their terms of service are available online, which is true. However, these are ambiguous at best. On Venmo, transactions for items that promote hate, violence, or racial intolerance are banned, but there is nothing in its terms of service to indicate that including the name of a heavy metal band in your transaction will place it in limbo. Similarly, if you delve deep enough into Paypal's terms of service you will find out that selling tickets to professional UK football matches is banned, but you won't find out how this restriction came about, or who had a say in it.

Payment processors can do better. In 2012, in the wake of the payment industry's embargo of Wikileaks and its refusal to process payments to European vendors of horror films and sex toys, the European Parliament Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs made the following resolution: 

[The Committee c]onsiders it likely that there will be a growing number of European companies whose activities are effectively dependent on being able to accept payments by card; [and] considers it to be in the public interest to define objective rules describing the circumstances and procedures under which card payment schemes may unilaterally refuse acceptance.

We agree. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies notwithstanding, online payment processing remains largely oligopolistic. Agreements between the few payment processors that make up the industry and powerful commercial lobbies and governments, concluded in the shadows, can have deep impacts on entire online communities. When payment processors are drawing their terms of service or developing algorithms that are based on industry-wide agreements, standards, or codes of conduct—especially if these involve governments or other third parties—they ought to be developed through a process that is inclusive, balanced and accountable.

The fact that you can't use Venmo to purchase an Isis t-shirt is just one amusing example. But the Shadow Regulation of the payment services industry is much more serious than that, also affecting culture, healthcare, and even your sex life online. Just as we've called other Internet intermediaries to account for the ways in which their "voluntary" efforts threaten free speech, the online payment services industry needs to be held to the same standard. 


          AppLoad 256 - Les clans clashés 2        

Au programme : Et les news :
  • Nouveau téléphone d'Andy Rubin : Essential
Plus d'infos sur l'épisode :
          Leave Banking, Hawk Cryptocurrencies for a Living        
There's plenty of these already--with boatloads more to come.
Manias in the business world are nothing new. In the technology realm, we've had any number of these already like the dot-com boom followed by the dot-com bust earlier in this century. In the realm of finance, the latest and greatest gold rush concerns the issuance of cryptocurrencies. Instead of initial public offerings of shares of stock, the marquee events here are initial coin offerings (ICOs). As no shortage of issuers and investors buy the gospel (or Kool-Aid for skeptics) that cryptocurrencies represent the future widely-used form of money, there is a lot to be made (or lost).

A surefire sign of optimism about opportunities is when folks leave otherwise well-paying if predictable jobs for the Wild West of trading these largely unregulated instruments. Bloomberg says that's already happening with many ex-bankers setting their sights on the larger promised returns of virtual monies:
From Hong Kong and Beijing to London, accomplished financiers are abandoning lucrative careers to plunge into the murky world of ICOs, a way to amass quick money by selling digital tokens to investors sans banks or regulators. Cut out of the action, a growing cohort of banking professionals are instead applying their talents toward buying or hawking cryptocurrency.

They’re going in with eyes wide open. For [ex-banker Richard] Liu, who put together some of China’s biggest tech deals in his old job, the chance to shape the nascent arena outweighs the dangers of a market crash or crackdown. Loosely akin to IPOs, ICOs have raised millions from investors hoping to get in early on the next bitcoin or ether, and their unchecked growth over the past year is such that they’ve drawn comparisons to the first ill-fated dot-com boom. Yet with stratospheric bonuses largely a thing of the past, the allure of an incandescent new arena far from financial red-tape has proven irresistible to some.

“Traditional investment banks and VCs need to monitor this space closely, it could become very big,” said the 30-year-old partner at $50 million hedge fund FBG Capital, which has backed about 20 ICOs. He’s off to a quick start, getting in on this year’s largest sale: Tezos, a smart contracts platform that raised $200 million to outstrip the average Hong Kong IPO size this year of around $31 million.
That said, the potential for huge gains trading these monies comes with correspondingly huge risks as their critics point out:
Critics say many ICOs are built on little more than hyperactive imaginations. A cross between crowdfunding and an initial public offering, they involve the sale of virtual coins mostly based on the ethereum blockchain, similar to the technology that underpins bitcoin. But unlike a traditional IPO in which buyers get shares, getting behind a startup’s ICO nets you virtual tokens -- like mini-cryptocurrencies -- unique to the issuing company or its network. That means they grow in value only if the startup’s business or network proves viable, attracting more people and boosting liquidity.

That’s a big if, and the sheer profusion of untested concepts has spurred talk of a bubble. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission signaled greater scrutiny of the red-hot sector when it warned on Tuesday that ICOs may be considered securities, though it stopped short of suggesting a broader clampdown. The regulator however did reaffirm its focus on protecting investors: part of the appeal of ICOs lies in the fact that -- for now -- anyone with a bold idea can raise money from anybody.
Actually, the dot-com boom may illustrate the future of these virtual monies. Most startups of course went bust. However, those that survived for the longer run eventually did well enough and have introduced widely-adopted consumer standards. The survivors are exceedingly well-known including the likes of Amazon, EBay, Google, and so on. Like before, these newfangled entities cannot survive on novelty alone but must offer some sort of unique selling proposition to customers.

It will take some time to sort the Amazons from the Pets.coms of the cryptocurrency world. Meanwhile, there apparently be many gamblers drawn to this realm--even from the relatively stolid world of banking.
          SEX-роботы, Apple Watch 3 и русский файрвол | Droider Show #303        
      Появилась пачка новой информации о грядущей презентации Apple и походе там будет показан не только iPhone 8 но и Apple Watch 3 а также яблочные очки дополненной реальности, тем временем Bitcoin разделился на две валюты, ну а в России все не так гладко - похоже строят русский файрвол, еще бомбанул очередной стартап […]
          The NSA’s Inadvertent Role in the Major Cyberattack on Ukraine        

There’s a moment in Dr. Strangelove, Stanley Kubrick’s dark Cold War comic masterpiece, when President Merkin Muffley (played by Peter Sellers) learns that an insane general has exploited a loophole in the military’s command-control system and launched a nuclear attack on Russia. Muffley turns angrily to Air Force Gen. Buck Turgidson (played by George C. Scott) and says, “When you instituted the human reliability tests, you assured me there was no possibility of such a thing ever occurring.” Turgidson gulps and replies, “I don’t think it’s quite fair to condemn a whole program because of a single slip-up.”

The National Security Agency currently finds itself in a similar situation.

One of the NSA’s beyond–top secret hacking tools has been stolen. And while the ensuing damage falls far short of an unauthorized nuclear strike, the thieves have wreaked cybermayhem around the world.

The mayhem was committed by a group called the Shadow Brokers, which in April announced that it had acquired the NSA tool (known as Eternal Blue) and published its exploit code online for any and all hackers to copy.* In May, some entity—widely believed to be North Koreans—used the the exploit code to develop some malware, which became known as WannaCry, and launched a massive ransomware attack, which shut down 200,000 computers, including those of many hospitals and other critical facilities.

Then on June 27 came this latest attack, which was launched by the Shadow Brokers themselves. This struck some security analysts as odd, for two reasons. First, the Shadow Brokers are believed to be members of—or criminal hackers affiliated with—a Russian intelligence agency, and Russians tend not to hack for mere cash. Second, the attack was slipshod: The ransoms were to be paid to a single email address, which security experts shut down in short order. If the Russians had decided to indulge in this mischief for money, it was a shock that they did it so poorly.

Now, however, several cybersecurity analysts are convinced that the ransomware was a brief ploy to distract attention from a devastating cyberattack on the infrastructure of Ukraine, through a prominent but vulnerable financial server.

Jake Williams, founder of Rendition InfoSec LLC (and a former NSA analyst), told me on Thursday, two days after the attack, “The ransomware was a cover for disrupting Ukraine; we have very high confidence of that.” This disruptive attack shut down computers running Ukrainian banks, metro systems, and government ministries. The virus then spread to factories, ports, and other facilities in 60 countries—though Williams says it’s unclear whether this rippling effect was deliberate. (Because computers are connected to overlapping networks, malware sometimes infects systems far beyond a hacker’s intended targets.)

By the way, the attack left the ransomware victims, marginal as they were, completely screwed. Once the email address was disconnected, those who wanted to pay ransom had no place to send their bitcoins. Their computers remain frozen. Unless they had back-up drives, their files and data are irretrievable.

It’s not yet clear how the Shadow Brokers obtained the hacking tool. One cybersecurity specialist involved in the probe told me that, at first, he and others figured that the theft had to be an inside job, committed by “a second Snowden,” but the forensics showed otherwise. One possibility, he now speculates, is that an unnamed NSA contractor, who was arrested last year for taking home files, either passed them onto the Russians or was hacked by the Russians himself. The other possibility is that the Russians hacked into classified NSA files. It’s a toss-up which theory is more disturbing; the upshot of both is, it could happen again.

So should the NSA stop hacking computers out of concern that bad guys could steal its tools and use them for their own nefarious purposes? This remedy is probably unreasonable. After all, spy agencies spy, and the NSA spies by intercepting communications, including digital communications, and some of that involves hacking. In other words, the cyber equivalent of Gen. Turgidson would have a point if he told an angry superior it’s unfair to condemn a whole program for a single slip-up.

Besides, the NSA doesn’t do very many hacks of the sort that the Shadow Brokers stole—hacks that involve “zero-day exploits,” the discovery and use of vulnerabilities (in software, hardware, servers, networks, and so forth) that no one has previously discovered. Zero-day exploits were once the crown jewels of the NSA’s signals-intelligence shops. But they’re harder to come by now. Software companies continually test their products for security gaps and patch them right away. Hundreds of firms, many created by former intelligence analysts, specialize in finding zero-day vulnerabilities in commercial products—then alerting the companies for handsome fees. Often, by the time the NSA develops an exploit for a zero-day vulnerability, someone in the private sector has also found it and already developed a patch.

More and more, in recent years, the NSA chooses to tell companies about a problem and even help them fix it. This trend accelerated in December 2013, when a five-member commission, appointed by President Obama in the wake of the Snowden revelations, wrote a 300-page report proposing 46 reforms for U.S. intelligence agencies. One proposal was to bar the government from doing anything to “subvert, undermine, weaken, or make vulnerable generally available commercial software.” Specifically, if NSA analysts found a zero-day exploit, they should be required to patch the hole at once, except in “rare instances” when the government could “briefly authorize” the exploit “for high-priority intelligence collection,” though, even then, only after approval not by the NSA director—who, in the past, made such decisions—but rather in a “senior interagency review involving all appropriate departments.”

Obama approved this recommendation, and as a result his White House cybersecurity chief, Michael Daniel, drafted a list of questions that this senior review panel must ask before letting the NSA exploit, rather than patch, the zero-day discovery. The questions: Would this vulnerability, if left unpatched, pose risks to our own society’s infrastructure? If adversaries or crime groups knew about the vulnerability, how much harm could they inflict? How badly do we need the intelligence that the exploit would provide? Are there other ways to get this intelligence? Could we exploit the vulnerability for just a short period of time, then disclose and patch it?

A 2016 article in Bloomberg News reported that, due in part to this new review process, the NSA keeps—and exploits for offensive purposes—only about two of the roughly 100 zero-day vulnerabilities it finds in the course of a year.

The vulnerability exploited in the May ransomware attack was one of those zero-days that the NSA kept for a while. (It is not known for how long or what adversaries it allowed us to hack.) The vulnerability was in a Microsoft operating system. In March, the government notified Microsoft of the security gap. Microsoft quickly devised a patch and alerted users to install the software upgrade. Some users did; others didn’t. The North Koreans were able to hack into the systems of those who didn’t. That’s how the vast majority of hacks happen—through carelessness.

It may be time to view surfing the internet on computers as similar to the way we view driving cars on the highway. Both are necessary for modern life, and both advance freedoms, but they also carry responsibilities and can do great harm if misused. It would be excessive to require the equivalent of drivers’ licenses to go online; a government that can take away such licenses for poor digital hygiene could also take them away for impertinent political speech. But it’s not outrageous to impose regulations on product liability, holding vendors responsible for malware-infected devices, just as car companies are for malfunctioning brakes. It’s not outrageous to force government agencies and companies engaged in critical infrastructure (transportation, energy, finance, and so forth) to meet minimal cybersecurity standards or to hit them with heavy fines if they don’t. It’s not outrageous to require companies to program their computers or software to shut down if users don’t change or randomize their passwords or if they don’t install software upgrades after a certain amount of time. Or if this goes too far, the government could require companies to program their computers or software to emit a loud noise or flash a bright light on the screen until the users take these precautions—in much the same way that drivers hear ding-ding-ding until they fasten their seatbelts.

Some of these ideas have been kicking around for decades, a few at high levels of government, but they’ve been crushed by lobbyists and sometimes by senior economic advisers who warned that regulations would impede technical progress and harm the competitive status of American industries. Resistance came easy because many of these measures were expensive and the dangers they were meant to prevent seemed theoretical. They are no longer theoretical. The cyberattack scenarios laid out in government reports decades ago, dismissed by many as alarmist and science fiction, are now the stuff of front-page news stories.

Cyberthreats will never disappear; cybervulnerabilities will never be solved. They are embedded in the technology, as it’s developed in the 50 years since the invention of the internet. But the problems can be managed and mitigated. Either we take serious steps now, through a mix of regulations and market-driven incentives—or we wait until a cybercatastrophe, after which far more brutal solutions will be slammed down our throats at far greater cost by every measure.

*Correction, June 30, 2017: This article originally misstated that the NSA tool stolen by the Shadow Brokers was called WannaCry. It was called Eternal Blue, and its code was used to create WannaCry. (Return.)


          Opportunities and threats for Iran to enter the blockchain technology market        
Soheil Nikzad Marketing Director at PersianGIG.com Bitcoin and Blockchain technology at a glance If we are asked how much we trust somebody, the answer would probably be a collection of sentences which expresses our mental estimations about his/her possible reactions in different situations. Now if the question is solely about financial issues, we would be …
          Dogecoin se creó por diversión y hoy capitaliza $202 millones. Entrevista a James Butterfill        
De alguna manera parece haber una burbuja en el mercado de criptomonedas pero monedas como el Bitcoin o el Ethereum están ampliamente aceptadas como monedas del futuro. Las criptomonedas son mucho más que una clase de activos emergentes, y la tecnología detrás de ellas está continuamente en desarrollo.
          Future Tense Newsletter: How Facebook Is Coming to Terms With Its Political Influence        

Greetings, Future Tensers,

Nine months since the U.S. presidential election, Facebook is still in the early stages of coming to terms with its political influence. As part of its ambitions to create a platform that goes beyond connecting friends and family, it has unveiled new features aimed at connecting government representatives to the citizens they’re elected to serve. But Faine Greenwood questions whether we can trust a social media network’s attempts to better our representative government. She writes, “Not only is it unclear whether these tools will actually foster meaningful engagement, it’s also questionable whether private companies like Facebook—even if they’re well-meaning—should be trusted to keep democracies’ best interests at heart.”

Relatedly, Will Oremus took stock of Facebook’s most recent attempts to combat fake news—a major problem during the presidential campaign, of course. He points out that the company no longer uses the term “fake news” in press releases. Facebook has also launched a “Related Articles” feature to the news feed as a way to give users “easier access to additional perspectives and information, including articles by third-party fact checkers.”

While Facebook wants to bring some tech to government, government was thinking about tech this past week. The Senate is considering (surprisingly) sensible security legislation for internet of things devices. In more concerning news, Immigrations and Customs Enforcement is investigating the potential to use predictive policing technology—which critics say depends on biased data—in its new “extreme vetting” program.

Other things we read this week while trying to figure out why our stash of bitcoin doubled last week:

  • Coding boot camps: Although coding boot camps were supposed to be the next big thing in higher education, the recent closures of two high-profile camps reveals the industry is struggling to find a sustainable business model.
  • Wacky neural networks: Jacob Brogan talks with Janelle Shane about how (and why) she teaches neural networks to name craft beers and come up with knock-knock jokes.
  • Paper technology: Rachel Adler chronicles how improvements made to the printing press and the manufacturing of paper contributed to major societal changes in the 19th century and heralded the beginnings of mass media.
  • Sex-trafficking bill: Members of Congress have introduced a bill that would make it easier to punish online service providers when criminals use their services for sex trafficking. But Mike Godwin says that the bill, as currently written, could threaten internet freedom and innovation.
  • Religious apps: Aneesa Bodiat explores the benefits and pitfalls of using new technology to satisfy spiritual and religious needs.

Un-tagging myself,
Emily Fritcke
For Future Tense

Future Tense is a partnership of Slate, New America, and Arizona State University.


          The HBO Hackers Are Demanding $7.5 Million to Stop Leaking Game of Thrones        

The HBO hack is finally starting to make sense. Last week hackers released upcoming episodes of Ballers and Room 104 and script material from an unaired Game of Thrones episode, the network’s most popular show. But at that time, it wasn’t clear what their motive was: money, political power, lolz?

Now the hackers have made their intentions clear. They want lots of money.

On Monday, the hackers, who allegedly seized 1.5 terabytes of data from the hit-making television network, released even more stolen loot, including script summaries for the next five episodes of Game of Thrones, as well as scripts and entire seasons of other HBO shows. The leak also included a month’s worth of emails from an HBO executive as well as what appears to be the contact list of HBO chief executive Richard Pleper, which the Guardian reported contained the personal phone numbers of Game of Thrones actors.

But it wasn’t only spoilers that leaked Monday. The hackers also shared a ransom note, in the form of a video, demanding HBO pay millions of dollars or else even more sensitive company data will be posted online. That note was shared as a bizarre video with scrolling text set to the Game of Thrones soundtrack, which was included in Monday’s dump.

In the video sent to Pleper, obtained by Mashable, the hackers say that they want up to $7.5 million in bitcoin delivered later this week. “We often launch two major operations in a year and our annual income is about 12–15 million dollars. We are serious enough to do our business,” the hackers’ ransom note to HBO read. “We don’t play with you so, you in return, don’t play with us. You only have 3 days to make decision so decide wisely.”

HBO is apparently the hackers’ 17th target, and they claim only three have failed to pay up. While it’s still unclear how the hack was carried out, the ransom note does point out that the hackers spend “about 400-500,000 dollars in a year to buy 0days exploits.” That detail hints at the possibility that the hackers purchased an exploit of a software vulnerability online to break into HBO’s system.

If that is what happened, it’s similar to Sony’s hack in 2014, when hackers believed to be linked to North Korea breached the media giant’s computer network. They released tens of thousands of internal emails, as well as the Social Security numbers of thousands of employees, which led to a multimillion-dollar settlement for Sony employees. The Sony attack shared a very similar code to the WannaCry ransomware attack in May, which took advantage of a vulnerability in Windows that had been found and stockpiled by the NSA. That vulnerability was leaked out last year by hackers calling themselves the Shadow Brokers.

Hackers buy and sell software vulnerabilities on the dark web and other pseudonymous forums. The exploits are then often used to create malware or execute an attack. While it’s unclear what HBO could have done differently without knowing how the attack was carried out, one thing is certain: Malware attacks are on the rise.

“Thousands of new malware samples everyday are popping up,” said Steve Grobman, the chief technology officer at McAfee, a security firm. “The vast majority are driven by criminal activity.”

According to recent data from McAfee, the first quarter of 2017 alone counted nearly 100 million more incidents of malware than in the first quarter of 2016. A decent chunk of that malware is actually ransomware, which is when an attack locks down a user’s data until someone pays up or fulfills the hackers’ request. In the first quarter of 2017, McAfee found 9,597,233 cases of ransomware, a huge uptick from the first quarter of 2016, when the security firm found 6,029,206 incidents of ransomware.

HBO now has to decide whether to pay up, try to somehow stop the hackers from leaking, or risk losing even more valuable intellectual property. But the real damage might have nothing to do with Game of Thrones. With the Sony hack, the information leaked out from private emails between executives was far more harmful than stolen intellectual property. After all, HBO’s members are already paying customers who presumably want more than a handful of episodes of shows, so it’s not clear that it will lose any subscribers. Nor is it clear that most Game of Thrones fans would even know where to begin to look for a hacked script or episode. The main thing HBO is probably worried about is whether the hackers accessed any of the media company’s dirty laundry in its stolen email and documents—that damage is often much, much harder to recover from than a leaked television episode.


          Bitcoin Has Split Into Two Cryptocurrencies. What, Exactly, Does That Mean?        

If you owned bitcoin prior to Aug. 1 and slept in a little that morning, you would have woken up to find your stash had doubled—sort of.

Before Aug. 1, there was a single bitcoin currency simply called bitcoin, or BTC. Like most cryptocurrencies, bitcoin avoided having a central bank that verified transactions by maintaining a constantly verified ledger of transactions that was distributed across thousands of computers. This ledger is called the blockchain, and up until Aug. 1, there was only one of it. That day, at 8 a.m. Eastern, an “alternative coin” called Bitcoin Cash, or BCC, was born when the bitcoin blockchain split in two. Bitcoin Core, as the original currency is now called, and Bitcoin Cash have identical ledgers until Aug. 1. Now each currency maintains a separate ledger, and since cryptocurrencies are represented by their blockchains, that means bitcoin has effectively split in half, giving each user a bank account filled with both currencies.

The question of why bitcoin split is a deeply political one, as much about the philosophy of what bitcoin should be as it is about practical concerns of payment speed and per payment surcharges. As David Z. Morris described in Future Tense in June, the dispute centers on the maximum size allowed for any block in the blockchain. This is a technical point, but you can think of it as arguing over how many transactions are allowed on one page of the ledger. The original limit, imposed by pseudonymous creator Satoshi Nakamoto either as doctrine or temporary filler—depending on whether you support BTC or BCC—was 1 MB of data. This low limit is leading to delays in the amount of time it takes a transaction to be verified, which is itself leading to higher surcharges for premium verification. (For a primer on how this all works, click here.)

If transaction time were the only issue, though, there wouldn’t be a three-year-long flame war and a battling subreddits, one for each coin. There are two other issues. One is that the BTH folks think that allowing larger blocks hinders small players from “mining” bitcoins, centralizing power in the hands of large mining entities. Bitcoin was created as an alternative to centralized currencies, however, so “greater centralization” is a serious accusation. Point for BTC.

BTC has proposed a size increase of its own, one that comes with an even greater philosophical change. Segregated Witness, also known as SegWit2x, aims to fit more transactions on one page of the blockchain ledger by doubling the size of the page (that is, doubling the blocksize limit), and by reserving all space on the page for transactions. Right now, each page (each block) contains transaction details (Alice gave Bob 2 BTC), and signatures (I, Alice, agree to give Bob these 2 BTC). Instead of making the page much longer, SegWit2x wants to create more space on the page by erasing the signatures and reserving that space for transactions.  Many believe this proposal changes the fundamentals of bitcoin more than BCC does, and in terms of structure of the chain, they are right. That’s why some supporters of BCC oppose the name “alternative coin,” they view what they’re doing as closer to Satoshi’s vision than BTC. Point for BCC.

However, the Highlander “there can be only one” approach is a false choice. To understand why, we need to look at the recent history of another cryptocurrency, Ethereum. Back in June 2016, $50 million were siphoned away from the “Ethereum blockchain” by some clever thieves. However, the thieves weren’t quite as clever as they thought. Because of the way they drained the money, they had to wait 28 days before they could withdraw it and, presumably, retire to some tropical locale. In that time, Ethereum made a hard choice, one that Gavin Wood, co-founder of Ethereum, called “the single most important moment in cryptocurrency history since the birth of Bitcoin.” Rather than let the thieves make away with the money, a large portion of Ethereum users forked the blockchain so that the transactions that stole the ETH never happened.

A lot of people were upset by this. It violated the “spirit” of the blockchain. The purists split off and started their own cryptocurrency called Ethereum Classic (ETC). A year later, both currencies are still used (though ETH is worth far more than ETC) and are fairly stable. In fact, their combined value is greater than the original value.

The same thing seems to be happening with bitcoin. According to Quartz, BCC is already the third most valuable cryptocurrency, behind BTC and ETH. And, just like the Ethereum split, the BTC-BCC market is worth more than the original market was. However, while there can be more than one currency, that’s not to say there will be. It took six hours for the first BCC block to be mined, a process which usually takes about 10 minutes on BTC. That block was 1.9 MB, larger that BTC would allow, but the next block on BCC was only .04 MB, stoking fear that not enough miners had adopted BCC. Whether the achievement of BCC’s debut as a new cryptocurrency is a Pyrrhic victory for the founders or a resounding success will hinge on the answer to that question.


          The Hacker Who Saved the World From Ransomware Was Just Arrested For Making His Own Malware        

Just two and a half months ago, 22-year-old Marcus Hutchins, a British security researcher, was hailed as an international hero for putting a stop to the WannaCry ransomware attack. But on Thursday, as he was arrested on charges that he was behind a banking hack in 2014 called the “Kronos banking trojan,” according to a federal indictment against him.

Hutchins was the subject of international praise after he discovered the kill switch that shut down WannaCry, which had infected hundreds of thousands of computers in 150 countries around the world, including hospitals throughout the U.K., as well as utility systems in Spain and parts of the Russian government. Once infected, computers were locked and their files encrypted until victims paid about $300 in bitcoin to regain access. Hutchins, who works for the Kryptos Logic security firm, examined WannaCry’s code and found a domain name that, when registered, prevented the malware from spreading any further.

Hutchins was arrested in Las Vegas after he attended the annual hacker convention DefCon, as Motherboard first reported. The indictment includes a second defendant, but that name has been redacted.

Kronos, the malware program that Hutchins is accused of helping unleash, stole internet banking credentials and credit card data by sending emails with compromised attachments, like infected Microsoft Word documents, that were used to spread the attack, according to the Guardian. An ad for Kronos on Russian forums in 2014 priced the malware package at $7,000.

On Wednesday night, Quartz reported that the bitcoin accounts where victims of WannaCry were asked to deposit their ransom had been completely emptied. However, that could be a coincidence—there’s as yet no clear link between the emptying of the bitcoin accounts and Hutchins.

Whatever happens to Hutchins, there’s one sure lesson from all the exploits that he’s been associated with: Use caution when opening email. Even if it looks like it’s from someone you know, check the actual email address, and if you’re at all unsure, don’t open any attachments or click on links. Anyone able to exercise that level of personal restraint would be doing better than the people who work at the highest level of the United States government. On Monday night it was revealed that numerous members of the Trump administration had exchanged emails with a prankster pretending to be White House staffers and even Trump family members. Even the White House homeland security adviser, Thomas Bossert, who is supposed to be a cybersecurity expert, was duped.


          Don’t Blame Online Anonymity for Dark Web Drug Deals        

Last Thursday, the Justice Department announced that it had worked with European authorities to shutter two of the largest destinations on the dark web to buy and sell illegal drugs, AlphaBay and Hansa.

The shutdown followed reports from earlier in the month that AlphaBay, the larger of the two, had mysteriously stopped working, causing users to flock to Hansa.  But it turns out that Hansa had been taken over by the Dutch national police, who were collecting information on people using the site to traffic drugs.

European and American law enforcement collaborated to quietly arrest AlphaBay’s alleged founder Alexandre Cazes in Thailand on July 5. The 25-year-old Cazes later committed suicide in a Thai jail, according to the New York Times.

These dark web drug marketplaces are accessed using a service called Tor, which allows users to browse the internet anonymously. With Tor, you can circumvent law enforcement surveillance as well as internet censorship filters, which are often installed by governments or companies to restrict where people go online. Tor also allows for the creation of anonymously hosted websites or servers that can only be accessed via the Tor Browser. AlphaBay and Hansa were both hosted anonymously on Tor.

Though AlphaBay, Hansa, and, most famously, Silk Road depended on Tor to run their illegal operations, the Tor Project, the nonprofit that maintains the anonymous browser and hosting service, says that only 2 percent of Tor traffic has to do with anonymously hosted websites. The vast majority of Tor traffic is used for browsing the web anonymously. More than 1.5 million people use Tor every day, according to a spokesperson.

The U.S. government has a rather complicated relationship with Tor. On the one hand, documents revealed by Edward Snowden revealed how the National Security Agency had been trying to break Tor for years, searching for security vulnerabilities in browsers that would allow law enforcement to crack the online anonymity service. The Department of Defense has also invested in trying to crack Tor. During the 2016 trial of one of the administrators of Silk Road 2.0, another shuttered dark web drug-trafficking site, it was revealed that DoD hired researchers from Carnegie Mellon University to try to break Tor’s encryption in 2014.

Yet Tor also wouldn’t exist without the U.S. government—it was  originally built as a project out of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. The State Department continues to fund Tor (at least someone has told Rex Tillerson about it, presumably) because internet users around the world rely on the anonymity tool to access information and communicate safely online, particularly in countries where the internet is heavily monitored or censored by the government, like in China with its national firewall, or in Thailand, where it’s illegal to criticize the royal family online.

Cazes, the AlphaBay ring leader, was caught thanks to investigative work, not a break in Tor’s encryption. Cazes had sent password recovery emails to his email address, which investigators used to find his LinkedIn profile and other identifiers. (And no, the FBI did not dig up an email from Cazes asking to join his professional network on LinkedIn. According to The Verge, Cazes used the same address on a French technology troubleshooting website, which listed his full name, leading investigators to find a LinkedIn profile where he boasted cryptography and web hosting skills, as well as involvement in a drug front.)

And that’s good news for the vast majority of Tor users who aren’t interested in scoring molly. In 2015, a report from the U.N. declared that anonymity tools “provide the privacy and security necessary for the exercise of the right to freedom of opinion and expression in the digital age."

Anonymity tools, like so many technologies, have both good and bad applications. And in the same way cellphones aren’t evil just because some people use them to make drug deals, it’s important to not malign anonymity tools just because some people use them to sell drugs, too. If the U.S. government is ever successful in finding a way to disable Tor’s encryption to find criminals, it could put hundreds of thousands of people who depend on Tor at risk, too.


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          Swisscoin Whitepaper released, Blockchain on Test mode        
Finally, the most anticipated cryptocurrency, Swisscoin, is set to go public as their decentralized blockchain is completed and now in test mode. However, most of their project goals, aims and objectives were released on their whitepaper, alongside with evidence of their blockchain on test mode.


Swisscoin Blockchain on Test mode


According to the company, they aim to acquire over 1Billion users on their ecosystem, and this would be the first of its kind in the history of cryptocurrency innovation, as they’ll be providing a very unique products and services and create a total capitalization amounting to over 50 billion US dollars.

Swisscoin also stated her economic model on its whitepaper as they’re set to acquire over 30,000 merchants within a very short period and also how its value will be protected by commodity values in the form of precious metals. And this underlapping not by means of value rights separated but in a mix of 1/3 of gold, platinum and palladium will occur in actual form.

Read also: Swisscoin Cryptocurrency Review, Alternative to Bitcoin – Creating Billionaires Worldwide

Conclusively, within a short period of time, Swisscoin would become the top global payment system as more acceptance point emerges globally and usability of the crypto coin increases. However, with the expected growth on their ecosystem, it would become the one of the top-3 cryptocurrency in no time. So, if you’ve not taken advantage of this historical opportunity, I advise you take action immediately so you don’t regret it later. For those of you that is yet to register, you can register via here.

          Why Everybody Who Doesn’t Hate Bitcoin Loves It         

Thinking of Bitcoin as just a digital currency is like thinking about the Internet as just e-mail. Its potential is much more exciting than that.


          Venezuela: Transacciones por LocalBitcoins exceden el millón de dólares        
LocalBitcoins ha superado la brecha de los 9.430,92 millones de bolívares: unos 1,1 millones de dólares para la semana del 17 de junio. La más grande demanda de bitcoins en el mercado venezolano se registró el pasado 8 de abril, cuando fueron intercambiadas unas 736 unidades; la cifra alcanzada durante la semana anterior fue de 462 ...
          Explanation for Future Trading – chance to win 1 BTC        
Write new explanation for Futures Trading and win 1 BTC OKCoin is one of the world´s most traded bitcoin exchange. If you are trading on OKCoin, maybe you know it – you can make the most of small price movement by using 10x leverage of Bitcoin futures. Do you know, what … Continue reading
          The Uncanny Mind That Built Ethereum        
Vitalik Buterin invented the world's hottest new cryptocurrency and inspired a movement — before he'd turned 20 - "I think a large part of the consequence is necessarily going to be disempowering some of these centralized players to some extent because ultimately power is a zero sum game. And if you talk about empowering the little guy, as much as you want to couch it in flowery terminology that makes it sound fluffy and good, you are necessarily disempowering the big guy. And personally I say screw the big guy. They have enough money already."
"There's still technical problems. It doesn't scale. It's not efficient. It's not secure. It sucks, basically. It's shitty technology," says Vlad Zamfir, a developer that Buterin has hired to conceptualize the next iteration of the Ethereum software.
viz. Ethereum: Platform Review - Opportunities and Challenges for Private and Consortium Blockchains by Vitalik Buterin e.g. i.e.
  • Global Money, a Work in Progress - "Our amalgamation is first about the C6, the top six central banks now joined in the central bank swap network. It took a global financial crisis to get us to this point. The next step is bringing in the periphery, starting maybe with the BRICS. Hopefully we are educated enough to do that without requiring another global financial crisis." :P
  • Today global money is largely private credit money, the issue of a profit-seeking bank that promises ultimate payment in public money which is the issue of some state, quite possibly a different state from the one where the bank is chartered and does its business. Global money is also largely dollar-denominated, even when the ultimate users of that money lie completely outside the United States. The issue of dollar-denominated US Treasury bonds is just part of the huge stock of dollar assets and liabilities; the stuff of dollar hegemony is the private credit money dollar, not the issue of the state.

    Although global money is substantially private credit money, the fact that it is denominated in dollars means that the Fed is de facto, if not de jure, the ultimate lender of last resort for global money. Therein lies the rub. De facto the Fed's responsibility is global but de jure its authority is only local. The Fed is essentially hybrid, both government bank and banker's bank, and also both US central bank and global central bank. The great challenge of the present time is the politics of managing the hybrid reality of the global dollar system.
  • Why Central Banks Will Issue Digital Currency - "A better model, ultimately, is central bank digital currency. This would mean that a central bank, like the Federal Reserve, would participate on the network and would digitally mint U.S. dollars onto it. Since the Fed is the legal issuer of dollars, this would make digital dollars a native digital asset. There would be no need to 'convert' back to some underlying 'real' dollar because these digital dollars would be real, just in a new medium. In the same way that dollars already exist today in multiple mediums — notes, coins, electronic reserves — we would treat these digital dollars as just dollars in a new medium, backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government."
  • The medium of money has only changed a few times in history, from precious metals to bearer currencies to now our ledger-based electronic systems. Bitcoin and blockchain represent a transition to a new medium. This transition is often referred to as distributed ledger technology, which is a reference to today's centralized ledgers. But I find it more helpful to look back to bearer instruments, like banknotes, to appreciate what this new medium enables: a digital bearer instrument...

    The goal of the blockchain industry is to collapse these steps into a single step, where payment is the settlement, just like with physical notes. This is what I mean by digital value transfer, which I sometimes like to call money-over-IP. Soon, the phrase "cross-border payment" will make about as much sense as "cross-border email."
cf.
  • Life in the People's Republic of WeChat - "I message a Chinese friend who's in the U.S. on a fellowship and ask for a loan. Within minutes, he's sent me two hong bao, or red envelopes—a play on the red envelopes traditionally used to give gifts of money. They arrive as chat messages that say, 'Good fortune and good luck! You've received a red envelope'. Once I click on them, I have 200 yuan in my WeChat wallet."
  • The Future of Banking Is in China - "Building financial services on the back of its popular WeChat messaging system. During Lunar New Year, its over 760 million users exchanged 32 billion 'red packets', a twist on a holiday tradition to gift small amounts of cash. Last year, Tencent joined Ant in launching online-only banks that accept minideposits and microloans, extending their leadership in the country's $235 billion internet payments business. At Tencent's WeBank, the one-minute process to set up an account requires little more than a mobile-phone number, the applicant's national identification number and the user's photo taken with the phone's front-facing camera." (What Is a Bank?)*
also btw... The Web's Creator Looks to Reinvent It - "Tim Berners-Lee and other computer scientists are pondering newer technologies to create a web with more privacy and less government control... computer scientists talked about how new payment technologies could increase individual control over money. For example, if people adapted the so-called ledger system by which digital currencies are used."
          Sapiens 2.0: Homo Deus?        
In his follow-up to Sapiens, Yuval Noah Harari envisions what a 'useless class' of humans might look like as AI advances and spreads - "I'm aware that these kinds of forecasts have been around for at least 200 years, from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, and they never came true so far. It's basically the boy who cried wolf, but in the original story of the boy who cried wolf, in the end, the wolf actually comes, and I think that is true this time."
          Desire Modification in the Attention Economy        
The Future of (Post)Capitalism - "Paul Mason shows how, from the ashes of the recent financial crisis, we have the chance to create a more socially just and sustainable global economy." (previously; via) "Learning how to think really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what you think. It means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and to choose how you construct meaning from experience." --dfw, this is water Albert Wenger helps set the stage a bit... Land, Capital, Attention: This Time It Is the Same
Only 1% of the global population now controls about 50% of all capital. And in another critical historical parallel, the ruling elites everywhere directly or indirectly represent the interests of capital. Capital has replaced land as the factor against which policies are measured. Take quantitative easing for example, which is aimed at reducing the cost of capital on the belief that this will continue to create jobs. But the new technological disruption has already arrived and it is digital technology. This is a new set of machines and networks. Unlike their earlier predecessors they are universal machines which as they get better can eventually do anything. And the results are that capital and labor are no longer long-term complements which has been driving down labor's share of the economy and depressing wages. Digital technology even means that less and less capital is required for most endeavors (see for instance how much cheaper it is to start a new company today than it was even a decade ago). Capital is no longer scarce and labor even less so. Where is the new scarcity? It is human attention. With birth rates thankfully decelerating almost everywhere, peak population is finally a possibility. We all have only 24 hours in the day and we need to work, eat and sleep. That puts a hard limit on how much human attention exists. At the same time digital technologies are producing unprecedented amounts of information that we could pay attention to. On Youtube alone 100 hours of video is uploaded every minute. Increasingly you can measure how valuable something is by how much attention it controls (e.g., Google, Facebook, etc). And just like previous scarcities one of the reasons that attention is scarce is that we are bad at this new technology. As society we have lots of information locked up through copyright and patents instead of making it available to everyone. As individuals we too often lack a purpose other than making money and we will happily watch another cat video in our limited free time than read a challenging book. Over time we will get better at all of this and it will let us achieve amazing things as humanity, including free education and healthcare for everyone and cleaning up the mess we have made of the planet. But none of that will happen as long as we keep ourselves trapped in a belief that capital is scarce and that everyone needs a job. So yes, this time is the same. Once again technology is fundamentally shifting scarcity and the ruling elites are controlled by the prior scarcity, this time capital, which is trying hard to maintain its power. The sooner we all begin to understand this, the better our chances of a peaceful transition. The longer we wait, the more we will be like the land owners who didn't get industrialization and led us down a path of violent change.
So broadly speaking, in a nutshell, the politics of the attention economy amounts to: Shock the middle class - "The basic structure of politics is that the median voter's income is below the national average income, so redistribution is popular. The job of the anti-redistribution party is to stand up for popular positions on other issues. Ronald Reagan was against Communism and 'welfare queens' and George W Bush 'kept us safe' and defended traditional marriage." As Mason mentions, capitalism is adaptive; how might it adapt? To maintain inherited class hierarchies in a burgeoning global social network — to extend the 'enclosure movement' from land and capital to attention itself — requires the cultivation of productive identities and the advertising of tribal affinities[*] (to justify one's existence ;) through 'brand management' of one's reputation and social credit 'score': How Companies Are Reducing Consumers to Single Numbers [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]
Policymakers should discourage the expansion of credit scoring into life scoring—or, at the very least, require disclosure of all the data and algorithms behind the scores to the people being scored. There needs to be a recognition that scoring can be "highly reductionist[,] atomizing complex, contingent relationships into simplified, one-dimensional measures that cannot provide a full and multidimensional picture" of individuals. It's not necessarily an innovation to celebrate. Rather, it can be a prelude to the discrimination that's rightly condemned. And before succumbing to the voyeuristic thrill of submitting friends or strangers to the consumer-facing versions of these scores, everyone should carefully consider the reliability of their sources.
Moving from 'markets' to 'algorithms' just shifts the problem unless they are beneficent 'machines of loving grace' out there that look beyond the efficient frontier. "Imagine it has data tentacles everywhere, reaching into browsing and buying records; game worlds; chats; texts; friend networks; phone conversations; airline, banking, utility, and entertainment records; GPS locations; surveillance cameras; whatever. It could know more about us that a spouse or lover knows. It could figure out who we really are, and what we really want—down to the dreams we won't admit to ourselves—and then steer us in that direction, onto new paths that optimize who we are, that lead us toward the lives we're best suited to live." --Linda Nagata, The Red: First Light Another way... Machines for thinking
A terrific balance between delightful stories and thoughtful analysis is found in Jerry Kaplan's relatively short book, "Humans Need Not Apply". An entrepreneur and AI expert (he is one of the personalities in Mr Markoff's story), Mr Kaplan has done some serious thinking about how AI will transform business, jobs and most interestingly, the law. The book glimmers with originality and verve... To the problem of skills not being well matched to the needs of businesses, he proposes a "job mortgage". Companies would agree to hire a person in future in return for a tax break; the person would take out a loan against the future income to pay for the training. This way, educational institutions get clearer economic signals about what skills they should teach. To lessen income inequality, Mr Kaplan gets even more inventive. Companies would get tax breaks if their shares are broadly owned, using a measure he bases on the Gini coefficient. The American government would let people choose the firms where some of their Social Security (national pension) funds would be invested. Spreading stock ownership, Mr Kaplan reckons, will diffuse the gains from companies that, using AI, make oodles of money but employ few.
also btw...
  • The trust machine - "The notion of shared public ledgers may not sound revolutionary or sexy. Neither did double-entry book-keeping or joint-stock companies. Yet, like them, the blockchain is an apparently mundane process that has the potential to transform how people and businesses co-operate." [1,2,3]
  • Don't Automate, Obliterate - "All of this kind of thinking is premised on the principle of 'don't automate, obliterate' – too much of what is currently being debated in the policy realm is about automating existing processes and further enshrining categories that made sense historically but no longer do. It is time to figure out what government and society can and should look like now that we have digital technologies."
  • Discovering why we are not technologically doomed to inequality - "The overarching theme in all this work, however, is profound: it is that inefficiency and rent (whether it's increased or is simply being divided differently) are important causes of inequality, and that power in some form or other is central to these mechanisms. The important lesson to draw is that policies can be developed that at the same time create greater prosperity and distribute the fruits more equally — though they may be policies it will take brave politicians to put in place as they will challenge current power structures."
  • The difference between social democratic and liberal intuition - "Liberals don't really believe welfare is a good thing, but instead view it as a necessary thing in order to save people from total destitution... I don't share this liberal view of welfare. Rather, I think welfare is incredibly good and cool. In fact, I'd like to increase welfare expenditures by trillions of dollars each year."
  • Data shows that welfare doesn't have a corrupting influence on poor people - "Studies rebut a long-cherished belief in America, on the right and left, that welfare encourages bad behavior by the poor."
  • Former IMF chief economist backs 'people's QE' - " 'There is clearly something else you can do if you get to zero (inflation) and still want to increase spending. You can buy goods. Which one should you choose? We haven't asked the question in the crisis but we should', he said. Blanchard said that this does not mean central banks would buy goods directly. Rather, governments can increase their fiscal deficits by spending on infrastructure projects. Central banks can then buy this debt with newly created money."
  • Trekonomics - "Brad DeLong: Social credit! Quantitative easing for the people! Monetary policy via direct crediting of seigniorage to everyone's bank account, in equal shares!"
  • Negative interest rates and helicopter money could be a marriage made in heaven - "If strongly negative interest rates were ever implemented, they would spread through the deposit system. By itself, that would gradually shrink the money supply — and this is a reason to worry that negative rates could be contractionary. The hope is that the banks, which create most of the money in circulation, would expand their balance sheets (lend more at slightly less negative rates than charged on deposits, and profit from the margin) to make up for negative interest cost on their own reserves. But if they did not do so enough, there would be a case for expanding the money supply directly — and helicopters would be the most effective way to do so."
  • Negative real rates signify a broken financial system - "In short, the best explanation for why private markets are forcing interest rates to zero is that the banking system is broken. The system which functioned for centuries on the basis of unsecured, reputation-based, interbank lending no longer exists. ZIRP is just evidence that the financial industry is turning to government as a source of the liquidity that the financial industry is no longer capable of creating on its own."

          Ethereum Launched        
In case you missed it Ethereum announced its first developer release a week ago. What is Ethereum? According to the video it's a "planetary scale computer powered by blockchain technology." Given the breathlessness, some skepticism is in order, but what if it purports to do on the tin is true? One good sign, I'd submit, is they recognize that Ethereum does not exist in a regulatory vacuum despite their claims of being a 'trustless' computing platform. On that note, I'd say widespread adoption, of any digital currency, hinges on gov't/central bank[*] backing, viz. fedcoin or cf. any other govcoin. also btw...
  • Vapor No More: Ethereum Has Launched - "These are very early days; this is only the first preliminary phase of a multi-stage launch. (One which will theoretically end with an eyebrow-raising transition from proof-of-work to proof-of-stake, for you hardcore cryptocurrency nerds out there.) Even then, performance will be terrible; it will be a decentralized virtual machine, but a painfully slow and weak one compared to the computer on your desk, or even the one in your pocket."
  • Ethereum Network Continues Thawing Process in Anticipation of the Start of Trading - "The gas limit will not be released immediately, but will grow gradually. Ethereum's gas price is determined by miners and how much of their computing power they are wiling to contribute to the network. If no miners update their client and raise the artificial limit they are willing to accept, then no transactions will be possible on the Ethereum network."
  • Ethereum Launches Frontier; Ether Mining Begins, Trading to Follow - "The Frontier release is an achievement to be lauded and not taken lightly, but Ethereum still has a long, difficult road ahead. Its technical merits continue to be challenged by different parties, and significant development milestones remain. However, to anyone excited by the promises of decentralized blockchain technology, Ethereum is a project that is surely awe-inspiring and, if successful, to be one of the greatest technological feats since the advent of the Internet."
Some previous hype:
  • The Utopia Algorithm - "When you buy something on eBay or Airbnb, a cut goes to the company for facilitating the transaction. A handful of programmers are planning to build an online marketplace on Ethereum where buyers and sellers can connect without a third party and their commission."
  • Come With Us If You Want to Live[*; pdf] - "I prefer thinking about the problem of 'How do we make sure that all people have at least something?' So figuring out how to create a currency that would, say, give everyone on earth one unit per year—to me, that would be the ideal."
  • More on the possible benefits of Ethereum[*] - "One of the more advanced concepts being touted for a next-generation Bitcoin is the idea of decentralised autonomous corporations (DAC) – companies with no directors. These would follow a pre-programmed business model and are managed entirely by the block chain. In this case the block chain acts as a way for the DAC to store financial accounts and record shareholder votes."
  • Filtered for the future of the firm - "So, y'know, the idea that a corporation - an organisation for orchestrating human endeavour to deliberate ends - an entity invented in the 1600s, and entity which BY ITS INESCAPABLE LOGIC forces us into mass production, mass consumption, mass media, alienation and the loss of individuality, and all kinds of ugly inhuman shit... the idea that we can re-invent the corporation, and create new forms of it: That's interesting."
  • The idea that we might create a type of organisation which is empowering, has local value which doesn't mean everything gets coerced into the value of giant companies, is smaller, can be interrogated and critiqued because it's just code, that avoids the priesthoods of capital and law.

    That a company might be a fuzzy-edged thing, where consumers are owners too...

    I'd say: Make a little bottle-city company that embodies all of this. Consumer-owners, internal currencies for resource allocation, corporate governance as executable code, doing an actual interesting tractable not-too-ambitious thing. Half co-op, half lifestyle business, half startup. Show what happens when we use capital, instead of capital using us. Do it simply and elegantly. Make a little nest of these companies. Then sit back and see what happens.
  • Teenage Hacker Transforms Web Into One Giant Bitcoin Network - "Ethereum and other next-gen crypto-platforms paint a very attractive picture of our online future, one where users are in control, not governments or big companies."
  • There's a blockchain for that[*] - "There's this hopelessly geeky new technology. It's too hard to understand and use. How could it ever break the mass market? Yet developers are excited, venture capital is pouring in, and industry players are taking note. Something big might be happening. That is exactly how the Web looked back in 1994 — right before it exploded. Two decades later, it's beginning to feel like we might be at a similar liminal moment. Our new contender for the Next Big Thing is the blockchain — the baffling yet alluring innovation that underlies the Bitcoin digital currency."
There is a contingent on today's Internet—a minority, perhaps, but influential—who believe that the industry took a wrong turn over the past decade. That an Internet dominated by a few big companies is an unhealthy one. That the centralized-computing paradigm—of privately owned data silos housed in giant server farms that harvest our personal data in order to sell ads—is one that needs to change. The entrepreneurs, coders and crypto experts leading the blockchain charge — I shall call them blockchainiacs, because they need a name — see this new technology as an antidote, and they are hopped up on dizzying visions of a disrupted future. (One sure sign that this technology has achieved geek-cred critical mass: The tech publisher O'Reilly just announced a new conference on the topic.)
Some more background material:
  • Understanding the blockchain - "The technology concept behind the blockchain is similar to that of a database, except that the way you interact with that database is different. For developers, the blockchain concept represents a paradigm shift in how software engineers will write software applications in the future, and it is one of the key concepts that needs to be well understood. We need to really understand five key concepts, and how they interrelate to one another in the context of this new computing paradigm that is unravelling in front of us: the blockchain, decentralized consensus, trusted computing, smart contracts, and proof of work/stake. This computing paradigm is important because it is a catalyst for the creation of decentralized applications, a next-step evolution from distributed computing architectural constructs."
  • The reality is that the crypto-led computer science revolution is giving us concepts that go way beyond a one-currency type of scenario. Yes, bitcoin is programmable money, but the blockchain is also programmable value, programmable governance, programmable contracts, programmable ownership, programmable trust, programmable assets, etc. And we have barely scratched the surface on these applications.

    It is too early to tell exactly where the cryptocurrency landscape will end up. Maybe it will be like social media, with four giant platforms, dozens of large players, thousands of other companies as beneficiaries, and of course, millions if not billions of end-users. And that would be a good thing.

    But to get there, let's not forget the basic golden rule of network effects: without users, there is no network effect.
  • Blockchain scalability - "Blockchain scalability is an essential set of issues that must be tackled as blockchain technologies become more popular. It's particularly difficult to build for scalability and to maintain backward compatibility. Solutions are being proposed, in academic papers and whitepapers, but we'll have to wait and see what really works."
  • The Blockchain is the New Database - "It's a bit like your home address. You can publish your home address publicly, but that doesn't give any information about what your home looks like on the inside. You'll need your private key to enter your private home, and since you have claimed that address as yours, no one else can claim a similar address as theirs. The blockchain can also be seen as a software design approach that binds a number of peer computers together that commonly obey the same 'consensus' process for releasing or recording what information they hold, and where all related interactions are verified by cryptography."
  • Enabling Blockchain Innovations - "Chaum introduced the blind signature, which he used to provide a cryptographic means to prevent linking of the central server's signatures (which represent coins), while still allowing the central server to perform double-spend prevention. The requirement for a central server became the Achilles' heel of digital cash."
  • Clarifying the Foundational Innovation of the Blockchain[*] - "Let me repeat that again for emphasis: before the blockchain's existence there were *no* systems that were organizationally decentralized, yet logically centralized. This is why Bitcoin is such a foundational technology."
  • Blockchains as a public and private resource - "In other words, what's still to be determined is whether Ethereum and its ilk would ever be more cost efficient on a per participant basis than just trusting the government to run an equivalent database on the public behalf, funded by good old fashioned tax dollars.‏"
  • Demystifying incentives in the consensus computer[*] - "Bitcoin and similar cryptocurrencies are a massive network of computational devices that maintain the robutness and correctness of the computation done in the network. Cryptocurrency protocols, including Bitcoin and the more recent Ethereum system, offer an additional feature that allows currency users to specify a "script" or contract which is executed collectively (via a consensus protocol) by the network. This feature can be used for many new applications of cryptocurrencies beyond simple cash transaction. Indeed, several efforts to develop decentralized applications are underway and recent experimental efforts have proposed to port a LinuxOS to such a decentralized computational platform."
  • In this work, we study the security of computations on a cryptocurrency network. We explain why the correctness of such computations is susceptible to attacks that both waste network resources of honest miners as well as lead to incorrect results. The essence of our arguments stems from a deeper understanding of the incentive-incompatibility of maintaining a correct blockchain. We explain this via a ill-fated choice called the verifier's dilemma, which suggests that rational miners are well-incentivized to accept an unvalidated blockchain as correct, especially in next-generation cryptocurrencies such as Ethereum that are Turing-complete. To explain which classes of computation can be computed securely, we formulate a model of computation we call the consensus verifiability. We propose a solution that reduces the adversary's advantage substantially, thereby achieving near-ideal incentive-compatibility for executing and verifying computation in our consensus verifiability model. We further propose two different but complementary approaches to implement our solution in real cryptocurrency networks like Ethereum. We show the feasibility of such approaches for a set of practical outsourced computation tasks as case studies.
  • A simple model to make sense of the proliferation of distributed ledger, smart contract and cryptocurrency projects - "I think the two dimensions that help me think about these projects are: [1] 'Who do I trust to maintain a truthful record?'; and [2] 'What do I need the record to be about?' "
  • Cost? Trust? Something else? What's the killer-app for Block Chain Technology? - "Imagine we're living five or ten years in the future. Perhaps we have a securities block chain that records ownership of all securities in the world. Perhaps we have a derivatives smart contract platform that records (and enforces?) all derivatives contracts? Maybe, even, there will be a single, universal platform of this sort."
  • Sure – everybody still has a copy of the data locally... but the consensus system ensures that we know the local copy is the same as the copy everywhere else because it is the shared consensus system that is maintaining the ledger. And so we know we're producing our financial statements using the same facts as all the other participants in the industry.

    Does this mean we no longer need audit? No longer need reconciliations? Obviously not, but perhaps this approach is what is driving some of the interest in this space?

    But notice: this is just a way of ensuring we agree on the facts: who owns what? Who has agreed to what? We can still run our own valuation algorithms over the top and we could even forward the results to the regulator (who could also, of course, have a copy of the ledger) so they can identify situations where two parties have very different valuations for the same position, which is probably a sign of trouble.
  • Smart Contracts? - "I reprised my current theme that the world of 'blockchains' is really two distinct worlds – the world of Ripple-like ledgers and the world of Bitcoin-like systems – that happen to be united by a common architecture, the Replicated, Shared Ledger. This unifying concept is based on the idea that each participant has their own copy of the entire ledger – and they trust the 'system' – whatever system that is – to ensure their copy is kept in sync with everybody else's. The differences are about what the ledger records and how it is secured."
  • Broadly speaking, Ripple-like systems are focused on the representation of "off-system" assets and are secured by identifiable entities. Systems like Ripple, Hyperledger and Eris are broadly in this world, I think. The security model of these systems is based on knowing who the actors are: if somebody misbehaves, we can punish them because we know who they are!

    Bitcoin-like systems are more focused on "on-system" assets and are secured by an anonymous pool of actors. Bitcoin and Ethereum are broadly in this space, I think. The security model here is based more on game-theoretic analyses of incentive structures: the goal is to make it overwhelmingly in the actors' financial interests to do the "right" thing...

    Bitcoin-like systems could be disruptive to existing institutions if they gained widespread adoption, whereas Ripple-like systems seem, to me, to be far more closely aligned to how things work today and are, perhaps, a source of incremental innovation.

    If this observation is correct, then firms looking at this space probably need to assess the technologies through different lenses. The question for banks for Ripple-like systems is: "how could we use this to reduce cost or improve our operations" whereas the question for Bitcoin-like systems is: "how would we respond if this technology gained widespread adoption?"
  • A Simple Explanation of Balance Sheets - "One can imagine a world where the bank still records that it owes some money to its customers but the shared ledger is the place that records precisely who those people are. This is fundamentally different to using the shared ledger as a mirror (or mirroring it to the bank's own ledger) – it's more akin to seeing the shared ledger as a partial subledger. And it might perhaps be something that gets adopted to different degrees by different firms... hopefully this sketch shows some possibilities for where this could be going. And, like I said earlier, none of this will happen unless we get everybody to the same page with the right mental model for how banking works."
  • Two revolutions for the price of one? - "Bitcoin is worse than existing solutions for all the use-cases that banks care about. It's expensive. It's slow. And it's 'regulatorily difficult'. And this is by design."
So, if this is true, we should expect to see adoption of Bitcoin come from the margins, solving marginal problems for marginal users. But disruptive innovations have a habit of learning fast and growing. They don't stop at the margins and they work their way in and up... Bitcoin essentially runs on a MASSIVELY replicated, shared ledger. (The trick is in keeping it consistent, of course...) It sounds insanely inefficient and expensive... and perhaps it is. But we also have to ask ourselves: inefficient and expensive as compared to what? Just look at the state of banking IT today... Payments, Securities, Derivatives... Pick any one. They all follow the same pattern: every bank has built or bought at least one, usually several, systems to track positions and manage the lifecycle of trades: core banking systems, securities settlement systems, multiple derivatives systems and so on. Each of these systems cost money to build and each of them costs even more to maintain. And each bank uses these systems to build and maintain its view of the world. And they have to be connected to each other and kept in sync, usually through reconciliation... But what if... what if these firms – that don't quite trust each other – used a shared system to record and manage their positions? Now we'd only need one system for an entire industry... not one per firm. It would be more expensive and complicated to run than any given bank-specific systems but the industry-level cost and complexity would be at least an order of magnitude less. One might argue that this is why industry utilities have been so successful. But a centralised utility also brings issues: who owns it? Who controls it? How do the users ensure it stays responsive to their needs and remains cost-effective? The tantalising prospect of the blockchain revolution is that perhaps it offers a third way: a system with the benefits of a centralised, shared infrastructure but without the centralised point of control: if the data and business logic is shared and replicated, no one firm can assert control, or so the argument goes. Now, there are lots of unsolved problems: privacy, performance, scalability, does the technology actually work, might we be walking away from a redundant (antifragile?) existing model? Who will build these platforms if they can't easily charge a fee because of their mutualised nature? Difficult questions.

          Esteri di mer 05/03        
1-Ucraina: giornata di consultazioni tra Russia e occidente ( Giuseppe Sarcina, Emanuele valenti) ..2-Venezuela: un anno senza Chavez e un paese spaccato in due. ( Danilo De Biasio, Angelo miotto, Geraldina Colotti) ..3-Paesi del golfo sull'orlo di una crisi: L'Arabia Saudita ritira il suo ambasciatore dal Qatar. ..4-La crisi del 2008 e Il mea culpa di Bernanke: l'ex presidente della Fed ammette di aver sottovalutato il problema dei mutui subprime.5-Progetti sostenibili: boom dell'apicultura nel centro di Berlino.(www.fabiofimiani.it) 6-Musica e nuove tecnologie: nasce songcoin, la bitcoin del mondo musicale. ..7-World Music: Amira Kheir, una voce del Sudan. ..( Marcello Lorrai)
          Another Sloppy Security Blunder Takes Down Another Dark Web Drug Emporium        

It’s been a bad month for people who like to buy illegal drugs online. Just a few weeks after the illicit marketplace Silk Road got shut down by the feds, one of that site’s main Dark Web competitors is closing down as well. The proprietor of Black Market Reloaded—which Bitcoin Magazine has described as a Silk Road for people with "no moral restrictions at all”—announced Thursday that he was shutting the site. The reason: He’d made a sloppy decision that may have compromised his real-world identity—which is pretty much exactly what the FBI says happened to Ross William Ulbricht, the guy who allegedly ran Silk Road.

Here’s what seems to have happened. As you might imagine, Black Market Reloaded was deluged with new users in the wake of the Silk Road seizure, and the site’s owner, “backopy,” apparently had to acquire new servers to keep the site up and running under this increased demand. In a forum post published today under the title “The end of the road,” backopy wrote that he decided to use a virtual private server, or VPS, in order to meet demand. While you can get a VPS up and running faster than a dedicated physical server, the VPS will be less secure, in part because it is not wholly controlled by the site owner. Sure enough, as backopy wrote, the VPS administrator allegedly leaked the Black Market Reloaded source code. From that code, a careful investigator could have theoretically determined backopy’s identity, and possibly more. With the site compromised, backopy apparently decided to shut it down.

As a frequent evaluator of dumbness, I feel confident in my assessment that this was even dumber than the mistakes that allegedly sank Silk Road. Ross William Ulbricht’s alleged slip-ups came in the site’s early days, before Silk Road became a billion-dollar business. They were novice mistakes made by a novice manager. But Black Market Reloaded has been around awhile, and the site’s administrator should have known the risks of using a VPS. In this case, he actively chose to ignore safety in favor of expedience.

Sites like these promise safety in anonymity—that it’s a security feature when nobody really knows who they’re dealing with. But, as we’re learning, “you don’t know who you’re dealing with” can also be a huge negative when you don’t really know whether that person is taking the appropriate security precautions. And I guess you could argue that total security is always an illusion in cases like these—that as a site scales in size and popularity, it becomes harder to manage, and leads to more opportunities for a breach. Creating a digital trail is always fraught, no matter how well that trail is supposedly concealed or encrypted. That, to me, seems more convincing than the idea that these sites could’ve gone on forever if the creators weren’t big dummies.

Anyway, there are still several Dark Web marketplaces out there, and backopy himself has already promised that he will "come back in the future" with a new, safer version of the site. (Hooray?) I’m eager to see whether he and the other remaining proprietors have learned any lessons from Silk Road and Black Market Reloaded, or whether they, too, will fall in the wake of some digital blunder.


          What the Big Silk Road Bust Reveals about Buying Illegal Drugs Online        

Silk Road, a prominent online marketplace for illegal goods and services, has been seized and shuttered by the FBI, and its alleged proprietor arrested. Ross William Ulbricht, a 29-year-old San Francisco resident who went by the name “Dread Pirate Roberts,” was charged with operating a site that made buying illegal drugs almost as easy as ordering a book from Amazon. The criminal complaint against Ulbricht called Silk Road “the most sophisticated and extensive criminal marketplace on the Internet today,” which sounds about right, given that the site was a clearinghouse for drugs, fake IDs, and other things you can’t buy at Walmart. The site was accessible only by Tor, an anonymizing network that helps facilitate secure online communications; all business was transacted in Bitcoin, the relatively anonymous online currency, thus providing Silk Road’s users another level of security.

In a major story for Forbes earlier this year, Andy Greenberg characterized Dread Pirate Roberts as “a radical libertarian revolutionary carving out an anarchic digital space beyond the reach of the taxation and regulatory powers of the state—Julian Assange with a hypodermic needle.” (The story also estimated that Silk Road saw about 60,000 visitors per day and did about $30 million to $45 million in annual revenue.) The criminal complaint against Ulbricht, which is worth reading in full, makes the case that, revolutionary or otherwise, he was a fellow who didn’t do a great job covering his tracks.

The complaint alleges that not only did Ulbricht manage and maintain a site that facilitated more than $1.2 billion worth of mostly illegal transactions in its two and a half years of operation, he also solicited a hit man to murder someone who was threatening to reveal the names of several thousand Silk Road users. (While Ulbricht apparently paid the assassin, the FBI can find no evidence that the hit ever took place.) The feds caught Ulbricht’s scent after Canadian authorities randomly intercepted a package of fake IDs that was en route to Ulbricht’s San Francisco address. From there, they were able to accumulate enough circumstantial evidence to convince them that Ulbricht was Dread Pirate Roberts.

The government has been after Silk Road for a while, and it’s interesting to note that the site was brought down not by some great feat of hacking, but by old-fashioned investigative work. The idea behind Silk Road was that, if you followed the proper security protocols, you could conduct illegal transactions right out in the open and the government would be powerless to stop them. As far as I can tell, nothing in the criminal complaint disproves this notion. Ulbricht was arrested not because Tor failed, but because it is risky to send illegal goods through the mail. Further, agents were able to corroborate their suspicion that Ulbricht was Dread Pirate Roberts not by defeating Tor, but by noting that some of the earliest message board postings touting Silk Road were linked to an email address in Ulbricht’s name. And as Slate's Will Oremus already reported, the criminal complaint also indicates that Ulbricht stupidly used his real name to ask an in-retrospect-suspicious question on an online coding forum. The security failures here were human, not technological.

You read a lot these days about how online privacy doesn’t really exist, and how the government can crack most encryptions. And while this is undoubtedly true, the best online privacy measures are still pretty good—or, at least, good enough to stymie the FBI. Silk Road isn’t the only black-market website out there, and if the others ever get busted, I’m guessing it’ll be thanks to a similar human slip-up.


          #34: 本有主题但后来不得不变成没有主题的闲聊        

这一期本来的主题是「文件系统」。但是由于两位主持人无数次把自己绕进去,无法顺利地推进话题,不得不将录音剪辑成仅剩闲聊的部分。下一次一定录好。

本期的口号是:It only takes a single line of code to bring a system to its knees.

相关链接

人物简介


          [Engadget] Amazon Coins arrives for Kindle Fire owners, $5 credit thrown in to get you started~Reviews~Evaluation        
Engadget post time: May 13, 2013 at 09:31PM Forget Bitcoin: Amazon’s got a digital currency of its own, known as Coins, coming to the Kindle Fire right on schedule. The virtual money, which was originally announced back in February, is now ready to go for anyone who frequents the Amazon Appstore or uses a Kindle […]
          We Like Shooting 208 – You done messed up A-Aron        
Welcome to the We Like Shooting show, Episode 208 - tonight we’ll talk about Jennings, Bitcoin, Oxcart, Bulletsafe and more!
          http://makebitcoinsfast.com/        
http://makebitcoinsfast.com/
          Choose which Australian Political Party to vote for by their Website Design!        
For those of you who are not Australian citizens and therefore are not voting in our Federal election, you need to know that here - voting is compulsory. If you don't vote without a good reason, then you get fined. The upside is we get a better representation of our citizens in our voting results. The downside is that some people just come in and 'spoil' their voting paper by scribbling on it, and others 'donkey vote' - that is just vote in the order that the selections appear.

We have a bi-cameral system, so two voting houses - the lower house or House of Representatives (where the government is formed), and an upper house or Senate, which is meant to be where our seven states and territories are represented - but in practice it acts as a bit of a safety valve on the excesses of the lower house.

It looks like we are going to have a close result, with perhaps neither major party ( Labor or Liberal - sort of like Democrats and Republicans in the USA, or Labour and Conservatives in the UK) getting a substantive majority. That means some of the minor parties - and there are a few of them - might get a guernsey in deciding who forms government in the lower house.

In the Senate, it is almost certain that neither of the major parties will get a majority (they haven't over the last couple of elections), and that one or a combination of minor parties will hold the balance of power.

After reading a post on Facebook which quoted KnowYourParties - I was inspired to wonder what would happen if you applied a design critique to each of the parties website design, and determined your vote that way?

Many thanks to the writer of KnowYourParties, whose descriptions I have borrowed entirely.

Health Australia Party
Rebranding of the Natural Medicine Party, which was probably a better description. Anti-vaxxers, fluoridophobes and homeopaths trying to expand their business via changes to medical legislation.
Their colour theming leaves a lot to be desired. They chose a good template, and then ruined it with their 'Byron Bay' hippy logo. Wasted screen realestate on an image of a bunch of anonymous people (are these their candidates?). OK, on the plus side its clean and clear, unlike their grubby anti-science views.

Seniors United Party of AustraliaFinally, a voice in parliament for the wealthiest generation that ever lived.
I think KnowYourParties description is a little harsh, or maybe that's just because as over 55yoa - they purport to represent my age group! The website looks like some ex IT geek put it together circa 1993 when the Mosaic web browser came out and allowed graphics. Unfortunately this website is comically representative of those they probably wish to recruit.


Family First
But only if your family consists of a white Christian man, a white Christian woman and at least two white Christian children and you believe everyone else is headed straight for hell.
Look, I like orange, and blue is a natural contrast, but this is just horrible - or horribly STRONG. Unfortunately 'Bob Day' sounds like some kind of annual celebration of bobbing for apples, when in fact they are bobbing for Jesus. This site is unrepresentative of what they stand for - no christian iconography anywhere.


Liberal Democrats Headed by David Leyonhjelm, who made it into the Senate in 2013 because of a herd of Lib voters being too stupid to correctly identify their preferred party. The Lib Dems are committed Libertarians whose ability to ignore all of the evidence on every possible issue would make any cult proud. 
Awful logo - and its repeated. Its very hard to carry off yellow on a white background. Did anyone realise that at the centre of this photo - its focus in fact is nothing? I think its meant to be on their leader. That top menu - you just don't see, and the slogan is just not important enough to win my vote - besides the fact that their view of the world is loathsome.

VOTEFLUX.ORG | Upgrade Democracy
 Flux (n) – an abnormal or morbid discharge of blood or other matter from the body. Whenever there’s a bill before the Senate, you use an app to discharge your opinion into a tame crossbencher and tell him (yes, it’s always going to be a him) which way to vote on each bill. Founded by two Bitcoin consultants, and works on the same blockchain principle, whatever the hell that means.
Well, they look like a software company. What's with the black background? Sooo web design circa last millennium. Pretty logo though. Unfortunately that headline reads like a 404 error.


Liberal
You wake up in an ice bath and realise that your left leg is missing, and Rupert Murdoch tells you that brown people and greenies and reds all conspired to steal your leg and are coming back for the rest of your limbs, but then why is Rupert wearing a blood-stained hospital gown, and why does his left leg look familiar, and there, on the knee, isn’t that the scar that you got when you were ten years old and fell off your bicycle?
Well, this is actually well designed in the main. Its responsive, and works well, with the leader front, centre and active. Pity about that horrible medallion logo thingy (WTF! Blue and yellow again!) What function is it meant to perform - an award? a certification? a mark of quality? Or is it just meant to NOT look anything like the Liberal party logo? Malcolm looks very presidential, and there is no sign of those nasty right wing climate deniers and homophobes.

The Nationals
You wake up in a shed and realise that your left leg is missing, and Rupert Murdoch tells you that brown people and greenies and reds all conspired to steal your leg and are coming back for the rest of your limbs, but then why is Rupert wearing a blood-stained hospital gown, and why does his left leg look familiar, and there, on the knee, isn’t that the scar you got when you were ten years old and got kicked by a horse?
Now this is interesting - the nationals take the iconography of the green movement and apply it to their arch enemy's? Given that in all their difficult seats, it is green leaning independents, or actual greenies that are their greatest threat - I expect this adoption of green iconography is intentional. Except for that horrible logo, and the specific shades of green and yellow they have chosen - this looks pretty good. Not that I'd vote for them - given their leader is one of the biggest climate deniers out there. Wise not to feature his image.

Democratic Labour Party (DLP)
If you’re an economic progressive yet somehow still a dyed in the wool Christian homophobe, this is the party for you.
That logo looked old fashioned when Bob Santa Maria commissioned it. Alternatively it looks like the logo used for film awards on advertising. The slogan is soooo dated and fuddyduddy, and about spelling! The graphic representing a subject cloud, without actually being one is very folksy.

Science Party
 Formerly the Future Party. They’re still naïve, but now they’ve got a full quiver of policies, mostly geared toward fixing the shitblizzard of the last three years.
Like the logo - although a bit more finance company than scientific. Love the image - now that's aspirational! On design - they are in contention for my vote.

Australian Cyclists Party
 Does exactly what it says on the box.
Yep - what he said. Logo is good, but could be better. Bit of waisted space at the top there right of the logo. What is it with blue and green? I'd consider voting for them, if some of their number didn't ride like crazed loons on footpaths, and are so un-evolved they don't know what a bicycle bell is for. It's to warn me that you are coming up my arse!

Shooters, Fishers and Farmers
This party is like the time I hurt my back a few years ago and thought the problem would go away like it always had before, except it didn’t and now I live with chronic back pain.
The only thing that is wrong with this logo, is that it should have a big red 45 degree line through that circle! Go and murder some defenceless animal somewhere else you vermin. Annoyingly, other than the appalling logo and social and political views, the website is quite well designed - which I suppose just goes to show that you can't judge a book by its cover. When did they add 'farmers' to their name? Was it when that farmer murdered that environment protection officer? Odious people.

Voluntary Euthanasia Party
As advertised.
Great logo, clever setup, because the power of their campaign is in the power of individual stories. Worthy of support for their design, and for their opinions in my view.

Socialist Alliance
The kind of socialists you can actually have a conversation with.
Well, it had to be red didn't it. The 'vote' message is a bit self evident. They are in need of a good slogan, and all that empty space around the logo is a waste. Other than the words - there is no real visual demonstration of what they stand for. Could do better.

Rise Up Australia Party
The actual worst. Founded by someone who got thrown out of Family First for too much hate speech, which is like getting kicked out of Labor for not doing anything.
This website is pretty foul - which I suppose does reflect the views of the party. The logo is hideous, and the functionality of the website is woeful. Let me give you some examples - it has a loader that tells you the percentage loaded - while you wait and wait (is it a flash site?). When you scroll down (try it if you can bare it) - you just get the tops of each of the candidates heads. I'd give you a screen shot if the party wasn't so vile. Oops, I couldn't resist. The menu is mid page, and has way too many items of varying sizes. On the plus size, it is responsive (unlike their mindset), and uses icons for its policy areas. That is the best thing I can say about the site, and the party.

Labor
The post-war European centre right party for Australia today. 
Not as sophisticated as Liberal, but that heading and logo are so much better. They have an image, where the focus of it is actually on their leader. Slogan good and clear, and I like the 'stand with us' phrase as opposed to 'Vote 1' and their ilk. Solid effort but room for improvement.

Online Direct Democracy – (Empowering the People!)
Like VOTEFLUX, but with PollyWeb instead of the Bitcoin blockchain. (If you say that sentence backwards at the stroke of midnight when the moon is full, Lucifer will appear and grant you three votes on bills that will never get up.) 
As Windows is to Apple - this is to good design. Is that a blue planet in a black hole? At least the're honest - its all about the technology not the people. No, just no.

Derryn Hinch’s Justice Party
It turns out that this is about Derryn Hinch’s notion of justice, not about bringing Derryn Hinch to justice. Which is disappointing. A Federal party campaigning on State issues, implying either ignorance or extreme cynicism. My money is on cynicism.
Derryn, your rich enough to afford better. The logo is ugly and literal. Judge Judy has a better one. This site is a bit of a stinker. I must implement a new rule of web design: never use dot points on a home page. The only honest bit of design is the implication that Derryn is the harbinger of justice - 'Hinch Justice'.

Jacqui Lambie Network
Anatomically incorrect: the logo is a map of Tasmania, but the policy platform is an arsehole. 
Black and orange - a favourite combination of mine. Have you noticed that they have deepetched Jacqui's hair so that it looks like an upside down map of Tasmania? Actually, this, a little like the candidate is straight shooting, without her muddling of words and images.
Pirate Party Australia
Basically progressive, and I agree with them on most things, but their ideas on intellectual property are anti-artist and their views on tax are just idiotic.
Ok, the logo is cute, the pirate ship is cute, the font is good, and the layout good, if a little old fashioned. Its a little staid really - not what you expect from outlaws.

Pauline Hanson’s One NationHave you ever licked a gallbladder?
It galls me to say it, but good logo. Fortunately that is where it stops. Too many stock graphics. No visual breathing space, and justified text. Enough said.


Veterans Party Supporting veterans with no nonsense, no political game playing and absolutely no policies.
Looks more like a recruitment advert for the forces. They always say, one strong image is better than a whole lot of bad ones. Ain't that the truth.

Secular Party of Australia
Basically pretty great, but there are a couple of issues where the commitment to secularism starts to look a little like Islamophobia.
The imagery here just says 'We want your money'. Not sure that is a good way to introduce yourself to the public - unless you're a televangelist. Logo - do I have to say it?

CountryMinded
I don’t agree with everything they say, but I’m not really their target audience. This is essentially the party that the National Party should be.
Blue and green again, really? Badly chosen template, and that logo needs to be shot. With a shotgun.

Socialist Equality Party
Trotskyists. Well-intentioned but fanatical. These are the people who never forgot that Che’s real first name was Ernest.
The site is quite mild mannered in design. That is almost a 'liberal' blue. Nice touches of red though.

Katter’s Australian Party
Uncle Ho and Margaret Thatcher cohabiting in a single mind.
Red, red, red. Reds all over the bed. We already know that Bob is deaf to nuance (shooting . . . Orlando). Apparently he is blind to colour as well. Other than that - a professional website.

Palmer United Party
The earth will shake violently, trees will be uprooted, mountains will fall, and all binds will snap – Palmer will be free. Palmer will go forth with his mouth opened wide, his upper jaw touching the sky and his lower jaw the earth, and he will swallow Odin in a single gulp. Flames will burn from his eyes and nostrils, and his sons will come after to swallow the sun and the moon.
That map of Australia is a crime against cartography, and vexillology (look it up). I love the meaninglessness of the slogan. I am surprised that they are still featuring the image of the morally (and possibly literally) bankrupt Clive.

Citizens Electoral Council
Possibly just straight-up insane. Climate deniers, but economically kinda socialist. Anti-Semitic and possibly white supremacist, but pro-immigration. They also claim that the Port Arthur massacre was commissioned by the British royal family and implemented by a mental health NGO.
Worst political website for this election. I would say it was designed by a server engineer, but that would be unfair to the design skills of server engineers. Just all types of wrong, which I suppose reflects their policies.

Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party
The Eddie the Eagle of befuddled right-wing governance.
Blue and green again. Is this a thing? Other than that, if you can't design a good logo, just use the words - and they did (I'm ignoring the ubiquitous southern cross on the wrong angle at the top).

Animal Justice Party
Better people than me.
. . . and not to be confused with Animal Farm Justice Party. Logo looks like The Wilderness Society for animals. I know the image is about live exports, but cute cat video's are more loveable.

The Arts Party
Sound policies, surprisingly shitty logo. Come on Arts Party, you had one job to do.
What he said. One job. Menu wrapping is a crime.

Non-Custodial Parents Party (Equal Parenting)
Fielded candidates for the last six Federal elections. Seventh time lucky, guys.
Couldn't organise a supervised visit - let alone a live website.

Mature Australia
Your racist Western Australian aunt.
OK this screen grab doesn't do it justice - looks like I timed it badly. Pretty logo, but what he said about the views. '2 cent tax' - they can't add up.

Christian Democratic Party (Fred Nile Group)
The party’s charter is just a bunch of bible quotes. It’s like we’re in Pennsylvania in the fucking 17th Century.
They bought a good wordpress template, and a good shot of parliament house. Pity they didn't spend as much money or care on their depressingly unimaginative, and proportionally challenged logo.

Australian Sex Party
Are you turned on by sound economic and social policies with a strong evidence basis? Then number the box and put your ballot in the slot.
OK, you did well with the logo, but seriously - an industry that has some of the most imaginatively designed sex websites and you came up with this? Its definitely not sexy, and I'm not sure it makes people take you seriously either.

Australian Progressives
A broad suite of evidence-based best practice policies that only seems progressive because Australia is such a regressive ideological clusterfuck.
Great site - get rid of that horror of a logo.  It doesn't say 'progressive'. It says . . . oh sorry I fell asleep with a pen in my hand.


Nick Xenophon Team
A bit far to the right for me personally, but Xenophon has done exactly what an independent senator is supposed to do, and pretty close to exactly what he said he would do. Which is refreshing.
Oh South Australia, you are such contrarians, but you always did have good food, and good arts. You win a boutique non-industrial prize for the orange and black combo, and a reneable power commendation for making a name like 'Xenophon' into a brand.

Drug Law Reform
Single issue party focused on treating drug use as a health issue rather than a criminal one. The stance seems well reasoned. It’s just a bit hard to take them seriously when their logo is a hemp leaf.
What he said about the logo. Some terrible images in that carousel, including a quote from Richard Branson. The green isn't even pretty.

Sustainable Australia
Formerly the Stable Population Party. They want a ‘sustainable’ population through lower immigration. If they actually cared about sustainability they’d be calling for a lower global population, but instead they’re calling for reduced population growth in a country with only 24 million people. Which means that what they are is simply racist.
Loathsome website, loathsome policies, loathsome logos.

The Greens
Yes, they wear suits now, but at least those suits are made from sustainable bamboo in a small Liberian social enterprise that sponsors education initiatives for orphaned girls.
I want to love the greens, but they have three things I am having trouble coming to grips with. The logo (OK, I can nearly forgive, as it has become their brand); this website (which commits several crimes against font usage, colour, and layout), and Lee Rhiannon. I support their ethos, but some of their policies (their small business policy from the last election seems to have disappeared) are just naive - like the design - those icons especially.

Australian Liberty Alliance
Angry Anderson (remember him? didn’t think so) vowing to stop the Islamisation of Australia. Last time I checked, Islam was holding steady at 2.2% of the population, so maybe one bald dickhead is all it takes to hold the hordes at bay.
A site designed last decade I think - or from when Angry Anderson last had a hit. Don't start me on the logo.

Renewable Energy Party
Single issue, seems good prima facie, but founded by Peter Breen, who was Ricky Muir’s only staffer for a time. I can’t figure out whether this is a good sign (Breen taught Muir how to be a halfway decent senator) or a terrible sign (how can someone go from the petrolhead party to a renewables party and expect to be believed?).
Like the look of this - simple and clean. Like clean energy - it takes a lot of work to make something look this simple.

Marijuana (HEMP) Party
Entirely about legalising weed, and there’s no suggestion that they’ve thought about a policy position on any other issues. My concern is that they’d side with anyone who takes snacks into the chamber
The design got all to hard, so they went for a smoke. Cheap shot, I know - but look at that site. Green and yellow. Really.

Anti-paedophile Party
Fair enough, but they’re also anti-sex education. So they’re imbeciles.
Unfortunately, this website looks as creepy as the people they say they oppose.


Oh, I'm exhausted! Believe me, this is more exhausting than actually filling out the Senate voting tablecloth.  Good luck tomorrow (June 2nd), and read the voting instructions, because they have changed.

I'm just looking forward to the time when the politicians of the two major parties work out that Australians do support smaller parties, and quite like when they have to discuss things with each other and argue policy. They actually don't like their government to be in total control like fascists. They like it when there is a multi-party approach to government.

Happy voting.



          In Italia la casa si paga in bitcoin        
casa bitcoinIncredibile ma vero: in Italia si potranno pagare gli appartamenti in bitcoin, la valuta elettronica sfruttata anche dagli hacker e che spesso abbiamo citato quando abbiamo parlato di virus cryptolocker e ransoware. La novità è stata resa possibile dall’Agenzia delle Entrate. In che modo? In poche parole i bitcoin vengono considerati come una qualunque moneta straniera. bitcoin e l’acquisto della casa La prima società immobiliare a sfruttare questa possibilità è il Gruppo Barletta, che permetterà di acquistare in bitcoin 123 appartamenti all’interno di un edificio completamente ristrutturato, che si trova nel quartiere di San Lorenzo a Roma. Siamo la prima
          Truffe dei Bitcoin, malware all'attacco        
Gli analisti di Kaspersky Lab hanno fatto sapere che il 29% dei malware legati alla finanza dello scorso anno erano appositamente pensati per rubare Bitcoin. I Bitcoin sono una moneta elettronica nata nel 2009 e probabilmente sono stati presi di mira per la loro alta valutazione raggiunta nel 2013. In particolare si tratterebbe di applicazioni che si installano senza autorizzazione che tentano di generare illecitamente la criptovaluta e al contempo provano in continuazione ad accedere ai file dei wallet dove appunto risiedono i Bitcoin. Inoltre ad “aiutare” indirettamente questi malfattori ci sono anche alcuni utenti incauti che non vanno a
          Bitcoins        
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          Comment on Bad manners, blockchains, open data, government as a platform and and Birmingham pigs in muck. by Lorna Prescott        
Nice post Nick. I was a bit excited to hear that the voluntary sector somewhere might be experimenting with blockchain, so went off noodling around for more info on HullCoin. I was a bit disappointed that it seems to have started off as essentially payment for ‘volunteering’, which raised all sorts of questions. Or perhaps that’s simply the way the Guardian journalist thought they had to describe it, so that readers would understand (http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/apr/22/hullcoin-bitcoin-volunteers-new-way-pay). Only at the end of the article do they suggest a much bigger picture: "HullCoin, they say, could one day become the ‘blood supply’ of a growing collaborative economy, which extends from locally grown food projects to collective purchasing and savings networks, providing an economic safety net for hard times and new opportunities for good.” I know personal stories are important, and people connect with them and so on, but I think in cases like this we all need to take the time to have our head hurt, as the story about mopping a floor in exchange for a cup of tea really doesn’t do any credit to the thinking which is obviously going on behind HullCoin. (I note that the HullCoin website doesn’t use the term ‘volunteering’.) Much as you are frustrated by the polite government meetings which stifle change, I’m left feeling frustrated by the limited and limiting ways we have to talk about and understand participation, contribution and collaborative economies. I think this stifles change too, by hiding from people what is possible.
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          How Bitcoin And Blockchain Will Impact The Cybersecurity Industry        

Source: National Cyber Security - Produced By Gregory Evans

From global power outages to international hacking schemes to run-of-the-mill data breaches, protecting sensitive data has never been more important than it is today. In order for companies to keep their data secure, their cybersecurity teams must stay ahead of the newest technologies being used by both consumers and hackers....

The post How Bitcoin And Blockchain Will Impact The Cybersecurity Industry appeared first on National Cyber Security Ventures.


          Ð’ Інституті електрозварювання ім.Патона виявили незаконну фабрику Bitcoin        
Про це йдеться в постанові Святошинського районного суду міста Києва, опублікованій в єдиному державному реєстрі судових рішень.
          Ð¡Ð¾Ñ€Ð°Ñ‚ник Путіна хоче кинути виклик Китаю у "видобуванні" Bitcoin - Bloomberg        
Російська компанія Russian Coin Miner (RMC) виступила з так званою "первинною монетною пропозицією", в рамках якої інвестори можуть використовувати популярні криптовалюти Bitcoin або Ethereum для купівлі російського аналога.
          Comment on Mañana 1 de agosto, hard-fork de BitCoin by David        
No está claro ,si tengo un bitcoin solamente y envío un bitcoin convencional ,que es lo que sigue mostrándome la cartera de electrum a la dirección Y y a continuación quiero volver a enviarlo a la dirección Z de bitcoin cash ,simplemente no podré hacerlo porque ya lo envié a Y. La cartera de electrum por ejemplo ,no se ha actualizado y sigue mostrando la situación igual que antes.
          Comment on Mañana 1 de agosto, hard-fork de BitCoin by Nico        
Por otra parte teniendo en cuenta como de alta está la dificultad del algoritmo de minado en Bitcoin la rama sin apoyo podría tener dificultades para minar bloques y los 10 minutos teóricos se podrían alargar bastante... al menos hasta el siguiente reajuste del algoritmo (2 semanas) para luego poder oscilar brusca y peligrosamente... no sé si esto lo tienen también pensado los de Bitcoin Cash o tendrán que hacer un fork sobre el fork!
          Comment on Mañana 1 de agosto, hard-fork de BitCoin by Nico        
Más que interesante, teóricamente podrías vender los bitcoins de una rama para comprar en la otra incrementando tu saldo en esa rama como por arte de magia... jugada redonda si la rama elegida es la ganadora (y nefasta si es la perdedora), podría ser una estrategia para tumbar una de las ramas por parte de los stakeholders de grandes cantidades de bitcoins (los propios mineros o las propias casas de cambio como indica Ashish)
          Comment on Mañana 1 de agosto, hard-fork de BitCoin by Ashish        
Good summary! Its critical for Bitcoin owners to have their bitcoins in their own wallet and not in an exchange like Coinbase - which is not even distributing out the Bitcoin Cash. This way one can actually control your own Bitcoin Cash.
          Comment on Mañana 1 de agosto, hard-fork de BitCoin by Rafa        
Muy interesante! Estaría bien que actualizaras con lo que al final ocurrió.
          Comment on Mañana 1 de agosto, hard-fork de BitCoin by Juanma        
Muy interesante. Gracias por compartirlo!
          How SAP Ariba became a first-mover as Blockchain comes to B2B procurement         
The next BriefingsDirect digital business thought leadership panel discussion examines the major opportunity from bringing Blockchain technology to business-to-business (B2B) procurement and supply chain management.

We will now explore how Blockchain’s unique capabilities can provide comprehensive visibility across global supply chains and drive simpler verification of authenticity, security, and ultimately control.

Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Get the mobile app. Read a full transcript or download a copy.

To learn more about how Blockchain is poised to impact and improve supply chain risk and management, we're joined by Joe Fox, Senior Vice President for Business Development and Strategy at SAP Ariba, and Leanne Kemp, Founder and CEO of Everledger, based in London.

The panel was assembled and recorded at the recent 2017 SAP Ariba LIVE conference in Las Vegas. The discussion is moderated by Dana Gardner, principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions.

Here are some excerpts:

Gardner: Joe, Blockchain has emerged as a network methodology, running crypto currency Bitcoin, as most people are aware of it. It's a digitally shared record of transactions maintained by a network of computers, not necessarily with centralized authority. What could this be used for powerfully when it comes to gaining supply chain integrity?

Fox: Blockchain did start in the Bitcoin area, as peer-to-peer consumer functionality. But a lot of the capabilities of Blockchain have been recognized as important for new areas of innovation in the enterprise software space.

Fox
Those areas of innovation are around “trusted commerce.” Trusted commerce allows buyers and sellers, and third parties, to gain more visibility into asset-tracking. Not just asset tracking in the context of the buyer receiving and the seller shipping -- but in the context of where is the good in transit? What do I need to do to protect that good? What is the transfer of funds associated with that important asset? There are even areas of other applications, such as an insurance aspect or some kind of ownership-proof.

Gardner: It sounds to me like we are adding lot of metadata to a business process. What's different when you apply that through Blockchain than if you were doing it through a platform?

Inherit the trust

Fox: That's a great question. Blockchain is like the cloud from the perspective of it’s an innovation at the platform layer. But the chain is only as valuable as the external trust that it inherits. That external trust that it inherits is the proof of what you have put on the chain digitally. And that includes that proof of who has taken it off and in what way they have control.

As we associate a chain transaction, or a posting to the ledger with its original transactions within the SAP Ariba Network, we are actually adding a lot of prominence to that single Blockchain record. That's the real key, marrying the transactional world and the B2B world with this new trusted commerce capability that comes with Blockchain.

Gardner: Leanne, we have you here as a prime example of where Blockchain is being used outside of its original adoption. Tell us first about Everledger, and then what it was you saw in Blockchain that made you think it was applicable to a much wider businesscapability.

Kemp: Everledger is a fast-moving startup using the best of emerging technology to assist in the reduction of risk and fraud. We began in April of 2015, so it's actually our birthday this week. We started in the world of diamonds where we apply blockchain technology to bring transparency to a once opaque market.

Kemp
And what did I see in the technology? At the very core of cryptocurrency, they were solving the problem of double-spend. They were solving the problem of transfer of value, and we could translate those very two powerful concepts into the diamond industry.

At the heart of the diamond industry, beyond the physical object itself, is certification, and certificates in the diamond industry are the currency of trade. Diamonds are cited on web sites around the world, and they are mostly sold off the merit of the certification. We were able to see the potential of the cryptocurrency, but we could decouple the currency from the ledger and we were able to then use the synthesis of the currency as a way to transfer value, or transfer ownership or custody. And, of course, diamonds are a girl's best friend, so we might as well start there.

Dealing with diamonds

Gardner: What was the problem in the diamond industry that you were solving? What was not possible that now is?
Kemp: The diamond industry boasts some pretty impressive numbers. First, it's been around for 130 years. Most of the relationships among buyers and sellers have survived generation upon generation based on a gentleman's handshake and trust.

The industry itself has been bound tightly with those relationships. As time has passed and generations have passed, what we are starting to see is a glacial melt. Some of the major players have sold off entities into other regions, and now that gentleman's handshake needs to be transposed into an electronic form.

Some of the major players in the market, of course, still reside today. But most of the data under their control sits in a siloed environment. Even the machines that are on the pipeline that help provide identity to the physical object are also black-boxed in terms of data.

We are able to bring a business network to an existing market. It's global. Some 81 countries around the world trade in rough diamonds. And, of course, the value of the diamonds increases as they pass through their evolutionary chain. We are able to bring an aggregated set of data. Not only that, we transpose the human element of trust -- the gentleman's handshake, the chit of paper and the promise to pay that's largely existed and has built has built 130 years of trade.

We are now able to transpose that into a set of electronic-form technologies -- 
Blockchain, smart contracts, cryptography, machine vision -- and we are able to take forward a technology platform that will see transactional trust being embedded well beyond my lifetime -- for generations to come.

Gardner: Joe, we have just heard how this is a problem-solution value in the diamond industry. But SAP Ariba has its eyes on many industries. What is it about the way things are done now in general business that isn't good enough but that Blockchain can help improve?

Fox: As we have spent years at Ariba solving procurement problems, we identified some of the toughest. When I saw Everledger, it occurred to me that they may have cracked the nut on one of the toughest areas of B2B trade -- and that is true understanding, visibility, and control of asset movement.

It dawned on me, too, that if you can track and trace diamonds, you can track and trace anything. I really felt like we could team up with this young company and leverage the unique way they figured out how to track and trace diamonds and apply that across a huge procurement problem. And that is, how do a supplier and a buyer manage the movement of any asset after they have purchased it? How do we actually associate that movement of the asset back to its original transactions that approved the commit-to-pay? How do you associate a digital purchase order (PO) with a digital movement of the asset, and then to the actual physical asset? That's what we really are teaming up to do.

That receipt of the asset has been a dark space in the B2B world for a long time. Sure, you can get a shipping notice, but most businesses don't do goods receipts. And as the asset flows through the supply chain -- especially the more expensive the item is -- that lack of visibility and control causes significant problems. Maybe the most important one is: overpaying for inventory to cover actual lost supply chain items in transit.

I talked to a really large UK-based telecom company and they told me that what we are going to do with Everledger, with just their fiber optics, they could cut their buying in half. Why? Because they overbuy their fiber optics to make sure they are never short on fiber optic inventory.

That precision of buying and delivery applies across the board to all merchants and all supply chains, even middle of the supply chain manufacturers. Whenever you have disruption to your inbound supply, that’s going to disrupt your profitability.

Gardner: It sounds as if what we are really doing here is getting a highly capable means -- that’s highly extensible -- to remove the margin of error from the tracking of goods, from cradle to grave.

Chain transactions

Fox: That’s exactly right. And the Internet is the enabler, because Blockchain is everywhere. Now, as the asset moves, you have the really cool stuff that Everledger has done, and other things we are going to do together – and that’s going to allow anybody from anywhere to post to the chain the asset receipt and asset movement.

For example, with a large container coming from overseas, you will have the chain record of every place that container has been. If it doesn't show up at a dock, you now have visibility as the buyer that there is a supply chain disruption. That chain being out on the Internet, at a layer that’s accessible by everyone, is one of the keys to this technology.

We are going to be focusing on connecting the fabric of the chain together with Hyperledger. Everledger builds on the Hyperledger platform. The fabric that we are going to tie into is going to directly connect those block posts back to the original transactions, like the purchase order, the invoice, the ship notice. Then the companies can see not only where their asset is, but also view it in context of the transactions that resulted in the shipment.

Gardner: So the old adage -- trust but verify -- we can now put that to work and truly verify. There's newstaking place here at SAP Ariba LIVE between Everledger and SAP Ariba. Tell us about that, and how the two companies -- one quite small, one very large -- are going to work together.

Fox: Ariba is all-in on transforming the procurement industry, the procurement space, the processes of procurement for our customers, buyers and sellers, and we are going to partner heavily with key players like Everledger.

Part of the announcement is this partnership with Everledger around track and trace, but it is not limited to track and trace. We will leverage what they have learned across our platform of $1 trillion a year in spend, with 2.5 million companies trading assets with each other. We are going to apply this partnership to many other capabilities within that.

Kemp: I am very excited. It’s a moment in time that I think I will remember for years to come. In March we also made an importantannouncement with IBM on some of the work that we have done beyond identifying objects. And that is to take the next step around ensuring that we have an ethical trade platform, meaning one that is grounded in cognitive compliance.

We will be able to identify the asset, but also know, for example in the diamond industry, that a diamond has passed through the right channels, paid the dutiful taxes that are due as a part of an international trade platform, and ensure all compliance is hardened within the chain.

I am hugely excited about the opportunity that sits before me. I am sincerely grateful that such a young company has been afforded the opportunity to really show how we are going to shine.
If you think about it, Blockchain is an evolution of the Internet.

Gardner: When it comes to open trade, removing friction from commerce, these have been goals for hundreds of years. But we really seem to be onto something that can make this highly scalable, very rich -- almost an unlimited amount of data applied to any asset, connected to a ledger that’s a fluid, movable, yet tangible resource.

Fox: That’s right.

Gardner: So where do we go next, Joe? If the sky is the limit, describe the sky for me? How big is this, and where can you take it beyond individual industries? It sounds like there is more potential here.

Reduced friction costs

Fox: There is a lot of potential. If you think about it, Blockchain is an evolution of the Internet; we are going to be able to take advantage of that.

The new evolution is that it's a structured capability across the Internet itself. It’s going to be open, and it’s going to be able to allow companies to ledger their interactions with each other. They are going to be able, in an immutable way, to track who owns which asset, where the assets are, and be able to then use that as an audit capability.

That's all very important to businesses, and until now the Internet itself has not really had a structure for business. It's been open, the Wild West. This structure for business is going to help with what I call trusted commerce because in the end businesses establish relationships because they want to do business with each other, not based on what technology they have.

Another key fact about Blockchain is that it’s going to reduce friction in global B2B. I always like to say if you just accelerated B2B payments by a few days globally, you would open up Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and economies would start growing dramatically. This friction around assets has a direct tie to how slowly money moves around the globe, and the overall cost and friction from that.

So how big could it go? Well, I think that we are going to innovate together with Everledger and other partners using the Hyperledger framework. We are going to add every buyer and seller on the Ariba Network onto the chain. They are just going to get it as part of our platform.

Then we are going to begin ledgering all the transactions that they think make sense between themselves. We are going to release a couple of key functions, such as smart contracts, so their contract business rules can be applicable in the flow of commerce -- at the time commerce is happening, not locked up in some contract, or in some drawer or Portable Document Format (PDF) file. We are going to start with those things.

I don't know what applications we are going to build beyond that, but that's the excitement of it. I think the fact that we don't know is the big play.

Gardner: From a business person’s perspective, they don’t probably care too much that it’s Blockchain that’s enabling this, just like a lot of people didn't care 20 years ago that it was the Internet that was allowing them to shop online or send emails to anybody anywhere. What is it that we would tease out of this, rather than what the technology is, what's the business benefit that people should be thinking about?

Fox: Everybody wants digital trust, right? Leanne, why don’t you share some of the things you guys have been exploring?

Making the opaque transparent

Kemp: In the diamond industry, there is fraud related to document tampering. Typically paper certificates exist across the backbone, so it’s very easy to be able to transpose those into a PDF and make appropriate changes for self-gain.

Double-financing of the pipeline is a very real problem; invoicing, of course accounts receivable, they have the ability to have banks finance those invoices two, three, four times.

We have issues with round-tripping of diamonds through countries, where transfer pricing isn't declared correctly, along with the avoidance of tax and duties.

All of these issues are the dark side of the market. But, now we have the ability to bring transparency around any object, particularly in diamonds -- the one commodity that’s yet to have true financial products wrapped around it. Now, what do I mean by that? It doesn’t have a futures market yet. It doesn’t have exchange traded funds (ETFs), but the performance of diamonds has outperformed gold, platinum and palladium.
This platform shift is like going from the 
World Wide Web to the 
World Wide Ledger.

Now, what does this mean? It means we can bring transparency to the once opaque, have the ability to know if an object has gone through an ethical chain, and then realize the true value of that asset. This process allows us to start and think about how new financial products can be formed around these assets.

We are hugely interested in rising asset classes beyond just the commodity section of the market. This platform shift is like going from the World Wide Web to the World Wide Ledger. Joe was absolutely correct when he mentioned that the Internet hasn't been woven for transactional trust -- but we have the ability to do this now.

So from a business perspective, you can begin to really innovate on top of this exponential set of technology stacks. A lot of companies quote Everledger as a Blockchain company. I have to correct them and I say that we are an emerging technology company. We use the very best of Blockchain and smart contracts, machine vision, sensorial data points, for us to be able to form the identity of objects.

Now, why is that important? Most financial services companies have really been focused on Know Your Customer (KYC), but we believe that it's Know Your Object (KYO) that really creates an entirely new context around it.

Now, that transformation and the relationship of the object have already started to move. When you think about Internet of Things (IoT), mobile phones, and autonomous cars -- these are largely devices to the fabric of the web. But are they connected to the fabric of the transactions and the identity around those objects?

Insurance companies have begun to understand this. My work in the last 10 years has been deeply involved in insurance. As you begin to build and understand the chain of trust and the chain of risk, then tectonic plate shifts in financial services begin to unfold.

Apps and assets, on and off the chain

Fox: It’s not just about the chain, it's about the apps we build on top, and it's really about what is the value to the buyer and the seller as we build those apps on top.

To Leanne’s point, it’s first going to be about the object. The funny thing is we have struggled to be able to, in a digital way, provide visibility and control of an object and this is going to fix that. In the end, B2B, which is where SAP Ariba is, is about somebody getting something and paying for it. And that physical asset that they are getting is being paid for with another asset. They are just two different forms. By digitizing both and keeping that in a ledger that really cannot be altered -- it will be the truth, but it's open to everyone, buyers and sellers.

Businesses will have to invent ways to control how frictionless this is going to be. I will give you a perfect example. In the past if I told you I could do an international payment of $1 million to somebody in two minutes, you would have told me I was crazy. With Blockchain, one corporation can pay another corporation $1 million in two minutes, internationally.

And on the chain companies like Everledger can build capabilities that do the currency translation on the fly, as it’s passing through, and that doesn’t dis-remediate the banks because how did the $1 million get onto the chain in the first place? Someone put it on the chain through a bank. The bank is backing that digital version. How does it get off the chain so you can actually do something with it? It goes through another bank. It’s actually going to make the banks more important. Again, Blockchain is only as good as the external trust that it inherits.

I really think we have to focus on getting the chain out there and really building these applications on top.

Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Get the mobile appRead a full transcript or download a copy. Sponsor: SAP Ariba.

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Der Beitrag Bitcoin is back – Kryptowährung erreicht Wert von über 3200 US-Dollar erschien zuerst auf Coinwelt.de.


          NerdCast 394 - O Hobbit – A Desolação de Peter Jackson        
Lambda lambda lambda! Hoje Alottoni,  Thiago, Carlos Voltor, Tucano, Guga, Sr. K e Azaghal estão desolados com o segundo filme da trilogia O HOBBIT, A DESOLAÇÃO DE SMAUG! Neste podcast:  Descubra quem são os trapalhões da Terra-Média, veja que Peter Jackson tem o seu próprio Obi Wan, pergunte o que diabos Légolas está fazendo ali e chegue a conclusão que o Jack Nicholson seria um dragão muito melhor! Tempo de duração:  118 minutos de enrolação élfica. ARTE DA VITRINE: André Carvalho CUIDADO, SPOILERS DO FILME E DO LIVRO! Campanha Nacional de Doação de Sangue Assista ao vídeo Mais informações no Facebook Promoção de Fim de Ano NVIDIA Confira os detalhes da promoção Saída de Emergência www.sdebrasil.com.br www.revistabang.com @SdE_Brasil facebook.com/editora.SdE.Brasil Instagram: SdE_Brasil Submarino O mundo de O Hobbit com preço especiais!  Cozinha dos Nerds Upgrade do pavê de copo Por Vinicius Medeiros Pavê de Copo por Arthur Dias Rocambole de Vaca por Renato Guedes Vieira Tagliolini di Campobasso por Jose Ricardo Pavê de Copo por Miguel Clark Pavê de Copo por Rafael Berveglieri Nerds na Caceta da Agulha Fernando Araujo dos Santos Denys Fernando de Souza Rodrigo Soares Augusto da Silva Monteiro Italo Calazans Reis Eduardo Breda Encontro para Doação de Sangue no RJ Contos Skynerd The Hunt - Uma fanfic de Monster Hunter Nuzlocke: Capítulo 5 - A Primeira Queda por Matheus Forny Aurora – Capítulo 4: Quatro Luas por Matheus Forny Vídeo enviados PC Frito Links enviados Como declarar o Bitcoin E-MAILS Mande suas críticas, elogios, sugestões e caneladas para nerdcast@jovemnerd.com.br EDIÇÃO COMPLETA POR RADIOFOBIA PODCAST E MULTIMÍDIA http://radiofobia.com.br
          NerdCast 393 - Ouro, Diamantes e Bitcoins        
Lambda lambda lambda! Hoje Alottoni,  Marco Gomes, Cardoso, Caio Gomes e Azaghal vão tentar explicar, sem gastar muita energia, o que é o BITCOIN! Neste podcast: Não faça nenhum investimento precipitado, fique de olho na conta de luz, descubra "o criador" dessa moeda, guarde bem a sua carteira e deixei o computador ligado o dia inteiro para ganhar 0,00001 bitcoin! Tempo de duração:  82 frações de bitcoins. ARTE DA VITRINE: Ciro Sollero Editora Galera Compre agora Assassin's Creed: Bandeira Negra Campanha Nacional de Doação de Sangue Assista ao vídeo Mais informações no Facebook Lançamentos Nerdstore Caneca Pavê de Copo! Submarino Gaste seus "Bitcoins" com essas ofertas para os nerds! Encontros Skynerd Skynerd RJ: O Hobbit Desolação de Smaug Cozinha dos Nerds Philly Cheesesteak por Lucas Mochi 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Pavê de Copo por Luís Gonçalves Nerds na Caceta da Agulha Tiago Sanvi Lili Paola Oliveira Mãe da Paola Vinícius Costa Rafaela Nunes Maria Alice Freitas Yohane Honda Contos Skynerd Diário de Caça por Cássio HOLLEN PARTE SEIS por Fernando Raposo Nuzlocke: Capítulo 4 - A Floresta de Santalune por Matheus Forny Fugitivo - Parte 13 (Final) por Daniel Rossi Vídeos Enviados Discurso Henrique V E-MAILS Mande suas críticas, elogios, sugestões e caneladas para nerdcast@jovemnerd.com.br EDIÇÃO COMPLETA POR RADIOFOBIA PODCAST E MULTIMÍDIA http://radiofobia.com.br
          NerdCast 364 - Walking Dead: HQ vs TV        
Lambda lambda lambda! Hoje Alottoni, Fábio Yabu, Marco Gomes, Affonso Solano, Diogo Braga, Beto Estrada e Azaghal conversam sobre o seriado e a hq, THE WALKING DEAD!  Neste podcast: Descubra que a culpa quase foi dos alienígenas, entenda porque o seriado é igual uma novela e ouça qual é o melhor remédio para o apocalipse zumbi. ATENÇÃO: SPOILERS DO SERIADO, DA HQ E DOS GAMES! Tempo de duração: 87 min ARTE DA VITRINE: Anderson Gaveta Lojas MM Conheça o Guia do Smartphone das Galáxias e visite www.lojasmm.com Submarino Confira descontos exclusivos em tudo que existe sobre The Walking Dead Participe do Dia da Toalha Veja o que você tem que fazer para participar do Dia da Toalha Jovem Nerd Encontros Skynerd Encontro Dia da Toalha - Curitiba 8º Encontro SkyNerd - BH + Eduardo Spohr! Vídeos Enviados Sobre dinheiro, Bitcoins etc. Trailer de Grimm Love HD com botão de autodestruição Links enviados 10 motivos para você não fazer a barba Canibal alemão diz ter se decepcionado com vítima Visionario diz que sabe quem inventou o BitCoin! E-MAILS Mande suas críticas, elogios, sugestões e caneladas para nerdcast@jovemnerd.com.br EDIÇÃO COMPLETA POR RADIOFOBIA PODCAST E MULTIMÍDIA http://radiofobia.com.br
          NerdCast 363 - The Deep, the bad and the dirty web        
Lambda lambda lambda! Hoje Alottoni, Cardoso, Cris Dias, Marco Gomes, Vinícius K-Max e Azaghal batem um papo sobre as profundezas da DEEP WEB! Neste podcast: Entenda como uma cebola e o deus do trovão vão te ajudar a navegar anônimo na web, descubra que se pode comprar de tudo com os Bitcoins e tome cuidado para a nuvem não acabar com o seu casamento! Tempo de duração: 78 min ARTE DA VITRINE: Anderson Gaveta Lançamento do Galaxy S4 da Samsung Compre o seu agora mesmo no Submarino, versões 3G ou 4G Lançamento Nerdstore Camiseta Not Again! Confira o especial de ofertas Deep Web O Submarino separou uma seleção de produtos para você se aprofundar nos assuntos da web Saiba mais sobre Deep Web Confira a matéria especial feita pelo pessoal do YouPix Participe do Dia da Toalha Veja o que você tem que fazer para participar do Dia da Toalha Jovem Nerd Encontros Skynerd Encontro Dia da Toalha 8º Encontro SkyNerd - BH + Eduardo Spohr Nerds na Caceta da Agulha Ricardo Tavares Medeiros Vídeos Enviados As faces de Azaghal Conspiração Nazista E-MAILS Mande suas críticas, elogios, sugestões e caneladas para nerdcast@jovemnerd.com.br EDIÇÃO COMPLETA POR RADIOFOBIA PODCAST E MULTIMÍDIA http://radiofobia.com.br
          [ Episode #92 // Decrypting Cryptocurrency ]        

Digital communication technologies hold the possibility of re-orienting the way we exchange value and think about money. Do digital currencies like Bitcoin have the ability to change the global economic order? Can machine learning, automation, and cryptocurrencies unleash exponential innovations that unseat the financial institutions at the top of the monetary pyramid? In Extraenvironmentalist #92 we first […]

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          Inaugural Event of NYSSA Speaker Series Focuses on Bitcoin and Virtual Currency        

Nicholas Colas to give presentation on the controversial currency at the New York Society of Security Analysts titled “Bitcoin and Virtual Money—The Top 10 Things We Need to Know”

(PRWeb February 28, 2014)

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/03/prweb11626192.htm


          Coinbase Pulls Out of Hawaii        
One of the world’s largest bitcoin exchanges announced today that it would be closing accounts of customers in Hawaii due to state regulatory policies that “will render continued Coinbase operations in Hawaii impractical.” The announcement comes despite recent movement in the Hawaii state legislature to study the uses of and determine...
          The Crypto Show: Kevin McKernan Of Medicinal Genomics, David & Nuno Martin Of Power Ledger        

On tonight's episode of "The Crypto Show," we talk to Kevin McKernan of Medicinal Genomics about some of their upcoming product rollouts. We also discuss the upcoming Raise Awareness Cruise for MAPS, the MDMA Assisted Psychotherapy group that focuses primarily on helping those with PTSD using MDMA. We also discuss the psychotherapeutic benefits of cannabis and psylocibin.

In the second hour we talk to Nuno and Dave, Chief Technology Officer and Managing Director, respectively, of Power Ledger, at https://powerledger.io. Power Ledger is a company that allows peer-to-peer buying and selling of power using blockchain technology, eliminating the power-industry middlemen. There is so much more to it though, so check out the show!Use crypto20 as coupon code for http://100xinvestors.com for your discount to the Blockchain Investors Summit.

Sponsored by: Dash, CryptoCompare and Defense Distributed

Links

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          #195 Loi Luu: KyberNetwork - Towards Truly Decentralized Crypto-Asset Exchanges        

We're joined by Loi Luu, Co-founder of KyberNetwork. This new decentralized exchange protocol, built on Ethereum, aims to match buyers with reserve operators, who create liquidity for crypto-asset pairs. Trades occur instantaneously and without the need for a trusted third party exchange operator.

Topics discussed in this episode:

  • Loi's background and involvement with various projects such as TrueBit, Smart Pool, and Oyente
  • The desirable features of a decentralized exchange
  • Other decentralized exchange projects and how they compare to KyberNetwork
  • KyberNetwork's unique design philosophy
  • KyberNetwork's user experience and how a trade occurs from start to finish
  • The various actors in the network and their respective roles
  • How KyberNetwork mitigates certain vulnerabilities, such as transaction front running
  • How network actors are compensated
  • KyberNetwork's DAO governance model and development roadmap

Links mentioned in this episode:

Sponsors:

Support the show, consider donating:

This episode is also available on :

Watch or listen, Epicenter is available wherever you get your podcasts.

Epicenter is hosted by Brian Fabian Crain, S?ƒbastien Couture & Meher Roy.


          The Crypto Show: Paul Snow On 2017 Texas Bitcoin Conference & Bitcoin Cash        

On tonight's episode of "The Crypto Show," Paul Snow, Founder of Factom and CEO of the Factom Foundation, joins us to recap some of the company's recent successes and in the process gives a good overview of what the company is all about. He also announces details about the 3rd annual Texas Bitcoin Conference to be held late October here in Austin. We then get into a discussion about the recent Bitcoin fork and resulting Bitcoin Cash, and Paul gives us some illuminating answers concerning the implications of the split and the future of Bitcoin.

Use crypto20 as coupon code for http://100xinvestors.com for your discount to the Blockchain Investors Summit.

Sponsored by: Dash, CryptoCompare and Defense Distributed

Links

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          Ether Review Legal #4 - MME, the Beating Heart of Crypto Valley        

Luka M?ƒller and Dianne Schepers of MME?'?Š?'"?'?Šthe Swiss law firm famous for running the Ethereum crowdsale?'?Š?'"?'?Šdiscuss jurisdictional constraints, Crypto Valley, novel crypto-asset classes and the ?'?œsecond wave?' of tokenization.

With 25 previous ?'?œtoken generating events?' and 60 pending projects, MME is a clear leader in the crypto law realm. The firm is now welcoming a ?'?œsecond wave?' of clients; companies from the legacy economy which are seeking ways to enter the blockchain world through tokenizing their pre-existing equity.

In this discussion Luka outlines some of the major distinctions between US and Swiss law in relation to token issuance, looking at securities law, donations, and the commonly used foundation model. These and other regulatory differences, compounded by the stable and already-decentralized nature of Swiss government, make Switzerland the ideal jurisdiction for Crypto Valley, the rapidly growing successor to Silicon Valley based in Zug, a financial center.Alongside its long list of clients, MME is now focussed on creating Blockchain Crypto Property (BCP) standards. The final BCP paper, to be published in August, will classify tokens under a range of asset classes and outline a quality checklist for various token models. These standards will simplify risk assessment and ensure that tokens issued in Switzerland will be globally listable and tradeable.

mme.ch

twitter.com/MME_Switzerland

consensys.net

consensysmedia.net

etherreview.info

https://itunes.apple.com//podcast/the-ether-review/id899090462?mt=2


          Let's Talk Bitcoin! #340 - Assorted Forks        

On Today's Episode

We're headed back into the distant past of late last month. On the day before Segwit2x locked in, Stephanie Murphy, Jonathan Mohan and Adam B. Levine sat down for a discussion about the multi-forked, multi-coin future of bitcoin....

Have LTBCOIN? You can now swap it for tokens in the upcoming Po.et Project

Content for today's episode was provided by Stephanie, Jonathan and Adam. Music by Jared Rubens and Mind to Matter. This episode was edited by Matthew Zipkin.


          #194 Eyal Hertzog: Bancor and the Rise of User-Generated Currencies        

Bancor is a simple, but hard-to-understand protocol that enables price discovery and liquidity even for assets that aren't actively traded. Co-Founder Eyal Hertzog joined us to explain how the Bancor protocol works and why they think it will play a key role in enabling a massive wave of small, but interconnected user-generated currencies. We dissected the workings of the protocol, its radical implications as well as the takeaways from their record-shattering, but controversial crowdsale.

Topics discussed in this episode:

  • Eyal's background in early internet startups
  • The origin story of Bancor
  • Why asset markets suffer from the double coincidence of wants problem
  • The benefits of Bancor-based Smart Tokens
  • How Bancor and BNT can create a liquidity network
  • Why BNT benefits from network effects
  • What went well and what didn't go well about the Bancor Crowdsale
  • Why Eyal thinks the price floor was a good idea

Sponsors:

Support the show, consider donating:

Watch or listen, Epicenter is available wherever you get your podcasts.

Epicenter is hosted by Brian Fabian Crain, S?ƒbastien Couture & Meher Roy.


          The Bitcoin Game #47: Scaling Bitcoin with Paul Puey, Tone Vays, Ryan X. Charles, and Eric Lombrozo        

Hello, welcome to episode 47 of The Bitcoin Game, I'm Rob Mitchell. We recently had the State Of Digital Money, the first big Bitcoin conference in Los Angeles since 2015. Actually, I'm unsure if I should call it a Bitcoin conference, since the majority of the presentations were not directly related to Bitcoin. Luckily for me, I got to moderate a panel on scaling Bitcoin with notable Bitcoiners: Core developer Eric Lombrozo, longtime Bitcoin developer Ryan X. Charles, vocal trader and personality Tone Vays, and Airbitz Wallet?'?s Paul Puey. You'll hear the discussion in its entirety on this episode.


SHOW LINKS

State Of Digital Money

Paul Puey Twitter
Airbitz

Tone Vays Twitter
Liberty-Life-Trail

Ryan X. Charles Twitter
Yours

Eric Lombrozo Twitter
Ciphrex

Periscope live stream from audience member Vivek Kasarabada


STAY IN TOUCH

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http://TheBitcoinGame.com
Rob@TheBitcoinGame.com

Thanks so much for taking the time to listen to The Bitcoin Game!

Bitcoin tipping address:
1G8HDg5EsPQpamKYS2bDya9Riv9xv1nVo5


SPONSOR

While much of a Bitcoiner's time is spent in the world of digital assets, sometimes it's nice to own a physical representation of the virtual things you care about. For just the price of a cup of coffee or two (at Starbucks), you can own your own Bitcoin Keychain or the newer Bitcoin Fork Pen.

As Seen On
TechCrunch ?' Engadget ?' Ars Technica ?' Popular Mechanics
Maxim ?' Inc. ?' Vice ?' RT ?' Bitcoin Magazine ?' VentureBeat
CoinDesk ?' Washington Post ?' Forbes ?' Fast Company

http://bkeychain.com
http://bitcoinforks.com


CREDITS

Episode photo courtesy of Valerian Bennett.

All music in this episode of The Bitcoin Game was created by Rob Mitchell.

The Bitcoin Game box art was created from an illustration by Rock Barcellos.


          The Crypto Show: Jonathan Mohan & Jeff Berwick Talk Bitcoin Cash        

On tonight's episode of "The Crypto Show," Jonathan Mohan and The Dollar Vigilante's Jeff Berwick join us to discuss the recent Bitcoin Cash hard fork and its ramifications. We discuss the moral validity of the decision by some of the exchanges NOT to disburse Bitcoin Cash to their customers; Jonathan explores the possiblity of Bitcoin "endlessly" forking through every contentious soft fork becoming a hard fork; Jeff expresses his concerns about Segwit2x but also his admiration for the free market and how it has made current circumstances probably better than could have been expected; we compare the Ethereum fork to this recent fork; and we also speculate on the long-term outcome for Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash, and the the other cryptos. We get Jeff to give us a quick update on the upcoming Anarchapulco conference, and Danny gives us a brief update on the Texas Bitcoin Conference in October. Both Jonathan and Jeff, as to be expected, give some very cogent answers to some difficult questions and also offer some brilliant and profound insights into the crypto space above and beyond.

Use crypto20 as coupon code for http://100xinvestors.com for your discount to the Blockchain Investors Summit.

Sponsored by: Dash, CryptoCompare and Defense Distributed

Links

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1119365597/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_c_api_IQPczbQHWJKP8

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          The Crypto Show: Jimmy Song & DWB On Bitcoin Cash        

On tonight's episode of "The Crypto Show," our guests in studio include "Dances With Bitcoin" (a.k.a., Brian Deary, CSO of Factom) and Jimmy Song, veteran crypto developer with Paxos. We discuss the upcoming Bitcoin Cash hardfork, its history, and its diverse implications. We also briefly touch upon the Segwit2x fork coming in November. Complex but fascinating theoretical discussions about the future of Bitcoin.

Use crypto20 as coupon code for http://100xinvestors.com for your discount to the Blockchain Investors Summit.

Sponsored by: Dash, CryptoCompare and Defense Distributed

Links

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1119365597/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_c_api_IQPczbQHWJKP8

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          Let's Talk Bitcoin! #339 - Smart Contracts and the Pinata Problem        

On Today's Episode

Stephanie Murphy, Jonathan Mohan and Adam B. Levine discuss the similarities between early web-wallets and early smart contracts.

Have LTBCOIN? You can now swap it for tokens in the upcoming Po.et Project

Content for today's episode was provided by Stephanie, Jonathan and Adam. Music by Jared Rubens and Mind to Matter. This episode was edited by Matthew Zipkin.


          The Crypto Show: Trace Mayer & Eijah Of DemonSaw 4 Live From DefCon 25        

On tonight's episode of "The Crypto Show," we talk with Eric J. Anderson, a.k.a., "Eijah," about his ongoing "Demonsaw" project that he has made open-source and is retiring. We talk about his latest project Titan, and the launch party he is cohosting during Defcon on July 27th. (Additional Eijah audio from that launch party will be attached to the show, so listen all the way to the end.) We also talk about his desire to take on encrypted-messaging app "Signal", which he says isn't nearly as secure or private as it should or could be, and he wants to create a truly secure alternative.

Trace Mayer joins the discussion as we talk about ICO's (Initial Coin Offerings) and the Ethereum hack, and Trace makes some very insightful points about the events surrounding that hack and whether certain facts indicate incompetence or malfeasance on the part of those behind the Pulse wallets that got compromised. We also briefly discuss the implementation of BIP91 and Segwit2X, and whether a Bitcoin hard or soft work is still a possibility. Danny, Eijah, and Trace are all in Las Vegas getting ready for DefCon.

Use crypto20 as coupon code for http://100xinvestors.com for your discount to the Blockchain Investors Summit.

Sponsored by: Dash, CryptoCompare and Defense Distributed

Links

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          The Tatiana Show - Tiana Laurence, Jun Dam of 100xinvestors.com & Terry Brock        

Tatiana interviews Tiana Laurence of Blockchain For Dummies, Jun Dam of 100x Blockchain Investors & Terry Brock.

Topics Include:

--"What is Factom?"

--"Blockchain for Dummies"

--"100x Investors Blockchain Summit"